xt7sj38kfb1c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sj38kfb1c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19381111  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1938 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1938 1938 2013 true xt7sj38kfb1c section xt7sj38kfb1c J

I

The Kentucky Kernel

CLEARING
HOUSE
ilis. On today's editorial page is a
fui ;her discussion of erroneous ideas
ideas sometimes gained from a too
superficial reading of headlines only.
In regard to letters, please
sign ycur name and we will only
print initials. If you wish, your
identity will be kept strictly confidential.
Diagnosis
There are four common methods
of diagnosing syphilis:
1. Use of a high powered micro-- !
scope to detect the tiny germs
in the chancre.,
2. Laboratory testing of blood of
the suspected persons after the
chancre, which always heals,
whether treated or not, has disappeared.
3. Physical
examination by a
competent physician.
4. Laboratory
testing of spinal
fluid in cases where the disease
has affected the brain or the
nervous system.
Proper treatment can be given
only after diagnosis has been made
by one or more of these methods.

Treatment

Effective treatment can be had
only through the use of such recognized drugs as neoarsphenamine.
Only a
bismuth and mercuryskilled physician is competent to
administer these drugs correctly.
Beware of quacks and patent medicines.
The method of treatment varies
according to age and psysique of
the patient. Usually injections are
necessary, at regular intervals. ovr
a period ranging from twelve to
eighteen months.
The earlier treatment is begun
the better is the chance of cure.
Where treatment is started early,
the results are excellent in more
than nine out of every ten cases.
Where treatment is begun late, the
results are good in only about 50
per cent cf the cases.
-

Save A Stamp
we're on the subject of
contributions, let's have more on
peculiar remarks made in classes
by professors or students for this
column. Surely, with 3.600 students
daily opening their mouths, something other than wisdom is bound
to pop forth. Also keep up the discussion of campus problems. We
would like to see this column grow
into one of open discussion on all
While

n.atters pertaining to student welfare. No stamp is needed. Just ad-

dress the notes to CLEARING
HOUSE. Kernel, and drop in University post office.

