xt7sf7666v91 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sf7666v91/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690331  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 31, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 31, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7sf7666v91 section xt7sf7666v91 Precedent For Further Interaction?

State Schools Form Cooperative Publishing House

By TERRY DUNHAM
Assistant Managing Editor
When representatives of nine Kentucky colleges and
universities acted last month to establish the University
Press of Kentucky (UPK), they did so with ambition,
high expectations, and the realization that the unifying
move had come perhaps
The schools Derea and Centre Colleges, Morehead
and Murray State Universities, Kentucky State College,
Eastern and Western Kentucky Universities, the University of Louisville and the University of Kentucky-join- ed
together to provide a stronger press and then
reap the benefits of it.
A strong press, they believe, will encourage faculty
members to engage in research and to publish their
works; will provide an outlet for those already interested
none-too-soo- n.

Tie

Ncics Analysis
The schools involved will undoubtedly be much more

attractive to scholars, for, even without the

publish-or-peris-

h

motives often charged, there are those whose
work is of sufficient merit to deserve publication, and
although the financial return to the author is practically

the recognition is both welcome and deserved.
For this reason, the UPK will be a valuable device
in recruiting top educators to state schools, a fact that
is significant to both students and administrators. Al
though some scholarly works reflect little of classroom
interest, others the histories by Dr. Thomas Clark,
for example, or Yesterday's People, by Jack VVeller,
which has been used in both sociology and education
courses are of direct and obvious usefulness.
One of the most important virtues of the UPK, says
its director, Bruce Denbo, is that the strengths of the
pre ss a re m ult ipl ied by th e merger, wh ile they would h ave
been divided had each school chosen to establish its own,
individual press.
Continued on rage 2, Col. 1
non-existen-

t,

ECmtocecy EjsraiEiL

Monday Erening, March 31, 1969

VoL LX, No. 120

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

'

i

in doing so; will attract competent scholars to the
member schools; will up the quality of works by these
scholars by engaging them in competition; and, by
circulating the works throughout the region will further
the schools' reputations as institutionsof higher learning.
The results, then, are fairly obvious, and the benefits
for all members of the universities' communities are
hardly less discernible.

L

i

Sparse Crowds
H ear Speakers
At Focus '69

-

By CORDON DAVIS And DANIEL GOSSETT

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

What If They Held

A

Program And Nobody Came?

Kernel Staff Writers
The second annual focus program was held Friday and Saturday and centered attention on this year's topic, "Focus on Social
Morality." Featured speakers Anson Mount, William Kunstler,
T. George Harris, and John Siegenthaler spoke to small but interested audiences.
dents who act within the law.
FOCUS On Law
Speaking on this year's genKunstler, civil liberties attor- eral topic of "Focus on Social
ney who has defended H. Rap Morality," Kunstler commented:
Brown, Jerry Rubin and Jack
"The state of Kentucky, in
Ruby, kicked off Focus '69 Friday
your name, persecuted the
night by admonishing the estab(antipoverty workers Alan
lishment for persecuting dissi- and Margaret) under a law that
had been declared unconstitutional a decade before. And yet
we are still unashamed."
"Later on, Judge(Bert) Combs
a soul. The Communists can't
of the Court of Appeals said,
afford to have the truth known.
T can not see how any attorney
"But after the Communist
worthy of the name could in
conscience presecute anyone untakeover, students and police
der that law. Nonetheless, Comwere lined against the wall next
to each other and shot.
monwealth's Attorney (Thomas)
Continued on Page 5, Cel. 1
Continued on Page 7, Col. 1
Mc-Surel- ys

