xt7t1g0hx612 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7t1g0hx612/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690313  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 13, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 13, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7t1g0hx612 section xt7t1g0hx612 Tiis
Thursday Evening, March

13, 19G9

HC

mmh

W.

Vol. LX,

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Education Professor
Calls Student Revolt
'Rather Conservative'

115

U

By JEAN RENAKER

Kernel Staff Writer
Edgar Z. Friedenberg, professor of education and sociology
at the State University of New York at Buffalo, spoke Wednesday
night as part of the Blazer Lecture Series and described young
people as an "illegitimate minority."
Friedenberg is the author of; to get into tne car at all." They
"The Vanishing Adolescent" and: feel "it's 'unsafe at anvsoeed.' "
"Coming of Age in America."
The crucial aspects of the stu
His lecture was the first in the dent revolt are the contradictions
reorganized lecture series spon- within society today, according
sored by Mrs. Paul C. Blazer and
Continued on Page 2, Col. 5
the Stuart Blazer Foundation.
the
Friedenberg . defined
youthful minority as a political
minority, as opposed to a class
or ethnic minority.
He said "young people in
America are defined as members
of a group subject to special
sanctions and restrictions" which
The Associated Press
do not apply to adult society.
Some college administrators
These restrictions, he added, are taking a new and tougher
are "justified as being in their stance on campus protest demonstrations mushrooming across
(youth's) best interests."
He gave as examples of such the country.
restrictions the age laws concernBut many others continued
ing drinking alcoholic beverages Wednesday to try to iron out
and driving automobiles.
the causes of campus unrest.
Another restriction, he said,
Harvard's action in arresting
is the existence of juvenile courts five outside demonstrators for
and the juvenile code itself. The breaking up a lecture class Tuesfact that in many jurisdictions
day led to speculation on whether
a juvenile can be searched with- - the Ivy League university was
out a warrant, Friedenberg said, taking a harder line on disturbwas evidence of restrictions.
ances in classrooms.
He also attacked the draft
system as being one of youth's

N.

Lecture
Series

h Dr. John

Lienhard, Department of Mcnchanical Engineering, was

the first speaker in the Philosophy Club's Spring Lecture Series
Wednesday night. The theme of the series is "Science, Technology
and Philosophy." Dr. Lienhard spoke on "Steam Engines, Frankenstein and the Men Who Made Them."
Kernel Photo By Paul Lambert

Administrators Take Hard And Soft Lines
In Attempt To Stop College Student Unrest

"restrictions."

"I have never understood why

the draft board does not come
under the general heading of
'molestation,' " the New York
professor remarked.
Youth is an illegitimate minority, according to Friedenberg,
because "none of the restrictions
provide any corresponding safeguards." Even feudalism, he said,
gave the serfs some protection
unavailable to youth in America
today.
Under such circumstances, he
said he feels some kind of revolt
is inevitable. And to him, the
present student revolt is a "rather
conservative action."
Friedenberg added that when
he was in his twenties, the youth
were convinced they could do a
better job of running the world
than their parents.
This generation, he said, "not
only doesn't want to get into
the driver's seat it doesn't want

S. I. Hayakawa, embattled
acting president of San Francisco State College, threatened discipline Wednesday against students who continue to publish
the campus newspaper he has
banned until a new publications
board can be set up. A student
editor replied that if Hayakawa
wants to silence the student journalists, he will have to "throw
himself upon the wheels of our

printing press."
At

burgh,

the University of Pitts-

college officials cleared

a campus building of students,

sit-iwho staged a
by
having a court order served on
them by a deputy sheriff.
At Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., seven members of the
Society have been
warned they will be suspended
unless they appear Thursday before a college board to answer
charges stemming from a December vandalism spree. They have
refused twice before to appear.
St. Mary's College in South
Bend, Ind., neighbor to Notre
16-ho-

n,

Afro-Americ- an

Statewide Cooperative Venture
Replaces University Press
The University Press of Ken- grams to meet their own needs
tucky, a new statewide press in the new centralized publishing
designed as a cooperative pub- operation for the editing, delishing venture involving nine signing and publishing of schocolleges and universities, will larly works.
have an orientation meeting FriBy coordinating the publishday in Lexington.
ing activies of the nine instituThe statewide publishing ef- tions, the press expects that the
fort will replace the University duplicate overheads and other
of Kentucky Press, which will expenses incurred by separate
cease to exist except as a legal publishing operations can be
avoided. This will then permit
entity for the handling of matters pertinent to its own publi- more publishing programs and
cations issued prior to the estab- opportunities for individual scholishment of the cooperative press. lars from the member instituIts staff on the Lexington campus tions.
An editorial board, composed
will serve as the nucleus of the
of representatives from the nine
new publishing facility.
Plans call for the nine Kenschools, will approve all manutucky colleges and universities scripts.
The chairman for the editorial
participating to formulate pro

board is Dr. Holman Hamilton of

UK.

