xt7sxk84js4j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7sxk84js4j/data/mets.xml Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station 1914 Title from cover.
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é

 TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
Kentucky Agricultural
Experiment Station
STATE UNIVERSITY
_ LEXINGTON, KY. ‘
FOR THE YEAR 1914

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 TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
Kentucky Agricultural
Experiment Station t
FOR THE YEAR 1914. »
PART 1.
A Report of Director and Heads of Departments.
Water Analyses and Meteorological Observations.

 
 Letter of Transmittal.
To His Excellency, ~
Hon. JAMEs B. MCCREARY,
Governor of Kentucky. "
· Sma-
Under the authority of the Board of Control of the Ken-
tucky Agricultural Experiment Station, and in accordance
with an act of Congress, approved March 2, 1887, and entitled
“An Act to establish Agricultural Experiment Stations in
connection with the Agricultural Colleges established in the
several States under the provision of an act approved July
A 2, 1862, and under ,the acts supplementary thereto," and of
the act of the Legislature of the State of Kentucky,
approved February 20, 1888, and entitled "An Act to accept V
the provisions of an Act passed by the Congress of the
United States, approved March 2, 1887, for the establish-
ment and maintenance of Agricultural Experiment Stations
in connection with Agricultural Colleges established by the
several States and Territories under an Act of Congress,
approved July 2, 1862, "l herewith submit the Twenty-seventh
Annual Report of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment
Station.
_ Very respectfully,
Josern H. KAsrLE, Director.
February 1, 1915. -

 State University
LEXINGTON, KY.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES.
HIS EXCELLENCY, GovERNoR JAMES B. MCCREARY, em-ojicio
Chairman.
PRESIDENT HENRY S. BARKER, Member ex-q[y’icio.
HON. BARKSDALE HAMLETT, Supt. Public Instruction, Mem-
ber ea;—o§’ici0.
AI>I·oINTED BY THE covsimon.
HON. JAMES BREATHITT, Hopkinsville, Christian County.
THOMAS LEWIS EDELEN, Frankfort, Franklin County. `
CHARLES B. NICHOLS, R. F. D., Lexington, Fayette County.
DR. JAMES K. PA'I"I`ERSON, Lexington, Fayette County.
JAMES W. TURNER, Paintsville, Johnson County.
ROBERT W. BROWN, Louisville, Jefferson County.
HON. TIBBIS CARPENTER, Scottsville, Allen County.
HON. WILLIAM H. COX, Maysville, Mason County.
DENNY P. SMITH, Cadiz, Trigg County.
HoN. CLAUDE B. TERRELL, Bedford, Trimble County.
HON. JOHNSON N. CAMDEN, Versailles, Woodford County.
RICHARD C. STOLL, Lexington, Fayette County.
LEWIS L. WALKER, Lancaster, Garrard County.
RICHARD N. WATIIEN, Lebanon, Marion County.
DR. A. GATLIFF, Williamsburg, Whitley County.
IELECTED BY THE ALUMNI. ‘
DR. SAMUEL BLACKBURN MARKS, Lexington, Fayette County.
·.l()llN VVESLEY WooDs, Ashland, Boyd County.
CEoRoI·: GREEN BROCK, London, Laurel County.
JoIIN EDWIN BROWN, Shelbyville, Shelby County.
PIIILIP PRESTON JOHNSTON, JR., Lexington, Fayette County.

 » KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL Exi=EmMEN·r STATION
BOARD OF CONTROL
RICHARD C. STOLL, Chairman, Lexington, Ky.
CHARLES B. NICHOLS, Lexington, Ky.
LEWIS L. WALKER, Lancaster, Ky.
HENRY S. BARKER, President of the University.
THE DIRECTOR. Secretary, ex-oilicio.
JOSEPH H. KASTLE, Director.
· ' STATION -COUNCIL
THE DIRECTOR
A. M. PETER J. D. TURNER
H. E. CURTIS _ E. S. GOOD
H. GARMAN GEORGE ROBERTS
C. W. MATHEWS ` J. J. HOOPER
R. M. ALLEN
DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION M I CHEMISTRY
' A. . P CTER. Chief Chemist, Head.
_ ,T,II§_I§{§‘,§?§§$’§h§§§f%f’· S ig. Avtmtw, Chemist._ _
I-IYWEL DAVIES, Purchasing Aggn; ·I· 5. MCI‘I:*}l{(.¤UIn, Asst. Chemist, _
.. . ·. , . R. PFANSFIEL, Asst. Chemist.
O. L. GINOCHIO, Seuetaxy to Ducctox. , _ _ , _ _
ADDIE LEE DEAN, Lib,.a,.i.m_ E'] HEL V. 'I. L.AS\\ ALL, Llerk.
ANNA WALLIS, Clerk. ENTOMOLOGY AND BOTANY
CORNELIA C. PAGE, Clerk. _ H. GARMAN, Entomologist and Botanist,
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION IVIARIYIEI DIDLAKE, 1.tti»m—utm-y Asst.
F. MUTCHLER, Superintendent. ‘ E. C. VAUGHN, Asst. in Seed Inspection and
T. R. BRYANT, Asst. Superintendent. Plant Breeding.
J. H. CARMODY. Horticulture. H. H. JEWETT, Research Asst. Entom.
H. B. HENDRICK, Agronomy. H. R. NISVVONGER, Asst. in Field Work and
C. D. BOHANNAN. Rural Economics. Nursery Inspection.
W. D. NICHOLLS, Dairying. _ LOUISE BEVVLAY, Clerk.
H. W. RICKEY, Poultry. (In cooperéxtion with FFFD
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. r ,. A 4
T. E. STOKES, Animal I·Iusl>andry. (In coopera-if      
tion with U. S. Dept. of Agriculture.) E A H` NOLIIAU ASQ, Chemist
MARY E. SWEENY. Home Economies. ].;LM`ER ]NGI{[{M Cyijcf ]nqI,,QCt,_,,»
AUBYN CHINN, Cookery and Dietetics. ROGER yy JONEE Inspccibr `
RUBY M. BUCKMAN, Sewing, and H0u»seh0ldFANNY C'ROGER'S élerk `
ANNA isrtimtié .1oN1;s cient · I I’I€RTII·IiRR
MARGARET RYAN Cl`m.k_ I H. E. CUIRTIS, Chemist, Head.
' WM. RODES, Assistant Chemist.
AGRONOMY ELMER INGRAM, Inspector.
Gisonctc ROBERTS, Agronomist, Heart. R- W- JUNIIS· I?S¤?¤¤*¤¤`-
E. J. KINNEY, Assistant Agronomist. ANNA WAI*LIR· ©I¢·‘I<-
P. E. KARRAKER, Soil Survey. FOOD AND DRUGS
A. E. EWAN, Supt. Experiment Fields. R. M. ALLEN, Head.
D. S. MYER, Assistant in Crops. J. O. I»ABACI’I, Chief Chemist.
JESSIE I·`. CASWALL, Clerk. L. A. BROWN, Chemist, Drugs.
J. W MCFARLIN, Chief Food Inspector.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. W. R. PINITELL, Bacteriologist.
( ,, . ,_ , I · .· , C. S. PORT GR, Inspector, Drugs.
  S_ GO&§f;,gj:lfl“ Shep md R“'"“‘l wA1.T1c1< _scum·1>1at.MAN, inspector-, Battery
ROBERT GRAHAM, Veterinary Scienc ·, in §"I'II“LI"II· ,_ _ _ _
Charge Hog Cholera Serum Protluctilon. E· I`i·i3yORTIIINGION— II‘SI’°“T°I· DIIIIIY bIIIIIuI'
O. S. CRISLIGR. Hog Cholera Scrum. _ ,‘_·_ ,
R. L. PONTIUS, 1-ttm chtltcm set-ttm. W- I·· ILRRI‘·LI·- I¤F1·¤¤}<·*‘· I’¤¤_IUN· LIIII-`T (#l“I`lI·
M. J. SMITH, Asst. in Animal I·Iusl»:1ndry. LIVINA I·I>"ION Cl“I`k·
M. G. GINOCI-IIO. Clerk. I·I()RTICULTURE
Ii. J. G()T'I`, Hog Cholera Serum. CLARENCE VV. MATIIEWS, Head.
A. L. BRUECKNIGR, Hog Cholera Serum. F. W. IIOFMANN, Asst. in H 5 E
,. __V_ _ _ ;;_,_·e¢   $*7 .5 S
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 Kentucky Agricultural Expcrioncnt Station. 5
NEW BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. Within the period
included in this report, two new buildings have been erected
on the Experiment Station farm—a conservatory for horti- `
cultural investigations and a small beef cattle barn, and an
addition to the barn on the horticultural grounds.
The conservatory, a cut of which is shown in Plate 1
includes attractive offices, a general work room, photo-
_ . graphic room on the first floor, store room and a sleep-
ing room for the attendant on the second iioor, and a hot
water heating system in the basement. The greenhouse
proper is 30 by 85 feet and has been used during the past
season for purposes of propagation and for experiments in
forcing vegetables.
The new beef cattle barn was built primarily to illustrate
the methods employed in western Kentucky in the feeding
and housing of beef cattle and to serve as an inexpensive
model of a barn of this type to farmersin Central Kentucky.
This barn, a photograph and plans of which are shown in
Plates 2, 3, 4 and 5, was constructed of rough lumber and
cost complete, $1015.70. It has the advantage of good ven- .
tilation, adequate protection of the cattle during the winter
months, and complete preservation of all of the manure until
such a time as it may prove convenient and desirable to apply
it to the land. Most excellent results have been accomplish-
ed in the feeding of beef cattle in barns of this general type
in western Kentucky in the neighborhood of Bowling Green.
Complete plans and specifications of this barn will be fur-
nished to farmers of the State free of cost. We had planned
to utilize this barn in actual feeding experiments during the
autumn and winter of 1914-15, but were prevented from so
doing owing to dangers arising from the widespread preval-
ence of foot—and-mouth disease throughout the State.
/

