xt7sn00zq51c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sn00zq51c/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 19411942 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 19 (1941-1942) text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 19 (1941-1942) 1941 2012 true xt7sn00zq51c section xt7sn00zq51c   Bullezm 0f the
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  GENERAL CATALOG
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  Published monthly, January to September inclusive, by the Uni- ‘
iyn versity of Kentucky, Lexington. Entered as Second—C1ass Matter at the
  Post Office, Lexington, Ky., under the Act of July 16, 1894. V
  Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in
  Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized June 30, 1920. ·
 
  V0}. 34, JUNE N0. 6 A
  Y . ’·

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES ·
1941
EX OFFICIO MEMBERS
f Keen Johnson, Governor
John Brooker, Superintendent of Public Instruction
W. H. May, Commissioner of Agriculture v
FROM THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE ;  
A Robert Tway, Louisville, 1948
_ H. S. Cleveland, Franklinton, 1944
Harry W. Walters, Shelbyville, 1946
· MEMBERS AT LARGE · I
I Richard C. Stoll, Lexington, 1948
R. P. Hobson, Louisville, 1948
V Lee Kirkpatrick, Paris, 1944 .
Mrs. Paul G. Blazer, Ashland, 1944
John S. Cooper, Somerset, 1946
‘ _ Harper Gatton, Madisonville, 1946
ALUMNI MEMBERS
H. D. Palmore, Frankfort, 1948
Marshall Barnes, Beaver Dam, 1944
. James Park, Lexington, 1946 1
A I OFFICERS OF THE BOARD
l . Keen Johnson, Chairman
_ Richard C. Stoll, Vice Chairman
‘ Gayle Starnes, Secretary
. “Frank D. Peterson, Secretary
‘ John Skain, Treasurer
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE  
· Richard C. Stoll, Chairman l
Q R. P. Hobson
. James Park A
H. S. Cleveland U
·f H. D. Palmore
· Y *Resigned June 30, 1942.
‘ *Beglnning July 1. 1942.