Other members include Dr.
Louis Smith, Berea College; Dr.
Charles Hazelrigg, Centre College; Dr. Frederic C. Ogden,
Eastern Kentucky University;
Dr. Henry E. Cheaney, Kentucky
State College; Dr. Johnson Duncan, Morehead State University;
Dr. Ralph A. Tesseneer, Murray
State University.
Dr. Richard M. Kain, University of Louisville; Dr. Lowell
Harrison, Western Kentucky University; and Dr. Lewis W. Cochran, Dr. Donald A. Ringe, Dr.
Vernon Musselman and Bruce F.
Denbo (as
nonvoting
secretary), all of the University
of Kentucky.
io

Dame, made public the same
stiff rules against campus disorder adopted recently by Notre
Dame.
Under the rules, students who
don't respond to a "cease and
desist" order and continue to
disrupt campus operations will
be suspended after 15 minutes
and expelled after an additional
five minutes. Outsiders will be
charged with trespassing after
the first
period. Students will be liable to the same
charge after expulsion.
te

Elsewhere, college administrators worked through negotiation and conciliation to put
down campus rebellion.
Dr. Edgar F. Shannon, president of the University of Virginia, announced plans to set
up a committee on equal opportunity as a response to demonstrations by some campus
groups which accused the university of having a "racist" policy.

He said all members of minority groups and students from
all backgrounds should "be made
to feel welcome" at Virginia.
At Temple University in Philadelphia, the board of trustees
granted tenure to a professor who
was turned down on tenure last
spring because he refused to give
students grades.
Student support of the professor, Dr. Sidney B. Simon, had
led to student marches, sleep-ins,

sit-in- s

and

sing-in-

s.

Takes Effect March 24

Construction Causes Bus System Changes

JE ANNIE LEEDOM
Kernel Staff Writer
A new University bus system
will go into effect Monday,
March 24, because of construction
which is scheduled to begin in
the Medical
Science Building area around
April 1, according to Col. F. C.
Dempsey, chief of Safety and
Security.
Col. Dempsey said the new
bus system will consist of four
routes which will be designated
by specific colors appearing on
the curbs and various other places
near the bus stops.
The system will include an
Express Route (designated by
No. 1
green stops), Local Route
red stops). Local
(designated by
By

Center-Agricultur-

al

Route No. 2 (designated by blue
stops) and Local Evening Route
No. 3 (designated by purple
stops).
The Express Route, known
as the green route, will begin
in the fann lot on Cooper Drive
and will schedule stops at the
Agricultural Science Building,
the Medical Center, the Pharmacy Building, Limestone Street
side of Taylor Education Building, Euclid Avenue side of the
Student Center, and the Fine
Arts Building, then proceed back
to the Medical Center.
There will be no stops past
the Medical Center while the bus
is making its return trip to the
farm lot.
According to Col. Dempsey,

the trip from the farm lot to the
main campus will take about
three and a half minutes. During
rush hours (7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m.,
4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.) twobuseswill
follow this route.
Local Route No. 1, the red
route, will begin at the Ag
Science Building and will stop
at the Medical Center, the Pharmacy Building, Law College,
Limestone Street side of Taylor
Education Building, Euclid Avenue side of the Student Center,
the corner of Rose Street and
Euclid Avenue, the Fine Arts
Building,

Chemistry-Physic- s

Building, then proceed to the
Medical Center and the Ag
Science Building.
Col. Dempsey said Local

Route No. 1 would not attempt ing to the intersection of Hugue-le-t
Drive and University Drive.
a precise schedule, but would be
It will then go down Univercontinuously moving bus.
Local Route No. 2, the blue sity Drive to the farm lot and
route, will comprise two buses start the route anew.
during rush hours and is set up
Local Evening Route No. 3,
to serve the resident core on the the purple route, will remain the
west side of campus.
same as the present evening route
This route will begin at the and operate from 5:30 p.m. until
farm lot on Cooper Drive and
10:30 p.m.
will stop at the Sports Center,
Local Routes Nos. 1 and 2
the Complex mall on University
will operate from 7:30 a.m. until
Drive, the Complex mall on
Woodland Avenue, will proceed 5:30 p.m.
By splitting the present local
up Woodland to Columbia,
stopping at the intersection of route into two local routes, the
Columbia and Rose Street, then buses should be able to transport
three times as many people
stopping at the Chemistry-Physic- s
Building and at the metered during the day, Col. Dempsey
area on the north side of the said. The buses are now moving
Medical Center before proceed more than 30,000 people a week.

