xt7sqv3c1q61 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sqv3c1q61/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky 1949 athletic publications  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Football Media Guides Kentucky Football Facts For Press and Radio, 1949 image Kentucky Football Facts For Press and Radio, 1949 1949 2015 true xt7sqv3c1q61 section xt7sqv3c1q61   9 _ ,
0*%/;/ J     ;;  
· r__ _ ·   '•\—"~\__4r,1  `».“$,
, ______A_ __ ___n   mV€¥$lfY Archiyés Pi  ..` Q
¥      ·.   'luh    M°'$‘"°* ‘·~ _ ;;§.ibv¤ry.., , ,..,___ 
; ‘ ,»  _ _ ,___ ”`" ‘ ’ i L U""’°    Kanmg  ···‘ ? ‘
· ·   A" %    ‘*“‘*‘··· “
  —»—  }   , J °"‘""°    . ¤*··=*·v  49;%    
* Z=igfi·¥  ‘    — dm'-   A    
f L7.;} vi  i ` _  _   f__ A"’  ¥y,1§¥;;)= _ ,   i "}
` S  (Ii. L-4   .  #’  J   V 4     T":  ,   V  
      /";  p¤"'*   %`*   V
`    T    ·. .·v‘  .f·· ·*4» ».~¢%>Z¥<  `*’°  , ‘,·,  
.· ._:~'.A _`   if     /R,/;-· _\   J  
   .$   I  h `*—;  
  I   ry   {   . .._  ;-N __;=_;{  
E -   g  *1/ - . ·  
    f        
 3;:},1   { ‘   4*   A 1*’ fi}  
 ·;?*-‘]   ·'* . M`:. °*      
 *·‘TT7‘=   ; jr  V  
       M ’ ` L_    ‘    z i      
*   Y  » V . Fm   ¥=¤”-`;·— f . gi  
     Y E         g.,        
._     ‘ Y       4 . Ei  
F   f ;‘· ‘ ,·i  *  ‘ ‘ Y ‘? §§é¤L· 
; ; gg E--·» sgaé, S
_ 1 ` _ M_ `  
""  ·—-.. _   rr-, ___ _r__ _r?m§TYf V 7 Q N  
FOV Press and R.;&E¤    

 CONTENTS
Facts About U. of K. .....,.....................,......,.............................A............... 'I
Information For Working Press & Radio ..........................................,...,. 2-3
1949 Schedule—194B Record ...........................................................,.... 3
The Bryant Story ...........,.........,...........,.....,.........,.................................... 4-5 j
Coaching Staff ....,..........r.......................,.................................................. 6 j
Kentucky Football Coaches Through The Years ........ ‘ ............................ 7 `
Headquarters On Football Trips .................. Z ........................................... 8
The Outlook For 1949 ..........,.......,.............,........... 1 ............................... 9-10
Summary By Positions . .............r.............................,. . ..................,............ 11
1948 Lettermen Lost, Returning Lettermen,
Squad Breakdown By Classes .....................,.....,,............................. 12
The Wildcat Offense .,,........................r......,.... _ ......................................... 13 `
Thumbnail Sketches ...................................... i .......................................... 'I4-22 <
Origin "Wildcats" Nickname ...................................,,....,....................,... 22
Pronunciations .............................. , ............................V . ............,................... 2 2
1949 Roster ....,.............,..............................................i . ........................... 23-25 H
Kentucky Statistics, 1948 .........................................................r.............. 26-27 l
Composite Opponents Schedule .........................,.............,...................... 28 1
Schedule Details ...............................,....,   ................r... , ......................... 29-36
Stoll FieId—McLean Stadium ............. 1 ....... Z .... z ..................................... 36-37
University of Kentucky (History) ........... J ......,..........................,.............. 38
Column Notes and Briefs .....,.................................................................. 39
U. of K. All-Time Football Record .......................................................... 40-45
Edited by Ken Kuhn
Sports Publicity Editor
SPORTS PUBLICITY OFFICE
TELEPHONES
Dept. of Public Relations Dept. of Athletics
205 Administration Bldg., Alumni Gymnasium i
2l89 • 2l80 2327 • 224] ¤
i l
Home Ph0ne—5633 · l
(Dial Number—2·8289)
I
Lexington, Kentucky f