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-’   · 19 Education Building ’
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6 ,.» ` 23 Mining Laboratory
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L   ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
{   GENERAL .
Z ;y Herman Lee Donovan, M. A., Ph. D., LL. D., President  
, Q Henry Harrington Hill, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of the University‘ `
  ' T. T. Jones, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of Men
‘, * Sarah Bennett Holmes, A. B., Dean of Women
= _ Frank D. Peterson, A. B., University Comptroller
` _ Leo M. Chamberlain, M. A., Ph. D., Registrar
` Margaret Isadora King, A. B., B. S., Librarian
" Louis Clifton, M. A., Director of University Extension
= Ki
  THE COLLEGES
    Paul Prentice Boyd, M. A., Ph. D., LL. D., Dean of the College of
~ Arts and Sciences _ I
‘ i Thomas Poe Cooper, B. S., D. Sc., Dean of the College of Agricul-
? i . .
. E ture and Home Economics and Director of the Experiment
- Q Station
  James Hiram Graham, C. E., Dean of the College of Engineering
  Alvin E. Evans, M. A., Ph. D., J. D., Dean of the College of Law
_ William Septimus Taylor, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of the College of
l Education
  Edward Wiest, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of the College of Commerce
  William Delbert Funkhouser, M. A., Ph. D., D. Sc., Dean of the
I Graduate School“
  Jesse E. Adams, M. A., Ph. D., Acting Dean of the Graduate School" I
. l ___
_ J 1Rcsignc·d Aug. 1, 1942. I
— E Um leave sovmid seniesler, ]El—ll-42.
S *‘ S¤~l·<»ml semester, 19-ll-42. I;
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 C O N T E N T S
Page
Publications and Sources of Informatiw .-Y·---»-·-----------------·-------——----- -— 6
Calendar ...........................»».>..».........»-»-»» - ------»---»-·--»-·--—-—--»—-—»~-»- — ——-·--·-—··--·--— 7
University Calendar ..............»......».........»-.--»»-»--------- - -------·-·-——-—-----—--—-—---- 8
Registration Schedules, 1942-43 ...........»............>..-. - .-·-»----—------—-- — -—-—-----· 9
Part I. General Information of Special Interest to the
Prospective Student ......r.......................r.........l......r...... . .... ll _
The University of Kentucky .c,.........,.........,lr,..........i..,,..»»..,·. 13
Admission to the University ............,...............................r... 14
Fees and Expenses ..........................»..........r.........»»».»...»............ 17
Residence Halls for Women ..,.c.........................,.....c....,.,...... 21
Residence Halls for Men ..,...........i....rr,..........,.......r............... 22
Opportunities for Financial Help ...................ic...........c....... 22
What Is Expected of the Student .._....,.,.....Y...>,t.................. 23
Opportunities Outside the Classroom ...,,.......i.....l.c.....i.c... 30
)f The Facilities of the University ...........,....,.,.............._.......... 34 _
_ Part II. Educational Opportunities at the University of A
l- Kentucky ....................... . ...c....,c...._,.........,...........,........,........ 39
1'B Degrees and Curricula ................,,.....,...V.....c,.....,......c......,... 41 ·
College of Arts and Sciences .,...,..........._............,,......c....,.... 44
College of Agriculture and Home Economics ......,.c,.....,,c,. 61
College of Engineering .......__,..,._,....._,....._,.c,.....,,,.,.....,....c....c. 73
>f College of Law .......................,.,..,....c....i,..,,_ . ...i.......,...,.........i.. 85
College of Education ..i,....,c,...,,.....__,...,l_..,,.l._........,.c_.,...l.c...... 89
College of Commerce ,.........,..,.......,...,c.....c..c....c . ,._......c....... 96
me Graduate School ......._.........._.._..,_,_.___,,lc,._. _ ____,. . _,_._,c...,c___..,,__ 102 4
Department of University Extension ........c........._.......c._.....». 113
12}
) Part III. Statement of Courses Otlered at the University .....,......,... 117
Part IV. Special Services of the University .....,.......,....r.,,................ 303
Part V. The Administrative and Instructional Personnel of the
University ............,.,...,....._,.....ss,....,,..   ..,,ss.....1......,......s..., 311
Part VI. Statistical Summary . ._....   .,c,...,c,,..,,..,...,.c,,...,,,,..l,,,....c,,... 343
Index ......., . ....... . ..._,...,..,....l . .._,...,_,,..,......._c......._,...,.,.,.ll.,,.._,.,,. 351

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  PUBLICATIONS AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION
  The following publications are issued by the University for the
l Q purpose of giving prospective students and others necessary
i‘ information about the institution and its various divisions.
a _' Opposite each publication is listed the office or offices from which
· ·· Z it may be obtained.
{   Bulletin of General Information ..... Registrar’s Office
, _d General Catalog ................................... Registrar’s Office
i   Summer Quarter Bulletin ................. Registrar’s Office
€ i Law Bulletin ......................................... College of Law or
j   Registrar’s Office
i v_ Graduate Bulletin ................................. Graduate School or
j I Registrar’s Office
1 Commerce Bulletin ..........................,.... College of Commerce or
  Registrar’s Office
  Agriculture and Home Economics
J ?§ Bulletin .................._......,......_....,___._.__.__ College of Agriculture and
· Q Home Economics or
  Registrar’s Office
F   In order to assist those who may wish special information
_   about some part of the University’s program, there are listed below
- . 4 the names of officials to whom inquiries of various types may be
‘   sent. In each case, the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ken-
i   tucky, is the post oHice address.
  The general policies of the Univer-
,_ sity .......................................................... President of the University
  General information, all admissions,
  and transcripts of records ................ Registrar l
·: Living accommodations, student
  help, social affairs ........,................... Dean of Men or Dean of i
i Information about a particular Women '
{   college and its program .........f....... Dean of the College
_   Graduate work .._...................._.._.._.._._.. Dean of the Graduate
é School  
·-{ Summer Quarter .........__.,.._...,___,,_____..___ Dean of the University ‘
  Class extension and corre- S
—   spondence study ..,........_......_._..._...___ Director of University
6 Extension `
\ * Agricultural extension ...................f.f. Director of Agricultural i
  Extension  
@5 r
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, ii
  l

