xt7tdz032238 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7tdz032238/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680829  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, August 29, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, August 29, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7tdz032238 section xt7tdz032238 Tee Kentocky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

Thursday Evening, Aug. 29,

UNIVERSITY

19G8

MEM Gets Nod;
Violence Erupts

By AUSTIN SCOTT
Some 3,000 antiwar demonstrators and Chicago
CIIICACO(AP)
police battled beneath the windows of the Conrad Hilton Hotel,
the Democratic National Convention headquarters, Wednesday
night as Hubert H. Humphrey was receiving the party's presidential
nomination across town.
Early today, as Illinois National Guardsmen formed a protective
circle around the Hilton, some 600 dissident convention delegates
and youths marched down Michigan Avenue. They carried candles
and sang softly while the antiwar protesters slept in a park across
the street from the hotel.
,
The International Amphitheatre, site of the convention and
five miles distant, remained secure behind police guards and a
barbed wire fence.
Tear gas filtered throughout the nation's largest hotel Wedsuite of Humphrey
nesday night, even reaching the 25th-floand the room of Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy.
Clubs Used
Police used clubs in subduing the demonstrators, most of them
white youths, some of them bearded and sandaled, some clean-cu- t.

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Police arrested 267 youths. At least 300 demonstrators were
injured, most of them from the policemen's clubs as the youths
surged into police lines and attempted to storm the hotel.
The estimated 3,000 protesters filled Michigan Avenue from sidewalk to sidewalk during the melee, blocking all traffic, taunting
police with names, throwing an occasional rock or bottle, and
refusing orders to disperse.
Police, after the original confrontation, beat and dragged the
protesting youths into police vans.
The latent in what has become a nightly series of confrontations began in the early afternoon, at an antiwar rally which police
said was attended by 7,000 persons.
Violence In Lobby
Violence even invaded the hotel's
lobby as police
pursuing fleeing demonstrators fell upon an unidentified, longhaired newsman. He was beaten and dragged through the lobby

door.
He was released at the insistence of two Columbia Broadcasting System executives, and taken to an aid station set up
by supporters of McCarthy on the hotel's 15th floor.
Sidney Lens, a demonstration leader, said 15 of the injured
remained at the hotel because "the cops are arresting anyone
with a bandage."
McCarthy's
daughter, Margaret, rolled bandages
for a time, and McCarthy came down briefly to talk with several
injured persons.
Much of the hours-lon- g
confrontation appeared to be a stand-of- f
with a double line of police stretching from sidewalk to sidewalk
and backed by a double line of
National Cuardsmen
facing an equal number of demonstrators who sat or stood in the
street, milling and singing an occasional song.
rifle-carryi-

Dragged Across Class
g
But during several
rushes five and six policemen
would fall upon a single demonstrator who had shouted an insult,
club him, then drag the demonstrator across streets strewn with
broken glass to the paddy wagons.
Photographers who tried to take pictures of these incidents
were often threatened by groups of police who raised their clubs
and shouted fn unison, "Get out of here!" Several were arrested.
Police Supt. James B. Conlisk said, "The force used was the
force necessary to repel the mob."
street-clearin-

Kernel Photo by Howard Mason

Rushee Gets
The Ole 'Buffin'

Final preparations prior to Wednesday night's bus trips, the opening
of fall fraternity rush, are made by Joe Chase, a freshman from
Ft. Knox. Shining and buffing are performed by Fred Brown;
supervision is by Lionel Evans, in the striped shirt. Bus trips
continue through Friday night.

Culture Course
To Operate On Pass-FaBasis
Afro-Americ-

an

il

By DARRELL RICE
Managing Editor
Many of the students who attended the first class session Wednesday of the new ','AfrorAmeri-ca- n
Life and Culture" course
were surprised to learn that the
g
class is embarking
on another progressive trail the
pass-fa- il
grading system.
The special course was instituted as a result of efforts
made during the last school year
by the Black Student Union.
Some ten professors from different departments are to conduct the class in segments during the semester. The format
of lectures will deal with the
disciplines of anthropology, sociology, psychology, economics,
literature, music and political
science all as related to the
black man.
pace-settin-