 Facts About
The University of Kentucky
i I.()(JA'1`l()N-—l,exington, ai community ol 75,000 population, capital
of the thoroughbred horse industry, located S0 miles east of Louis-
1 ville and 85 miles south of Cincinnati.
FOUNDED—l865
ENROLLMEN'l`—Approximately 7.500
` PRESIDENT-—Dr. Herman L. Donovan
( VICE-PRES1DEN'I`—-Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain
F 1·`A(JUL'1`Y CHAIRMAN ()1·` A'1`I—lI.E'l'1(1S-l)ean r\. 1). Kirwan
A ATHLETIC DIRECTOR—Bernie Shively (Illinois 1927)
1 HEAD FOOTBALL COACH—Paul Bryant (Alabama 1936)
  ASSISTANT FOOTBALL COACHES—Carney Laslie (Alabama 1933);
Frank Moseley (.~\1al>ama 1934); joe Atkinson (Vanderbilt 1942);
( Ermal Allen (Kentucky 1942); Clarence Underwood (Marshall
_ 1938); and Ted I). Osborn (Ohio \Vesleyan 1931)
l 'I`RAINER—\·\’ilbert (Bud) Burger (Illinois 1941)
TICKET SALES MANAGER—Harry Dickerson
ATHLETIC CONFERENCE—Southeastern
NICKNAME OF TEAM—V\/ilclcats
STUDENT MANACER—Unis Saylor
EQUIPMENT MAN ACER-Harvey Brown
MAS(j()T—'I`he "(io|oncl" (:1 live Kentucky wildcat)
BAND——"Best Band In Dixie" (100 men)
SCHOOL FIGHT SONG—"On, On U. of  
STAD1UM—McLean Stadium on Stoll Field (Capacity——35,500)
J DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS—Raymond WV. (Jack) Wild
1 (Kentucky ’35)
5 SPORTS PUBLICITY ED1TOR—Ken Kuhn (Michigan State"42)
l
O

 l
Information For The 5
Working Press And Radio P
' l
y l
l `l`he Stoll Field press box, re—built entirely dttring the past summer  
I at a cost of more than $30,000, is believed to be one of the most modern l
in the country. Among the unusual facilities of this "eye in the sky"
are two unique press-radio lounges located on the second floor at both
y ends of the box, and heat—resisting, glare-reducing plate glass panels
Y slanted at an angle of approximately 20 degrees to increase visibility ·
of the field. Working spaces in the press section are 30 inches in width
V and radio crews have booths approximately eight feet square to work in. ~
The press section of the heated and ventilated box has two levels
occupying the first floor and the radio section is located on the second I
floor. Restrooms are located near the entrances at both ends of the
press box, which stretches between the 25—yard stripes, .
Admission to the press box is limited to male working members of l
the press and radio, statistical and clerical assistants, scouts, and certain g
other athletic representatives. Space assignment inquiries should be  
directed to the Sports Publicity Editor in care of either the Department `
of Public Relations or the Department of Athletics. University of Ken- l
tucky, Lexington. . l
Sideline passes will be issued to accredited photographers and as- =
sistants. Space for newsreel men and photographers working with tele- y
photo lens will be made available upon request to the Sports Publicity l I
Editor. Complimentary press-radio tickets for seats in the stands are ;
awarded only by the University Complimentary Ticket (lommittee and ‘  
are issued prior to the opening of the season. L y
Radio stations desiring to broadcast l{entt1cky's home football con- ” Y
tests must first secure il permit from the University Radio Director.  
Address requests to Elmer (Q. Sulzer, University of lientucky Radio [
Studios, Lexington, Tickets will be issued to the working crew by the
Sports Publicity Oflice upon notification that a permit has been grant-
ed. Spotters are available to sportcasters if requested in advance. l
Kentucky’s current broadcast policy prohibits simultaneous television of l
home games. V
Newspaper and radio representatives should order their own line l
facilities through the Lexington Telephone Company and \Vestern i
Union to assure reservation of loops from the press box. Hotel reser-
vations also should be made direct. Among the better hotels are the
Lafayette, Phoenix and Kentuckian, all in downtown Lexington and ·
within -a few blocks of the stadium. All assistance possible will be ren-
dered by the Sports Publicity Office. l
Programs, brochures, current rosters on both teams. mimeographed {
` running play-by-play accounts, halftime and final individual-team sta-  
[ 2 ]
l