VOLUME XXIX

LEXINGTON. REM I

Z246

anti-syphil- is

K.V,

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER

BESTOR TO PLAY
AT UNION DANCE

Man-Size- d

The eighth act of the local football production will be staged tomorrow on Stoll Field when Kentucky's resurrected Wildcats, revived
after holding Georgia Tech to a
win last week, close their Famous Orchestra Will Offer
heme season against the powerful
Its Subtle Swing For
Tigers of Clemson College.
U. K. Dancers
Following their hard game last
week, with the Engineers, whom
TICKETS ARE ON SALE
they outgained two to one. the pracAT INFORMATION DESK
tice menu for the Cats during the
Only one
week has been light.
n
with their T'lav Don" RhVthms To
hunk of scrimmage
sparring partners has
freshman
At 9 P. M.. End At 12
been fed to the victory starved WildMidnight
cats. The spirit that was so evident preceeding the Tech game has
First "name band" of the year to
again been present in the practice play for a University dance, Den
sessions as the Blues have prepped Bestor's orchestra. Broadway. Midfor the Tiger invasion.
west and Pacific Coast favorite, will
The game will mark the final furnish their "Play Don" music for
home apearance of four squadmen, the Union dance from 9 p. m. to
Captain Sherman Hinkebein, Harry midnight in the Union ballroom.
Brown, Dameron Davis and Harold
The name of Don Bestcr has been
Black. Hinkebein and Brown are synonymous with good dance music
expected to receive starting nods for several years. Long a favorite
while Davis, the team's leading in the Middle West, Bestor brought
scorer who has been hampered his band to Broadway in 1931,
and
since the Washington and Lee game within a few months time became
with a side full of cracked ribs, may- one cf the nations ranking dance
be handed the right halfback post. bands. His first triumph was at the
Black will view the game from the Hotel New Yorker and frcm there
bench since he has been sidelined he moved into the Hotel Lexington.
for the season by a wrenched knee. Next came an engagement at the
Tigers Terrible
Hotel Pennsylvania and simultanSo far this season Clemson has eously the orchestra was engaged to
turned in a report card with but broadcast Jack Benny's radio show
one flunk, a 20-- 7 loss to Tennessee, fcr an automobile tire concern.
to mar its pages. The Tigers
Tickets for the dance are on sale
opened the season by shocking the at the information desk of the
South with one of the years greatUnion, $1.50 stag or couple.
est upsets when they forded the
strong Tu'sme Green Wave. Other
outstanc"':g' wins hav been wrested
from
Carolina and Wake
Forest: the team that held Duke
to a 6 point margin. As usual the
cast for Th. RivaU-wi- GJulg"
money W riding with Clemson
' tha s second "aJor .p,roduc-fac- e
by at leas two tcuchdowns but in
th year'
wlll Pen
of the terrifying tales that
have been circulated concerning the Pembtr 5' was
by Frank Fowler- - dlrector.
of the team from rebel-lanTne cast: FaulkIand (Carl
t.
the Wildcats refuse to concede a
Jessie Mountjoyi, Lucy
Realizing that this is the,ner'- Fa
last chance to ring up their third ,Barbara MacVeyt, Lydia Langu-wiof the campaign, since the re- - ish "Barbara Smith), Julia (Sarah
maining game is with Tennessee's Elizabeth McLean), Mrs. Malaprop
(Dorothy Dyer Rhodes), Sir And
Vols, the Cats are expected to pounce on this chance for thony Absolute (Robert Hobgood),
a victory like a drowning man Bob Acres (C. R. Lisanby, Jr.), Cap).
grasps at even a razor blade.
tain Jack Absolute (Clarence
Heading the Tigers is Captain
Sir Lucius O'Trigger (Sam
Charley Wood. 180 pound candidate Nuckols), and David (William
tContinued on Page Four)
dor).

SATURDAY NIGHT

Heritages Of The Present Day

Mi

Linked To

19--

Guignol Announces
"The Rivals" Cast

,J

se

"

annued

d,

Con-poin-

-

n

Gei-ger-

Wide Armistice Observance
Places Wreath On War Dead
DriimmOnd felated
To Make Address

alllmji

I

MISS ANNA KASKAS

KaskasTo Open Musicale Series
Sunday, Nov. 3,
1

Confederate Flag
Absent At Parade;
Yankee Suspected

The Inquiring
Reporter

ship-shap-

open-mind-

s

j

Uji!
v-

.-

i

For39

Season

"There is a great field here in
linking the romance and traditions
of the University to those of the
State for greater heritages of the
future." said Thomas R. Underwood
in an address to students and faculty members at a general convocation Wednesday. November 9 in
Memorial Hall.
Mr. Underwood, editor of the Lexington Herald, spoke on "University Heritages."
He was introduced
by Dr. Paul P. Boyd, dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Recounting events of a recent trip
he had made to Lexington. Massachusetts, and Lexington. Virginia,
Mr. Underwood compared the traditions of Kentucky to these of other
Lexingtons and pointed out that
the heritages of th University were
as great as those of Washington
and Lee anil other southern schools.
In enumerating the advantages
which present day students have
over stud- nts cf 20 years ago, Mr.
Underwood mentioned the new and
modern equipment and the new
buildings which have recently been
completed on the campus.
Reviewing members of the faculty under whom he had studied. Mr.
Underwood said that James K. Patterson, president of the University
during its formative years, was one
cf the greatest educators in the
United States. "The late Prof.
Enoch Greham." he said, "trained
the majority of men who are the
editors of Kentucky newspapers today."
As examples of the progress the
University has made since the
World War. he mentioned former
students and graduates who have
become outstanding in the affairs
of state and nation.
A former Journalism
student at
the University, Mr. Underwood was
at that time sports editor of the
Kernel. He is
of the
Kentucky Press Association and has
been associated with the Herald for
20 years.
-

