xt7sn00zs974 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sn00zs974/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660207  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  7, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  7, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7sn00zs974 section xt7sn00zs974 Imidc Todafs Kernel
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Centennial Boll poses dress
Peg. Tfcree.
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UK student and religion: faqe

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pol- cy: Pog Four.

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Vol. LVII, No. 76

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Slty OfKctltUClCy

LEXINGTON, KY., MONDAY, FEB. 7,

19C6

Eight Pages

Not A Candidate

For SC President,
O'Brien Declares

fly TERENCE P. HUNT
Kernel Managing Editor
Student Congress Vice President John O'Brien Friday ruled
himself out as a presidential candidate in the
upcoming Student
congress elections.
In an interview O'Brien also sity . . . and most of the time
leveled charges of "negatavism all we hear (concerning them)
and sensationalism" against this is criticism and personal ven- dettas."
year's Kernel Editor-in-chieWalter Grant.
"I think a free press, espeO'Brien admitted he had let cially a free student press, is
it be known last semester he was one of the most wonderful things
interested in running for presi- the nation and the University
Transylvania College Professor William Thompson ship Conference,
dent. .."even to the point of can have, but when it is misused
emphasizes a point at Saturday's Freshman Leader
to the point of abusiveness, then
making a near selection of running mate," O'Brien said. But, it should not be tolerated,"
after considering the election,
O'Brien added.
The Kernel has recently critO'Brien said he decided he had
adminexhausted his ideas for Congress icized the Miller-O'Brie- n
istration and Student Congress
action.
O'Brien, who recently was members, charging them editorially with "provincialism."
closely identified with Congress'
"If this year's editor should
withdrawal from the National
By JANE MARSH
based on assimilation original
Student Association, said inter- try to succeed himself," O'Brien
Kernel Staff Writer
thought needs to be stimulated,"
nal matters of Congress were not warned, " I would urge a strong
William Thompson, professor he said.
form of of drama at
relevant to his decision.
protest, possibly in the
Transylvania ColThompson and Mr. Robert
"Although this is not a rea- a student protest, which I would
lege advocated
"original Shanon, professor of art at Lexbe happy to lead myself.
son for my not running," O'Brien
thought" Saturday at the Freshington's Transylvania College,
man Leadership Conference.
,said, "I would centainly hate to
Continued On Pare 8
"In our process of education directed the conference sponserve as president of the student
sored by the campus YWCA at
government with the present
the Presbyterian Center.
TOll01"as" editor of the student
There purpose in the exercises
newspaper.
was to teach the technique of
O'Brien charged "this year's
involving everyone in the group
editor is a sensationalist and a
into the problem, drawing their
negatavist in the sense that there
interest, and making them think
are many people who work hard
constructivily toward the purand try to make a constructive
pose of the group.
By RICK STEPHENS
contribution to the Univer- Kernel Staff Writer
Mr. Shanon said that in such
How consistent is Hugh Hefner's philosophy and his magazine?
a short period of time (the conWhat do the women think of Playboy? What are some of the ference lasted six hours) nothing
substitutes for his philosophy? Does this philosophy fill a gap in can be concluded as to the efof the program.
fectiveness
many college men's lives?
"Awareness is essential though,"
These questions and many leaders and participate in an
he said.
more will be the concern of a
activity," Mr.
d
to be Leak said.
The professors worked with a
program
held each Tuesday night in Febvoluntary "control group" for
The first of the Playboy Philosintitled "The two nights prior to the SaturSeries,
ruary from 8 p.m. in Room 204 ophy
day session. In this groupwere
of the Student Center.
Playboy Philosophy,"
Changing
Don Leak, University YMCA will feature Mr. Leak as the Mike Farmer, Earl Bryant,
Richard
G. Bryant,
Nancy
advisor, said the program "is speaker.
Storey, Mary Alice Shipley.Julie
first prodesigned to meet the activities
Accompaning this
Hanson, Peggy Cooley, and Larry
gram will be a discussion of the
requirement of the social fraterCrigler.
should be of particular purposes of the series and the
nities and
interest to this segment of the benefits that hopefully can be
Such questions were discussed as what are the shapes
gained from its presentation, Mr.
University."
of the primary colors and what
"Freshmen especially should Leak said.
find this program interesting beThe consistency with which toy would make a good dessert?
Julie Hanson, student cocause it will afford them an op- Hefner has printed his magazine:
to consider social life featuring the "Playmate of the ordinator of the conference, said
portunity
and educational goals as well Month," the jokes, and the that the purpose of these type
questions was to develop a
Continued On Pace 2
as a chance to meet some campus