Cuban Describes Evils Of Communism
By JOE HINDS
Kernel Staff Writer
The former Cuban clutched
e
his
shirt and moved
from the microphone. His
away
booming voice filled the auditorium.
"They have tried to kill me
five times. They told me after
one speech I gave that they
were going to cut my throat.
"But I am going to die for
freedom."
Pedro Diaz Lanz, a chief of
air force under Fidel Castro 10
years ago, paused to survey a
sparse group in the Student Center Theatre Friday. The Young
Americans for Freedom (YAF)
invited him to speak.
Diaz Lanz, who looks like
Robert Vaughn, continued:
"These people slaughter millions
to bring about their paradise.
There is no master in the world
who can make me change and
become one of them."
The former guerrilla in Castro's revolutionary army was
talking about his experience
with Communists.
"I Have Ideals . .
He said, "I have ideals which
I will back with my life. I am
against any kind of dictatorship,
Communist or whatever."
He was appointed chief of air
force when Castro gained control of his country in January
1959. The following summer he
fled with his family and came to
America.
Now he says there is no other
place to go. "We are here to
either live or die." He said he
feared that Communism was
nibbling at the heart of America. He suggested that a criminal international conspiracy to
take over the world was
blue-strip-

Why did Diaz Lanz leave his
country? What did he find out
about Communism that was so
distasteful?
He explained that he had put
his hands in the fire and got
burned. He asked, "Do you see
these hands? They helped the
Communists take over Cuba."
"To Start A Protest . .
He paused and continued: "I
learned from the Communists
themselves. One time they told
me that they shot a student to
cause unrest and start a protest
movement. They want a class
struggle.
"As a member of Castro's
underground force, we were
taught to hate the police. But
here is what I learned from the
themselves. We
Communists
were duped and used to create
disruption. I understand now

that we hated the police just as

younger students are doing in
America.
"This is the way Communists
take over.
"The only thing I did wrong
was to stand up for my beliefs.
I believe in God and that I have

Women Students Being Surveyed
For Views On Dormitory Hours
J
By

Students (AWS), which is sponThe survey is being distribhalls and sosoring the survey, said quesuted to residence
houses. A booth also will tionnaires for the survey would
rority
be set up in the Chemistry-Physic- s be tabulated and submitted to
the administration as "proof that
building for
what our committee recomwomen.
mends is what the women of
Sara O'Briant, one of the
of a committee work- the University want."
Miss O'Briant said the quesing out of Associated Women
tionnaires would be distributed
Monday to representatives of
AWS for distribution in residence halls. She also said other
questionnaires would be given
to members of the Panhellenic
16 years ago as he took the oath of office
Council for sorority distribution.
as tlie 34th president of the United States.
She said the committee's main
"We salute Dwight David Eisenhower
problem would come in polling
there in our memories. Eirst in
standing
women students'
war, first in peace and, wherever freedom
opinions. However, the polling
is cherished, first in the hearts of his felbooth in the CP building will
low men."
be open from 12:30 p.m. to
Dwight D. Eisenhower's mother belonged
4:30 p.m. this week.
to a pacifist religious sect and wept when
"The objection to the last surhe received his appointment to the U.S.
vey on women's hours was that
Military Academy.
it did not give a representative
Peace was part of his heritage, and he
women's
sample of
said once while in the Army that he wanted
opinions," she said. "We are
only to see "people in my profession permhoping that a large number of
anently out of a job."
off campus women will particiUniversity functions here, including
pate in this survey." Miss O'Briclasses, have been cancelled between 3 and
ant was referring to a similar
5 p.m. today in recognition of the declared
survey taken by AWS last year.
day of mourning.
According to Miss O'Briant,
the survey will serve as a
on Pate 2, CoL 1

DOTTIE 1JEAN

Kernel Staff Writer
A survey which might determine the outcome of women's
hours for the fall semester 1969
is being circulated among women students this week to determine their opinions on abolishment or extension of hours.

NATION MOURNS IKE'S DEATH
ght
WASHINGTON
D. Eisenhower was borne in a soldier's coffin along
America's route of heroes Sunday and President Nixon led the nation's farewell salute
to a man he called "one of the giants of
our time."
Eisenhower's widow, fighting to hold back
tears, stood nearby as Nixon spoke in firm
tones of his former boss, and recalled
Eisenhower's last words:
"I have always loved my wife. I have
always loved my children. I have always
loved my grandchildren. I have always
loved my country."
Nixon faltered but once as he spoke this
(AP)-Dwi-

final

tribute:

"Each of us here will have a special memory of Dwight Eisenhower. I can see him
now standing erect, straight, proud and tall

guide-Continue-

d

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, March 31,

19G9

.