Metropolitan Contralto To lie
Feature Of First
Concert
Miss Anna Kaskas. prima donna
contralto of the Metropolitan Opera
association, will be featured at the
first Sunday afternoon musicale of
season at 4 p. m. Sunthe 1938-3- 9
day, November 13. in Memorial Hall.
She will be assisted at the piano by
Howard Kubik.
Four Years ago. Miss Kaskas was
a pupil of Enrico Rosati, the teacher of Gigli. Lauri-Voland Rosa
Tentoni.
She entered the Metropolitan Opera Contest in the spring
cf 1937 and was awards first p'ace.
She sang in the spring season of
the Metropolitan with such success that she was given the contract to sing leading controlto roles
during the winter season.
Miss Kaskas has chosen the following program for her Lexington
recital :

SuKy Plans
Special Train
For Vol Game
A special train for all stu- dents who wish to go to Knox- ville for the Thanksgiving
game will be run if 500 stu- dents sign up for accommo-- (
dations. SuKy president. El-- ',
Hot Beard, Said yesterday.
Tickets will be $4 a person
i for the round
trip. Students
desiring to make the trip
..please leave your names at
the Union information desk.

pi

i
m accende

Quella fiumina que
Amor, commanda
Aria: O don fatale tfrom

Carlos"

t

Don

-

II
Alle Dmge habeu Sparuclie
Slandchen
Me me Llebe ist Orun
III
Aria: Una voce poce la tlroin
Barber ol Seville
The

Marcello

Handel
Verdi

FROSH NETTERS
FEEL AXE

FALL

McBraver Slashes Kitten
Squad To 20, With

New

More To Co

Wolff

With their first game billed for
December 2 with the Georgetown
College frosh, freshman coach. Paul
Rossini
McBrayer. swung the axe over his
IV
Chopin squad during the past week and
Opus 53
Polonaise in
Mr. KUDU
reduced the number of squadmen
V
Arensky
to 20.
Autumn
Head
Slumber Song ot the Madonna
unna The opening game will be played
Journey
The
Kacninaninou as a preliminary appetizer to the
Floods of Spring Kentucky-Georgetow-

SUKY WILL HOLD
FINAL PEP RALLY
Microphone" Will
Assembly
Interesting Slant

'Traveling
Give

SuKy pep rally.
the first of its kind to be given at
the University, will be held at 7
o'clock tonight in the Alumni gym
nasium.
program
has been
A unique
planned by the committee and this
rally promises to be the most successful one this year. Kentucky's
"Best Band in Dixie will be featured and Elliot Beard, president
of SuKy, will be introduced to the
students. Kernel sports editor. Joe
Creason, will hold a "powwow" at
n
the microphone with Coach Ab
and Clemson Coach Jess Neely.
Members of the football squads will
be introduced by the feminine members of SuKy.
Another novel plan, which will be
tried for tha first time at this rally,
is the "traveling mike." which will
be passed around through the student body, giving various students
the opportunity of expressing their
nnininn Q tf Kptl IPW V'.S ChftnCeS
against the Clemson
tomorrow
eleven. .
This rally will definitely be an
affair, with no outsidSuky's proers on the program.
gram committee consists of Bill
Elder, chairman; J. Coblin. Jean
Abel, Betty' Elliot, and Katherine
Rozelle.
Following the pep meeting, the
students, led by the band and a
will parade downtown.
The parade will go down Limestone
to Main, down Mam to Rose, up
Rose to Euclid and back to the
gym.
An

nt

Kir-wa-

n

varsity

All-Sta- te

g;

1

!

YM-Y-

W

Will Opeil

Membership Drive

nt

e,

Dr. A. E. Bigge To Be Speaker
At Dinner Meeting

Sunday Night

Ur. A. E. Bigge, head of the German department, will speak at the
first membership dinner of the YM-Yto be held at 6 p. m. Monday.