N

f,

'

J
sponsored by the campus YWCA.
The Kentucky Kernel

Original Thought Is Important,
Freshmen Learn At Conference

YMCA Series To Air

Playboy Philosophy

extra-curricul- ar

YMCA-sponsore-

7--

i

Misty
Johnny Mat his
charm
pletely
audience here
reviewer says.
picture on page

failed
his

to comconcert
Friday night
Story, another
two.

sonally.
Mr. Thompson said that dignity in self and personal responses to the world around us
were primary goals of the conference,
"It is an experiment in
breaking up the required
,

cur-ricul-

and letting the student
think for himself," Mr. Shanon

said.
Both professors thought that
such a program should become
part of freshman orientation and
should be a two or four-wee- k
course of eight hours a day.
"The most important thing is
concentration of time," said Mr.
Thompson.
When asked what she thought
of the confernece, YWCA advisor,
Peggy Cooley, said, "I didn't
know what to expect. I think
it was very successful."
She said it was very different
in structure and accomplishments from last years conference. This is the second year
it has been held.
Anyone could participate in
the conference, and 21 attended.
They were Jane Cannon, Barbara Griffin, Linda Martin,
Sandy Alford, Pat Wykstra,
Bobby Cannon, Joe WesterfieM.
Betsy Coleman, Roger Talley,
Al Master, Suzanne Myers, Colleen McKinley, Thomas M.
Powell, and those in the control
group.

College Editors Discuss War With New York Senator

RFK Makes Plea For Viet 'Assistance
said both Peking and Hanoi think
the U.S. is ready to give up the
struggle.
The New York senator predicted it would be a long time
before Communist leaders realize
the United States would stand
Conseby its committments.
quently, he forecast a long, hard
struggle in Vietnam.
Discussing a peaceful solution
to the conflict, Sen. Kennedy said
assistance.
When the Vietnam struggle he thought President Johnson had
becomes a U.S. war rather than conscientiously tried for peace.
a conflict among the Vietnamese He said he would be in favor
people, we have reached a sad of letting the National Liberation
Front be a part of negotiations
state. Sen. Kennedy said.
Speaking to 250 college editors to end the war.
He repeatedly
at a meeting of the U.S. Student
Press Association, Sen. Kennedy his feelings that the U.S. war
By WALTER GRANT
NEW YORK -- The major emphasis in Vietnam should be
shifted from military aid to social,
economic, and political development, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy
said here Sunday.
Sen. Kennedy said he felt
the U.S. committment in Southeast Asia must be maintained at
all costs, but the United States
must realize its role is one of

Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

sensual awareness and perception which can be applied per-

would not be won by military
means.
Sen. Kennedy's statements
were a result of questions from
the editors. He did not present
a formal speech.
Asked about his feeling toward groups opposed to U.S.
Vietnam policy, he said, "They
have a right to speak."
He added, howev er, that some
of them have weakened their
position by the way their protests have been handled.

In regard to draft policies,

Sen. Kennedy said political
sent by students does not
stitute valid grounds for

discon-

Sen. Kennedy showed great
compassion for the poor in his
comments. He lamented that p r
people suffer most from the Vietnam war.
Discussing the possibility of
Red China to the
United Nations, the Senator said
Red China's admittance will '
accepted by the American people
at the right time. A relationship
between the U.S. and Red Chit, i
is inevitable, he added.

admitting

In closing, Sen. Kennedy said,
"All Americans have a responsibility for those who are less
well off." He called upon the
editors to be leaders in changing
the world.