 CALENDAR Y
,7 1942 1943 1943
L July January July
J SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
----   .-.. 1 2 3 4 ....   ....   .... 1 2 ....   ....   1 2 3
567891011 3456789 45678910
12 131415 16 17 18 10 11 12131415 16 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 ·
3 ____   ____   ____   ____   ....   ....   ....
August February August n
....   ....   ....   1 ,... 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 `
2345678 78910111213 891011121314
9 1011 12 13 14 15 1415 16 17 18 19 20 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 __,_   .,..   ....   29 30 31 ,_,.   ....  
1d 30 31 ....   ....   ....   ____   ..._   ....   __,_   ____   ....   ....
)I,      
September March September
____ ____12345 ____ 123456 ____   ____ 1234 V
m 6789101112 78910111213 567891011 ,
w 13 1415 16 17 18 19 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1
X, 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
n_ 27 28 29 30 ..·.   ..-- 28 29 30 31 ....   .... 26 27 28 29 30 ....   _
October April October
....   ....   1 2 3 ____   ____   1 2 3 ____   ____   ____ 1 2
ty 45678910 45678910 3456789
1112 13 141516 17 111213 14 15 1617 1011 12 13 14 1516
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
25 26 27 28 29 60 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
....   ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   31 ....   ....   ....   `
Of N°V°mb°1' May November 4
1234567 ____   ____   ____ ___1 ____ 123456
891011121314 2345678 78910111213
1516 1718 19 20 21 9 1011 1213 14 15 141516 17 1819 20
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
.t 29 30 ....   ....   .... 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 ....   ....  
1Y ....   ....   ....   .... 30 31 1.2.   ..1.   _.,.   1.,.   ....   ....  
December June December
.... ....12345 .... ..,.12345 ....   .... 1234
1 6789101112 6789101112 567891011
13 1415 1617 1819 13 14 15 16 1718 19 12 13 1415 16 17 18
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
27 28 29 30 31 ....   27 28 29 30 ....   .... 26 27 28 29 30 31 ....

  
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  UNIVERSITY CALENDAR J  
»   1942-43 ,3
` - J
  Fall Quarter J
` ;i 1942
= September 21 Monday—Classification tests a n d p h y s i c a 1 J
  examinations for all new students
* 3- September 22 Tuesday afternoon—Freshman registration [
1 J September 23 Wednesday forenoon—Freshman classiiication
1 September 23-24 Wednesday afternoon and Thursday——Registra-
1   tion and classification of upper classmen
· [ September 25 Friday—Class work begins
Q p September 30 Wednesday—Last date on which a student may
’ rl enter an organized class `
j October 19-20 Monday agud §‘uesday—Period for filing applica-
, 1ons or egrees
`   November 26-30 Thursday 8 a. m. to Monday 8 a. m.—Thanksgiv- S
fl ing holiday
  December 8 Tuesday—Meeting of Board of Trustees
A December 19 Saturday 8 a. m.-—Quarter ends
. i 1943 Winter Quarter
` i January 4 Monday forenoon-—Classification tests and physical
i J 4 5 M elxamigations for éillrnexg stucgants f S
i ` anuary — on ay a ernoon an ues ay- egistration or
-   winter quarter
- 5 January 6 Wednesday—C1ass work begins S
{ January 13 Wednesday-—Last date on which a student may
  enter an organized class
-3 February 1 Monday—Period for filing applications for degrees S
t xarclg   22 ¥l£ursgay 88 a. m.—%uar1t/er Ends 8 S _
· arc - urs ay a. m. o on ay a. m.— prmg
  vacation
l
  Spring Quarter
I . . .
March 22 Monday forenoon—Class1ficat1on tests and physical
‘   examinations for all new students
€ March 22-23 Monday afternoon and Tuesday-—Registration and
I classification for spring quarter
§ March 24 Wednesday—Class work begins
  March 31 Wednesday——Last date on which a student may
  _ enter an organized class
1 ; April 5 Tuesday——Meeting of Board of Trustees
  April 19 V Monday-Period for filing applications for degrees
g May 26 Wednesday evening—Military graduation excr-
. ' cises
  June 3 Thursday—Baccalaureate services
g June 3 Th_ursday—Meeting of Board of Trustees
  June 4 Fr1day—Seventy—Sixth Annual Commencement m
  June 5 Saturday 8 a. m.—Quarter ends
lj June 7-12 Monday to Saturday—Junior Club Week Se
A *3
il ·
1
—J
i