14 at the Maxwell street
Presbyterian church.
The dinner will inaugurate the

November

drive for money to aid oppressed
TO MEET students in Germany and students
China who are unin
The Student Affiliates of the able to complete their education.
American Chemical Society will Dr. Bigge will point out the immeet at 7::i0 Monday night in the portance of the movement
Organic UfUiri- liwni. Kastle Hall
The dinner is oiH,n (' ;il V ui ni.
Prt'less'.'r J L cijbbard will stak '.eri, ami their friends
lake'b are

CULMICAL

SOCIETY

In UK Law School
Seiuors of th- - Law school will
hold their weekly practice trial at
1:15 this afternoon in the ccurt
rocm of Lallerty Hall, using as
their subject a hypothetical false
imprisonment case entitled Stuart
Co.

Wolf-Wo- lf

Attorneys for the plaintif are Jo.
M. Ferguson and Charles Metcalf.
Paul Oberst and Lloyd Watken will
be attorneys for the defense.
Professor Frank L. Randall, who
presides at the weekly trials, invites students from other colleges
to attend these cases as spectators,
or it possible, to participate in the
trial by acting on the Jury.

UNIVERSITY BAND
TO SALUTE ARMY
Armistice Theme Formations
Being Prepared For
Clemson Game
To honor the United States army,
the "Best Band in Dixie" will use
show an
for its bet
Armistice theme, tomorrow afternoon at the Kentucky-CIemso- n
game.
"Tiger" will be the first formation, with the band playing "Hold
That Tiger." in honor of the visitFollowing the animal
ing team.
formation, a huge "C" will be
to the strains of Clemson's
formed
Alma Mater. The letter will change
into a half moon, and the band will
play "Carolina Moon."
From the Clemson motif, the
band will go into the martial theme
of "Over There." and will mass itself into "U. S. A." and march toward the Kentucky stands.
One of the most popular tunes of
the wartime era. "I'm Forever
Blowing Bubbles." will mak- - the
basis for the formation of a bubble
bubble
pipe, out of which a
will be blown.
es

--

rd

Offices

n

4 To 6 P. M.
An open house for all students of the University will
be held from 4 to 6 p. m. this
afternoon in the Union building.
There will be dancing and
refreshments will be served.

Job Of
Remodeling Sets Up
New Quarters
By JOHN ED PEAKCE
Ccmpleted at the cost of more
than one thousand dollars, the new
quarters of the University publications department was occupied yes-

terday

by

the

Kernel-Kentucki-

staffs.
Formerly used as a storage space
for the University Commons, the
of Mcoffices in the
Vey Hall have been divided into six
adjacent rooms, and will be used
to house the Kernel and Kentuckian
offices.
In addition to the Kernel
Editor's office, there is a news room,
a Kentuckian office, a mailing room
for the circulation department, and
be
(roup Approves Constitution. a large storage rcom which will for
used for old files and a morgue
Votes To Back Kernel's
the Kernel.
War
Work on the offices was begun on
September 1. by the Buildings and
Herman Kendall, senior in the Grounds department, after it was
College of Arts and Sciences, was found that the old offices were too
unanimously elected president of small to accommodate th enlarged
the Independent Association at a force. The new offices, which are
meeting held Wednesday night.
said to rank with the best of colOther officers elected were Joe lege newspaper offices in the south,
Bailey,
Jean Marie have a complete heating and venMcConnel. secretary: Paul Durbin, tilating system, and are connected
treasurer; J. Lee Friedman, politi- with each other and with the busical chairman: Marow Cox. assist- ness office on the floor above by an
inter-offipublic address system.
ant, and Orval Leech, sergeant.
presented by
Flooring for the quarters, which
The constitution,
Raymond Sutherland, chairman of alone cost more than three hundred
the constitutional committee, was dollars, is of inlaid linoleum, of a
adopted with a few changes. The dark pattern, in contrast to the
main tenet of the document is that walls, which ara of a uniform white.
The new offices are the result cf
all University students not affiliated
with a Greek social organization a movement to acquire better rooms
All for the Kernel staff, which have
are eligible for membership.
n confined to one
members are to have equal rights heretofore
floor
on the
to participate in all affairs of the small room building.basement
The main purpose of of the same
organization.
Easily accessible to the rest of the
the association is to encourage and building by
stairs or elevator as well
promote participation of the Inde- as by public address system, the ofpendents in all phases of campus fices can also be reached by the
life, including student government. side entrance to McVey Hall, and
was appointed to are ideally situated because of their
A committee
take charge of Kentuckian sales in nearness to the press room.
order to nominate Independent girls
The filing room, which is to be
for Kentuckian Queen. Members of used as a morgue a.s well as a filare Joe Bailey. Ma- ing room, is alone larger than the
the committee
row Cox. Roberta Wilson. Charles former offices of the Kernel, and is
Moore. Charles Bradford. Stuart one of the most useful additions to
Wahl, Graham Wilkin, Leslie Lee the Kernel in recent years.
Jones. Velma Swaite. Dorothy Neal.
BACTERIOLOGISTS TO MEET
Vashti Albert, Virginia Hayden,
Howard Watters. Beverly Richards.
The Bacteriological Society will
Waller, and imrt at 7:H" Monday night in KasMiller riobbins.
I'r. Cari'lim- - SoMt will
tle Hall
t'.i lly Clark
Tlif snhi!is drive, sponsored by speak on ' iai rhea nuil IKsesi'vry
nt