* ---

kLVnCkV

THE

Mcoda-.-.

KERVLU

I

f.

7.
1

f

f

Mzxeri Emotions, Not Magic

Fill Mathis Show Audience
tj ;ohn ZXH
Gii.ri:
rr
i:uth: J:iL:L

:oorf J.

t

It's

n:?st

Mith.

:corrf J

j.jit
iv

Fnii

ils: r.i.:

ttj:Ltr
Lrt

rr-- Ktj

iij. rn:rrr.iri;--

al-t-

h

1

x

h:

.

TL iudaftiZt of
polite, hut LrJ nnre.
:n.tj:c and i;7jlius

eves

"

r

'

i

Sti.ridr;

Lit that

Miri:n.i
.
hx thrs id a
irr3th SliririrJ pei.sfid.

Krry

sTt

the

But there were Liphpointi.
Tbe Mathis ten too of "Maria"
frora
est Side Star?" it ir
f;rp-ttih- eMatHs L:ts He
"CizT "Giirxet .re." and
"It's Not For Me To Say" were
recc'csized
after
the rvt few bar. -- Sweetheart
Tree." the titie oc g froa Mathis
lit erf alinrs, is a cieL'fbtful Icre

ai

apf-laude-

wcr scperbh daoc

The other scis in the ourj
rirtTs repertoire niile up an

ih!e
iriet.
5kh irmr j,acp as "On a Gear
Day" and Robert Coulet's
"Carre Back To Me are
with old
Lie "Daxrjy
&: " arjd "The Lady is a Trarnp.
This is orJ) a iarrpLr:; cf Lis
tremejdous ring.
Mathis brour
a
with
Srjup caljid "Ojt Vcurg Cer
ilrrjort

crie-he-

fates

JOHNNY

MTHIS

Playbov Talks Set
Cnissrf
piiyr-it- e

Frvm Paj

of the

is actual

1

tir"

.od interviews
jrvbibh-br,r.tritfed with his phdov.piy
m-- JJ

th

e

15

ire any

is ;t

atiH-ahl- e

substitutes for Lis
y
that will provide as oucii
wJi be meaning to its followers will be

verges

The Feb.

read it ill'
Wnetber there

read, or

pro-gar-

pholcrs-opb-

Laves
in atierr.pt to express Low women of thetia led in the final program
series.
the zzAginr,. Do they rea.d
';rw

t'

Are they envious of these
omen who are featured irj it?
YZZY
Cooley,
University
YWCA adtLsor, will lead a panel
or girh Lq this program
titled:
"Women 1ewing Pia)boy."
The third program in the senes
iU involve an effort to jcus
he iriluerce of FiiV(y on the
"I.'ege cirrous. Hew extensively
. , :ne rr.aaz: ,e read by college
rr.ren and omerJ' Ii there an effort
oo the part of
trr.it' men to
'e i "pla)bcy" on campus"? Is
t:.e magazine i good one to p--t
u? irj the lounge during i big
oirt'' How much of the mag--

;45,

AJt
M

rry

.

v4

f

ii
TT1 fV.

Dofeip

C3

-

U
.

JLiV

. ii

imiiuum

tfe

Mariui perfxmanc. CaerrKm
:
Myroorial Coliseum limply tar-dthe sound achieved
reproduce
ta the recordin? studio and relayed through a stereo recwd
player.
A
fnm anwherc except
the rst few rows can't match
witchir; MathJs on television.
No curtain and other stage
Lrutatioss prevented creation of
l
erTects. The crystal ball
which bus; rrjysteriouslyoverthe

until hit head reachet knee-leveHit accolades to the orchestra.
although probably deserved,
seem false.
On the financial tide, Mathis
took with him a little over $10,000.
About 13,500 from Saturday's concert, and profiti from the April
16 Kingsmen show will bolster
the Little Kentucky
Derby
Scholarship Fund.
l.

ipe-coa-

A Retiexc

Ends Tuesday
$on

Conntrj at Jamts Bond

in THUNDERBALL'

stage ustil late in the concert

is usually out of sight until time
for use. The illusion of moving
stars it flashed on the background
is orJy one of several effects
created on a regular stage.