The grading system is to consist simply of students' passing
or failing the three-hocourse
with no levels of gradation.
ur

No examinations will be administered during the year, and

tempt by black activists to instill pride in Blacks for being
Black and for being a part of
the black culture that has been
ignored if not suppressed by the
white majority.
At any rate, after the discussion had ended, it was difficult
to determine if anyone had gained
much of anything from the first

class attendance is not required.
The passing and failing marks
will be determined from a series
of papers required of the students
at the end of each course segment.
Terminology Discussion
The first session of the class,
saw a discussion develop over
the use of such words as" Black,"
"Afro-America-

A Black

and "Negro."
student in the class

session.

As the class was filing out
at the end of the period, one
black student encountered one of
his acquaintances and asked,
"Did you learn
anything,
Brother?"
"Yeah. There's a bunch of
honkies in here."

raised an immediate objection
to the word "Negro" as found
in the course outline and as used
by faculty members who will
conduct portions of the class,
as well as by white students
present.
BSU President Theodore Berry
said he felt instructors and students should be required to use
the term
or

UK May Invite

"Afro-America-

Nixon, HHH
To Speak Here

"Black" rather than "Negro,"

which many Blacks feel is a carryover from white paternalism.

'Negro' Implies Corporation
The point was raised that the
term "American Negro" represents an attempt by white society

Dr. Stuart Forth, who soon
will become acting vice president for student affairs, said
Wednesday he had been asked
to "explore the possibilities" of
inviting former Vice President
Richard Nixon and the Democratic Presidential nominee to
speak on campus.
The Young Democrats, the
Young Republicans and the Associated Women Students combined to ask the administration
to consider the invitation.
Dr. Forth emphasized that
the invitations are only in the
consideration stage, without taking into account the chances of

to incorporate Blacks on terms
set by whites thus, depriving
of their rightful
culture and heritage as retained
by other groups.
Several white students indicated that they considered the
terms "Black,"
and "Negro" superfluous, with
the point being that "we are all
Americans" and that that term
should be sufficient to cover all
citizens of this country.
And others said that the terms
were necessary for semantic purposesin order to differentiate
between what Americans are being discussed in particular instancessuch as Blacks in the
new course.
But Berry maintained that students and professors in the course
still should be "coerced" to use
"Afro-America-

'r.Ci

-a-

J-Jw?"

"

Package9

:

-

'a"kt3 the tenns "Black" and
rather than "Negro"
This is UK Marching Band Director William Harry Clark's secret
or "American Negro" because
at least until September 21 when UK opens its football season
"that was the purpose of the
course."
against the University of Missouri. Mr. Clark is not building up
any great expectations for the audience, but he feels that the band
Black' is Pride
will have people "completely surprised when we step onto the
He was referring to the at
field at the first game." (Story on Page 2).
f

'Surprise

?

fc

'

state-support- ed

"Afro-America-

i

the candidates' accepting.
Among the areas to be "explored" are the technical procedures under which a
institution may sponsor political events, the security
measures that would have to be
taken and the costs.
Asked if the candidates would
be asked to come during any
certain time of the year if inForth said he
vited at all-had no idea when they would
come but added, "I would assume it would be before

'

Dr.

* 2--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, August 29,

TIIK

UK Marching Band

l8.

WORLD REPORT

Promises 'Surprise'

By CHARLES BO WEN
The 19G8 Wildcat Band, under
the new direction of William Harry Clark, is trying for a surprise
package effect at the football
halftime season this year.
"I'm anticipating a fine band
this year, one of the best," Mr.
Clark said, "but we feci that
the best approach this year is
not by the printed page, but
by word of mouth."
Mr. Clark said that the band's
publicity plan this year is that
"we want the student to judge
the band by what we look like
and sound like, not by anticipation.
"Every year everybody says
'the band is really going to be
WANT ACTION? .

..

USE THE KERNEL WANT ADS

great and then when we may
not live up to their expectations;
they're disappointed." Mr. Clark
believes that students are disappointed with the band because
the band in past years has been

The coming year at UK,

Mr.