 Summer Quarter
June 14 Monday—Registration for_first term ·
June 15 Tuesday—Class work begins .
June 21 Monday—Last date on which a student may enter ·
an organized class _ _
June 25 Friday—Period for filing applications for degrees
July 21 Wednesday—First term ends
July 22 Thursday—Registration for second term
July 23 Friday-Class work begins
July 26 Monday—Last date on which a student may enter
an organized class _ _ _
3 8] July 29 Thursday-Last date for filing applications for
degrees
August 28 Saturday—Quarter ends
tra- I I
REGISTRATION SCHEDULES FOR 1942-43
nay · Fall Quarter
ma` September, 1942
§iV· September 21 Monday—All freshmen and all other new students
will report in Memorial Hall for classification
tests and physical examinations. All fresh-
men and all new students, except those enroll-
ing in the graduate school, must have the
tests and examinations completed before they
will be permitted to register. The student .
will find it advantageous to report as early as l
ical possible after 8 a. m.
September 22 Tuesday, 1:30 p. m. to 4:30 p. m.-Freshman
f01` registration, according to an alphabetical ·
schedule.
September 23 Wednesday, 8 a. m. to 12 noon—Freshman classifi-
nay cation.
EES September 23-24 Wednesday afternoon and Thursday—-Registration
' and classification of all upper classmen accord-
ing ing to the following alphabetical schedule:
September 23 ~`
Wednesday afternoon ‘
ical 1:30 to 2:20-M through O
2:30 to 3:20—P through R
and 3:30 to 4:20—S
my September 24
Thursday morning Thursday afternoon
EES 8:00 to 8:50—T through Z 1:30 to 2:20—H through J
_G1__ 9:00 to 9:50—A through B 2:30 to 3:20—K through L
‘ 10:00 to 10:50—C through D 3:30 to 5:00—Miscellaneous
11:00 to l1:50—E through G A through Z
Freshmen who register late should register with upper class-
men in alphabetical groups.
September 25 Friday—Class work begins.

 .  
  I
§  
  Winter Quarter
  January, 1943
3 January 4 Monday foren·oon—ClassiHcation tests and physical
L examinations for new students. All freshmen
; and all new students, except those enrolling in
  the graduate school, must have the tests and
_ g examinations completed before they will be
: Q permitted to register. All new students
i should report to the Registrar’s Office for i
‘ , these tests and examinations.
"   January 4-5 Monday afternoon and Tuesday—Registration of
_ { all students according to the following
·   alphabetical schedule:
I   January 4
  5 Monday afternoon
Q `E 1:30 to 2:20——T through Z
# ‘- 2:30 to 3:20-S
j 3:30 to 4:20-P through R y
T Qi January 5
  Tuesday morning Tuesday afternoon
7 -; 8:00 to 8:50-M through O 1:30 to 2:20-C through D
. _ 9:00 to 9:50-K through L 2:30 to 3:20-A through B
. 10:00 to 10:50-—H through J 3:30 to 5:00-—Miscellaneous
_ e 11:00 to 11:50-E through G A through Z
P ` January 6 Wednesday—lnstruction resumed.
_   Spring Quarter
J i March, 1943
· i March 22 Monday forenoon—Classiiication tests and physical
Q examinations for new students. All fresh-
men and all new students, except those enroll-
  ing in the graduate school, must have the
, tests and examinations completed before they
4 will be permitted to register. All new
  students should report to the Registrar’s
_; Office for these tests and examinations.
g March 22-23 Monday afternoon and Tuesday—Registration of
  all students according to the following alpha-
1 betical schedule:
¤   March 22
—   Monday afternoon
  1:30 to 2:20-A through B
  2:30 to 3:20—C through D
g 3:30 to 4:20-E through G
  March 23
_   Tuesday morning Tuesday afternoon
Q 8:00 to 8:50—H through J 1:30 to 2:20-—-S
ri 9:00 to 9:50-K through L 2:30 to 3:20-T through Z
A " 10:00 to 10:50—M through O 3:30 to 5:00—Miscellaneous
3 11:00 to 11:50-P through R A through Z
Y   . March 24 Wednesday—Instruction resumed
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· S

 THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
The University of Kentucky is located at Lexington, an urban
community of about 65,000 population. It is a state-supported
institution operated under the direction of a board of trustees of
fifteen members. The membership of this board includes the
Governor, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Com-
missioner of Agriculture, ex officio, and twelve members appointed
by the Governor, three of whom are alumni of the University and
three, members of the State Board of Agriculture. The University .
is one of a number of institutions known as land-grant colleges
which were established by the Morrill Act of 1862 and which have ,
continued to receive federal assistance under the provisions of ,
this and subsequent laws relating to the teaching of agriculture
and the mechanic arts and the provision of agricultural experiment
stations and extension services in agriculture and home economics.
The University of Kentucky is on the appr-oved list of the
Association of American Universities, and is a member of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the
Kentucky Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is
accredited in its respective colleges or departments by the Associa- .
tion of American Law Schools, the American Association of Col- ‘
legiate Schools of Business, the American Association of Schools
and Departments of Journalism, the American Library Association, ,
the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Engineers’
Council for Professional Development.
The major function of the University is that of instruction.
For the performance of this function it is organized into the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture and Home `
Economics, the College of Engineering, the College of Law, the
College of Education, the College of Commerce, the Graduate
School, and a Department of University Extension. Residence ’
instruction is given through four quarters of approximately twelve
weeks each, the summer quarter being divided into two terms.
In addition to giving instruction to its student body, the Uni-
versity contributes to the welfare of the state through research,
experimentation, and public service. While all departments make
important contributions along these lines, certain divisions and
bureaus have been established specifically for these purposes.
Included in this group are the Experiment Station and the Exten-
sion Division of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics,
the Bureau of Business Research, the Bureau of Government
Research, the Bureau of School Service, the Bureau of Source
Materials in Higher Education, the Personnel Office, the Teachers
Placement Bureau, the Department of University Extension, and
the Department of Public Relations.

