xt7t1g0hx58m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7t1g0hx58m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680115  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 15, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 15, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7t1g0hx58m section xt7t1g0hx58m EC

NTMCK.Y

EM-RfE-

L

The South's Outstanding College Daily
Monday Evening, Jan.

15, 19G8

UNIVERSITY

1-

Up to a foot of snow in some
areas of Kentucky and a full 10
inches on the University camofpus forced administration
ficials to postpone registration
one day.
Students scheduled to complete registration Monday are to
report to the Coliseum Tuesday
at the saifie time. Tuesday registrants are to report Wednesday. Any student who cannot
report either of the days is urged
to call or wire the University,
said Associate Registrar Ray
and "individual
Cumberledge,
arrangements will be made."
Mr. Cumberledge also added
Sunday night that classes will
begin as scheduled Wednesday.
Announcement will be made if
it is decided that classes are to
be postponed until Thursday,
he said.
A similar snowstorm Jan. 1
and 2 in the state forced registration to be postponed one day
at other state universities that
had scheduled it Jan. 3.
Two low pressure areas, one
in Western Kentucky and the
other off the Carolina coast,
the massive storm
triggered
system that dumped snow, sleet
and freezing rain in 11 states
in the Eastern third of the coun- -

Of Trustees
Midway through Friday's
Hoard of Trustees meeting, Cov.
Louie R. Nunn presented student body President Steve Cook
to the board saying that Cook
"had been invited to the loard
meetings to perhaps help the
lxard in matters pertaining to
students."
In

a group of

students at Kentucky's

state-support-

universities called for
representation on their school's
boards of regents and trustees
in the near futuie.
The students are members of
the Kentucky Student Association (KSA), an organization
composed of student government representatives from most
and
of Kentucky's
and
private colleges

fSl
mm

'Greetings9 From The Snow
Coming back to school to face another semester is often not a
pleasant thought for students. And for tliose returning to campus
yesterday the thought may have been worse after they heard the
news that registration has been postponed for a day.

Dr. Oswald To Hear
Prejudice Complaints

in Western

Cook Helps'
At Meetings

-'

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

r

failures were reported
Kentucky and Tennessee. Clarksville, Tenn., a city
30 miles northwest of Nashville,
was declared an "all-oemergency" by its mayor. Thirty
thousand people were without
power in that city.
Ft. Campbell, an Army base
line
on the Tennessee-Kentuck- y
near Clarksville, moved many
residents from civilian to permanent barracks to provide food,
emergency medical treatment
and blankets.
Intestates 61, 65, 40 and 75
all were reported passable, but
freezing conditions during the
night slowed traffic to a crawl.
University officials said they
had been "flooded with telephone calls all day" Sunday
from students unable to travel.
A meeting at 11 a.m. Sunday of
registration authorities resulted
in the postponement.

Vol. LIX, No. 76

Room And Board Raised

Registration
Postponed
By Weather

.

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

.

By HELEN McCLOY
Dr. John W. Oswald can expect a call today alxmt alleged
discrimination against Negroes
in diverse areas of University
life.
The call is being made by Dr.
Philip Crossen as a result of a
recent "town meeting" sponsored by the Lexington-Fayett- e
County Human Rights Commission.
Among the 150 persons present were five members of
UK black student organof
ization, who complained
racial problems in faculty hiring, athletic recruitment and
off campus housing.
A number of white students
corroborated these
charges, according to Dr. Crossen, commission chairman, and
agreed that abusive language
is sometimes directed toward
Negro students by white professors in the classrooms.
Dr. Crossen said in a tele- phone interview yesterday that
he hopes to talk to President
Oswald about setting up a meeting with the proper officials to
discuss the complaints.
He said the commission had
been interested in University
policies for some time "especially because UK is Lexington's
and
largest single industry"
that the students' grievances
"brought this concern to a
head."
"We would like to see if the
University can't take a more
active part" in seeing that its
faculty and students are not
denied adequate, housing
of race, Dr. Crossen said.
Property owners whose apartments are listed with the University Housing Office must
agree to rent to any University
student, Jack Hall, associate
dean of students, said last night.
"If a student is refused for any
reason," said Mr. Hall, "the
housing will be taken off the
approved list."
Mr. Hall said the problem
always has been "to validate
that theie has been discrimination. We have probably had
more problems getting housing
for our foieign rather than our
Negro students," he added.
( Negroes
repeatedly have
maintained that approved hous
Or-gen- a,

Some
ing is not "prejudice-free.- "
groups have even tried spot
checks of housing, but a large-scal- e
survey in this area remains to be done.)
The town meeting differed
from the regular monthly meetings of the commission in that
it was held out in the commun-nit- y
rather than downtown in
City Hall and representatives of
minority groups had been invited "to tell it like it is." Dr.
Crossen said he had worked on
the plan since August and that
the turnout was "beyond my
wildest dreams."