HEADS
INDEPENDENTS

KENDALL

Anti-Syphil-

Fa

1

1

Supported

With the second week of the
campaign drawing to a
close, over 110O students had reported to the Public Health building for Wassermann tests by late
yesterday.
Dr. J. S. Chambers, director of
the dispensary, expressed his satisfaction at the continued enthusiastic response to the current prog ram.
Every faculty member seen yesterday expressed himself as being
heartily in favor of the campaign.
Dean William S. Taylor. College
of Education, wished that "every
member of the faculty would get
behind the campaign and support
it wholeheartedly."
"Staff members of the Anatomy
and Physiology department are fully in favor of the Kernel's
drive" stated Dr. R. S. Allen, head of the department. Dr.
T. C. Sherwood endorsed the program as being "certainly worthwhile."
In expressing his approval of the
campaign. DeanrPaul P. Boyd. College of Arts anfl Sciences, said that
"the day is past when we can afford to maintain silence about such
a great menace as syphilis."
Dr. Amry Vandenbosch. head of
the department of political science,
and Dr. E. G. Trimble of the same
department, both endorsed the campaign and stated that matters such
as these should be brought into
the open.
Prof. M. E. Potter, head of the
department of physical education,
emphasized the educational value
of the program and added that it
shculd be carried on to a satisfactory conclusion with thei aid of students and faculty members.
"One of the most admirable and
desirable campaigns ever conducted
by a newspaper such as the Kentucky Kernel" was the opinion of
Dr. A. E. Bigge. head of the department of German.
Instructors are invited by the
Kernel staff to submit criticisms
cf the campaign.
Among the organizations taking
the Wassermann tests from Tuesday to Thursday were the Band.
Union staff. Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, additional ROTC classes and
rome members of the Independent
organization.
Scheduled for this afternoon, in
addition to any individual wishing
to take the test, are Alpha Delu
Theta. members
f the YW-Yand more f the Independent organization.
Tests were given last night at
Boyd and Patt Halls to coeds who
had not taken the Wassermann
with organized groups. As previous-- "
anti-syphil- is

ly

stated, the tests are for any and

all students, and are given from 2
p. m. to 5 p. m. every day except
Saturday and Sunday at the Public Health building, located between
Neville Hall and the Administration building.
Results from all tests given a
week or more ago may be had by
asking at the dispensary.
Each student will be given the
result only of his own test.