Press Merger An Omen For Interschool Relations?
Continued from Page One
It is here that the timeliness of the
move can be seen, for it has been revealed that at least several of the eight
schools which joined the already existing press at were considering beginning
their own separate presses. Other states
have gotten into serious problems by
having small presses at each state institution.
Perhaps the most important aspect of
the merger is not yet evident but will be
in years to come. It is not one related to
publishing, and is, at present, only symbolic. That aspect is the fact that the
publishing venture taken on by the nine
schools is the first joint effort to effectively
unite the schools in a state where many
future plans suggest the need for unified
efforts on many more diverse educational
fronts.
Retain Identity
each institution
retains its
Still,
identity and a degree of publishing
freedom under the constitution of the
UPK.

Each of the nine schools has its own
University Press Committee, the chairman
of which is on a statewide editorial
board of the UPK. These committees will

encourage scholarly writing by members
of their respective university communities and screen manuscripts submitted
before for warding them to the UPK editorial board.
Emphasizes Quality
The UPK has placed major emphasis
upon maintaining quality publications.
The constitution says it "shall at all
times be uncompromising in the maintenance of the highest possible editorial and
publishing standards, as gauged by currently accepted levels of scholarly research and writing."
To achieve this quality, manuscripts
will be assigned to anonymous experts
in the field of the particular work under
consideration. They then will recommend
editing changes, and present theirevalua-tioof the work. The final decision will
be made by the panel comprised of
representatives from all member schools.
Finances naturally play a big part in
the merger, since many savings are
possible. All printing will be done in
facilities formerly belonging to the University of Kentucky Press on the Lexington
campus, thereby reducing greatly the
overhead.
n

Also, with the expansion and a
planned, ambitious promotion program,
increased sales are expected, thus increasing the financial benefits and attracting manuscripts by more and better
authors.

scripts, the press has offered a $5,000
fellowship for the best work in progress
in the general area of conservation significant to the Commonwealth, and several
other smaller awards in other areas.

Nationally Advertised
As a primary step in creating a new
and vigorous statewide press, the staff
is planning a
promotional
campaign:
First, says Murrell Boyd, the press's
public relations director, brochures will
be sent to Kentucky newspapers, libraries and legislators, describing the purpose and plans for the new press.
y Next, about 30,000 brochures will be
sent to scholars and university administrators outside Kentucky, to familiarize them
with the new publishing house.
Finally, and most impressively, a
national advertising campaign will begin
in publications such as the New York
Times Book Section, Saturday Review
and New Republic, and specialized
publications such as the Yale Review,
the American Economic Review and
others.
In another effort to attract top manu

attract quality scholars to
"If
the state we're helping to enrich it,"
says Denbo, "by contributing to our
most valuable natural resource brains."
"In the scholarly world today," he
says, "there's very fierce competition for
.quality manuscripts. Since we are cooperating we can become more vigorous
and bring prestige and distinction to the
University Press of Kentucky, and thereby reflect it on all the state's institutions."
For legal reasons, the UPK had to be
lodged in one of the member institutions,
and has been located primarily on the
UK campus, where the facilties of the
already existing and now defunct University of Kentucky Press can be most
easily utilized.
As the UPK continues to grow and
prosper, it may perhaps be studied as
a model of intelligent cooperation among
state educational institutions, bodies
greatly in need of such a model.

Mining Drains
we can

Survey Seeking Girls9 Opinions On Dormitory Hours

Continued from Pape One
line for a recommendation on
women's hours to be submitted
to the administration along with
suggestions for a plan to implement new hours. A final committee of 15 women from both
residence halls and sorority
houses will make the recommendation. Miss O'Briant said that
although women's hours in sorority houses are determined by
the Panhellenic Council, they
are generally coordinated with
residence hall hours.
Miss O'Briant said the committee is "optimistic about final
approval by the administration,

recalling that approval was
given several years ago for a
system for junior and senior women. However, the plans
for implementation of that system were left to the individual
dormitories and after several attempts to find a plan for letting
women into the dormitories after closing hours, the system was
voted out by Keeneland Hall.
The other dormitories then established the present closing
hours of 1 a.m. on weekdays
and 3 a.m. for junior and senior
women.
'There seems to be no problem in changing the hours," Miss
no-hou-

O'Briant

said.