Clark said, "is going to be an
exciting year. I can feel a spirit,
a vitality about the coming year
that I've never felt before. I have
a feeling that this university is
coming to life. The band can
play a big part in this spirit.
That's why I want people to completely surprised when we step
onto the field at the first game."
He was adamant about revealing the exact nature of the
"surprise". Mr. Clark was named
to succeed Fred Dart, director
of the marching band since 1966,
by Dr. Hubert P. Henderson,
head of the Fine Arts Department. Robert Welch, formerly of
Eastern High School of Middle-toKy., is this year's assistant
director.
n,

Just 7 minutes South
on U.S. 27 (Limestone)
USE YOUR FREE PASSES
IN YOUR COUPON BOOK

INTERNATIONAL
Soviet armor
nearby, the Czechoslovak National Assembly refused to ratify the
Moscow agreement and urged
the government to seek an early
withdrawal of occupation forces.
The Soviet press hinted the Kremlin is bearing down on Czechoslovakia's leaders to purge advocates of that country's reform
movement.
GUATEMAL- A- U. S. Ambassador John Cordon Mein was
machine-gunne- d
to death Wednesday on a street in Guatemala
City by unknown assassins while
he was driving from his home
to the embassy. The Kentucky-bor- n
FRACUE-Wi- th

Mein's death left the State
in
Washington
Department
"shocked and grieved."
SAICON-- U.
S. air cavalry-

men forced a surrounded North
Vietnamese battalion to stand
and fight Thursday, 32 miles
northwest of Saigon. A U. S.
spokesman said 93 of the esti- -

Starts 8:30

Eugene J.
McCarthy said he offered all his
support to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in order to deny the nomination to Vice President Hubert
H. Humphrey, but a telegram

-

qaall-flcatl-

Julie Andrews
as

r

i

i

FOR SALE

dition.

$35

27A5t

Refrigerator. Good
or best offer. Call

6.

27A3t

standard transmisexcellent condition.

28A5t

MAL1BU SS,
Must
for $980. Chem. Phys. 245 or
28A3t

CHEVELLE

1963 Richardson Mobile
FOR SALE
The bedrooms located
Home. 10'x50
front and back. Central living room,

m.

kitchen, bath. Fully carpeted, furnished, lots of storage space. Excel- S
after
lent condition. Call
weekdays, all day weekends. 29A5t
254-61-

'ROSS HUNTERS

29A5t

Call

WANTED

V-- 8.

HEALEY 3 tops, rebuilt
engine, new clutch and transmission.
Good tires and in perfect running
condition.
Body needs work. Must
sell, will accept any reasonable offer. Call
after 6 p.m. 29A2t

MILLIE

Carol Channing
eJamesFox

Apartment near UK;
furnished; three or more graduate
students, $45 a month per student.
Also large house for rent near UK
furnished 20) or more graduate students at $45 a month per student.
RENT

FOR

con-

59 AUSTIN

Mary Tyler Moore

Men mam mtmu
ALSO

bedrooms for rent. Close
to bath and phone. Linens furnished
and the rooms kept clean. Private
home. Bath is almost private. $40 a
month In advance for each room.
27A4t
Phone
FOR RENT Studio Apt. opening onto
patio. Well furnished. So. Mill St.
Available Sept. 1; $150, Includes utilafter 6 p.m.
ities. Phone
I HAVE two

269-18-

FOB SALE

HONDA 67 Super CL 90. all the extras. In showroom condition; very
low mileage. Need offer this weekend. Call
after 6 p.m. 29A2t
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FOR RENT

a.

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THE TIME HAS COME TO
PAD YOUR PAD

3J

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CLASSIFIED

Te place a classified aheae UK
(tension ZS19 er lUs la at the
111 Jearnaltsm, frem I to Been,
1 to 6, Monday threat
Friday.
Rates are 11.85 fer te wards, IS fer
three eonsecatlve Insertions ef same
ad er $3.75 per week. Deadline la 11
a.m. day prior to pabllcatlon.
Ne advertisement may elte race, religion er national erlfla as a
for renting room er fer

sacrifice

it-

from Sen. Kennedy to the convention asked that his name not
be placed in nomination for president or vice president. Sen.
CeorgeS. McCovern and Georgia
Cov. Lester Maddox both agreed
to support the Democratic presidential nominee. Maddox withdrew as a candidate and headed
back to Georgia, while McCovern
said he would be placed in nomination by Sen. Abraham Ribicoff
of Connecticut.

automatic, excellent condition.

