xt7sf7664q4v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sf7664q4v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19230112  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 12, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 12, 1923 1923 2012 true xt7sf7664q4v section xt7sf7664q4v The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
VOL. XIII

LADY

LEXINGTON, KY JANUARY 12, 1923

WINDERMERE'S

SELECTED

FAN

SEMESTER

Parts

COPY IS IN THE LIBRARY
Manuscripts Have

Been Ordered by Dramatic

NOTICE!

Vocational guidance qucstion-airc- s
will be distributed through
the mail boxes to all women
students the first part of next
week. These will be similar to
the ones used last year, and will
be used in 'a program of great
assistance to university girls in
the selection and choosing of a
suitable vocation. Girls are requested to fill these out as soon
as possible and turn them in to
Dean Jewell's office.

'Comedy of Manners" by Oscar
Wilde, Has Seven Principal

Twenty-Fiv- e

RHODES AND PRIBBLE TO

NOTICE!

AS STROLLER

PLAY OF NEKT

No. 14

A number of overcoats have
been taken from classrooms and
halls. I am asking students to
be careful
where they leave
their coats and report promptly
any thefts to Dean Jones. Information leading to the identification of the thieves should be
given at once to the President's

ASSIST VARSITY

office.

BUCHHEIT, FROSH COACH

WINN, COUNCIL DECIDES
Graduate System of Coaching is
Adopted at Meeting of Athletic
Council.

FRANK L. McVEY,

Rumor Has it That Possibly Another Member May Be Added
to Advisory Board.

President.

Organization.

--

"Lady Windermere's Fan" by Oscar
Wilde, is the play selected by the
Strollers for their 1923 production. It
is the type of play commonly known
as a "comedy of manners" and finds
its background in English society of
the early nineties. There are sixteen
parts in the play, nine female and
seven male.
The tryouts will commence within
the next ten days, according to Director John Burks. Only the seven
principal parts will be competed for,
however. It is urged that those expecting to try out pick one of these
principal parts to which he or she may
aspire, and become familiar with them.
A copy of the play has been placed
on reserve in the University Library,
at which place the play may be read.
The Stroller organization expects 25
manuscripts of the play to arrive soon.
The principal parts for women are
Mrs.
those of Lady, Windermere.
Erlynne, and the Duchess of Berwick.
Lady Windermere is a young woman,
not far from 20; Mrs. Erlynne is supposed to look not more than 30, although the mother of a married
daughter; the Duchess of Berwick v
as old as her actions indicate.
The male parts of chief importance
are: Lord Windermere, slightly older
than his wife; Lord Darlington, the
other man, and nearly the same age;
Lord Augustus Lorton, a middle-age- d
bachelor; Dumby, the chief comedy character of the play, evidently
bachelor with a double-face- d
a middle-age- d
character.
All characters are members of the
smart English society of the day, cultured, fashionable, and artificial' a society to which an onion was more ornamental than useful. A perusal of the
play will dictate the choice of a role
(Continued

on Page Four)
K

LOVE, NOT CHARITY,
WANTED BY RUSSIA
M.

WESLEYANS
K

K-

--

TO OPPOSE

Bloomered Quintets Will Clash in
University Gym; U. K. Girls
Seek Revenge.
The Kittenettes of the University
will usher in the basketball season at
the Universty Saturday night at 8:00
o'clock when they play the Wesleyan
Quintets on the Gym floor.
The girls have not forgotten the two
defeats that Wesleyan handed them
last season and are out for "sweet revenge." The probable lineup of the
two teams is not available, but it is
supposed that the two teams will be
composed mostly of last year's veter
ans.
Kittenettes squad has a wealth of
material in Miss Blanding, Miss Wilson, Miss Potter, the captain of last
year's team, Miss Hall and Miss Ligon
both of whom played with Georgetown last year. Miss Carroll, Miss
Harrison are also rated as star players.
Miss Blanding, last year's coach,
will probably start the games Saturday night as forward. She is dangerous player for the other side and a remarkable shot and should from all indications keep ,the Wesleyan guard
worried and busy all of the time. Miss
Blanding is also captan of this year's
team.
The girls will make a southern trip
later in the season, playing against
some of the best teams in the south,
and Coach "Happy" Chandler predicts that .they will uphold the proud
traditions of the Blue and White whose
colors they carry.
K

GOVERNOR

FORMER

J.