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thuniday, March 13,

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V

Says Revolt
Is Inevitable
Continued from race One
to Fricdenberg. One such contradiction is in the area of civil
rights, he said.
"There can be no question
as to the legitimacy of the civil
rights movement," he added,
"because of the ideas of liberty
inherent in the founding of this

country."
He also attacked the war in
Vietnam as one of the "contra-

dictions."
"Explanations are demanded
if one person murders another."
Yet, he added, it is lawful
to "kill a woman or a child if
you are a soldier" and at war.
Friedenberg said, "There is no
demand for the United States to
do those things which would increase its legitimacy to terminate the war, for example. Yet
society contradicts itself by calling for an end to violence and
a return to law and order."

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The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky,
Kentucky 40506. Second class
poktage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
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KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March 13, 190- 9- 3

Fiedler, Washington National Symphony Supply Night Of Enjoyment
By DAVID A. DISOWNING

Kcmcl Music Critic
To have attended last Monday evening's concert by the
Washington National Symphony
under the direction of Arthur
Fiedler with any object in mind
other than entertainment would
have proved disappointing. However, this "Pops" concert presented by the Central Kentucky
Concert and Lecture Series was
musical entertainment at its best.
Tliis was no time to be burdened
with aesthetics.
The National Symphony is a
well disciplined ensemble and
provided Mr. Fiedler with a firm
foundation on which to work
his magic.
The "Pops" program opened
with the delightful "Hungarian
March" from the very serious
oratorio "The Damnation of
Faust" by Berlioz. The orchestral ensemble was quite good
and the work was presented with
vitality. Only the trombones
lacked clean playing toward the
end.
'Academic Festival Overture'
Although the "Academic Festival Overture" of Brahms was
given an adequate reading, it
seemed to lack an overall sense
of enthusiasm, a necessity for college tunes such as the four serving
as the nucleus to this work.
The orchestra several times

experienced minor difficulty in

anticipating Mr. Fiedler's cues.
Likewise, the audience had a
little trouble in anticipating the

end of the piece, beginning its
applause before the final chords.
The first half of the program
concluded with the Crieg Piano
Concerto with soloist Miss Hiro
Imamura, a very talented and
young pianist. There
were moments when one might
have wished for a bigger, richer
sound, but she always managed
to project her tone over the orchestra.
Miss Imamura has a very fine
technique and plays with clarity
and intelligence. Again the audience applauded at the end of
the first movement and caused
well-traine-

d

mm

one to wonder if it was started
by those impressed by the playing (it wasn't that unusual), or
perhaps by those that thought
it was over, having only that
much on their "great music" album of excerpts.
The second movement was
lyrical and lovely, but the transition to the faster third movement
was a bit awkward and one
might have wished for more sparkle in this final movement.
rt

The program notes pointed
out that Miss Imamura made
her recital debut in an
program. Her performance
Monday evening gives one hopes

o.

Louis Blues March" a la Glenn
Miller sent a murmur of interest
running through the house. These
numbers were played with zest.
The brasses, who up to this
point had just managed to get
by, now really came to life.
Not only were these musical
memories fun but hey were very
well done. '
The next symphony concert
in Lexington will be by the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra
on Thursday and Friday evenings, March 13 and 14, 8:15 p.m.,
at Haggin Auditorium, Transylvania College, with pianist Leonard Pennario as guest artist.