THEM ALL!

I

NATIONAL
CHICACO-Se- n.

64

OF

L
ILL
DICK VAN DYKE

300-pln-

sion, economical,
Call

THE
FUNNIEST
N

s
North Vietnamese
mated
had been killed; eight men of the
101st Air Cavalry Division were
killed and 26 wounded.

1963 PLYMOUTH,

1st OUTDOOR SHOWING!

NOW SHOWING!

ROB-I-

Presi

From the Wirt of the Associated

SomeWANTED
PROOFREADER
one to proof newspaper copy 1 hour
5 days
per week, afterper day,
noons. $20 per month. Call 2447 or
27Atf
2319.

FEMALE HELP

Bookkeeper wanted,
prefer married student's wife. Benefits good. Apply 407 So. Limestone.
27A3t
Mr. Shriver.
MEN. DRUG CLERKS Full time or
part time nights and weekends.
27A4t
Drugs in Southland.
Sag-es-

WANTED
Legal Secretary, 5 days
6c
week. Rosenbaum
Smith. Call
27A5t
Male student to share
WANTED
modern
efficiecy
apartment near
Call Ellerbe Powe at
campus.
28A5t

.

Male student to share fur277-75after 5 p.m.
29A3t

WANTED

nished apt. Call

cabbages & Icings
313 South Asland, behind Amato'i

production of

MISCELLANEOUS
Daniel Boone Riding Stable
Highway 227, between Winchester
and Boonesboro. Trail rides, picnic
area. Open dally
Phone

HORSES

10:00-6:0-

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The Kentucky

Original Dacca
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Tony Perkins "Champayne Murders"

71

LOOKING FOR
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Fast Cleaning Service

SUBSCRIPTION

PRIVATE BANQUET

Limestone

aiw n&sl

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MCLEAN

DE8T

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DIRECTOR-MIK-

E

nowi

Starts 8:30

ACADEMY AWARD
I

O MAJOR and MINOR ALTERATIONS

NICHOLS

JOSEPH E. LEVINE

rt
MIKE
UMTt

A

NICHOLS-LAWREN-

CE

TURMANi,

This is Benjamin.
He's a little
worried about
his future.

cihLJ
THE GRADUATE
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TECHNICOLOR

Open

7--

6

I 8 other Locations

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Adm. $1.50

WKH

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O ONE HOUR CLEANING

$9.27
$.10

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor.
Associate
News Desk Editors, Sports
Advertising, Business, Circulation

252-934- 4

119 South

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RATES

Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from files

ROOM

KERNEL TELEPHONES

Reservation

CLOSE TO THE CAMPUS?

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 19 IS.
Advertising published herein la Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

Plus

Laurence Harvey

PANAVtSION

"DARLING"

2321
1320
1447
X319

'

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tluirvby, AhrusI 29,

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SOAP DISHES

TthlOM

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BALSA WOOD

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POSTED
PENCIL

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LOCKS
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* The Kentucky
KSTADLISIIKn 1801

Iernel

Tlic South' s Outstanding College Daily
Univfrsity of Kf.ntucky

THURSDAY, AUQUST

29, 19G8

Editorials represent the ojHnions of the Editors, not of the University.
Leo

IS.

Decker,

Editor-in-Chi-

David Holwcrk, Editorial rage Editor
, Associate Editor
Guy M. Mcndcs,

Darrell Hicr, Managing Editor
Tom I Vrr, Ihisiness Manager

eV6M

Youth Gets To Know
Speaking before the Democratic
Convention Tuesday night, Democratic candidate for Senate Kath-erin- e
Peden called for a dialogue
between the party and the youth
of this nation. "Let us talk to
America's youth," she said, "and
at the same time try to listen to
what they are trying to tell us."
Considering the thousands of
anti-wa- r
demonstrators in Chicago,
the large number of students who
are watching in dismay as their
choices for President are systematically ignored, and the unknown
number who already feel no allegiance to the political system of
this country, we feel Miss Peden's
words could not have been more
meaningful.
Miss Peden was quite right when
she said that what the young people
of America are saying is "(we)
aren't going to buy this kind of
nonsense any more."
The answer, as Miss Peden also
said, "is to stop all this absurd
double talk to say frankly what we
believe, and to deliver on what we

promised."
This may not be the entire
answer, however, for the Convention has actually been doing a