U

G.

OF

SCRUGHAM
K

STUDENT

IS GOVEBNORf

mm

James G. Scrugham, Class of 1900,
Was Inaugurated on Jan-

uary 2.

James G. Scrugham '00, inaugurated
as Governor of Nevada January 2, is
the first alumnus of the University of
Kentucky to become chief magistrate
of a state.
Governor Scrugham rendered distinguished service to his adopted state
as chief of highways, as a member of
the public service commission and as
a member of the faculty of the University of Nevada. He was elected
last November by an overwhelming
majority, a Democrat in a Republican
state
During the war he served as a Colonel in the United States Army.
Utilization of the Colorado river for
power and irrigation was one of the
chief issues of Governor Scrugham's
platform.
It is estimated that this
work will involve an expenditure of
Six
neighboring states
$80,000,000.
are directly interested in the project.
Just previous to a hurried visit to Lex
ington, his former home, late in December, Governor Scrugham attended
a conference of western Governors
and leading citizens called by Herbert
Hoover, secretary of commerce of the
United States.
K

DR. SWIFT TO GIVE
SERIES OF LECTURES
SENATE AWARDS DEGREES
AT CLOSE OF SUMMER WORK
C. A. Worker Relates Russian
Medical Speaker to Talk to Women
Conditions to Students.

The speaker in the regular Freshman chapel Tuesday morning was
Guy R. Hurlbutt, of the Y. M. C. A.,
who told of his work and experiences
in Russia.
An enjoyable feature of the morn
ing's program was the University
quartette, wheh rendered two very in- iteresting and beautiful selections.
During the three and one half years
Mr. Hurbutt spent in Russia he had
ample time to observe the conditions
which prevail in that country of now
brought on by
foolish communism
This country
foolsh monarchism.
whose natural resources are unparal- led has thrown her people on the
great sea of life without even a rudd'T.
One meal a day is all they get and
they relay their clothes so that one can
go to school one day and another the
next.

Thc Senate of the University of
Kentucky certified tthe following persons have completed the courses of
study required for degrees indicated
and recommended that they be granted
their respective degrees.
Said action was taken at the meeting of the Board of Trustees for the
month of December.
Ollie Depew,
Bachelor of Arts:
Faulconer, Olive
James Newman
Myrtle Moore and James Ray Pepper.
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture:
Paul Wallace Gregory, Harold Bowers
McGregor, Lloyd Liston Rudolph.
Harry Bryan Waller, Joseph Rutledge
Witmer and Jack C. Vai Cleave.
Bachelor of Law: James March
Allen and Everett Balie Baker.
George
Engineering:
Meohaniccil
Lewis Jackson.
Mining Engineer: William Chrsto-phe- r
Kyi.
K

-

Assistant Professor J. C. Jones atThe students of Russia are going
American
to reconstruct Russia, he said. Char- - tended the meeting of the
Political Science Association, in Chi(Continued on Page Four)
cago, during the holidays.

Students on Social Hygiene

A series of lectures on social hy
giene will be given in chapel January
12 to 16 by Dr. Edith Hale Swift. All
woiyen students are excused from
fifth hour classes by the council and
arc expected to attend four lectures
Doctor Swift arrives this morning
from Millersburg, and will give her
first talk the fifth hour today. She
is a well known physician and medical authority, and is remembered by
students who heard her last year as
an attractive and interesting speaker
K