Kampus
Kernels
Friday

Transfer party

7 p. m.. Social
Room. Union.
Political science fraternity 7:J'
p. m.. Room 205. Union.
Fencing manager aspirants 4 p
m.. Men's gym.
Dutch lunch club 12 noon. Max
well Street Presbyterian Church.
Sunday
Catholic club breakfast. 10:15 a
m.. Lafayette hotel.
Monday
Home Economics club 7:30 p. in..
Student Room. Agriculture building
Sophomore grourj 4 p. m.. Great
Hall of Union, to visit the reform
school.
AWS 4 p. m.. Music Room. Un-

ce

bf

I

j

r u y Expresses Feeling
That Campaign Is Well

is

J''

Entire UK Koll

Takes Advantage Of
Kernel Campaign

anti-syphi- lis

Union Open
House Saturday

en-

counter. Although the schedule has
not been completed, at least 15
games will be booked for the Kittens for the coming year. Practice
was officially opened November 1
with 66 hopefuls reporting for the
team, but frequent scrimmages during the past week enabled McBrayer
to wield the axe. Another slice is
due in the next few days.
So far. three candidates have
been outstanding. James King, Staff
Kelly and Marvin Akers. King, as
captain and forward on the state
high school champion Sharpe team
last year, was selected on the
team. Kelly, a guard, is from
Lake Forest, 111., while Akers is
from Jefferscnville, Ind.
Other squad members are: William Gentry, McAfee; Jack Ramey,
Millersburg
Military
Institute;
Steve Baker, Riverside Military
Academy; Jim Mathewson. Vance-burHenry Walker. Maysville:
Kenneth England. Camblesburg:
Donald Miller, Terrace Park, Ohio;
Clayton Robinson and Lloyd Ramsey, Lexington;
Billy Downing,
Wis.;
Kenosha.
James Bacon,
Frankfort: Lucien Moreman. Valley
Station; Eugene Sparrow. Burgin;
Billy Hedges. Morganfield; Reggie
Palmore. Horse Cave; and Jim
Small, Louisville.

Kernel-Kentuckia-

Barristers To Try
False Arrest Case

vs.

One Third Of

EXPECT TO TEST
90 PERCENT OF UK

ood

Are Finished, And Now InUse

Btraust
Brannis

8.