 I
‘ I; tistics, substitution and scoring summaries, and other pertinent infor-
I mation will be supplied the working press and radio. Starting lineups
. will be announced over the Public Address system and may be cheeked
, against the probable starters listed on the center spread of the program.
I Mimeographed explanation of band maneuvers and halftime entertain-
I Hlellt also will be distributed.
I Refreshments will be served to your seats at halftime and coffee or
coca cola may be obtained anytime from the attendant. Outside tele-
phone service is available.
\I\’hen leaving the press box. please use the ramp in Section O
· directly below the press box \\’est entrance. The press gate opposite
the lower end of this ramp will remain open until all persons have left
. the box.
I `I949 Schedule
Sept. IT Iventuckv vs. Mississippi Southern ..........ll.... Here  
I Sept.24 IventucI;v vs. I..S.lI.* ............,l.. Baton Rouge. l.a.  
I Oct. I Iientuckv vs. Nlississippi’* ,,,......_............i. Oxford. Miss.
I Oct. 8 Iientucky vs. (}eorgia** ........i................... Here (N-HC)
_ I Oct. I5 Kentucky vs. The (Zitadel ................................ Here  
( Oct. 22 lientueky vs. S.I\l.U. .................................. Dallas, Texas
( Oct. 29 lventucky vs. Cincinnati ......................i........... Here (D)
I Nov. 5 lventucky vs. Xavier .............i.............. Cincinnati. Ohio
I Nov. I2 lientuckv vs. l·`loritIa’* .......................... Tampa, Fla.  
L Nov. ISI Kentucky vs. Tennessee’* ..............i......................... Here
° I Nov. 25 Kentucky vs. Miami (Fla.) ............ Miami. Fla. (N-Fri.)
L , * Southeastern Conference Games (N) Night Games
A   (HC) Hoinecoining (Laine (1)) l)ad`s Day (Fri.) liriday Game
I; Home Gaines Start—2 l’.)I. (CST) l)ay—8 l’.1\I. (CST) Night
  'I948 Record
I Ky. Opp.
48 Xavier (Ohio) 7
7 Mississippi 20
I I2 Georgia 255
7 Vanderbilt 26
I 2:3 Marquette 0
28 (lint innati 7
I III Villanova I3
Zi I I·`Iorida - I5
U Tennessee II
I 25 Miami (Fla.) 5
} 100 IQ?
` \\`on 5 » Lost EI — Tied 2
I ”” See Inside Back (lover For l"l`CSl]lI11\ll Schedule
I
[ 3 ]
I

 Y
I he Bryant Story =’
‘  rr»V· ·           f      ;‘§TZ
‘     °``   §’°;j` \.‘·  
    _g‘’  
  .._. V    
  »   »_-· ,. ·  
    _ · "    as ’
  `  ev: y-,;   ·  
      . _      ..      
       
         
  ,    »` '   ’‘‘·. r r ;‘1~=·· [ 
   ~  `*r~‘ 1 — i   
    `‘`;        —
r 5_z·=;·- \   ~ - ,,,   ji  »;._;f';~·`iQ·
  V   * #*“?#*'*—§
    *·  wwe? **,2;- l
,..¤r.¤>.~c.· ··f‘2=.>~’g,»·»_  .· ;.-—r ‘ »r
    i ;§i..?$;;,.·. gi _
é·’¢i‘& *2.`·‘— _    ,_ ; 3, ( t,,,,Q ~ ».;:'»?`g,>_l Y , . i
     qa , gl  ;   1
  2*    ...__§§· ; { s  ;ft§Q=il¥y3L“,‘~, 1
   ‘¤ ‘%*,;===¤=21l1  ;  »;gi%;S>‘e<>* il
   ..  se.   1 ~  waiite 1
*2  ·    ?l§l%?ylg§¢   `lxl/§?·_z*t*,osition des Jite numerous dif- 1
. l
Hculties. —
Bryant took `ust one vear to accom >lisl1 the near-miraculous feat
, J , l ,
of re-building the sliattered foundations of Kentuckv football into a
solid front that resulted in a season record of seven victories against
three defeats — the \Vildcats` most successful campaign since 1912.
Calling upon his wartime service experience. Coach Bryant consolidated »
the gains and launched an even more startling attack during 1947 that
saw the 'Cats roll up another impressive 7-Ii record for the regular '
season and then add a thrillinr 24-I4 victorv over Villanova in thc
Great Lakes Bowl maugnral at Cleveland -— Iventuckvs lirst bowl
appearance.
Minus the services of nine players from the starting eleven and live
more from the rest of the 1947 squad. the Kentucky team of last season
f 4 l `
l