'The

problem
up with
a feasible plan for letting students ' into the dormitory. But
the system cannot be changed
unless women students care
enough to fill out the questionnaires and let their opinions be
known."
Miss O'Briant said the committee has been working with
several members of the administration in trying to find a suitable plan. "We are trying to
look at it from the point of view
of the administration," she said.
"It would be to their benefit
for many reasons to liberalize
seems to be in coming

women's hours. If we're successful at this, it might open up
channels of communication between the administration and
students."
She suggested several plans
which the committee is considering. One is to have a
on duty to let students into the residence halls.
Another is to install locks, at the
approximate cost of $300 per
residence hall, which could be
released with ID cards.
One contingency which Miss
O'Briant mentioned was the possibility of finding a strong minority which would not want a
change in hours. She said such
an outcome might make it necessary to have different closing
hours for dormitories, and she
said in that case a change might
not be implemented for another
semester in order to allow wom
night-watchm-

en to apply for dormitories
which they wanted.
Miss O'Briant said the results of the survey probably
would be released April 7. She
said the survey would be tabulated by a breakdown into residence hall, sorority house and
opinion. It also will
be broken down by different
classifications.
"If our plan demands that
there is money to be spent, we
are prepared to go to the Board
of Trustees to present our case,"
Miss O'Briant said. "It is to the
benefit of the administration and
the .University .itself to make a
change. In doing so," it will make'
residence hall living more attractive for many women and
help insure full capacity."
Carol Rompf is
the committee.

Let's Get It Straight

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For a "Funderful Summer" . . . write or contact
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mm

Question: How can intelligent people believe that Christ rose
from the dead? What evidence do you have for this claim?
Answer: What evidence would be necessary to convince
you? Although history records that thousands of Jews, Romans, and others saw Christ die, no one actually saw Him
rise from the dead. But the historical records do show that
upwards of five hundred people saw Him afterward. These
were men of good character who had everything: to gain by
keeping quiet, and only martyrdom to gain by attesting to
wnat tney Knew.
But just as the proof of the copy of the New Testament
pudding is in the eating, so in modern English. Study it
the most convincing proof of as you would a textbook, not
the resurrection lies in your hit or miss. God has promwillingness to believe it, if it ised to reveal Himself
can be shown to be true. God
His Word.
knows who is sincere and through
Put as much energy into
who is not. Those who want
to know can know. But don't your search for eternal life
tackle the problem out of idle as you do into the quest for
curiosity or for mere intellec- material and intellectual
Ther you'll
tual satisfaction, but because achievement.
it really matters to you per- know the answer to the quessonally. Go to God Himself, tion: Did the historical Jesus
rather than depending on rise bodily from the dead;
hearsay. Tell Him you're was the tomb empty that first
willing to be shown. Don't Easter Sunday? If it's true,
tell Him how to reveal Him- and you neglect to; examine,
self to you, but tell Him that the evidence, you 'stand to
if He does convince you of lose more than you know. On
His reality, you'll give your- the other hand, you have
self to Him. Your destiny
and everynothing to lose
in this world and the next
thing to gain
by finding
depends on it. Get a good out for yourself.
The whole problem revolves around the question whether
Christ was God. Further evidence is presented in the free
booklet, "Was Christ God?", which you may obtain by writing to
Box 327. RmcrriELD. N.J. 07657. Dept. KK
READ THE CLASSIFIED COLUMN IN
THE KERNEL EVERY DAY

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, March 31,

AAUP Criticizes Eastern, Morehead Regents

The AAUP " condemned" the
Eastern regents for censuring stuThe Kentucky Conference of dent government president Steve
the American Association of Uni- Wilborn, who had distributed
versity Professors (AAUP) Satur- copies of an essay, "The Student
day passed t wo resolutions strong- As Nigger."
ly criticizing recent actions by
The AAUP said the regents'
the Eastern Kentucky and More-hea-d
State University Boards of contention that the essay was
obscene in no wayjustified either
Regents.

the censure or the further niling

Special To The Kernel

dfdllne
, 7he ?? tw0
pabliratlon

for

innomrfmrnti

Pr,or to th flr
of Items In this column.