K-

William "Doc" Rodes, one of the
fastest quarters that ever donned the
Blue and White, and Birkctt Lee Frib1922 elven, were
OF GALAXYOFNET STARS ble, captain of the
named as assistants to gridiron coach
Jack Winn, at a meeting of the UniCoach King Developing Wonder versity Athletic Council, held fast
Team ; First Clash to Be With Thursday evening. The Council also
voted not to reopen athletic relations
"Baby Tigers"
with Transylvania.
Every afternoon finds assembled in
When Winn accepted the position
Buell Armory, shooting baskets thru as Wildcat grid mentor, he was given
the multitude of rafters, quite a galaxy free rein to select his assistants. After
of court stars that go to make up the some consultation with the members
decided
Freshman squad. Under the tutelage of the council, the cat Coach
system,
to inaugurate the graduate
of William, "Bill" King, of
that of having the captain of the prefame, the Yearlings have developed
vious eleven remain as an assistant
into a whirlwind quintette, or hardly during the next season, and Captain
a quintette, for there are about ten Pribble was named as the first assistyouths with very little difference be ant under that system. Winn also de
tween them. The Kittens have been cided after some deliberation to rec
rapidly rounding into form and should ommend "Doc" Rodes as backfield
be in excellent shape to provide am
mentor and his request was quickly
ple entertainment for the Baby Tigers granted The former Princeton star
five plays
of Georgetown when that
asked that George Buchheit, present
here next Monday evening.
assistant varsity coach and basketball
Coach King as weeded the large mentor, be given full charge of the
number of candidates that appeared at Freshmen, with the help of one and
the initial call down to about twenty possibly two qualified assistants to be
men, but said that it has been the selected at a later date. Dame rumor
hardest work he ever experienced. Of has it that possibly another member
the twenty remaining on the squad will be added to the Cat advisory
McFarland, Helm, Carey, Underwood, board before the 1923 season is inWigginton, Tracy, Clark and Walker augurated in the person of a prominent
have attracted the majorty of the Eastern star, whose name as yet is
spectators by their flashy work. The unknown.
be
Rodes, who will be assistant varsity
first five will in all orobabihty
coach, will have charge of the back-fielchosen from the above mentioned.
is a well known celebrity in the
Almost daily the Yearlings indulge local football world. After making
Varsity
in a brief scrimmage with the
quite a reputation for himself as a Cat
and these battles are better than real years ago, "Doc" returned to Stoll
games. The Freshies have succeeded, Field the past season as Freshman asmuch to the delight of the members sistant and backfield mentor.
His
of the class of 1926, in defeating the work with the yearlings was
is a
big team quite a few times, which
in the showing of the
feat in itself. Jimmie McFarland-ha- s
The youthful backs were indeed
been the outstanding player in these fortunate in having as their instrucscrimmages, continuing to score tor one of "the fastest and brainiest
brief
from all parts of the floor and form gridders that has ever represented the
ing the main cog in the Green attack Blue and White on Stoll Field. "Doc"
Hughes, is a close second, because of is very popular among the athletes as
his speed and goal throwing accuracy, well as the student body at large and
while Underwood. Helm and Carey his selection is sure to be met with the
complete the five that will probably stamp of approval from all sides.
represent the Green against GeorgePribble, or "Big Boy," as he is
town Monday night. Coach King is known all over the campus, was origdetermined, however, to give as many inally a back, but was shifted to the
of the men a chance as possible.
line the later part of the 1921 season.
K
He soon picked up his new job and
under the tutelage of Winn the past
PRICE TO BE SET FOR
ALL SOCIAL AFFAIRS season became one of the best line- men in the south. Pribble was sclect- The social committee of the Men's ed by Billy Evans on his Southern
Student Council, which recently made honor roll, land well deserved it. All
public the social calendar for the through his athletic career "Prib" has
that given all he had all the time and with
coming year, also announces
there will be a limit set for money ex- - this Kentucky spirit should make his
ponded for each social function, and debut into the coaching game a huge
th.it .i ronort will be made to the coin- - success.
K
mittec. Those organizations which
miss Mclaughlin
intend to give dances arc requested to
see the social committee before they
Miss Margaret McLaughlin, instruccomplete their plans.
All requests Tor house dances must tor in Journalism Department, is conbe in the hands of the committee two fined to her home suffering from a
slight attack of appendjiciti). Her
weeks before the proposed event.
condition is not serious, but such as
K
LOST Sigma Chi sister pin, initials to prevent her attending her classes
for the rest of the week.
"R. K." Finder please call 5007-x- .

FROSH

ITT E N ETTESSATU R DAY

COACH

FIVE

COMPOSED

d,

s.

j
j

i

SENIORS,

NOTICE!