In

mid-Jul- y

the National

Com-

There are now two government
reports which bear upon this situation. While they are heartening in
some ways, they also underline
the necessity for even greater efforts
to solve the racial problem.
A Census Bureau report states
that the rate of concentration of
blacks in America's large, central
cities has not only stopped but may
even have been reversed slightly
during the past several years. Meanwhile, the Council of Economic Advisers reports a rapid rise in the
average nonwhite's income and
says that for the first time in American history large numbers of blacks
"have now begun to enter the middle class."
There is some encouragement
in these two reports. Obviously a
rise in nonwhite income is something to rejoice over. Clearly it

would be better were there a break

I

THROUGH
DOU)ry)TOvO0 SAlGOtt..

STAOLL

i

of oua

Htac.

commiTmcMT

pretty good job of showing what
it's thinking. For instance, the
Democrat certainly said what they
believed Wednesday night. Convention Chairman Carl Albert referred
to Chicago Mayor Richard Daley
as "Mr. Democrat, USA." Daley
is the man who delivered what he
promised the Convention Committee: law and order. He delivered it
by turning the city of Chicago
into an armed camp.
This kind of
approach may not build
confidence in the hearts of the
youth of America, but it does at
least serve the purpose of defining
who and where the enemy is. It
shows clearly why so many young
people have opted out of the political system of this country, for
it shows where the more "liberal"
Democratic party is heading and
what it thinks. And it also carries
the implicit warning that if the
party ever starts delivering on what
it has really promised, then this
country is certainly in trouble.
As an aftemote, the Convention
voted Wednesday night to exclude
Young Democrats from representation of the National Committee.
Punch it at me, baby, as the saying
hard-hittin-

g,

sock-it-to-m-

e,

IS

AOD WHV ITS

impeftATWC
U

STAV

THAT

I

C0CH IS, Of COUAXC

thc xuPAcmi Goal
AlCAfO.
OF
CxJCtlH

Artf

rWKiDO

motft

'OUT Of THIS

DC At

AN0 AtfCllCAfO

tOCAU

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muiT OC DtFCfOfiCD."
Do cvurtQ. what thc cocr.1!

By David Holwerk

in the trend for nonwhites to concentrate in compact areas in the
great cities.
Yet it is also necessary to examine closely the whole picture.
Part of the drop in the black movement to cities comes from the discouraging reports sent from these
cities to the folks back home in the
rural South. While this may result
in fewer blacks in Northern cities,
it only leaves large numbers of
Southern nonwhites without a
visible hope of
Yet it is clearly encouraging
that more blacks are able to move
into the suburbs when and if they
wish, thus indicating some improvement in attitude on the part
of whites. At the same time it
shows that all blacks do not reject
middle-clas- s
the
values.
This movement is the result of
higher incomes, even though this
as yet affects only a small minority
of blacks. It is also heartening
to learn that the antipoverty program of the past few years is beginning to bite and have its effect
on nonwhite incomes.
Thus there is reason for a modicum of encouragement. But it would
be a tragic mistake if this resulted
in any undue optimism, if it led
anyone to believe that racial problems were on the way to early
solution, or if it misled Americans
to feel that even greater efforts
were not needed.
Credit: Christian Science Monitor
self-betterme-

so-call-

'Because A some&oDv
LOT OF

Minnesota Daily

goes.

Some Hope In Cities
mission on Urban Problems released a most pessimistic report.
It dismally declared that, if present
trends kept on, "America by 1985
would be well on the road towards
a society characterized by race stratification along racial and economic
lines as well as geographic separation." The Monitor's reaction was
that this need not happen, that the
country had it within its power to
prevent any result so at variance
with the ideals upon which the nation was founded.