--

present

Phone Changes
DecT28
As

of

the

follow-

ing changes in residence hall
phones were made:
All numbers beginning with
"7" are now preceded by another 'T. Thus, 7100 becomes 77100.
All numbers beginning with
"3" were changed to "39".
Thus, 3125 becomes 39125.
All other four digit numbers are now preceded by
"8". Thus, 4500 becomes
84500.
Paid Nestor, director of
business services, said the
changes were necessary because of new equipment installed to serve the residence
halls.
He said the changes apply
only to the telephone numbers in the residence halls.

Trustees Annrove
Budget Reduction

Raised room and board rates for fall 1968 and a $3.5 million
reduction in
funds were approved last Friday
in a busy session of the University Roard of Trustees.
universities. After some debate,
ine board approved in prinrecomthe measure passed unanimous- ciple" a
mendation that the University
and the University of Louisville
Gov. Nunn said he is "ready
merge; reorganization of four to do that which has to be
offices in the Medical Center,
done," and that he expects the
and reorganization of the Colboard to do the same.
leges of Engineering and EduMerger Recommended
cation. The board passed a resMerger between UK and UL
olution to meet with city and
received official board recomcounty officials for future planmendation. The committee apning around the campus.
President Oswald
The meeting was the first pointed by
and UL President Davidson
headed by Gov. Louie H. Nunn.
presented a series of alternaAlso new on the board were
tives to each institution in early
former Gov. A. R. Chandler,
December and recommended
Owensboro dentist N. N. Nichbetween the two. Final
olas and London grocer George merger
for the merger lies
Griffin. The meeting opened authority
with the Legislature.
with the three Nunn appointees
Within the Medical Center,
being sworn in for four year Dr. Tom F.
Whayne, associate
terms.
dean for the College of Medirevised
In presenting
the
cine, was relieved of other ad1967-6- 8
budget spurred by a ministrative duties in the col$3.5 million reduction in
those of acting
funds Vice Pres- lege, including vice
dean, assistant
president
ident Jn charge of Business Afand associate director of the
fairs .and Treasurer Robert F.
UK Research Foundation. It was
Kerely said the four weeks befelt the scope of Dr. Whayne's
tween the announced budget cut
activities was too broad "to perand the time when the final
mit maximum effectiveness."
figures were reduced seemed
Dr. Alvin L. Morris, dean of
"a lot longer than just a month."
the College of Dentistry, was
Mr. Kerley showed the University's expenditures now cut appointed assistant vice presito $74.63 million, or about $3.4 dent of the Medical Center and
million below the original figure. a new dean of the College of
Dentistry was to be sought.
Rates Raised
Because of extensive modiMr. Kerley also presented the fication of the College of Enboard with a proposal to raise gineering, the college was adroom and board rates from the ministratively reorganized unpresent $425 to $440 (for the der three areas: undergraduate
three-meplan) and from programs, graduate programs
and continuing education and
$367.50 io $385 (for the two-meplan). The increase of extension. Three professors were
about four percent brings the named to head the new posts.
The College of Education was
University's prices for these
services approximately equal to expanded into eight academic
departments: administration and
state universities
surrounding
supervision, curriculum and inKentucky.
struction, educational psycholAlso, the annual room rate for
was increased ogy and counseling, health,
graduate housing
from $480 to $500 for efficiency physical education and recreaunits and from $570 to $600 tion, higher and adult education, social and philosophical
yearly for one bedroom units.
Summer school room, rates studies in education, special education and vocational educawere increased to a level comtion.
to, fegular school rates,
parable
A letter from President John
from $100 a summer to $110
V. Oswald
presented seven
for a double occupancy room.
people charged with making a
Gov. Nunn voiced concern
that room and board rates .were recommendation to the Athletic
Board for a new athletic directo be raised in this session, his
first. He aked Mr. Kerley how tor. Chairman of the committee
is Robert L. Johnson, vice preslong the proposal had been unident for student affairs. The
der consideration and then quescommittee is to make its report
tioned the comparison of the inbv Mav.
creased figure with other state
al

al

le-cau-

R

ir

fi

I

New Hoard Members Sworn In
Cov. Louie B.
A. B. Chandler,
Nicholas to the
his fir.t meeting

Nunn swears in former governor
George Criffin and Dr. N. N.
University Board of Trustees in
as Chairman of tlie board since

his election.