All those desiring class rings
will please hand name to either

Jessie Fry Moore, Haynes Barr,
or E. M. Ueavrin wthin the next
week. This must be done in order to get prices on rings.
Ring Co'iimittee.

ill.

* ,

A

,

n.li

rWidtofhOTS'ir--- '

rifti-nW"-

in t Vi aiWIWMaiiWWiMi

THE

Page Two

Alumni Secretary

AN OPEN LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

I

Graduates and former students of the University can, if they
will, make the University a great scat of learning, a builder of character and of wealth for the Commonwealth, a leader in everything
that is most desirable.
There are now in the state 15,000 graduates and former students
of the University of Kentucky.
Just think what a great amount of
good can be done by such a number of trained men and women if
only we will work for the cause.
It is suggested that you acquaint the people of the State with the
good the University is doing toward the upbuilding of the State.
Work for a sufficient appropriation to erect adequate buildings, to
employ necessary instructors and equipment.
Resolve during 1923 and all the years to come to do a little work
for the University to which we owe so much.
No doubt helpful ideas will occur to you. Make all such suggestions known to Herbert Graham, Lexington, Kentucky. We want,
we welcome new ideas.
If everyone will do just a little thinking, a few hours work, it
will help solve the problems now confronting Kentucky.
We can, we must, we will make Kentucky the University of the
South. The sooner we unite and really work for the common purpose, the sooner will our determination become a realization.
Rodman Wiley.

1
CALENDAR

1

the alumni clubs in the last two
.nonths, building up their listed and
membership. Their avtheir paid-uerage is 38 per cent whereas the average of the classes is 29 per cent. The
comparative standing follows:
Percent
Members
Paid-u- p
Listed
Club:
23
13
Akron, 0
28
28
Ashland, Ky
60
15
Birmingham, Ala.
39
Howling Green, Ky.. 23
p

Jan. 13. (Second Sat- urday Regular) luncheon at the
Ellicott Club.
Lexington, Jan. 13 (Second Sat- urday Regular) luncheon at the
Lafayette Hotel, 12:15. Business
meeting.
Pittsburgh, Jan. 18, (Third Thurt- day) dinner, 7 p. m., Fort Pitt
Hotel.
Detroit. Jan. 27 (Fourth Satur- dinner at 6:30
urday Regular)
p. m., Dixieland Inn.
Frankfort, Jan. 30, (Last Tues- day Regular) evening meeting.
Schenectady, Jan. 31 Evening,
with Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Wilson,
103 Central Parkway.
Buffalo,