A

WIGHT,

Some of us who had the misfortune
to have incomplete schedules and the
wrong places in the alphabet had a
great shock yesterday. The general reports from the last three semesters had
been that registration went smoothly and
efficiently, but it soon became apparent
that registration goes smoothly only for
those whose names come up at the right
time or for those whom the IBM machine
in the basement of McVey chooses to
bless with a complete schedule.
By the end of registration Tuesday,
many of those in line were convinced
of the conservative argument that this
country is indeed a welfare state. This
assertion is backed up the general conduct of the registration procedures, for
only in a welfare state could so many
people who know so little control the
actions of so many.
A case in point is the girl who handed
me a delinquent slip instead of my IBM
cards. She neglected to hand me the
little sheet which goes along with it,
and which states that the IBM cards
of delinquent students are hekl in the
Administration Annex.
The result was that after ascertaining
that the delinquent fee was
I traipsed over to the Coliseum again
non-existe-

only to discover that I had to go back
to the Annex to get my IBM cards.
Moreover, the girls in the Annex couldn't
find my cards for about five minutes;
this may have been because they should
have been filed under A for Administrative Blunder.
At any rate, by the time I got back
the few classes which had been open
were closed. "Be quick and efficient,"
the man on the loudspeaker was saying,
but this was somewhat hard to do without a schedule book. Explaining this to
him got me a schedule book, although
it didn't really matter: lighthorse husbandry was closed anyway.
There was also a wait for the lady
at the College of Arts and Sciences to
come up with a college card, a wait
while I filled out a schedule card which
I wasn't told to bring with me, and a
half-howait in the line to turn all
the cards in. This last event was apparently
caused by some inexplicable desire on the
part of the engineers of the proceedings
to at least have it end in an orderly
fashion.
Somewhere along the line of the whole
mess, though, I began to see how such
situations as the registration mess come
about. What caused the whole afternoon
to be so frustrating was not that a lot
of time had to be wasted on mistakes,
but that the schedule left no time for
my needs to finish registration quickly
and, moreover, did not consider the fact
that I was subject to feelings at all.
I felt dehumanized
because I was
confronting a process which saw me and
the other three or lour hundred people
in that line as merely numbers to be
processed. And, as soon as I realized
this, I began to consider the people
in the registration staff as something
less than human, too.
They are quite obviously human, of
course, for machines don't make that
nuny mistakes. But the fact remains
that the process which they implement
does not allow for the same
humanity
on the part of the students who are
going through it, and in fact discourages
it. It's no wonder that the whole
thing
went off with all the grace and
apparent
of a wart-hoplanning
convention.
g

* --

UT To Expand,

From Combined Dispatches

A&I's enrollment is more than
percent Black.
The suit alleged that expansion of the Nashville center-prima- rily
a night school for part-tim- e
students would only serve
to promote and continue segregation in the state's institutions
of higher learning.
In testimony by witnesses presented by Justice Department attorneys, the situation in Nashville
was compared with situations in
Houston, Tex., Tallahassee, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ca.
Dr. Samuel Wiggins, a former
faculty member at Peabody College in Nashville who directed
a three-yea- r
study of desegregations in Southern colleges, testified that the existence of separate
predominantly-Blac- k
and white
colleges retards desegregation efprovement of predominantly forts in the cities.
Black Tennessee A&I State UniDr. Wiggins said in cities
where such a situation exists
versity, also at Nashville.
Judge Cray said the univer- each university "works individsity could go ahead with the ually to improve itself, not seriplanned expansion but ordered ously attempting to recruit the
officials to come up with an kind of student who traditionally
effective plan for desegregation
attends the other."
d
of all
It was noted during testimony
institutions
of higher learning.
that both the University of Ten"It appears that genuine pro- nessee and A&I have been open
gress is being made," Judge Gray to all students since the early
said, by current efforts. However, 1950s.
"The fact remains that nothing
"The mere opening of the
is being done to dismantle the doors is not adequate," Ceorge
dual system so graphically il- Barrett, attorney for the plainlustrated by the enrollment at tiffs, said in his closing
A&I," he said.
NASHVILLE, Tcnn.-- A federal Judge ruled last week tliat
the state of Tennessee must come
up with a plan for complete
desegregation of
universities by April 1, 19G9.
The ruling was handed down
by U.S. Dist. Court Judge Frank
Cray Jr. and came in a case
originally filed by seven individuals but joined later by the Justice Department.
The case marked the first occasion on which the Justice Department had entered a case asking for desegregation of a complete system of state universities.
The original suit asked the
court to stop a planned $4.2
million expansion of the University of Tennessee's Nashville Center and divert the funds to im-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Thursday, August 29,