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of hearing her Mozart in the
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The second half of the program opened with the "Roumanian Rhapsody No. 1" of Enes-cAlthough played very well,
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* Where Are You Strom?
It's hard to put in words our reaction to Sen. Strom Thurmond.
Even now, hours after he has finished his speech, we feel uncertain
as to
something. Strom, dark suit, blue shirt, red tie, bald head,
clown-lik- e
gestures. Strom. Powerful Senator. Influential Republican
cohort of Dicky. Unaware, unenlightened, outdated, southern WASP.
At first we Just laughed. We were rude. When the old boy told
us the electoral college was needed as a "buffer" between the government and the people, we couldn't hold back. We really didn't
want to. We were sure Strom was going to tell us next the sugar
beet situation was a "paramount" problem facing the nation today.
He didn't. He said the Panama Canal thing was. We had a right to
do whatever we wanted there since we bought that land. Can one
country buy another? Is this man real?
Finally he started to talk about something. We need the ABM at
all costs. No price is too high to pay to protect American lives. Except
in the ghetto. The nuclear nonproliferation treaty should be defeated.
It gives the Reds too much of an advantage. Vietnam is crucial to
our national protection. If we don't stop them there, they will be at
the shores of Hawaii in no time. He really said that. And apparently
believes it. We should bomb the dikes and flood those little
in North Vietnam. We'll drop them notes first and tell them to get
put. What?
We felt like screaming, throwing chairs. This had to be a dream.
No modem man believes such nonsense. He does. Somebody tell him
he's dead. Tell him his world is not here. It's gone. Tell somebody
something. This is unreal. Laugh. Laugh louder. It cannot be true.
This is a government official, running our country.
It's true. A paramount problem: our government is indeed outdated
and unenlightened.

...

no-goo- ds

The Kentucky

Iernel

University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED

THURSDAY, MARCH

1894

13, 19.39

Le Nouveau Nixon

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Lee B. Becker,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Kernel Forum: the readers write

If
Band Threats

To the Editor of the Kernel:
' At Saturday's Tennessee game, several
students in the Kentucky crowd booed
the band when a march was started.
When the band stopped and didn't play
anything the rest of the game except
Banner"
"ON! ONI," the
and music for the twirling show, there were
a number of snide remarks directed toward
the band and Mr. Harry Clarke, director.
"We'll get you fired, too"; "You' re next";
and "If you want to keep your job you'll
play 'Dixie' " were some of the remarks
made toward Mr. Clarke. This attitude
had its core in a group of rooters sitting
behind and to one side of the band,
"Star-Spangle-d

and spread from there into various other
sections of the crowd. I don't know who
these
were, but as a UK bandsman, I have some advice for them.
I'll tell them just how much the student body had to do with the firing of
Fred M. Dart . . . absolutely nothing!
I'll tell them just how far they would
get in an attempt to have Mr. Clarke
relieved of his job . . . absolutely nowhere! The University of Kentucky, a long
time now in the big league of sports,
is just now coming into the big league
of bands (Tennessee, Ohio State, University of Texas at Austin, Vanderbilt). The
man solely responsible for this is Harry
Clarke. In the first place, no one in his
right mind is going to kill the "golden
no-min- ds

goose," and secondly, if some fools try,
they are going to have 200 people march
right over them. Further . . . the UK
band will continue to play "ON! ON!,"
the
Banner," "My Old
Kentucky Home" and "Dixie," but the
bulk of our playing will remain to be
marches, arrangements of pop times, and
twirling music, just as it is at Tennessee, Ohio State, University of Texas at
Austin and Vanderbilt. The crowd has
the right to request any tune . . . usually,
they will get it. They do not have the
right to boo any selection the band director makes.
You may ask why the band director
didn't make this statement. I'll tell you
that he doesn't have to lower himself

0

to stating the obvious to a pack of brats.
I enjoy doing this
it achieves results. It is when these zeroes see someone coming down a step ladder to get
to them that they realize how far below
the rest of us they are!
We ended this season on a rather
sour note. I recommend that people keep
this in mind and resolve to start next
band season off with a spirit of appreciation for the band, pride in being in
the big band league and cooperation to
boost a winning team. Those who refuse,
as I have said before, will have 200
people marching right over them!
John Daniel White
Act S Senior

...

"Star-Spangle- d

Wan
By

EDITOR'S NOTE: The opinions' expressed in this regular column are those
of its author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the Kernel.