I
j

j
I
j
j
I

Buffalo,

19
17.- -

N. Y.

79
29
36
29
50
44
30
24

Carrollton, Ky.
86
Chicago, 111.
102
Cincinnati, O.
j
20
Cleveland, O.
16
Denver. Col.
10
Evansvill, Ind
25
Frankfort, Ky
14
39- iickman, Ky
42
7
Huntington, W. Va.
7
14
Lagrange
30
13
PLANS
COMMENCEMENT
Lebanon, Ky.
25
513
Lexington, Ky.
29
155
Classes Hold Quinquennial Meets; Louisville, Ky
13
15
Standing is Announced.
Mayfield, Ky.
20
24
Alumni reunions will be the feature Maysville, Ky
30
125
of June 12 ,the busiest day in com- New York City
22
44
mencement week. Classes holding Owensboro, Ky.
12
25l.'
ther quinquennial gathering will be Paducah. Ky.
51
35
Pa.
83, 88, 93, 98, 03, 08, 13 and 18. The Philadelphia,
29
27
class of 1920 will hold its first reunion Pineville, Ky
39
48
under the plan for ithe younger classes Pittsburgh. Pa
60
5
Raleigh. X. C. to return after three years absence.
38
21
The Alumni Association has adopt- Richmond. Ky.
33
36
ed a custom in operation in several Washington, D. C
34
28
Winchester, Ky.
for four-yeleading institutions
40
10
groups to meet at commencement Somerset, Ky
40
time. Thus the classes holding their Schenectady, N. Y. 10
quinquennial reunion will be joined by
the three classes that were juniors,
SALES TALK NO. 2.
sophomores and freshmen, respectively, during their last year at the
College of Engineering
University. In this way other classes
For a third of a century engineers
coming iback this year will be 84, 85,
86. 89, 90, 91, 94, 95, 96, 99, 00, 01, 04, have been trained at the University of
05. 06, 09, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21. Kentucky. Some of the most outstandThe ipercentage standing of the ing leaders in industry today graduatclasses in .paid up membership is as ed from the College of Engineering
About two hundred men who receivfollows:
Per Ct. ed technical education here are helpPer Ct.
Class
Class
19
42 ing to develop the resources of the
06
J 869-838 state.
37
07
90
28
08
20
91
Kentucky, potentially is the richest
11
33 state in the union. Kentucky's coal
09
92
10
23 fields could rival Niagara. There will
10
93
11
30 come a time when Kentucky will rival
23
94
19 Pennsylvania in
12
industry and when
35
95
30 that 'time arrives we will have agricul13
33
96
31 tural counties in Kentucky that will
14
26
97
27 rival Lancaster county in Pennsylva15
44
98
33 nia. A great industrial development
16
37
99
17
21 means a great agricultural develop29
1900
18
28 ment. There is no reason why Ken28
01
19
34 tucky should not 'be the tobacco ma
35
02
28 ufacturing center of the country.
20
21
03
33
21
28
04
that has
The race of engineers
38 been steadily growing to prominence,
22
05
30
Ex-e- s
18 during the last thirty years will soo
The class of '98 takes first place. begin to play a part in Kentucky's
Honorable mention goes to '06 '07 and material unfolding. The Kentuckia
is a natural engineer.
'22. The average is 29 per cent,
The pioneer is
always a man of engineering instincts.
CLUBS PROSPER
The University of Kentucky has
Paid Membership of Locals Shows long taken a leading posit'on that the
engineer should be given a broad basic
Big Increase.
Great progress has been made by training rather than have his energies
j

KERNEL

in college entirely consumed in merely
technical subjects. Such a policy has

Alumni Notes
EdHor

KENTUCKY

produced industrial leaders and not
iicrc technicians.
During the senior year ten days arc
devoted to a trip of inspection which
,s a part of the course of study for the
purpose of getting the first comprc-nensiv- c
picture of the great opportunities awaiting the well equipped and
intelligent engineer.
It is the hope of those interested in
engineering progress in Kentucky that
at some early date a commission will
be appointed by the Legislature of
Kentucky to study the industrial possibilities of the state with a view tr
inducing new industries to locate within the state. Kentucky sihould produce
more. She has the men, the mateWhat is needed is
rial, the territory.
to set all these great forces at work
for a greater industrial Kentucky
LOAN FUND GROWS

of

Contributions

Alumni

Help

The Alumni Loan Fund is this year
being used to the limit and there is at
present only $10.17 in the treasury.
With the increased number of students
at the University there is a greater demand for loans than ever before.
The fund is administered by the Student Loan Committee appointed for
handling all loan funds in the University.
The following is a brief report from
June 1, 1921, to the present time:
7
Number of notes collected
$ 29.69
Average value of notes
207.84
Total value of notes
23.61
Total interest collected
10
Number loans made
11
Number students assisted
$ 74.50
Average value of notes
$745.00
Total value
Gifts to the fund:
Woman's History Club of Mt.
$ 50.00
Sterling
Number of notes outstanding
17
December 10
$1,189.00
Total value of notes
10.17
Cash on hand Dec. 10
$1,249.17
Total Alumni loan fund
50.00
Liberty Bonds
The Alumni Loan Fund cannot assist more students until it has more
more money. The other funds will
meet the need for the next two or
three months.
The present funds are:
$100.00
Alpha Zeta No. 1
107.80
Alpha Zeta No. 2 .
115.50
Lexington Alumni Club
101.89
South Africa Club
'90

-

Class 95
Class '96
Class '09
Class
Class
Class

'12
'16
'04

Woman's History Club
Miscellaneous

202.02
109.30
115.00
50.00
84.00
45.00
15.00
112.00
83.66

...