I.

Today
.V?c?me tax orms and Information
vvm be available between 11 a.m. and

1
p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays
m the Student Center until
19
lne tax both sponsored April
by lleta
Alpha Psi.
The English Department Is offering
The Dantzler-FarquhAwards to the
student or students with the best published works in creative writing. There
Is a $50 prize for the best
poem and a
$50 prize for the best story. It is necessary that each entry should have been
published, but the medium of publication is not important. All entries
should be typed, double-spacewith
an original and a carbon. A statement
as to the place of publication should
also be included. Please submit all
entries to Professor Robert D. Jacobs,
McVey Hall, English Department, prior
to April 15.
Focus '69 will feature a Focus on
Social Morality March 28 and 29 In
Memorial Coliseum.
Members of Alpha Epsilon Delta,
national
and
honorary. In cooperation with Dr.
d
will be advising
Pisacano,
and
students throughout
in Room 8, Bradley
Hall, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.
"The Colloquium on Diomedical
History and Philosophy lecture is
cancelled for the month of March.
for student parkacademic
ing permits for the 1969-7- 0
year are being accepted now through
April 4 by the Safety and Security
Division. Applications may be picked
up at the Student Center Information
desk, in the residence halls and the
d
Safety and Security Division, 109
Hall.
A student at the London, England
School ' of Economics is trying to orto
ganize an overland expedition
India. The trip is being arranged by
a group called "Encounter Overland,"
who have organized trips for six years.
The expedition is trying to get students from both Britain and the
United States. Anyone desiring information may contact David Aarons,
23 Manor House Drive; London, N.W.
6; England.
Rotaract, a campus service organization affiliated with the Rotary Club,
will hold a meeting Monday, March
31, at 7:30 p.m.. In Room 111 of the
Student Center. All interested students are Invited to attend.
Club will meet at 7 p.m.
The
Monday, March 31, in Room 109 of the
Student Center.

The Associated Press

cient and honored" general
vention.

pre-me-

distance call

came to The Kernel Sunday night.

and good

50c,
The caller, who introduced
literature, buy University3 Poetry, Stuin the
on sale April 1, 2, and
himself as a student at Queens
dent Center.
Pryor Premedical Society will hold
York City, said
its last meeting of the. semester at 7 College in New
p.m., Tuesday, Apfil 1, in Room MN he was calling' to inform The
463 of the Medical Center.
Dr. John
700 and 800

Coming Up

UK Placement Service
Register Tuesday for an appointment Thursday with:
Del Monte Sales Co. Bus. Adm.
(BS, MS) for sales representatives
positions. Locations: Midwest. Citizenship.
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance
Bus.
Agr. Economics, Accounting, EcoAdm., Economics, Agr. E., Home
nomics, Computer Science, Math, Political Science, Psychology, Recreation, Social Work. Sociology (BS). Locations: Lexington and Eastern Kentucky. Citizenship. (Community Colleges Accounting, Agr. Bus., Gen.
Educ, Mkt. Tech.).
Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Mich.
Master's degree candidates in the folHistory,
lowing areas: Philosophy,
Psychology, Political Science, SociArt Math, Biology, Physics,
ology,
English, Speech, P.E.
The Sunday School Board of The
AcSouthern Baptist Convention
Bus.
Architecture,
Art,
counting,
Adm., Office Mft., Data Processing.
Sales. Mech. E.. Elec. E., Advertising,
Journalism, Research. Statistics (BS).
Location: Nashville, Term.