12:00,

220, 4;45, 7:15,

9:40

2 DAYS ONLY!
WEDNESDAY tiiXi.
THURSDAY 5,J.T,M

Regardless of the limitations
and what can be called a cold
performance, Johnny Mathis'
voice is still majestically magical.
His stage presentation leaves
something to be desired, but it's
an improvement over past years'.
Taking a bow, Mathis borders
on the ridiculous, bending over

Laurence Olivier
AS

Othello'

IN COLOR

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WITH COt'POV OF ID.

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The four boy s arid fo-j-r
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They are xur.rr. however, and
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Feb. 7,

196G- -3

Black Tie At Centennial Ball
Poses What To Wear' Question
By BLITHE RUNSDORF
As the calendar

gown will be appropriate for this
very special occasion.
Since it is still
gown materials offer greater variety than do spring formats. The
only material that may not be
quite right for this fete is linen
although a heavily appliqued
linen may be perfect.
The Tightness depends almost
entirely on the gown itself. Generally, though, faille,
velsilk and
vet, and jersey or synthetic
jersey-blend- s
suit the Centennial
occasion.

approaches
the night of February 19, students begin to furrow their
brows and mutter about the
BIG question: "What to wear
when the invitation says black
tie.
Black tie, the dress designation that demands a tuxedo for
men and, generally, long gowns
for women, will be in order
for the evening as the second
annual Centennial Ball dances
to the sounds of Lester Lanin's
Society Orchestra from 10 p.m.
until 2 a.m.

mid-winte- r,

peau-de-soi-

e,

e

matching

bow-ti- e

and

cumber-bun-

d.

Starched white shirts with
studs complete the attire. Today , however, tux jackets are
available in a variety of colors,
from light blue to
d
burgundy, anyone of which is
acceptable for a black-ti- e engagement.
For the slightly more convention-minded
a little dash and
personality can be put into tux
wear by adding a tie and cumber-bun- d
in plaid, striped, or
figured design. Shirts with lace
or frill fronts lend a flattering
touch to all formal outfits and
are good background for displaying stud sets.
Black-tiwhile specifically
an indication for male attire,
(ettiquettests assume that women inherently know what to wear,
where) tells women that a long
silver-threade-

long-form-

e,

motion of academic excellence,
the active linking between law
students and practicing attorneys, the promotion of high professional and ethical standards,
and the planning of an active

Delta Theta Phi, national law
fraternity, has granted a charter
to 29 members of the University
College of Law.
The new chapter, to be known
as the Alben W. Barkley senate,
lists its goals as the stimulation
of learning experience, the pro- -

social program.
Charter members are: Charles
Bedell, Denny Bricking, Steve
Cawood, Fred Cohen, Jim Crary,
Sid Douglas, Gordon Finley, Bob
Callenstein, Keen Johnson, Bill
Knapp.
Orson Oliver, Jim Pate, Bob
Patton, Mel Price, Clyde
Richardson, John Richardson,
Bill Rivers, Kendall Robinson,
John Seelie, Charles Shackelford,
Dick Stevenson, Carl Swanger,
John Thompson.
Winn Turney, Bob Vance,
John Vigor, Norrie Wake, Jim
Welch, and Ron Wheat.

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Simply, gloves should be kept
on unless you are eating, drinking, or smoking. With short
gloves, remove one glove only
and hold in the opposite hand.

EM "TED

Cor. Broadway & Short St.
and 1081 New Circle Rd.

Long gloves are often provided with three buttons at the
wrist; since they are awkward
to remove. To free your hand
unbutton the wrist buttons and
remove your hand through the
space lift. Roll the hand portion
underneath the glove length at
the back of the wrist and your
hand is freed for use.
Cown length is a detail that
often harasses the best of us.
Formal gowns should not brush
the floor, but should, at maximum length, brush the instep
of your foot when you are
wearing heels.
Occasionally an independant-thinkin- g
gentleman will want
to attend a ball in full dress:
tuxedo pants, cutaway-taile- d
shirt, and
jacket, wing-collbow-tiFull dress attire can
provide some problems if you
are a first-tim- e
wearer, so before
the grand metamorattempting
phosis, check with a tailor or
other expert for the correct attire.
c.

al

Law Fraternity Initiates

b.