   nevertheless proved the surprise of the league. No one seriously ex-
` pected the 1Vildcats to provide more than token trouble and were about
lu write them off as a threat after three early season losses, But the
experts failed to count on the spirit instilled by the resourceful Bryant,
j lirazenly benching three of his top backfield stars, the \=Vildcats’ head
` mentor jerked his charges out of their defeat lethargy enough to com-
plete the remainder of the schedule without a setback. The record
stood at 5-3-2 and the defeats came at the hands of the three teams who
tinished first, second and fourth in the conference standings.
_ Bryant’s three—season record of 20 victories against nine defeats and
i two tie games- the best in Kentucky football history for a three-year
period since a 23-5-1 total was made in 1909-11 — has attracted wide
attention. He has been mentioned prominently in speculations on the
successors to head mentors at larger schools and in the pro ranks. The
latest outcropping carrie last December when Bryant was rumored as
the "odds-on-choice" to become head coach of the professional \Vash-
_,j ington Redskins. However, he rejected the bid (which reportedly was
for an eight—year term at double his present salary) to remain at Ken-
` tucky.
i Bryant came to Kentucky in 1946 from the University of Maryland,
-; where he had served as head gridiron coach for one year after having
l been released from the Navy. During that year he produced the
i Maryland school's best l`ootball record in history—six victories, two
V losses and a tie.
I THE BRYANT RECORD
`Won Lost Tied
i Head Coach Maryland 1945 6 2 1
j Head Coach Kentucky 1946 7 3 0
. Head Coach Kentucky 1947 8 3 0
j Head Coach Kentucky 1948 5 3 2
` 26 11 3
~ A native of Fordyce, Ark., Bryant starred in football and basketball
while attending high school there. Later, at the University of Alabama,
he starred on the highly successful Crimson Tide elevens of the 1933-35
period including the Rose Bowl team of 1935. Playing the end opposite
‘ the famed Don Hutson, he failed to gain significant attention from the
_ press and fans but Coach Frank Thomas chose to retain him as an
assistant following his graduation.
{ After four seasons with the Tide, Bryant moved to Vanderbilt as
line coach and spent two years with the Commodores before leaving for
the Navy in 1941. Following a training period, he went overseas to
Africa and remained there until released as a Lieutenant Commander
in 1945 just before the football season opened.

 1
t
1
O 11
The Coaching Stuff 1
`1
CARNEY LASLIE _ . Like Paul Bryant is a University of Alabama 1
, product and a former Rose Bowl star for the Crimson Tide . . . Laslie
lettered three years at ’Bama ’5(), `fll and ’E’»2 . . . ln ’32 he played on 1
the Tide eleven which won a 24-0 decision over \~\’ashington State in 1
- the Pasadena classic . . . Remained at .·\l2ll)}l11l2l as an assistant for o11e 1
1 year after graduating . . . Then he became head f`ootbal1 coach at the 1
Blytheville, Arkansas, high school _ . . His teams went undefeated for  
` three seasons and then Laslie went to V.M.1. as line coach. . . l·`rom the  
1_ Lexington, Va., school, Laslie entered the Navy . . . \Vhile in the Navy.
he coached the North Carolina Pre-Flight eleven . . . Released to in- 1
active duty after three years service with the rank of Lieutenant Com-
mander . . . joined Bryant at Maryland a 1`ew days before the 1945
season opened . . . Came to Kentucky in 1946 when Bryant was named 1
head coach . . . Specializes in coaching the tackles . _ . Married and has ;
a 12-year—o1d daughter.
FRANK MOSELEY ...l A native of Montgomery, Alabama . . . Quar- 11
terbacked the Tide elevens in 'fll. ’52 and   . . . Played two seasons 1
on the same Alabama teams as Laslie . . . Came to Kentucky in 1934 1
and served as backfield coach under Chet \Vynne and Ab Kirwan . . . 1
Entered the Navy in '42 . . . Served as gunnery ofhcer aboard the air- ’
craft carrier Lexington with the rank of Lieutenant Commander .._, A 1
veteran of practically every battle in the Pacific . . . joined Bryant a 11
few days before the season opened at Maryland . . . and returned to I
the Bluegrass in 1946 when Bryant was named head coach , . . Spc- 1
cializes in coaching the backfield . . . Married and has a two—year-old 1
son . . . Called “Mose" by many. but "Bully" or "Chesty` by his old I
Capstone acquaintances.  
  ATKINSON . . . \N1as a star guard with Vanderbilt from ’f19 to ~
’·1l . . . Bryant coached Atkinson in '40 and `4l when he was line coach 1
at Vandy . . . joe captained the ’~11 Commodore eleven . . . Entered
the Navy after graduation in `42 . . . Served 46 months . . . Skippered 1
a PT . . . Came to Kentucky immediately after his discharge in March, `
1946 . . . Handles the varsity guards and serves as head Freslnnan coach 1
. . . A native of Lebanon, Tennessee . . . Married. 1
CLARENCE UNDERWOOI) .... -\ 1988 graduate of Marshall Col- 1
lege where he was a varsity guard for three years. . . joined Kentucky`s
staff early last year . . . Coached at Beckley, \¤\’est Virginia. high school  
from 1938-43 . . . Served three years in the Navy as a Lieutenant . . .  
Married and the father of two children. ,1
ERMAL ALLEN . . . Joined the Kentucky coaching staff after being 1
ruled ineligible after two games in the 1916 season in one of the South- 1
eastern Conferences most controversial cases , . . In 1947 Allen played
fé ] 1
. 1