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box Aim.
Begun as the Cadet in 18W and
published continuously as the Kernel
kince 1915.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
,
$9 27
Yearly, by mail
$.10
Per copy, from files
KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
2320
Associate Editors, Sports
2447
New Defck
Business, Circulation 2319
Advertising,

l,'

Under normal circumstances,
Episcopal conventions are made
up of two houses one including
the bishops and the other includ

ponooonnnnonoin

'

Kernel that between
students had taken over the Dean
of Students' Office and had occupied part of the building housing the office since Thursday.
The Kernel reporter taking

the call asked him what the

OWNED

noise was in the background on
the New York end of the line.
Speaking in a thick New York
accent, he explained that he had
many people all around him.
"I'm calling from - the Dean
of Students Office. This is his
call is
phone I'm using-t- his
compliments of the dean."
There were no sirens to be
heard in the background. Just
-

i

the shuffling of many feet, the
sounds of distant conversations,
occasional laughter near the
phone and the calm, confident
voice of the young man holding
the receiver of the dean's phone.

AND

n
n
n

u

2
g

n

.

ns

H

Kt

(Next to Qegltsf Drugs)

H

10 o.m. - 12 p.m.

Weekday
Weekends

a
a
u
a
U

u
u
h
n
u
u
H
n
n
n

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OPERATED!

I Eload runner enterprises
a 390 East High
Chevy Chose
ii
u

n
u
n
n

Poor, Blacks Are Topics
For Colloquia Speakers

n
a
n
a
a
H
a
a

STUDENT

'Operator' Makes Unusual Call

An unusual long

Prof. Joseph DeRivera, associate
professor of psychology at New York
University, will speak before a Patterson School Colloquium on Wednesday, April 2, at 4 p.m. in Room 309
of the Student Center. His topic will
be "The Psychological Dimension of
Foreign Policy." The public is Invited.

proposal is to set up an 'estates-generain which membership
would rest not upon free election
. . . but upon that 'state of life'
in which a person finds himself. . . "

ap-

The resolution added that the
guidelines' "requirement for prior
approval of speakers and their
topics infringes both the speaker's freedom of speech and the
student's freedom to listen."
The resolution called for the
regents' reconsideration of the
guidelines, which in effect stated
that any speaker brought to the
campus by students had to be
approved by thedean of students.
In addition, the sponsoring
group for a speaker is required
to submit a detailed explanation
of the nature of the gathering
and why the speaker was invited.
The Eastern resolution also
included criticism of the regents
there for not granting Wilborn
a hearing before censuring him.
The four Eastern faculty members who opposed the resolution
told a reporter their opposition
essentially stemmed from the
complexity of the issue and the
belief that it had not been given
sufficient consideration by the
state AAUP group.

ing four members of the clergy
and four laymen elected from
each diocese.
The Rev. Wayne Craig, former secretary of the Lexington diocese, said a planning committee
for the coming convention had
invited delegates to biing "representatives, not necessarily members of the church, from the underprivileged, minority groups
and women."
Women will be seated at the
1970 regular convention, but they
have not been included in conventions of the past, he said.
"If this is the way we wish
to run the church," Bishop
Moody wrote, "there exists in
the constitution itself recourse
for change.
"But under this proposal, the
whim of a, group in the leadership of the church is to be substituted for due constitutional
process," he added.

legislation

plan

g

ularity."

From Occupied Zone

Tomorrow

MS-50-

affect

"Instead of a general convention," he wrote the bishops, "the

Bishop Moody, in a preamble to his letter, said the move
"obviously is to 'pack' the as- -

H

Laverty, a University Hospital administrator, will speak. An election of
officers for the coming school year
will also be held.
Dr. Eugen? Crawford of the DePhysiology
partments of Zoology and on
"Cutanand Biophysics, will speak
eous Gas Exchange in the Lizard,"
5
Tuesday, April 1, in Room
of the Medical Center at 4 p.m. The
public is invited.
A business meeting of the SCEC
will be held Tuesday. April 1, 6:45
p.m.. In the Commerce Auditorium.
Following the meeting will be a lecture by Herbert Goldstein, professor
in the Dept. of Special Education at
Yeshiva University, who will speak on
"The Regular Class Model: Implications for Teachers of the Retarded."

and

Bishop Moody said the move
to invite "a large number of persons who have not been elected
to the general convention" bypasses the church's convention.

non-votin-

-

enterprise

con-

In a letter to all Episcopal
bishops in this country, Bishop
Moody protested a move to ing
clude, as
guests, representatives of minority groups
at the church's special convention this summer.