Gowns with sleeves present

unusual gloving situations but
a good rule of thumb here is,
the longer the sleeve, the shorter
the glove.
Glove etiquette is bothersome
in the least and completely unmanageable in the extreme.

Jewelry should definitely be
kept to an almost bare minimum.
Formal occasions are not the
time to display all the charm
bracelets you own; heirlooms
that Crandma left you might be
better left at home on this night;
and since you will have gloves
on, those heavy dinner rings are
much more suited to heavy dinners.
A single strand of pearls may
be all that is needed to finish
the flattering affect of
feminine attire. Jewelry
is never worn on top of gloves.
Gloves are often a problem,
both in their selection and
knowing what to do with them
after you have tham on.
Sleeveless
and strapless
gowns can take almost any length
of glove; from the wrist length
shortie, to the extra long
length and all the
.
The long
lengths
glove in either white or black,

tuxedos are
or black with

Traditionally,
midnight-blu-

e,

depending on your gown, is the
most appropriate, however.

isn't hard
when you let
Cliffs Notes
be your guide
Cliff's Notes
expertly summarize and
explain the plot and
characters of more than 125
major plays and novels -including Shakespeare's

With the "what to wear,
when" problem solved, the next
lesson needed might well be titled: "The waltz and its vari-

ations."

works. Improve your

Waltzing, in this day of loose-limbgyrating is an all but
forgotten art which should be
taken out of mothballs along
with your formal wear. Tuxedos
and formal gowns just do not
lend themselves to all that
jerking, fruging, monkeying, and
g
but oh, how they
love to waltz!

understanding-an-

ed

Engagements
Ricki Verstermark, junior elementary education major from
Danville and a member of Delta
Camma to John Sanders, sophomore
major, also from
Danville, and a member of Kappa
Alpha.
Judy Jones, senior education
major from Mt. Side, New Jersey,
and a member of Delta Gamma
to Wally Pa gen, a recent graduate
from Bellevue and doing graduate
work at Xavier University.
pre-dent- al

Recently Wed
Bea Talley, junior German
major from Magnolia, and Bob
Mahan, senior engineering major
from Ashland, and a member of
Tau Kappa Epsilon.

wJAMlET

HAMLET

your

125 Titles in all -- among
them these favorites:
Hamlet
Macbeth
Scarlet Letter Tale
of Two Cities
Moby Dick Return of the
The Odyssey
Native
Julius Caesar
Crime and Punishment The Iliad Great
King
Expectations I Huckleberry Finn
Wuthering Heights
King
Henry IV Part
Lear
Pride and Prejudice
Lord Jim
Lord of
Gulliver's Travels
Othello
the Flies

hully-gullyin-

muff

$1

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jjj&r

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grades. Call on Cliff's Notes
for help in any
literature course.

at your bookseller

or write:

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JUiff&Hate
CLIFF'S

NOTES, INC.

Ittkjif SUtitt. Liacili.

Nekr. SIMS

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WITH ONE DOLLAR PURCHASE
Expires Feb. 10, 1966

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* 'Who's Gonna Slop Mc?"

Clear Policy Needed
The president of the student
Kxly it the University of Miami
Fla.) pointed recently with something sounding like pride to the
recent cheating scandal there,
casing it indicated an increased
quality in educational standards.
He added that evidence that
students were cheating indicated
Miami was losing its image as
'Suntan U" and was upping its
academic quality.
Contained within his statements is the innuendo that cheating
is an accepted correlate to high
pressure academicsan attitude we
feel is far too widespread.
This University, for example.
Las no clearcut policy on cheating.
It seemingly prefers to pretend that
nothing so "ungentlemanly would
occur on this campus.
Yet nationwide surveys have
shown that up to fifty percent
cf all college students admit to
cheating sometime during their
college career. It would take a
rather naive UK student not to
realize the blackrnarket in term
papers and other accompanying