Mr. Criffin and Dr. Nicholas are
both Republicans, while Mr. Cliandler is a Democrat, although Chandler spoke out for Nunn in
the recent election.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Jan.

15,

l8-- 3

Graphics '68 Exciti ng

By D.C. MOORE
Before the real class

a careful viewing because of the American" by Walter Rogalski,
work wide range of schemes and ideas as an example, is the idea of an
begins for the spring semester, c.plored.
American woman today. The Grait might be a good idea to po
phic here comprises several picHistory
into the University Art Gallery
The history behind the graphic tures into one graphic picture and
and see the "Graphics' 68: Reeach one is a separate and searchcent American Prints" now being joints is as varied as the current ing glimpse.
exhibition.
featured.
Another print that is a good
In the 1940's experimentation
This collection of 82 prints
was beginning and is still going study of faces, and can be seen
was selected by Edward Bryant,
with a sensitive understanding,
on. Sincethen various artists have
director of the University of Kenis "Man, Woman and Silver Arbranched out to include almost
row" by Marvil Lowe. This print
tucky Art Gallery and features
for
some of the exciting work being any type of material suitable
the prints and to develop new is in color and is a contrast study
done in the field of art.
that is intelligent and expressive.
The most notable thing about printing techniques.
The exposition though is a colIn the 1940's William Stanley
this collection of prints is that
lection of good work that was
inthere is such a wide selection of Hayter's "Atelier 17" was
of the intelligently . selected 'and armatter Pd variation of fluential in the exploration
subject
ranged;
1940's
color schemes being used by the intaglio process. The late
The UK Art Callery will be
and '50's saw other developments
artist featured in the collection.
open 9 a.nv to 5 p.m. Monday
Also for students of art there taking place. Among them were through Friday; 1 to 5 p.m. Satrelief, planographic and stencil
are a wide range of styles inurday and Sunday, 7 to 9 p.m.
process. The 1960's brought in
color-fielhard-edgcluding pop, op,
and Thursday.
in "lithography, Tuesday
experimentation
neo-da- d
a and surrealism.
Also included are social protest serigraphy and inkless intaglio."
From the beginning new techand pure abstraction.
niques have come forth and this
VVhen going to see this graart has become one of specialiphic collection it would be wise
zation that requires not only
to take time and give each print
ByD. C.MOORE
knowledge of composition and
The movie "Valley of The
the use of colors, but als6 the Dolls" or "Peyton Place Joes
use of print and even scientific
to Hollywood" or "If You" Are
techniques because of the materBig in Show. Business Take
ials that are being used.
Drugs " is nbf a classA movie,
evert if the advertising says so.
Graphics' 68
Among the better prints in the
Sure, the movie contains subgraphic showing are "The Seject matter that is of current inFeder-ic- o
ducers," a lithograph by
terest and might be an expose of
Castellon, "The Image Masorts, but this in itself is trite.
kers," an etching by Walter
"All American," an inThe movie is one of those
taglio by Robert R. Malone, current movies that will make
"Death of Dillinger," an etch- "Saturday Night at the Movies,"
ing by Warring Colescott, and early.
"Leave the Moon Alone," a slate-pri"Valley of the Dolls'.' based
by William Kent.
Most of these graphic prints upon Jaqueline Susanrj's book
mentioned contain some type of of the same name is the story of
message and even some satire. three modem' young ladies who
They are clear, expressive and are in show business and rise
make a deeper impression than ' rapidly to the top of their profesthe first glance will tell. "All sions, but cannot stand the pres
-.

"No Misere, No Kyrie" by Edward Hill is among 82 graphic
prints currently being shown at the UK Art Callery in a show
titled Craphics' 68: Recent American Prints."

e,

d,

Dolls Not

AMERICAN

Ro-gals-

r

GANGER

nt

society!