9

-o

Betwixt Us
Several weddings were celebrated
during the holiday season that are of
interest to readers of the alumni page.
On December 21, Ethel Louise Anderson and Lester S. O'Bannon, '15,
Mr.
married in Lexington.
were
O'Bannon is a member of the engiMrs. O'Bannon is
neering faculty.
an instructor in the Science Department.
Mary Helen Whitworth '21, and Lee
were married in
Oldham, Jr.,
December 23.
Louisville, Saturday,
They will reside in Paducah, Ky.,
where Mr. Oldham is on the high
school faculty.
In Catlettsburg, Ky., at the home of
the bride's parents, Dew Flanery
and Whayne Wilson Haffler, '20, were
married. Mr. Haffler is in the engineering department of the Central of
Georgia Railway Department, Savannah. They will be at home at the
Forsyth apartments in that city.
The marriage of Olive Allen and
Frank W. Button ex, was solemnized
in Louisville, Ky., December 27. Mr.
Button is connected with the Steel
Realty Company, of Louisville.
Opal Reed, of Indianapolis, Ind.,
and C. U. Jett, of Lexington, were
married in Indianapolis, December 27.
Mr. Jett is connected with the Experiment Station and after February 1,
they will be at home in the new Price
Apartments, East High Street.
ex-2-