 -1
  14 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
4 The University of Kentucky began as a part of Kentucky Uni-
Qi . . . . .
j versity under a cooperative plan authorized by the legislature in
l` 1865. The purpose of this plan was to unite sectarian and public
  education under one organization. This experiment was tried for
  a number of years. In the meantime, the federal funds authorized
1 { under the Morrill Act were used to develop agriculture and
  mechanic arts in Kentucky University. In 1878, when the people
‘ —} of Kentucky decided to establish a state institution of higher
H i learning, the College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts was
;   separated from Kentucky University and reestablished on land
j_ Ei given by the City of Lexington and the C-ounty of Fayette. Thirty
I T years later the legislature changed the name of the institution to
: ; the State University of Kentucky, and gave it additional financial
g _ support. In 1916 the name was again changed, this time to the
  g present title, and additional maintenance was arranged by
. ‘ legislative act.
‘   ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
  Students are admitted to the University of Kentucky as fresh-
1 ·l men; with advanced standing from other institutions; as special
“ · students; and as auditors. Admission to certain colleges is also
_ _ _j ` governed by special regulations.
F   Applications for admission to the University should be made to
  the Registrar. Certified copies of high school credentials and of
. 4 work done in other institutions should be submitted to the Regis-
~ ii trar’s Office in advance of the registration period. Failure to file
I 1 credentials in time for checking before the registration period will
I i delay the student in arranging his program. All admissions, includ-
  ing those to the professional schools and the Graduate School, must
r be passed on by the Registrar’s Office. Students who come to the
  University without having had their admission approved, do so at
  their own risk. The University reserves the right to refuse con-
  sideration of applications not made before the beginning of the
  registration period.
` 3 Admission to the Freshman Class
  Resident Students. Residents of Kentucky who are graduates
  of accredited high schools will be admitted to the University on cer-
  tificate, provided they have fifteen units of high school work char-
.   acterized as follows. ·
ii At least ten of the units presented must be chosen from the
_ E English studies, the social studies, mathematics, the foreign lan-
Q guages, and the natural sciences, the last to include not more than
  one unit of general science. Within these ten units, the student
— ] must present three units in English, exclusive of journalism, public
  speaking, and dramatics. It is strongly recommended that the ap-
el
‘ l

 GENERAL INFORMATION 15
’r{i' plicant present one unit each of algebra and plane geometry, since he A
tn may wish to take many courses in the University for which these ~l
mc subjects are prerequisite. Should the student lack these courses as ·
for prerequisites for any of his college work, he will be required to take
Zed them in college without credit, thus delaying his graduation.
md One unit is the minimum credit accepted in any foreign lan-
ple guage, and one-half unit the minimum in any other subject.
her Double periods are required in shop, drawing, typewriting, and
vas other courses requiring no outside preparation.
md Admission to the University does not necessarily qualify a
rty student for admission to a particular college. In every case, the
dg? student must meet the admission requirements of the college in '
' which he is to enroll.
tg; Resident students who have graduated from unaccredited high ’
schools and those not graduated from high school may be admitted ~
as freshmen if, in addition to presenting the fifteen acceptable
units, they successfully pass the University classification examina- ‘
tions.
Sh- Students may be admitted either under the above plan or under
Zia} the regulations previously in force through the first quarter of
lso 1944—45.
Non-Resident Students. Students who are not residents of .
to Kentucky may be admitted when they meet the above requirements 1
of for resident students and when in addition they rank in the upper `
{is- two—thirds of their high school graduating classes. _
file
  Admission to Advanced Standing
E; Resident Students. A resident of Kentucky who applies for ad- ,
at mission with advanced standing is expected to present evidence
m_ that he is in good standing in every respect in the·1nst1tut1on last
me attended and in general is required to have maintained a standmg l`
of 1.0 in all previous college work. Where all circumstances seem ‘
to warrant, the student may be admitted on probation when his
standing is below 1.0. In no case, however, shall a student be ad-
mitted whose record is such that he would have been dropped at
tes the University of Kentucky.
,r_ The University does not disregard at any time or under any
u__ conditions college or university records in order to admit applicants
solely on the basis of their high school records.
he A transfer student is allowed only as many advanced credits as
n_ he can present quality points. Otherwise, work done at a fully
an accredited college or university is recognized credit for credit.
pt In order to be classified as fully accredited, a college must be a
{jc member of a regional accrediting association or it must be on the
p- approved list of the state university of the state in which it is