near-breaki-

Future-Underw-

Lexington Herald Editor. In
Convo Talk. Praises
University

He-gi-

How About It?
Statements On World Status
"Editor: Would another 'Keep Off
Bv Faculty. Brinir Dire
the Grass' campaign be out of orWarnings
der? The committee has really im
proved the walks and plantings this
By
i.. HI.MR
year, don't you think? But look at
Mrs jameS Erskine Drummcnd
I't'dce is rarely denied to the of Coldspring Hollow, Long Island,
the path in front of McVey hall and
York, specialist on personality
there are plenty more paths. Let's bcareful.-Schi- Urr
j
give Nature a chance." J. S.
development,
will speak to the
World-wid- e
observance of the women students at 4 . m. Monday
There really shouldn't, be any necessity of conducting a campaign. Armistice places a wreath of res- - in the Music Rocm of the Union
If students would only realize that pect today in memory of each son building.
they are saving very little time and who gave his life in the Great War
Taking
n.r subject
Art
are certainly ruining the appearthe war to end wars."
of conversation," Mrs. Drummond
ance of the campus, the matter
11,' will endeavor to show how person-191Twenty years ago, November
Why
would take care of itself.
in the martial
private ality may be developed through
don't a few organizations get be- confines of a French and
railway car. conversation.
hind this?
victor and vanquished convened and
Mrs. Drummond has spoken at
signed a document that brought to , many eastern) colleges and universi- Basketball Tourney
"Mr. Editor: You probably no- cessation the most destructive mi ties.
Following the talk, to which all
ticed the two columns of Herald litary conflagration in world his
women students are invited, Mrs.
Dunn which tory.
Sports Writer
Now. two decades have mnp hv Drummond will answer any ques- were devoted to a discussion of the
Southeastern basketball tournament from that day behind the lines; tloIls'
which we hoped would be held in but events of universal significance.
Lexington. Why can't we have the nurtured to the
point
(Continued on Page 4)
by the almost exact forces that
charged the fuse of international
animosity in 1914, again threaten
to plunge the world into an even
more revolting chaos.
Statements made by University
Will the damnyankee who
faculty members carry with them
hooked the Confederate flag
warnings of impending disaster.
from its resting place in the
Professor John Kuiper, head of
armory pleas.- return it to the
the Kentucky philosophy departmilitary department? Thank
ment views world affairs as "disThe Question:
yo' suh!
turbing."
What do you call a
Members of the Pershing
"From almost any point of view.
man?
Rifle's Confederate squad were
world affairs are disturbing. The
The Answer
in a quandiy last Tuesday.
Louise Ni.sbet, Sophomore. Arts emminence of war on a more stuThey were all lined up to
pendous scale and a more destruc"A
Sciences:
and
march down Main street in
man is one who possesses knowledge tive scale than ever before leaves
the Tobacco Carnival parade.
and the ability to use it. He should little room for joyous optimism."
e
Everything
was
in this knowledge
be
For America to remain aloof from
from the fake whiskers to the
towards the ac- war. according to Professor Kuiper.
and
captain's sash, when suddenquirement of new things and tow- "we must resist the fatal attraction
ly someone noticed that the
ards the opinions cf others."
for despotism and insist on putting
flag, which had been presentRuel Foster. Graduate School: "I our own house more democratically
ed to them last field day by
a man who in order, and we must agree to
would call
the United Daughters of the
has adjusted himself reasonably stand commonly together with othConfederacy, was missing.
w?ll to liis physical environment
er democracies against the common
A frantic search began. All
mid al the same time possessed the enemies of peace."
the cracks and crevices of the
awar-nesto the subtler
quality of
From Dr. T. H. Dupre comes this
armory were carefully exand more intangible filaments cf statement:
plored but without result. So
being which distantly manifest
A general European
war has
thf squad paraded flagless.
themselves to the
brought
been postponed only."
Official inquiries
that is the uncloaked mind."
out the fact that no one had
Dr. Dupre contends that the
Louis Mucci. Sophomore, Law:
seen the flag since the presUnited States should
"It is a man who knows more and any European war. and"stay out of
entation ceremony. Officers
should limit
more about ! ss and less until he
of the military department
knows all that is to be known about itself to an armaments program
and members of Pershing
only for the purpose of defense
NOTHING."
Rifles are at a loss to account
Olive Rosar. Sophomore. Agricu- against attack."
for its absence.
Dr. Amry Vandenbosch. head of
lture: "I would say a man is
Strictly unofficial and unis able to cope the University political science dewhen he
reliable sources infer that
with any situation in which he finds partment and eminent authority
some practical joker with a
himself. He would have to be an on world problems, has gone on rediabolical sense ,,f humor
intelligent and interesting conversacord with the opinion that Amermade away with
iri,e
This man would Imvr icans, particularly in the immediate
tionalist
uussesnioi
liniiL-tlU'.ce-!'".' v&U have not
"hat
aJ:
ta'i'
j!

1,100 Of Student Body Respond
To First Call On Syphilis Drive

On Powerful Clemson Tigers
Last Home Game For Blues
Promises
Tussle

KERN EI

Y

NEW SERIES NO. 17

II. I!:!8

Metropolitan Contralto

Resurrected Cats Turn Guns

Bowl-boun-

More About C olumnists
Two letters this issue compliment
two of our columnists and the KerOne.
campaign.
nel's
from A. D.. points to the fact that
Joe Creason's foctball predictions
are proving pretty accurate in regard tc Kentucky. The other, from
G. D.. says that it was very good to
find "Behind The Eckdahl" back in
Tuesday's paper. Writer G. D. considers the columns of Creason and
Eckdahl the best in the paper.

C

SEMI-WEEKL-

OF KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY

In this issue we continue with the
facts you should knew about syph-

FRIDAY ISSUE

ion.

Intramural committee
Room

Union.
Freshman group
J06. Union.

p

5

in

.

'205,

5 p. in

,

Ru"iu

HAYS IN ORGAN RECITAL

I
!

The Kentucky Children of the
American Revolution Societies will
present J. Smith Hays III. junior
president of the state board, in an
orsan recital at 8 p. m. today in
Memorial IfcitV Mrs. William I
Goodwin will complete the prtvrl'i
by singing a group of songs
1!'"