 6 Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the
Among the additions to our equipment made within the
period covered by this report, may be mentioned the com-
plete equipment of a new bacteriological and pathological
laboratory for the veterinary department. This new labora-
tory is located on the second floor of the hog cholera serum
laboratory and has already served a‘ most useful purpose for
the diagnosis and treatment of animal diseases.
EXPERIMENTAL AND COOPERATIVE FIELDS. The work of
our experimental and cooperative fields, nine of which are .
now being operated in various localities in the State, has
attracted great attention during the past year. The experi`-
· mental fields at Lone Oak, Russellville, and Greenville have
been visited at intervals during the past year by large and
enthusiastic delegations of farmers from counties contiguous S,
to these fields. Our agricultural population is awakening
to the realization that it is only through such studies as are l
now being carried on on these experimental fields that we -
can arrive at an intelligent conception of the needs and ”
requirements of the various types of soil represented on
¤ these several fields and that systems of agriculture can be \
p devised that will restore these soils, many of which are
badly worn and depleted, to a permanent condition of ·
fertility. It is proposed to establish and maintain experi-
mental fields on the ten great soil areas of the State, as soon
as the funds of the Experiment Station will permit.
INVESTIGATIONS UNDER THE ADAMS FUND AND THE STATE
ArrRor1<1AT1oN. As is well known, the principal object of
Experiment Stations is to carry on such investigations as
will likely benefit the agricultural interests of the state and
nation. Under the Adams Fund, approved March 16, 1906,
the sum of fifteen thousand dollars is appropriated annually (
by the Federal government for the support of agricultural

 Kentucky Agricultural Easperiment Station. 7
research in the Agricultural Experiment Stations of the
several states and territories. The Kentucky Agricultural
‘ Experiment Station is a beneficiary under this act, and dur.
ing the past year, the following investigations have been
provided for out of the Adams Fund:
[ 1. (a. b. c.) .
V a. Thecontinuation of the study of the nodule organism
_ e of alfalfa and its relation to the nitrifying organisms
‘ ‘ . of sweet clover and red clover.
_ ob. The completion of our work on the life history of the
corn-ear worm, etc.
' `c. The locustborer.
l ‘ Messrs. Garman, Jewett, Niswonger and Miss Didlake.
’ 2. Contagiousiabortion in horses and cattle and immuniza-
tion against these diseases. Prof`. Good and assistants.
3. The rendering available of the potassium of insoluble
silicates by the action of soil bacteria and yeasts. `Dr.
» ` A. M. Peter and his assistants and Dr. Healy.
4. The occurrence of sulphur in plants and soils and the
significance of this element to permanent soil fertility,
and the determination experimentally of the best and '
most economical sulphur compound to employ in correct-
ing a deficiency of sulphur in any soil. Mr. O. M. Shedd.
5. The translocation of mineral matter of plants. Dr.
G. D. Buckner. _
6. The occurrence and distribution of barium in the vegeta-
ble kingdom and the part (if any) played by barium in
the growth of plants, and the possible effect of this
element in stimulating the production of nitrifying
nodules on leguminous plants. Mr. J. S. McHargue.
7. The occurrence and distribution of manganese in plants,
especially in the harder lepidermal tissues of various
` J parts of plants and the possible significance of manga-
nese in the production of such tissues. Mr. J. S.
McHargue.