 Za? V ‘ I" 7
. si
rl
. ._]
`l
  ’ 16 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
  located. Advanced standing from an unaccredited college may Be
  obtained at the University only by special subject examinations.
yi Non-Resident Students. A non—resident who applies for ad-
ii mission with advanced standing must in all cases have maintained
.   a standing of 1.0 in`all previous college work. In other respects, the
A   requirements and conditions of transfer are the same as for resident
V 1 ii students.
` J   Admission as a Special Student
5 QQ A graduate of another university or college may enter the Uni-
Q   versity as a special student. Other persons may be admitted as
special students provided they are fully prepared to do the work
Q   desired and provided they are at least twenty-one years of age.
Q I Before a special student can become a candidate for a degree
1 ., he must have his status changed to that of a regular student. This
I ‘ may be done in one of two ways:
· i 1. Satisfying the entrance requirements for admission to the
3 freshman class.
  2. Completing in residence one hundred quarter hours of credit
I   with a standing of at least 1.5 in all work attempted.
,   Admission as an Auditor
_1   By payment of the required fees any person may be admitted
g to a class or classes as an auditor. A student regularly enrolled in
A A § any college must apply to the Dean of the College in which he is
—   registered in order to be an auditor. Other persons should apply
’ Q to the Registrar’s Office for admission. No credit can be given for
` Q a class audited, nor is the student permitted an examination for
  credit. No instructor is authorized to admit an auditor to any of
, his classes except on presentation of an auditor’s card from the
  Registrar’s Office.
4 Admission to Colleges and Schools
1
  College of Arts and Sciences. Admission to this college is
_ governed by the general admission requirements of the University
‘   outlined on the preceding pages.
I College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Admission to
Q this college is governed by the general admission requirements of _
  the University outlined on the preceding pages.
  College of Engineering. Admission to the freshman class of
  the College of Engineering is limited to students rated in the upper
T three-fourths on the University placement tests.
`   In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission
  to the University, the high school credits presented by the appli-
, ¤g cant shall include one unit in Plane Geometry, one-half unit in
  Solid Geometry, and one and one-half units in Algebra. If the
_   student lacks only the half unit in Solid Geometry, he may be
tl
 
li

 GENERAL INFORMATION 17
BB admitted, but this subject will be added to the requirements of
ms. the freshman year.
ad- College of Law. An applicant for admission to the College of
ned Law must offer ninety quarter hours (exclusive of physical educa-
the tion and military science) completed in residence in colleges other
ent than Law, nine of which must be in English. A standing of 1.0 is
the minimum qualitative requirement, but in other than excep-
tional cases an applicant will not be accepted unless he has main-
,m_ tained a standing of 1.3 on all previous work. While·there is no
as prescribed pre-law curriculum, the applicant’s record is evaluated
Drk in terms of its relationship to the study of law, and in terms of the
age requirements of the Association of American Law Schools. .
Teé College of Education. Admission to the freshman class of the
gms College of Education is limited to students rated in the upper ,
` three-fourths on the University placement tests. In order to trans-
fer to the College of Education from another institution or from
th€ another college of the University, a student must have a standing
of 1.0 or higher. The freshman applicant must meet the general
idit admission requirements of the University.
College of Commerce. Admission to the freshman class of the
College of Commerce is limited to students rated in the upper
three-fourths on the University placement tests. The freshman
;ted applicant must meet the general admission requirements of the _ ·
l in University.
B is The Graduate School. Graduates of fully accredited institu-
*DlY tions of higher learning may be admitted to the Graduate School -
for upon evidence of graduation and an oificial transcript of under-
f0Y graduate courses. However, such admission does not obligate the
' of University to accept all credit granted by the undergraduate school.
the When full credit is not granted, the student will be required to do
more than the normal amount of work to complete a graduate
degree. Applications from graduates of institutions not fully
accredited will be individually evaluated. However, students from
3 is such schools are encouraged to secure a bachelor’s degree from a V
sity fully accredited institution before applying.
. to FEES AND EXPENSES
S of _ Fees at the University vary according to the privileges granted
and the classification of the student; that is, as a resident, non-
; Of resident, full-time, part—timc, auditor, ctc. The following table gives
,p€1· the schedule of regular fees for each quarter. Checks are accepted
by the University in payment of fees, room rent, and board, if they
mm are made out for the exact amount due. That is, no money is
p1i_ returned on a check. In transmitting funds to students, drafts,
3 in money orders, and certilied checks should be us