 s
  professional 1`oot1>al1 with the All-American League champions, Paul
1 Brown's Cleveland Browns . . . lirmal was a T-quarterback for the
11 Brownies . . . \*\’orks with quarterbacks at Kentucky . , . Married and
1 is the father ol` two children.
1 Tlil) 1). OSBORN . . . ls the latest addition to the Kentucky stall, arriv-
1 ing in 19-18 lrom Akron Central High School. Akron. Ohio. where he
1 had been head basketball and football coach for 12 years . . . Osborn
l was graduated in 1931 from Ohio \\’esleyan, where he starred as a
1 hallback 1`or three seasons . . . Following his graduation. Osborn went
  to ()hio State in 1953 as a 1`reshman coach . . . Served during the war
1 as a Lieutenant in the Naw.
1 `l`hese coaches are assisted part-time by Bill l\·IcCubbin and jim
Iirooks.
  Kentucky Football Coaches
Through The Years
` Year Coach College \Von Lost Tied
` 1891 No Coach 0 1
l I892 jackie Thompson Purdue 2 21 1
` 1893 jackie Thompson Purdue —1 3 1
1 1894 \’V. P. Finney Purdue —1 1
v_ 1895 Charles Mason Cornell ·1 4
1896 Dudley Short Cornell 3 6
1 1897 Lymon 15. Eaton Cincinnati 4 4
1 1898 YV. R. Bass Cincinnati 7 0
1 1899 \·\1. R. Bass Cincinnati 5 2 2
; l90() \\’. 1-1. Kiler Illinois 4 6
1 1901 YV. H. Kiler Illinois 2 6 1
1 1902 li. N. McLeod Michigan $1 5 1
19031 C. A. \=Vrigln Columbia 6 1
1901 F. 13, Schacht Minnesota 9 1
` 1905 F. li. Schacht Minnesota 6 3 1
1 1906 _1. \\’l1ite Guyn Kentucky 4 3
1 1907   Yllhite Guyn Kentucky 8 1 1
1 1908   \#\’l1ite Guyn Kentucky 4 3
` 1909 li. R. Sweetland Cornell 9 1
1 1910 li. R. Sweetland Cornell 7 2
1 1911 P. P. Douglas Michigan 7 3
f 1912 E. R. Sweetland Cornell 7 2
1 1913     Tigert Vanderbilt 6 2
1 1914 Alpha Brumage Kansas 5 3
· 1915 _].   Tigert Vanderbilt 6 1 1
1 [7 1 A
1

 1 1
1
J Year Coach College Won Lost Tied [
 
1916 J. J. Tigert Vanderbilt 4 1 2 1
- 1917 S. A. Boles Vanderbilt 3 5 I ,
1918 Andy Gill Indiana 2 I 1
1919 Andy Gill Indiana 3 3 2
1920 W. J. Juneau Vllisconsin 3 4 1
1921 WV.   Juneau Wisconsin 4 3 1 `
1922 WV.   Juneau \1\’isconsin 6 3 K
1923 J. J. ll/inn Princeton 4 3 2 1
1924 Fred `J. Murphy Yale 4 5  
1925 Fred   Murphy Yale 6 3 J
1926 Fred   Murphy Yale 2 6 1  
1927 Harry Gamage Illinois 3 _ 6 I  
1928 Harry Gamage Illinois 4 3 1 ‘
1929 Harry Gamage Illinois 6 I 1 1
1930 Harry Ganiage Illinois 5 El 1
1931 Harry Gamage Illinois 5 2 2 1
1932 Harry Gamage Illinois 4 5  
1933 Harry Gamage Illinois 5 5  
1934 C. A. VVynne Notre Dame 5 5  
` 1935 C. A. VVynne Notre Dante 5 »1 1
1936 C. A. Wynne Notre I)an1e 6 4  
1937 C. A. \Vynne Notre Dame 4 6  
1938 Ab Kirwan Kentucky 2 7 11
1939 Ab Kirwan Kentucky 6 2 I  
1940 Ab Kirwan Kentucky 5 3 2  
1941 Ab Kirwan Kentucky 5 4  
1942 Ab Kirwan Kentucky 3 6 l  
1943 No team  
1944 Ab Kirwan Kentucky 3 6  
1945 Bernie Shively Illinois 2 8 ;
1946 Paul Bryant Alabama T 3 11
1947 Paul Bryant .\laba¤na 3 3 1
1948 Paul Bryant Alabanna 5 ll 2 1
l`otal W 193   l
Kentucky Headquarters On Football Trips 1
Louisiana State. Sept. 24 . . ..... Hotel Heidelberg, Baton Rouge. La.  
Mississippi. Oct. 1 ......._t............... ...Hotel Claridge, Memphis. '1`enn. 1
Southern Methodist. Ort. 22 ..........r......... Melrose Hotel, Dallas, Texas yl
Xavier, Nov. 5 ,,......................_ · ...,....... ( Libson Hotel. Cincinnati. Ohio 1
Florida. Nov. 12 .................................... Hotel Hillsboro. rl`2ll11])2l. Fla.
Miami. Nov, 25 ..................................,..... Hotel Shelborne, Miami, Fla.
[8 ]  
1