material available to aid students
in courses.
Yet the University has outlined
no absolute rules on cheating or
on punishment for those caught
Detected cases are
cheating.
handled through a variety of
agencies the deans offices, by the
individual professors, or through
the Student Congress Judiciary
Board. It is hard to believe that
with so many different agencies
handling cheating cases that all
offenders are judged on the same
scale.
Cheating is an
undercurrent in the modern multiversity, but it is not one which
must be tolerated with a blind
eye. UK cannot continue considering it as a phenomena so rare
that it deserves no special regulation governing it in the wealth
of University regulations.
We think the University must
admit that cheating is a large scale
problem and at least must set forth
some guidelines for treatment of
those who are involved in its
various forms.
ever-increasi-

Slaughter On The Highway
Every week nearly a thousand
people die in automobile accidents
in this country. Although the driver,
the vehicle and the condition of the
: oad are
obviously factors in each
-- evident, not a
great deal is actually
Known about this dreadful phenomenon. Much less is known about
-- utomobile accidents, for
example,
than about airplane crashes, which
.ike fewer lives in a year than cars
Jo in a week. The American Trial
Lawyers Association does not exaggerate when it calls highway
,:eaths"the greatest unsolved murder mystery of our times."
The association has begun an
riucaticnal campaign to arrouse

Congress and the public from their
indifference and ignorance about
fatal highway accidents. It urges
Congress to enact a National Highway Safety Act that would establish
an agency to set minimum safety
standards for vehicles and uniform
requirements for drivers.
The association suggests that
three basic safetv devices be installed in everv car: shoulder harnesses, doors that will not open in
a crash, and collapsible steering
posts. We would add the further
suggestion that highway police
make spot checks to determine
w hether a driv er and his
passengers
are using their seat belts and
once available their shoulder harnesses; failure to use them should
count as "driving so as to endanger."
Rigorous regulations
against drunken driving have
proved successful in Sweden; why
not adapt them to the United
States?

Letters To The Editor

Reader Objects To Policy

concerning wordy comments, and
perhaps my letter did run on a
of the Kernel's current editorial bit in its original form. The result,
a
position. Either I have been grossly however, of this censorship was
staccato form letter which, so I
misinformed, or the Kernel editor
needs to review English 101. Since see it, distorted my view. I say
this because, while finding Col.
w hen do a punch line, a few
quotes
out of context, and paragraphs of Stephenson's remarks absurd and
the edited letter
derogatory statements joined by dangerous, (which
I did not wish to
got across),
faulty logic comprise an editorial?
seemingly associate myself with any
Starting with the latest slash, dissention
ideal, as the printed
"Wrong Approach to Peace", and revision seemed to do.
w orking backwards to
coverage of
The letter was written mostly
Student Congress, I find the
editorials in poor form, and more to voice the rights of citizens,
dissenters or not, to take stands
destructive than constructive.
fear
of government
More research is needed to peneBeing in line with a recent without
Kernel campaign, perhaps logical punishment.
trate this baffling, stubborn and
JIM WAINSCOTT
deadly killer. But while research is and more inclusive editorials w ould
A&S Sophomore
intensified, safer cars and high- do more to stimulate student
better-traine- d
drivers and interest in politics than crudely
ways,
relentless war on violators of the constructed sw ipes at people
trying
law can help reduce the death toll. to get intelligent,
rational, constructive programs going
ent
Ti KerTj! eiroJ
ner fn.. reaien n - - f io
c4 spce
vpr irrun receaved.
'
Congress).
to 3:t
te
to
orci..
rtfcen tr
'i.autt, jtrier
Then again, if the editor spent
tve iurrr
lor iumru. more time
tni co-t- c
jc: u?.tte
working on editorials,
tier.
tic cor.- rien. : ifguacA. A jer.r fc':'- -t
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and less time rolling in prestige,
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lert
cf Kr.:T. w
accurately
slaj i jcT. is
cite, iwc :J-- of tie
accused other BMOC's of doing,
the Kernel might regain the title,
The South's No. 1 College NewsTo The Editor of the Kernel:
I want to voice my disapproval