Kin-kea-

free

buted copies of the essay to an
administrative office.
Only four members from the
Eastern faculty voted against the
resolution.
The second resolution, which
was passed unanimously by
about GO AAUP members, called

A special convention of the
Episcopal Church will be held
in August in South Bend, Ind.,
in preparation for the church's
regular 1970 convention.

The Rt. Rev. William R.
Moody, bishop of the Lexington
diocese, characterized the attempt as "a constitutional crisis
of magnitude, brought on by hysteria, compounded by impatience

pre-dent- al

pre-dent- al

Support

sembly

An Episcopal bishop here has
charged there is an attempt being
made "to overthrow the accepted order" in his church's "an-

speaker-screenin-

proved at Morehead "completely
inconsistent with those principles
of academic freedom which guarantee the free and rational examination of ideas and philosophies,
regardless of their current pop-

Priest Opposes 'Overthrow'

d,

al

a

that Wilborn return the undistri-

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Black capitalist Franklin A. Thomas will speak on "The
Project" at 3 p.m. Tuesday in the Student Center
Theatre.
Thomas, executive director of ley, he will speak on "Legal
Services to the Poor."
the
RestoraA question and answer period
tion Corporation, will be sponsored by the colloquia on "Work- will follow both presentations.
Other scheduled speakers in
ing Solutions to the Dimensions
the series include Richard Boone
of Poverty."
(April 9) speaking on "Promises,
Speaking in the colloquia and Performances: OEO and the
series at 3 p.m. Wednesday in the War on Poverty"; Dr. Alan
n
Law College Auditorium will be
(April 11) speaking on
Earl Johnson Jr. Presently a visit"Hunger and the Poor"; and Dr.
ing scholar at the Center for the William Crier (April 30) speakUniversity of California at Berke
ing on "Black Rage."

IQoononnonnniinnnnnonnnnunnnna

SPECIAL QFFIEIft

472 ROSE STREET

-

Bedford-Stuyvesta-

nt

skid SANDWICHES
AT PRICES STUDENTS CAN AFFORD
CARKV-OU-

OINING ROOM

DELIVER

T

Mer-man-

H9B

Yewbk

Some 2,200 KENTUCKIANS were ordered for graduating seniors last year.
. . . These were mailed and distributed
through Jan. 1, 1969. Approximately
200 books were returned as unclaimed.
These books must be moved from storage in order to handle the 1969
You may purchase a 1960
n in Room 111 of the Journalism
Bldg. for $5 plus tax. The office is open
Ken-tuckia-

n.

Kcn-tuck- ia

from

8-4:-

30

Monday-Frida-

y.

1968 KENTUCKIAN

$5.00

plus 25 cents tax
ROOM 111
JOURNALISM BLDG.

Holy Week

Services

ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHAPEL
Holy Eucharist, 12:05 p.m.

Tuesday, April

Wednesday, April 2

Holy Eucharist
7:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Sacrament of Penance,

4--

i

ytor

by

Maundy Thursday, April 3

6

p.m.

appointment)
Holy Eucharist

and
Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 p.m.

GOOD FRIDAY, April 4 Litany,
and Meditation, 12:05 p.m.
(Private meditation and prayer in
chapel until 3:00 p.m.)
Stations of the Cross, 5:30 p.m.
Ante-Communi-

HOLY SATURDAY

Lighting of the New Fire and Choral
Eucharist 11:30 p.m.
(Breakfast following the Eucharist)

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* The Kentucky

Iernel

Umvf.hsity of Kknu'cky

KSTAIILISIIKI) 1891

MONDAY, MARCH 31,
Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

19G9

Lcr H. IWtkcr. Editor-in-ChiMciulrs III, Managing Editor
D.irrcll like, Editorial rape Editor
Tom Dvtt, Business Manager
Jim Miller, Associate Editor
Howard Mason, rhotography Editor
Chip Hutclicson, Sports