73

i

-

Class--

A

sure for a number of reasons and
take drug capsules called dolls.

The biggest user of dolls is
Nelly O'Hara (Patty Duke), who
as a rising young singer gets all
the breaks and becomes a high-pai- d
movie star. Patty Duke in
this part is still the Patty Duke
of television.
The other two users of dolls,
Ann Wells (Barbara Parkins) and
Jennifer North (Sharon Tate), are
two characters that make what
there is of the movie, and they
are weak. The odd thing is that
Ann Wells in "Valley of , the
Dolls" comes from a small New
England town. Barbara Parkins
plays a girl from a small New
England town in the television
series "Peyton Place" and she
brings the same role to the movie.
What hurts the movie is the,

Movie
fact that television talent has
arrived in bulk fo- - this movie.
All the leads are familiar faces
on television and they don't seem
quite up to par for a major movie.
In other words "Valley of the
Dolls" is a color television show
with feature movie billing.
The total movie though is an
attempt to create a reality which
is not fulfilled and to say something which is' not clear, but if
you do decide to see the movie
watch for the symbolism of the
white snow and the red drug
capsules. Here "Valley of the
Dolls" has continuity.

use he

.

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Jan.

II

,

mlt

-

The six college students, identified only as juniors at an unnamed western Pennsylvania col

lege, suffered total and permanent blindness last spring w hile
d
staring at the sun in an
LSD-induce-

trance.
Health officials said it was
the first instance they knev of
in w hich total blindness resulted.
But they noted another case last
May in which four students at
the University of California at
Santa Barbara permanently lost
their reading vision under neatly

identical circumstances.
Norman M. Yoder, commissioner of Pennsylvania's Office
of the Blind, said the Pennsylvania youths had Iain on their
backs because they thought it
was a good position for experiencing the effects of the drug "and
were not consciously looking at
the sun." He said doctors surmise
the drug caused the students'
eyelids to remain open.
Yoder, interviewed by tele--

imperial JJoUSe
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AVENUE

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Ky

ROAD

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Dr. Leon Jacobs, deputy assistant secretary for scientific affairs for the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare,
expressed hope "the demonstration of what a terrible thing

a pilot license
a better job!
Earn both at the same

...

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time.
low cost UK
special
flight training. . . .
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Contact

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TECHNICOLOR9

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W

THE TIME

During the last 8 minutes of this picture the theater will be darkened to heighten the terror of the climax. No one will be seated
at this time.

HAS COME

TO VISIT
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First Run!
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1

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Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Dog Days
dog's life, no less than a student's, can be complicated by
snow drifts and slippery pavement. This pampered pet, however,
is about to be lifted out of danger.
A

Campus News Briefs
Dr. Gifford Blyton, University
director of forensics, was elected
president of the American Forensic Association during that
group's annual convention in Los
Angeles.
He is immediate past secretary of the 1400 member organization. Debates between U.S.
and Russian students via t he
communication satelite Telestar
is the first project on the agencla
of the president.

were:-Universit- y

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The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky,
Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holiday! and exam
periods, and once during the summer

r,

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"The association is negotiating with NBC for the debates,"
said Dr. Blyton. He has leen
coach of the University debate
team for 15 years.

Enrollment in Kentucky's 32
colleges and universities have increased 5.7 percent since September 1966, according to a report released by the Gmncil on
Public Higher Education.
This was the twelfth consecutive year that enrollment had
increased. Total enrollment was
85,558. There were 21 percent
more graduate students in the
state, said the report, and a 17
To place a classified
phone UK
extension 2319 or stop In at the of- percent increase in the number
fice, 111 Journalism, from 8 to noon, of seniors. Fall figures for the
1 to 5, Monday through Friday.
Rates are $1.25 for 20 words. $3 for state's six universities
three consecutive Insertions of same
of Kentucky
ad or 3.?5 per week. Deadline Is 11
a.m. day prior to publication.
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"I think it's a terrible price
to pay for kicks," said Yoder.
All six of the students had used
LSD previously, he said.
The young men are receiving
rehabilitation services from the
Pennsylvania Department of Welfare, said Yoder.

A College degree

j

i

g

HI, WILDCATS

What did they want with her?