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suffered under the editor's blue
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connotation than I intended.
Manager
I sympathize with the alitor

Artj Editor

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Feb. 7,

UK

1906- -5

Student: Religious Interest Waning
take things seriously. They are
experimenting with what life
means, who they are, what they
believe, and what they are going
to do."

nyJUDYGRISIIAM

The religion or irrcligion
of today's college student is an
issue of'major concern to campus
ministers, administrators, interested laymen and scholars, and
student t. Many magazine
been written on the
subject, thousands of sermons
many
.preaoh$;5nd and hours spent
in searching
studying the
relation of the college student
to his religion.
The question remains unanswered today for the UK student and for those concerned with
the UK student, but it is still
asked: What is the role of
religion in the life of the student?

A

"Many people who react
violently to the institutionalized
church may indeed be very
religious," Mr. Boyd said in the
Mademoiselle Interview.
A national survey by Time
magazine in 1952 revealed "No
appreciable number of defections" and said those which do
occur "result from weak background prior to college than from
campus living and experiences."
The Rev. Calvin Zongkcr of
the Baptist Student Union said
Part one of a
series on religion aiid the UK that in his 10 years with UK,
the participation of students in
student, prepared by Kernel bis services has dropped from
0
Associate News Editor Judy
to
During this time
he also saw a change in the
Grisliam.
8 p.m. closing hours for freshThe Rev. Malcolm Boyd, men gjti and 10:30 p.m. library
former Episcopal chaplain at 'closing hours.
and now
Wayne University
On an informal questionaire
"chaplain at large" to college prepared by this writer and disstudents, said, "The spirit of tributed to freshmen students,
.the modrfacnopus is a skepti- one freshman said he felt "reto engender ligion shows an insecurity in
cism
d
not society" which is for "people
ieqjlhfc1' v
solve all bis who are not sure of their
r with aid of existence."
ijaj
Another freshman admitted
oir
do not attend
-his participation in church is
He added that ideas are things "more of a habit than anything
to be "tried and tested." (Madeelse," and another said he was
moiselle, August, 1963)
"more or less forced to go at
The Rev. Don Leak, religious home."
for the University,
Many complained of lack of
said, "Students are idealistic and time for religious activities.
five-artic-

)

.

le

140-15-

60-7- 0.

iliVUs

Xv?enls

W

"Inside Report"

i

-

"Sunday mornings are used
needed sleep," was

for much

one comment.

"I neglect my religious activities as I neglect many of the
things that are commonplace at
.home but are forgotten at school
because of hours of study," another said.
One student disagreed with
the views of the pastor of his
particular church here and sodid
not attend.
freshman
Another
asked,
"Being new in town, who knows
where to go?"
Nietzsche has said, "Cod is
dead. . . What are thesechurches
if they are not the tombs and
sepulchers of Cod?"
But w riter Michael Novak says
(Harper's, October, 1960), "Western Humanism is dead. Men do
not wander under the silent stars,
listen to the wind, learn to know
themselves, question 'Where am
.1 going?', 'Why am I here?' They
'leave aside the mysteries of contingency and transitoriness for
the certainties of research, production, consumption. So that
it is nearly possible to say, 'Man
is dead' . . . What
are these
buildings, these tunnels, these
roads if they are not the tombs
land sepulchers of man?"
"God, if there is a God, is
not dead," Mr. Novak said. "He
will come back to the colleges
when man comes back."
;

Next: Campus
the 'Problem'.

Ministers View

By Rowland Evans and Robert Novak

LBJ -Tries Internal Peace Move In Vietnam

WASHINGTON Alarmed
by the failure of successive "pacification" programs in South
Vietnam, President Johnson has
ordered highest priority for a

new, highly selective approach
to this vital part of the war.
Instead of the
pacification efforts of the past, the
new plan will put cadres consisting of up to 85 Vietnamese
experts in political organization,
health, agriculture, and sec