ex-1-

--

graph Company as District Traffic
Engineer immediately after graduating. He now holds a responsible position with that company at Shrcvcs-por- t,
La., address P. O. Box 249.
Mrs. Robert D. Nolan, of Washington, D. C, formerly of Beth Fried, is
visiting her parents, Mr.' and Mrs. V.
Fried at her their home in Ashland
Park. Her friends arc giving her a
royal welcome, with numerous bridge
parties, dinner parties, and theatre
Cleveland Club Meets
This is her first visit home since
"The first regular meeting of the
her marriage in September.
Cleveland Club was held Saturda
night, December 9, and although all
14
those that should have been there were
now started.
Thos. Leonard Pcarrc is with the
we arc
not present,
Plans were made for another meeting engineering department of the Florida
that will be held soon and while there East Coast Railway. Mr. and Mrs.
arc comparatively few of us in this Pcarrc arc rejoicing over the arrival
big town we feel sure that our num- of a little daughter, "Annie Lou,"
bers will be increased. From time to December 16, 1922. They reside at
time you will hear about our members 54 Almcria St., St. Augustine, Fla.
Levi O. Coleman is assistant highr.nd what they arc doing." O. L. Day,
way engineer, division of highways,
Secretary-Treasurewith offices at 302 Apollo Theatre
The Pittsburg Club, University of Bldg., Peoria, 111. His residence is 107
Kentucky Alumni Association, will Broadway.
hold its next meeting at the Fort Pitt
15
Hotel, Pittsburg, Pa. You arc urged
to be there and bring along any other
The following card has reached this
Kentucky Alumnus or former student. office: "Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Ehrlich
It is important that you return the at- announce the birth of Robert Lee, Jr.,
tached card promptly. Will you be Jan. 4, 1923, weight nine pounds."
there?
"Slim" is resident engineer with the
Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa., State Highway Department, at presThursday, January 18, 7 p. m. H. Lee ent located at Neosho, Mo., P. O.
Moore, Secretary.
box 892.
"I hope both the University and the
since October Alumni Association may have a very
H. W. Greifc,
manager of successful year."
1, has been advertising
James V. Karrick,
the Display World and its associate Department of State Roads and HighTimes, lo- ways, Frankfort, Ky.
publication, Signs of the
Sycamore Street.
cated at 1209-1- 1
Cincinnati. Mr. Greife is treasurer
'16
of the Cincinnati Alumni Club and
A most original and unique "EXAve.
lives at 3628 Evanston
in the shape
is on the TRA" was received here
Paul F. Harris, Jr.,
of a blue print announcement of the
financial staff, Presbyterian Education
arrival of' a daughter, Leona Rae, at
Commission, 410 Urban Bldg., Louisthe home of Mr. and Mrs. Julius
Residence 2728, Field Ave.
ville, Ky.
Wolf, March 25, 1922. The announcein the
is
Stuart E. Neff,
ment was a little late reaching us, but
of the Enro Shirt Co., 331 West
was worth waiting for. Mr. Wolf is
Main St., Louisville, and is living at assistant
professor of Steam Engi2204 Woodbourne Ave.
neering, Lewis nstitute, Chicago, 111.
Mrr. Wolf was formerly Miss Ethel
'98
Phyllis Schaeffer; the happy family resure; haven't forgo'.ten side at 6644 Maryland Ave., Chicago.
"Slow but
this but am too busy in school to
"Am sorry that I have been tardy,
think of small amounts," writes Wm. but find that I cannot exist without
T. Carpenter, who is now in the offi- tne Kernel any longer. Over a month
cers' training school at Fort Leaven- since I saw one, so please get me on
worth, Kansas. Major Carpenter was the list at once." John S. Fish, Dean,
married December 3, 1910, to Miss Sue Bennett Memorial School, LonVirginia Fee and they have three chil- don, Ky.
dren Wm. T. Carpenter, Jr., aged
nine; Anne Virginia, two years and
'17
the baby, Carolyn Baldwin. Address,
J. Griff Scott was a visitor in the
Major Wm. T. Campbell, C. A. C, Alumni office this week. Immediately
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
after graduating Mr. Scott entered the
service of his country. Since his re'02
turn to civilian life he has been con"I wish to congratulate the editor nected with the Buffalo Forge Comand staff of the Kernel for publishing pany at Buffalo, N. Y. He is now on
such an excellent paper; one that is his way to Portland, Oregon, where
doing so much good for the student he becomes a member of the firm,
body and the University as well."
Power Equipment Company, 806-0- 7
G. W. Ewcll, Major, Q. M. Corps, Lewis Building.
Camp Normyle, Texas.
H. Courtney Smiser, 28 years of age,
died at the home of his mother-in-la06
Mrs. J. M. Scrivener, 326 Aylesford
H. S. Scott was a visitor in the Place, Friday morning, January 5.
during the holidays. He The burial took place in the Lexington
alumni office
is signal supervisor with the Illinois cemetery,
Sunday afternoon.
Mr.
Central Railway with headquarters at Smiser had been ill for more than two
McComb, Miss. Mr. Scott belongs to years .but during the last six months
the "regulars" and s not only always seemed much better and until Thanksin line himself but keeps all in his vi- giving was teaching in .the College of
cinity up to the mark.
Engineering, University of Kentucky.
J. C. Nisbet is assistant engineer
with James W. Billingsley, Consulting
'It
Engineer, New Orleans, La. His pres"Attached find my check for two
ent address is Homer, La.
dollars. In return, kindly send me
$1,000 worth of literature in the way
'OS
of Kentucky Kernels, etc. Regret the
"I hope to be able to attend com- delay, but I'm a busy man." J. A.
exercises in June. My Brittain, 508 Mining Exchange Bldg.,
mencement
heart years for 'My Old Kentucky Denver, Colo.
Home,' which I haven't seen for ten
"Sorry we have been negligent but
years. I wonder how many '08 mem- only had to miss- a few copies of the
bers will return for the reunion, and Kernel to be reminded of it." Mrs.
if plans arc being developed now for J. W. Howard
(Lois Pewell),
it? Perhaps our class secretary can
W. Va.
tell me." A. B. Beaumont, Prof, and
Head of Dept. of Agronomy, Mass.
'19
Agr. College, Amherst, Mass.
"I have enjoyed the copies of the
Kernel and hope to receive it regu11
larly." Mrs. L. Raymer (Marie ColC. Kremer Bain is Division Super- lins), North Middlctown, Ky.
Joseph Lead
intendent with the St.
C. F. DeMey is now connected with
Company, at Bonne Terre, Mo. He the Central Hudson Gas &
Electric,
was married in 1917 to Miss Marie Company at Poughkeepsie,
N. Y.
Woodard. They have one son, Charles
Kremer, 'Jr., aged 16 months.
'20
"Never before have alumni of the
'13
University been more eager to do their
John William Kuuzman went with
the Cumberland Telephone and Tele
(Continued on Page Three)
The marriage of Lyda L.
cx'-2and Howard G. Glenn
Lexington,
'22, was solemnized in
December 30. Mr. Glenn is a civil
engineer in the employ of the State
They will be at
Road Department.
home at 256 Clay Avenue, Lexington,
until spring when they will remove
to Bowling Green where Mr. Glenn's
professional duties call him.
Yar-brou-

par-tic- s.

r.