EROS.-SETC-

'

phone from his office in Harris-bursaid the Pennsylvania students had gone in the morning
to a wooded area within walking distance of the college campus. They were found that afternoon, about six hours later, by
fellow students who knew of the
drug-takinplans. The victims
were helpless when they were
found, Yoder said.

happened to them may keep other
kids away from it LSD."
But an official of the Federal
Bureau of Drug Abuse Control,
N. B. Coon, said "scare tactics
don't work in trying to keep
these kids fromtaking LSD. They
know through their own contacts
that there are good 'trips' and
bad 'trips' and if the chances of
something serious are maybe 1
in 500, their reaction is: "It's not
going to happen to me.'"

For a delightful, relaxing, carefree weekend, a
pleasant evening, or when porents and guests
come to Lexington, visit the Imperial House,
Lexington's most elegant motel where gourmet
foods, wines, end fine service prevail. Entertainment and dancing nightly for your pleasure. Our
rooms are spacious, elegantly appointed and
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STANLEY DEMOS. Manager

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.,11

15, 19(58

Six Students Blinded On
WASHINGTON (AP)
The
case of six Pennsylvania college
students who were permanently
blinded by staring at the sun
during an LSD "trip" is spurring a nationwide federal search
for other such incidents.
Shortly after The Associated
Press learned Friday of the Pennsylvania case federal health officials announced a st at
survey to see if other per son shave
lost their sight while under the
influence of the powerful hallucinogen.
Federal officials had known
of the case since last November
but a spokesman said no study
was undertaken earlier because
of policy questions involvingfed-era- l
and state jurisdictions.

-

12

session.

Published by the Board of Student
Publications. UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1913.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

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Per copy, from files

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KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business,

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Jan.

Larger Draft Calls

AP Military Writer
WASHINGTON
sources say the 39,000-ma- n
draft call announced for March
is a sign of things to come this
spring and summcr-wi- th
monthly manpower requests of about
40,000 or more likely in April,
May and June.
AP-Pent-

agon

Last year's draft summons in
the same
h
period averaged only about 15,300 per
month.
As one manpower planner put
it in describing the upswing:
"We're dealing entirely with mechanics here."
The mechanics are that the
Army is .now in the midst of
what the Pentagon calls a major replacement cycle involving
the rotation out of service of
thousands of men drafted when
the Southeast Asia buildup was
launched.
four-mont-

By August replacement needs

will really be soaring. The reason: In August 1966, when U.S.
manpower for the war was escalated, 36,600 men were ordered to duty, followed by 37,300
in September, 49,200 in October
and 37,600 in November.

Reported
Request
For Robinson Forest Is Denied
Strip-Minin- g

March Brings Large Call
Of Draftees For Service
By BOB HORTON

15, 1908- -5

during the balance of the year"
ending June 30.
After that there could be a tapering off in Pentagon requests
to the Selective Service System.
This would reflect the dip in December 1966 to 12,100 inductions
and average monthly inductions
in 1967 of only 18,200.
The 39,000-ma- n
call for March
second highest of the Vietnam
war compares with January's
34,000

and February's

23,300.

Calls in the Vietnam war reached a high of 49,200 in October 1966. Actually, 50,576 men
were drafted then there is always a difference between manpower request and the number
brought in making it the biggest month for inductions since
54,981 men were put in uniform
in May 1953 near the end of the
Korean War.
Monthly inductions ranged to
87,000 in the Korean War.
For the past 23 months all inductees have gone into the Army.

The other services have been
relying on volunteers to maintain their strength levels.

Agriculture at the University
made news during the Christmas
break.
In- - a letter to the Courier-Journa- l,
Harry M. Caudill, a
Agriculture at the University
made news during the Christmas
break.
Journal, Harry M. Caudill, a
Whitesburg lawyer, said a mining company had asked the University for permission to strip-min- e
in the Robinson Forest in
Breathitt County. The University is involved in several research type projects in the forest, including ways of returning
soil banks to vegestrip-minetative growth.
Caudill also said "according
to information
reaching me,
the University has not denied
d

the operator's request."