If Desegregated
Declaring that Tennessee
operates a racially biased dual
system of higher education, the
suit maintained that educational
opportunities and facilities were
"inferior" at A&I, as well as at
the other institutions attended

99

state-support-

mostly by Blacks.
An official of the Justice Department in Washington, D.C.,
predicted the Tennessee suit will
be the first of many civil rights
cases involving colleges and universities. Since the 1964 Civil
Rights law was passed by Congress, most of the department's
efforts have been aimed at desegregating elementary and secondary schools.
Although the Justice Department's suit was aimed at the
white power structure which is
responsible for the dual system
of higher education, many black
people probably were alarmed
by it.
The black power movement
has emphasized the necessity of
schools and
retaining
making them the centers of Black
culture. Black militants, therefore, do not want their traditionk
schools invaded by
ally
all-bla-

state-supporte-

1968- -5

When the woods

court had approved a plan that
would require the State to make
the opportunities and facilities
at Tennessee A6tl equal to those
at the white institutions.
The Justice Department is not
the only federal agency which
now is becoming involved in
securing equal opportunity for
Blacks in higher education. The
Office for Civil Rights is conducting a series of investigations
of white colleges to insure that
black students are not discriminated against in such areas as
housing, recruitment policies, financial aid policies and athletic
programs.
Joshua B. Zatman, a spokesman for the civil rights office,
says his agency has nothing to do
with the Tennessee suit. Zatman
said his office is conducting
"compliance reviews" to insure
that colleges and universities are
not violating Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964. If an institution is violating the civil rights
law, an administrative hearing
will be held, and the school
could lose its federal financial

arsonist strikes,
you get burned...
right in the
pocketbook.
Forestsmean money

Money that circulates all
over the South from the
harvesting, hauling, and
sale of timber; pulpwood

and paper production;
important

and payrolls.
But all goes up in smoke
when the woods arsonist
strikes.
Strike back. Reportany
signs of woods arson to
local authorities; help

Smokey Bear save the
South's valuable forests!

assistance.

all-blac-

whites.

But the suit filed seemingly
made an effort to get around this
sticky question. The Justice Department did not try to completely do away with the Nashville
extension center, but only to forbid construction on it until the

YOU HAVE A CHARGE ACCOUNT

AT EMBRY'S

A reception honoring
Vice President and Mrs. Robert

L.

Johnson

will be held

between 11:30 and 1:30
on Friday, August 30, 1968
in the Student Center Ballroom

All members of the

University Community and their families

mm

are invited to attend

w

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IV

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flounce.
Strike o pleasantly
note among the
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Sizes 3 to 13.

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* ft

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, AuKmt 29, 19(8.

SEC Looks Like Gator Bait In '68
the biggest limb of all. This
is the time of
polls.
Many a sports columist has
Editor's Note: This story on the been burned at the stake bepre-se- a
son predictions in the cause he picked the Dodgers in
Southeastern Conference pre- '51 or Oakland over the Packers
cedes nine individual looks at in the Super Bowl or Silky Sullthe nine teams (other than UK) ivan in the Derby.
in the SEC.
But, regardless of the conIt's that time of year again. sequences, here goes the PrecocTliis is the time that sports ious
Prognostication
writers put themselves out on for the Southeastern Conference:
By JIM MILLER
Kernel Sports Editor

Second choice

Florida
Alabama
Louisiana State
Tennessee
Ceorgia
Kentucky
Auburn

1.

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

pre-seas-

that

UA

has 'Bear Bryant. "Snake" Stabler is gone at QB so the Tide
will have to count heavily on
Joe Kelley, Stabler's relief man
for two seasons.

OleMiss

Vanderbilt
10. Mississippi State
Yes, it looks like Florida all
the way