It was my pleasure about two years
ago to visit San Francisco. I found that the
city lived up to its reputation of being
one of the most beautiful in America.
Although I found the city fascinating,
the real highlight of my trip was a visit
to the Napa Valley north of the city.
We spent an entire Sunday driving around
the narrow country roads of the valley
and, although it was October, the sun
was hot and the air reeked with the pungent odor of ripening grapes.
The Napa Valley grapes are used primarily for California wines which grace
many American dinner tables. During
my visit, I took the opportunity to tour
a few of the wineries and sample some
of their products and, although I'm certainly no connoisseur of great wines, I,
know what I like and I like California
wines.
Since my trip I've done a little research on the grape industry in California'
and I've uncovered some interesting facts
which I would like to jiharejvith you.
Although California does produce considerable quantities of wine, one jot its
greatest contributions has been "table
grapes, in particular the Tokay. Experts
tell us that the Tokay, which is found

L

E. FIELDS

on so many American tables, grows best
One man is reported to be building
in the 10 square mile area around Lodi, a machine that will pick the grapes.
Calif.
The machine has three major advantages.
The uses of this famous grape are al- First, it will pick up to four pounds an
most unlimited. I have come to be such hour, which is about twice the amount
an admirer of this succulent fruit that picked by the average migrant worker.
whenever I'm writing. I always have a Secondly, it does not eat more grapes than;
bowl nearby and munch on them during it picks and third, it is a better judge
of the quality of grapes.
pauses. I have come to believe they stimulate my brain. (This is, of course, just
Another man is working on the idea
one man's opinion.)
of training chimpanzees to harvest his
Moreover, what would an orgy (of crop. The chimps have proven more than
late called Frat Parties) be without grapes. smart enough for the task, but the major
From time immemorial the grape has problem is that they can't reach all of
been the symbol of a truly successful the grapes. The gentleman is training
orgy and no honest host would be caught
gorillas. (His first alternative was to use
without them. The grape's primary use the offensive line of the Los Angles Rams,
at orgies is to keep some sweet young but the linemen all wanted blazers.) The
thing occupied peeling them for you. gorillas, like the chimps, are smart enough,
This is of particular importance if there but like the migrant workers, they eat vast
is a surplus of sweet young things availquantities of grapes.
able. (In the event you should encounter
Whatever the final solution, I'm sure
this problem, at the same time lacking that old Yankee Ingenuity will pay off
sufficient grapes to go around, my phone and there will always be an ample supnumber is
If my wife should ply of California table grapes.
California grapes can be purchased
answer, hang up.)
The harvesting of California grapes In just about any reputable food store.
is an interesting process in itself. For They are even available in the Crille
most of the state this job is usually done at the Student Center, as many of you
by migrant workers who travel from vinemay well know.
yard to vineyard. In recent years, howCrape eating, over the years, has deever, there has been some sort of wage veloped into a fine art, considered by
dispute (I don't know the exact details), many to be one of the most sophistiand this has forced the owners to recated art forms in existence. There are
sort to Interesting innovations.
several techniques which can be mastered

with relative ease by the amateur.
The simplest is grasping a single grape
between the thumb and first two fingers
and with a sweeping motion, you pop
it into your mouth. Another slightly more
complicated maneuver is to cradle the
grape on the fingers, and, starting about
the waist, bring the hand up in a sweeping motion and releasing the grape somewhere below the chin. (To raise the hand
above is a violation of the rules
of etiquette as set forth by Amey
The grape then travels upward,
until overcome by gravity, whereby it falls
and is caught in the mouth.
This method was originally connected
with peanuts but can be used very effectively with grapes if care is taken to
recompute the trajectory, which will be
somewhat different due to the size and
weight of the grape.
Another method which was perfected
by the grape pickers themselves is to
grasp an entire bunch and Jam them into
your face, greedily gobbling up grapes as
you go. Care should be taken to see that
the owner isn't watching.
Whatever method you finally decide
to use, remember that there are a few
people In this world who don't eat grapes
and don't like others to eat grapes. Your
answer, should you be approached by one
of these nonbelievers is, "THINGS ARE
ROUCH ALL OVER, EVEN THE BIRDS
ARE WALKINCII"
Van-dersno-

277-592- 3.

'

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March
441-32-24-

The Trials Of An IBM Card

51

By DAN GOSSETT
And
MARY NELL SUTHERLAND

Kernel Staff Writers
Watch it, clown!
I'm still sore from getting his
number punched on me and that
dum-dutwirls me a round on his
pencil.
That's better, put me down
and write gently, filling in all
of spaces. Don't forget to sign
your name, dum-duStop bending mc! It's written
plainly all over my face, "DO
m

FLOWERS
For Any

NOT BEND, FOLD OR SPIN-

DLE."

There I was sitting in my box
with the other IBM schedule
cards, minding my own business,
when some broad grabs me and
runs me through a
machine. That's where I picked
up this clown, No.
He's a real comedianin the box
marked sex he puts "only on
weekends.