 l
l
l Bryant Year IV
I
y The Outlook For 'I949
l
"lientucky will field 2111 improved, 'spectacular' gridiron aggre-
gation for the 1949 season. . ."——Paul Bryant.
( Such an adrrrissiorr on the subject of team prospects coming from
{ an experienced collegiate football mentor in preseason sounds like
1 the epitonre of optinrisrrr. but lientucky's youthful T-formation di-
  rector has an explanation that lCll(lS the expected sobering note of
y qualification.
g The fourth edition of Bluegrass \Vildcats to perfornr under the
yl tutelage of the former .»\labama Crimson Tide flankman is almost
=l certain to be "spectacular"-—but only in the sense that it promises to
y display form to the liking of fans who dote on the "wide-open" br.tnd
l ol offensive play. Tl1e team will have sorrre personnel best adapted
1 to ptttting on a colorful. crowd-pleasing football show.
{ "\\'e may not win a lot of games. but we`ll look good even in
l those we lose," (Zoach Bryant asserts.
{ Facing a tough, ll-ganre schedule, the most extensive regular
l season campaign ever attempted by a \\’ildcat eleven, Bryant and his
  coaching assistants can Hut be pinned down to venture a prediction
  .>n how rrrany games the `(jats will win or lose. However, they cagily
lr admit to the possibility that their lientueky charges will be slightly
  improved over the outfit that "got up off the floor" in 1948. after
  three stunning, C2l]`l}’-$(321801] setbacks. to mark up a surprisingly strc-
l cessful 5-3-2 record.
  "ln llly opinion, the display of courage and character by the 1948
  team in fighting back after a poor early-season showing will con-
  tribute greatly to the morale and spirit of this year`s squad and our
- teams in the future. From a long range point of view. I believe we
ll progressed rrrore in 1918 than in either of the two previous seasons,"
` the licntucky head mentor poitrts out.
l Bununing up thc potcntialitics of the `·l9 Iicntuckyvlgrid aggre-
gation that should make lor tnrprovctncnt over the \\tldtat learn
’ ol last season. Bryant points to the lreartetring prospect of more rc
serve strength than at any time during his tenure at the Bluegrass
I sthool. Only seven letterrnen were lost from the 1948 tearrr and at
y least lll deperulable 11ew hands will appear on the scene from last
. ycar`s sttccesslul ycarling squad. .\ll hut one ol` the approximately
  Sill returnecs. who will ruakc up the nucleus of the |949 team. earned
l a "li" last fall or in previous years.
l Besides depth ol material. the Kentucky coaches are counting on
l greater all-around team speed and finesse during the coming season
stemming mainly front an additional year`s experience running off
the T-f()1`I112lll()1l. This intricate. tricky style of offense was adopted
  [9 ]
l