* i ft F. k T. N T IJ C

Fare Two
show cases which would not be indicated by the
Wassermann. If a blood specimen is at all
doubtful, both tests are used. And if there still
is anv question, a complete physical examination
and additional tests are given. It is ridiculous
to assume that an individual would be treated
for the disease if he did noi have it.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
STUDENTS OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Published semi weekly during the school year except holidays or examination periods.
Entered at the Pout Otfle at Lexington, Kentnrky,
D(1 els
nutter under the At of March 3, 1879.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE

e-

MEMPER
Kentucky Intercolleginte I'resi Assoctetlna
wrAluUti Mwfd OS UuiBOWrU
ro

I

go

Cm

trtsToa

NATIONAL

fa

it-

S2.00 One

.oris T. loiriuRT

E. H.

sn

thing. They cannot realize that most college
editors would much rather publish a story stating that no cases of svphilis were found than to
make a grand expose of "existing conditions."
We sincerely hoie that the "father and alumnus," and others who feel as he does, will try
lo understand the actual purpose behind ihe
campaign and will join our side in the fight

o

RATES

SUBSCRIPTION
$1.M One Semester
I

-

los Adcctrs

Tear

Editor-in-Chie- f

Managing Editor

Mithsifr

Mc F.i roy
M. Smith

Ki-.- rs

Editor

Business Manager

Harrv

An Anonymous Letter

against venereal diseases.

Opens Our Eyes

Signed "A Father and Alumnus." the letter
was addressed to the KrRn editor and was
Louisville. Ky.
I'siiallv. anonvmous letters go into the waste-baskebut this one was interesting because it
campaign and loconcerned the
writer so definitely was confused as
calise the
to ihe purposes and ideals of the current program.
"We are sorrv to observe the Kr.Rvri. management has seen fit to give the disgusting subjects
of enereal diseases and sexual matters so much
piominehce and to spread your views in large
With this
head lines on your front page
"ocncr" the writer launches into an attack cm
health doctors and deplores the fact that "our
sons and daughters are induced to lecome human guinea pigs for the experiments of these
lalxiratoiy medicos."

Behind The Eckdahl
Bv ANDREW C. ECKDAHL

t,

After this stir that has been caused by the
activities,
committee investigating
we can understand fully Kipling's line. "The
lumult and the shouting Dies."

anti-syphil- is

ven-eica-

r--

check-ups-

t

-

ic-:-

"Campus Clipper"
for
Co-e-

i

Sc-

---

-

thick crepe rubber
sole; natural color
with either crepe
or leather sole.

SS,':

jA

'

'?

..

NO

Air Picture

f.ver
I

1

Mailt--!

IS COLOR

N

'MEN
WITH
WINKS'
with

Zanr Grey's

FRED
MacMURRAY

Scoop! What group of cciiege
..omen are due for a shock when
they hear that Male No. 1. last
year's and a couple of year's befors
that Powerhouse Plus, Ace Mi'ler.
is married?
Yep. it's true,
Saturday night saw the end of ba
chelorhood for the Ace. Congratu
lations and best wishes.

AIo Popeye ( artixm

...

Py JIM CALDWELL

a

tws-n-

S

MAR

MATS

TEST

I

TO

N

V

N

Arnolds Millinery

ot

Kit-ting- er

.

above-name-

"Illustrated Condon News." the
French "L'lllustration," and Herr
Not
Hitler's "Illustrirte Zeitung."
only are they Interesting in their
utter difference from the taleof the
bearers and
U. S. but they act as the fingers
of the Europuon the pulse-beaean peoples. We may read in our
domestic magazines how and why
people are living on the continent,
but these descriptions can only be,
at best, the opinions of disinterested observers. In Europe's own magazines, however, we forner Europeans in their own lair, and see them
gaze-entice- rs

ts

And. if you are inclined to believe that Germany has reduced
power, one
Britain to a second-rat- e
peep at the German magazines will
drown that opinion in horselaughs.
For these latter are such
y
excuses
insipid,
for periodicals that they