 8 Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the
8. The study of clover bloat or tympany of the rumen in
cattle and its cure by means of formaldehyde, urotropin
or hexamethylene-tetramine. Dr. Healy.
A number of these investigations have been completed
during the past year and note-worthy progress has been
made in all of them.
The State appropriation of fifty thousand dollars per
annum, for the benefit of the Kentucky Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, approved March 11, 1912, also provides for the
carrying on of various lines of experimental work in agricul-
ture. Among the subjects of investigation specifically men-
tioned in the act are the following: Field experiments to
determine the character of the various soil types represented
in Kentucky and the best methods of cultivation of the same;
experiments in orcharding and in the cultivation and market-
ing of fruits and vegetables, remedies forinsect pests, studies ‘
in plant breeding and variety tests; such investigations as
are calculated to develop the beef, pork and mutton interests
of the State, including the economical feeding of meat—pro-
ducing animals and their preparation for the market; studies
looking to the development of the dairy and poultry interests
of the State: the rearing of calves and the experimental
study and investigation of various animal diseases; studies
looking to the development of the horse interests of the
State, and lastly the production and distribution of hog
cholera serum, in the attempt to control and eradicate hog
cholera. In conformity with the purposes of this act, field
experiments have been carried on on a number of soil types
throughout the State; soil surveys have- been completed in
two counties of the State and numerous analyses of soils
have been made in the chemical laboratories of the Experi-
ment Station. As already pointed out, studies have been

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 Kentztc/cy Agricuiltzwdl E;rperime1zt Stat/ion. 9
made in orcharding and in the reclamation of old orchards.
Successful demonstrations in pruning and spraying have
been made in a number of localities throughout the State,
and on the Experiment Station farm and in the conservatory,
experimental studies have been made on the cultivation of ,
fruits and vegetables including variety tests and improved
methods of cultivation. Our studies in plant breeding have
already resulted in the discovery of a variety of wheat
(Jersey Fultz) that seems admirably adapted to the soil and
climatic conditions prevailing in central and western Ken-
tucky, and in the propagation for seed purposes of a variety
of winter oats that seems able to withstand the rigors of
the winter climate in central Kentucky and which promises
good returns to the farmer. For a number of years, the
Experiment Station has distributed among tobacco growers,
free of cost, small amounts of the seed of pure bred varieties
of burley tobacco and has recleaned and graded samples of
tobacco seed brought in by farmers. Experiments in beef
cattle feeding and in hog feeding have been carried on on
the Experiment Station farm during the past two years with
considerable success. In fact, Professor Good’s swine feed-
ing experiments have attracted considerable attention among I
hog raisers throughout the State. The experimental work
carried out on the Experiment Station farm during the past
year has also included studies in the economic feeding of
dairy cattle and the rearing of calves. Valuable experi-
mental work has also been done on hog cholera, forage
poisoning, blackleg and other diseases of live stock. The
Experiment Station has actively cooperated with the Bureau
of Animal Industry, United States Department of Agricul-
ture, and with the Kentucky State Live Stock Sanitary Board
in the work of hog cholera eradication in Henderson County

 10 Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the
and in the control and eradication of foot-and-mouth disease.
Our studies affecting the horse interests of the State include
a study of the inheritance of coat colors in horses and the
study of lack of virility in thoroughbred stallions and an
investigation of infectious abortion in mares and of infectious
arthritis in colts. During the past year, the poultry plant on
the Experiment Station farm has been completed and I
brought into successful operation. Inexpensive colony _
houses have been erected embodying the best and most
economical principles of poultry house construction. Our
studies with poultry have included a comparison of a number
of pure bred varieties for egg production and general utility
purposes, the feeding and care of young chicks and turkeys,
etc. More attention than ever before has been given to
bringing the results of Experiment Station work directly
home to the farmer. This has been accomplished throughi
- the medium of our bulletins and other publications, by I
correspondence, and through the medium of agricultural 9
chautauquas, farmers} meetings, movable schools in agricul- {
ture and the various other agencies employed in agricultural
extension. Within the past year, we produced 3,238,835
cubic centimeters of hog cholera serum in our serum labor- _.
atory and inoculated 57,297 hogs in 83 counties of the State,
with a saving of 91.49 per cent
l)UliI.l(TATlONS. The following publications have been made
by the Experiment Station during the year 1914:
Bulletins.
No.
178. Alfalfa and Sweet Clover. Geo. Roberts, E. J. Kinney,
H. B. Hendrick. March, 1914.
179. Construction and Equipment of Dairy Barns. W. D.
X Nicholls. June, 1914. ‘

 l . _ · Kentucky Agricztltzwctl Ervperiment Smtion. 11
180. The Inheritance of Coat Colors in Horses. W. S.
Anderson. July, 1914.
181. 1. Suggestions Relative to the Prevention of Hog
` Cholera. 2. List of Publications of the Ken- ,
tucky Agricultural Experiment Station. J. H.
Kastle and Robert Graham. August, 1914.
182. Hog Cholera and Its Control, with Foreword by ‘
Joseph H. Kastle, Director of the Kentucky Agricul-
tural Experiment Station. Robert Graham and E.
W. Mumma. August,1914.
183.4 Some Kentucky ·Weeds and Poisonous Plants. H.
Garman. August, 1914.
184. Six Different Species of‘No