 + . I
ir
·‘
i in l9—l7 after Coach Bryant utilized a single wing system during his
4 first season as head mentor at Kentucky. Also contributing to the
speed and deceptiveness of the \\’iltlcats` running game will be the
` fact that the squad will be generally small i11 regard to weight and
height. but very little changed in this respect from last year.  
' Also on the positive side of the ledger. the 1949 Kentucky grid- I
ders will present a tighter front line defense due for the most part ,
` to capable. experienced linemen such as All-.—\merican candidate Bob
  (lain at tackle and (Zapt. Harry Ulinski at center. '.l`he \\'ildcats’
y secondary defenses. on the other hand. appear to be weaker and form  
` the biggest question mark in the defensive setup since several of the i
i men in these positions will be untested sophomores. y
In the aerial department. look for no "circus" but expect to see lg
more pigskin tossing than at any time during the past three years.  
The passing attack should be improved, most observers feel, despite °
the loss by graduation of ace passer-kicker George lilanda. Stepping  
into Blanda’s shoes. as both quarterback and number one passer. y
will be a triple threat sensation up from the freshman team of last l
season, Vito (Babe) Parilli. ()n the basis of his showing in I9·f8 as  
a freshman and his performance under fire in Spring practice games  
this year. Coach Bryant and his staff are counting heavily on the  
A sophomore speedster`s trusty right arm and unusual allied abilities  
as a kicker and runner. l
Much of the success that the Kentucky \i\’ildcats may be able to i
enjoy this season will depend to a great extent on the development  
of several promising sophomore prospects. such as l’arilli. ’|
Some of the difficulties and weaknesses faced by the Kentucky yl
coaches in the I949 team. in addition to the untested secondary. are ll
the lack of a superior punter of the Blanda calibre. undermanned i
tackle and end slots, and a tough schedule that calls for the \Vildcats 5
to face six major opponents on foreign fields. Kentucky is the only  
Sl·Z(Z team that meets all three top teams of the conference in the  
same season and the order in which the `(Zats catch certain teams, as  
well as the site (six games away and most of them in a hot climate) i
are definitely tnulesirahle.
I
l
noi  

 I
O I
SI.II11I1’1OI‘y   POSI'I'IOI1S
ENDS—Strength in depth lacking. . . The loss of stellar flankman
VVallace (\~Vah \*Vah) jones by gracluation will be felt strongly, but
l prospects are for a little better all-around end play tl1is season. . .
I Zaranka and Odlivak, both seasoned performers. should make left
end the strongest while sophomores Bruno and Bradshaw are leading
candidates for the right flank post.
TACKLES—\~\’eak beyond first line defenses. . .Despite tl1e presence
‘ at the left side of Bob Gain. an odds-on choice for .-\ll-.~\merican hon-
I ors tl1is season. and the veteran Lloyd McDermott o11 tl1e right, the
I team probably will be weak at tl1e tackles d11e to a lack of exper-
  ienced replacements. . .Pope and Vance are s11re to see service and
  sophomore john lgnarski, slated to play guard. 1nay prove :1 real dark
I horse if shifted to tackle.
II GUARDS—ShouId be strong. . ..-\ll five 1948 guard lettermen back
I led by Dick I-lolway, alternate captain for 1949. . .()pposite Holway
I will be veteran RG Pat james. . .lgnarski looks like top flight pros-
  pect. . .\1Vannamaker. Baldwin, Porter are sure to see action.
  CENTERS—Another potential trouble spot i11 tl1e line. . .(}apt. Harry
I Ulinski should be a great performer. . .Dot1g Moseley. a sophomore.
I is being C()l1Il[€(l upon heavily. . .Ford and Shafnitt also are available.
  QUARTERBACKS—Biggest question mark. . .lt`s almost a cinch
§, that an inexperienced sophomore will be running the ’·i9 \~’\’ildcats’
  offense. . . The loss of Blancla left a big hole to be filled, especially
II in the kicking and passing departments. . .Bryant is depending on
I* a great prospect. Babe Parilli, to fill the gap with help from Dom
` Fucci, tl1e only letterman in tl1is position. . ..·\lso seeing considerable
I service will be Bob Bezuk and Paul jones.
j LEFT HALFBACKS—Strong. . .Bill Boller and l)opey Phelps. who
  carried the brunt of tl1e 1948 attack, are both back and should reach
  new heights. . .Speed demon Phelps in l1is final year promises to
reach the heights predicted for him after his freshman season. . .
Star of tl1e Great Lakes Bowl game of 1947. Bill Boller will be es-
pecially dangerous if he regains l1is stride. . .Bobby Brooks. another
I speed merchant, also will be used extensively.  
I RIGHT HALFBACKS—l’ossibly the strongest position on squad. . . ‘
Leading contenders among tl1e bevy of talented 2lll(l experienced
I backs for the RHB position are jim Howe and Shorty jamerson with
close competition expected from sophomore Cliff Lawson and two-
I letter-man Dick Martin. . .Also up from the freshman team will be
Ed Hamilton and joln1 Cobb, who may develop as the season pro-
gresses.
FULLBACK—Also in good shape. . .From last year’s team there is
I Lee Truman, rated one of tl1e VVildcats' best defensive backs: Ralph
  ffl]