denial proposals for several

re-

search projects, including
in the forest. One was
from the College of Engineering
in cooperation with the College
of Agriculture.
Dr. William A. Seay, dean of
the College of Agriculture, also
g
denied any knowledge of
proposals for the forest,
either commercial or for research
purposes.
Dr. Charles E. Bamhart, director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, said the forest is
committed to long-terforestry
research work.
Farm Relocation?
The University's poultry farm
also came into the spotlight. Dr.
Creech denied rumors that UK
has plans to sell or trade the
poultry farm.
strip-minin-

g,

strip-minin-

The farm was given to UK in
the U.S. Ceneral Services Administration after the
Veterans Hospital discontinued
its farming operation. Under the
terms of the deed, the land on
which the poultry research is conducted must be used continuously until 1977 for educational
purposes, according to the plans
submitted in the application, Dr.
Creech said.
However, the University was
asked to study the "feasibility"
of relocating the poultry research
work to Coldstream or Spindle-top- .
Most of the other of the
University's farm research is now
on these two farms.
1957 by

However, Dr. Glenwood L.
He said that before the farm,
Creech, vice president for university relations, denied that UK located on Leestown Pike near
was giving consideration to such the Veterans Administration Hosa proposal.
pital, could be disposed of it
Dr. Creech said records would have to have the approval
showed several such proposals of the U.S. Department of Health,
and requests had been made in Education and Welfare, the
the past, but none more recent Board of Trustees, the Kentucky
finance commissioner and the
that 1964.
He said the University had governor.

LEXINGTON
YELLOW CAB
Inc.
Radio Equipped
DIAL
252-22- 31

-

Those

men will be ending
tours this fall,
and the Pentagon has to allow
about five months for the induction process and training in lining up ready replacements. Thus,
March inductees actually will be
August replacements. Pentagon
planners say it would be somewhat misleading to try to project 68's April, May and June
manpower needs simply by looking at the draft calls of September, October and November 1966.
This is because enlistments and
over which the
Pentagon has no control help
determine replacement needs and
localise the overall planned level
of the armed forces must be considered.

their

two-ye-

The Army strength

stood at

1.47 million at the last accounting Nov. 30. A new force level

may be set for the fiscal year
beginning July 1.
The Pentagon declined to predict officially monthly draft calls
for 196S's second quarter, but
said in response to questions,
"We can expect a relatively high
level of draft calls to be required

State Now
Issues UK
PayChecks
State Treasurer Thelma

Sto-va- ll

has convinced University officials that she will issue payroll checks from now on.
The Board
meeting Jan.
the move "is
Earlier in the

of Trustees, in its
12, said only

that

a legal matter."
month, Clay Mau-pi-

n,

Why should you

confide in a guy
you've never met
before?

Because the guy we're talking
about is a college recruiter from
Alcoa. And the only way to play it
is honestly.
He'll be on campus in a couple of
days. And here's what we recommend you do at the interview.
First, lay your cards on the table.
Tell him what kind of work would
really turn you on.
Then, sit back and listen while he
explains how your plans figure
into Alcoa's plans. (You'll be
surprised how versatile
Aluminum Company of America
can be.)

So make it a point to meet Alcoa's
recruiter. He's a confidence man
you can really trust.

Change for the better

0ALCOA

Interview date:

THURSDAY, FEB.

1

An Equal Opportunity Employer
A Plans for Progress Company

UK pejty cash custodian,
told Mrs. Stovall that she would
be sent the records needed for

making out the January payroll.
In December, Mrsk Stovall
informed President John W. Oswald that she was legally the sole
dispenser of state monies. Thus,
after she became treasurer Jan. 1,
said Mrs. Stovall, she would end
a practice whereby the state treasurer transferred some $3.5 million
monthly-- as
"petty cash"-t- oa
UK account in a Lexington bank.

For two years, as an "experiment," the University issued its
payroll checks from those funds.

with Alcoa

* 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Jan.

15, 19G8

he

T1

IP

Fraternity Way

.

,

Of

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XV

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V

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Intramurals

L

rJ- -k

Service

Academic

Leadership

FRATERNITY RUSH

-

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Social Life

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Pall

Adv.

- SPRING

1968

Fraternity Rush this Spring will be an experience and
opportunity you should not miss. During rush, you will
have the opportunity to visit each fraternity house and
its members. From this you will get an over-al- l
picture
of fraternities and you will be able to compare each
fraternity and decide which best suits your ideals and
aspirations.
Fraternity Rush will be open to all University of Kentucky men who have completed twelve (12) hours with
a 2.1 overall either on the Lexington campus or a community college campus. Also Rush will be open to all
transfer students who have completed twelve (12) hours
with a 2.0 overall.
If you meet these requirements, regis