Worthy Students

Class

mum

ex-0- 3,

cx-1- 5,

ex-2- 3,

en-plo- y

-

Ber-win- d,

* x

HE KENTUCKY

KERNEL

Pagt ThrM

Galloway '03, MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
'03, Clarence Albert
Jackson Pate Whittinghill '03, Martin
s
ML
Augustus Doyle '04, William David
(Continued from Page 2)
FINE STATIONERY, SHEAFFERS PENCILS
Gray '04, Francis Joseph Montgomery '04, Sarah Cleveland Smcdlcy '04,
1161 THEME PAPER, GLUE AND PASTES, SHEAFFER'S PENS, III
bit towards putting Kentucky on the Claude Robert Smith '04, Thomas
map in every way we all believe that Marshall Smith '04, Cornelius Ware
Phone 154
Open 7 am to 1 1 pm
a new and fine stadium is essential to '04.
keep pace with other institutions of
Krocll '05, Ernest
Oscar Robert
like rank in the south. And give us Murphy '05, Artcmus Dcnman Mur-rcl- l,
a chance to 'do our bit.' Personally,
'05, George Lucas Paddison '05,
THE PROCRUSTEAN BED
I am far from 'rolling in wealth' but Elijah Bland Stiles '05, Mrs. Scott
MATTHEW A.
& COMPANY
when I get my notification of what Bradcr (Sallyncill Wathen) '05, WaltA Department of Prejudices
is expected of me, YOU CAN COUNT er Simeon Weaver '05, Charles Roy
By Troy Perkins.
ON ME! I believe all will come Wright '05, Byron McClelland '06,
Prejudice
across for Alma Mater, even if we Mrs. Pcrcival Fanslcr (Mary Estill
I consider Irvin S. Cobb the most
have to sacrifice to do so. Yours for Scott) '06, Frank Raymond Scllntan
d
writer in America, and
Kentucky' Oscar V. Petty, (Fel- '06.
Maurice Maeterlinck the most overUniversity) Apt. 1, 854
low, Columbia
Josic McCoun Alexander '07, John
Joseph
W. 180th St., New York City.
Griffin Allen '07, Paul Clifton Grun-we- rated writer in the world.
My Work and Prices Always Keep Me Busy
living writer of
"Enjoy the Kernel very much and
'07, Florence May Maddocks '07, Conrad is the greatest
140 South Limestone
he is a Pole. I regard
don't want to miss a copy. Please Frank Chester Paulin '07, Benjamin English, and
change my address to Chief Engineer'! Franklin Scherffius '07, Mildred Stiles Thomas Beer as the foremost AmeriTO
Office, Central of Georgia Railway '07, Beverly Todd Towcry '07, Benja- can writer of promise, even more likeV.
Company, Savannah, Ga." G. A.
min Duncan Bell '08, Willis Johnson ly than F. Scott Fitzgerald, JohnBcn-c- t.
Dean '08, Mrs. Robert Dclaficld Rands A. Weaver, or Stephen Vincent
Aldous Huxley is t'hc quarterback
"Find enclosed two dollar bill with (Minnie Carficld Frost) '08, Clinton
team,
apologies." D. L. Thornton, Jr., Robert Galloway '08, Henry Lemuel and captain of my
usual
The Charles Hartman Co., 985 Dean Herring '08, James Alfred C. Lewis as he is easily the most learned and
Englishmen.
St., Brooklyn, N. Y.
'08, Oscar Lewis Schultz '08, James brilliant of the young
George Jean Nathan is the greatest
Staffel Watson '08.
21
George Francis Browning '09, Cecil critic in the country. H. L. Mencken
Burton
e is our foremost man of ideas.
"Enclosed find check for that two Byrne Ellis '09, William Owsley
."HOME OF STUDENTS"
Dclong Wallace Rascoc is the most promising of the
'09, Leonard
dollars you are always talking about."
crtics. I do not regard O.
younger
Vinson L. Johnson, 415 Riverside '09, Milton C. Crafton '10, Royalston
Cram '10,