 l` Genito, Clayton \·Vebb and Harold Wlooddell . . . Hard—luck Bill Les—  
. kovar looks in physical shape and may be the dark horse to watch {
yl here. t
l 'I948 Lettermen Lost  
(Four By Graduation. Three Other Causes)  
`· George Blanda———Quarterback \iVallace jones—1ind [
{ Doc Ferrell-—Tackle Norm l{lein—Halfback
ii johnny Miehaus-—Halfback Frank Smother1nan—Tackle  
` Carl Genito—Quarterback  
  Returning Lettermen  
(Total of 30) l
ENDS: Ben Zaranka, Nick Odlivak, jerry Claiborne, Charles Brad- §l
shaw, Charles Bentley.  
TACKLES: Bob Gain, Bob Pope, Lloyd McDermott, \/Valt Yowarsky.  
GUARDS: Dick Holway, Bill Mlannamaker, Pat james, Bill Dawson,  
Ray Porter, Allen Hamilton} .
CENTERS: Harry Ulinski, Roy Ford, Bill Shafnitt. E
M BACKS: Dominic Fucci, Bill Boller, Bobby Brooks, jim Howe. \»\’il-  
bur jamerson, Dick Martin, Lee Truman, Ralph Genito. Harold gi
Wooddell, Clayton \Nebb, Bill Leskovar*. Don Phelps.*  
’”‘Lettermen ol previous years. §=
_ Squad Breakdown By Classes ..
(Ten Seniors——20 juniors—27 Sophomores)  
SENIORS: Dick Holway, Harry Ulinski, Ray Porter, Lloyd McDer- is
mott, Charles Bradshaw, Charles Bentley, Bill Boller, Don Phelps. ll
jim Howe, and Lee Truman.  
(Ten, Including six linemen and four backs) »,
jUNIORS: Ben Zaranka, Nick Odlivak, jerry Claiborne, Bob Gain, l
Charles Pope, Bill \Vannamaker, Allen Hamilton, Roy Ford, Bill i
Shafnitt, Harry Rogers, Pat james, Bill Dawson, \Valt Yowarsky, j
1)ominic Fucci, WVilbur jamerson, Dick Martin, Ralph Genito, Clay- .
ton \/Vebb, Harold \’Vooddell and Paul jones.
(20, Including 13 linemen and seven backs) (
SOPHOMORES: _john Netoskie, james Mclienzie, Chet Lukowski Q
john Baldwin, Edwin Burnett, Robert \/Verner, Doug Moseley, Bob  
Martin, john Ignarski, \Villiam Conde, \Vendell Vance, Frank Ful—  
ler, Al Bruno, Charles McClendon, Don Frampton, Emery Clark, `
james McConnaughey, john Griggs, Vito Parilli, Bob Bezuk. Ken 1
Knight. Bobby Brooks, Clifton Lawson, Ed Hamilton, john Cobb,
Bill Leskovar, and Ed Kozlowski.
(27, Including 17 linemen and 10 backs) {
,|
t121 l
l
l

 l The Wildcat Offense
5 SYSTEM—Kentucky will use the T-formation exclusively for the
1 third season. The VVildcats expect to employ the "two~platoon" system
I of substitution for the first time this season. ~
i RUNNING GAME—1t is expected that the Kentucky ground attack
will be slightly improved over last season due chiefly to several ca-
] pable, experienced backs with another year's training under their
I? belts in running off the intricate and tricky T-formation. The back-
{ field will be light, but will make up for the lack of weight in speed.
  AERIAL ATTACK—Despite the loss of the chief passer of last sea-
y' son, George Blanda, Kentucky’s passing should be as good or slightly
  improved this year. Babe Parilli, triple threat quarterback prospect,
  will do the bulk of the pigskin pitching. Spring training observers
gg say the sophomore sensation may be the best passer at Kentucky in
il recent years. Bryant plans to rely more heavily on aerial advancement
i this season.
  PUNTING—.—\gain Parilli will be in the forefront doing most of
E the Kentucky kicking, with considerable help from Clayton WVebb
  and some assistance from Dopey Phelps and Bill Boller.
E, EXTRA POINTS—KICKOFFS—Bobby Brooks can be expected to
  perform most consistently in the points-after-touchdown department
i* with some help from Bob Gain. Kickoffs will be made by either
* Gain or Ben Zaranka, and Gain will be the most likely kicker on
F field g