xt7tht2g837z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7tht2g837z/data/mets.xml  McDaniel, J. M. 1899 v. : ill. ; 23-25 cm.  Volume numbering changed during 1899 from Volume 8 to Volume 2.  Description based on Vol. 8, no. 2 (Nov. 1989) journals  English Lexington, Ky., [s.n., 189?-] This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine University of Kentucky. Kentucky University. Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky. University of Kentucky--Students--Periodicals. State University, Lexington. State College, Lexington. The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 2, no. 2 text The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 2, no. 2 1899 2012 true xt7tht2g837z section xt7tht2g837z . ` ¤  . ~ I! V
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  ,»`. A     i' M. S. VAUGHAN. ROBERT W. VAUGHAN r _  
  VAUGHAN BMS.,    
l Corner High and Broadway. I
‘ (bt R is     or the re
= Leading SoutI>Srdc  
__ i . Suecessors to S. K. COZINE.
.' We are headquarters for the College Boys. V See us for esti-
mates on everything you need in the grocery line, and we will
satisfylyou as to quality and prices.
> · Free Delivery. Telephone 193. ,
` ‘ VAUG HAN BROS.  
  zrurcksbarrk, sbocmalrc  
Manufacturer of Fine Boots and Shoes. Repairing 11eat1yexecuted. Sipeoial `
drscovnt to students. ..
i " 105 East Main, Lexington, Ky. l"
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We started our lloliclav l)emor1str:1tio11 Sale
.’ ° on Deceml>er 18th.
  Cut Prices on all N|en’s and B0ys’ A
R Suits Ovcrcuats and Trousers. 7,*
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I   The World Famous Blue Grass Region of Kentucky.  
—   Lexington, "Th€ Athens Of th€ W€St.’°  
· 1V  
V  ?  
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   V 
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  r.-  I   t I •I ~ I . I I- It I It I   ·2 ‘, I  
  *   E     { II I · { »   ‘·  
{   ~ I VoL. 2. DECEMBER. 1899. e N0.M2· t A  
    ‘ i · . —-—————-— { E E { s [QI ‘i»f§?‘? ‘
I 5 I I I . >· v ‘ I I I ` VI    
g   ° up . {KEN EUCKY. _ g g _ - g '_ _  · 
    c . · ‘ I I E. CARL L1TsEY. _ V QI I.   IIII i  
{ ;_ — I ‘ » —————e. Y   ‘   VC-vE  
{   » HERE’S a song to sing of the Bluegrass State, I V __ v _. {_   
{ [Q; I , { For the ears of the wo: ld to hear; ~ I _‘ I H -‘II I 
{   · . I ‘ . For its fame’s as broad as the world is broad, { — _e?‘_ I;i§?·{
{   I _ V And has flown both far and near. ‘ I It I _ {_    
{   V It’s ’a grand old State which we call our own, . ss;_ r ‘ _  
, {   t I .And wherever its name is heard, I _ E . I   {   .
_~     I"“`“"’n· o { _ There hats- go oil in respect to her 7 ‘ 4 I . .      
·   { ` For this is a magic word——I E ‘ _I I‘ I E. _»   _
{   c {Kentucky! » I e { - .1  
{   We’ve horses down here in the Bluegrass State e ; Ip    
{   { That no other horses can beat; , cz _ YI,  
{ ; The Derbies can tell ot t*:e victories won, I   I ’-_`,  
  With maybe a single defeat. — I _ _ p  
  The · are fed on the rass which is blue as the sk , I s    
2 y g y, - ¤ ` ` it
{   And their {ieetness no one can dispute: { _ “ »I , {  
{   I I lust mention a· horse, and your mind will revert _ . ~ {  _,AI‘  
{   ‘ To the home of this wonderful brute— » v_ j_ eIs» I·  
{ , Kentucky! - -     ji
aP?] s { 4 I t _~ -‘
{ Q There’s Jlent of corn in the Blue rass State, _ ‘  
{ _: l Y g _ . V.
{   And rye is an item, too, ~ 3*%
1 {CQ And we know how to crush the grains of each     {  
  · I To make our mountain dew. I   _§‘
  For whisky is good in its place, you know, ’ II  
’·sI And its place is ever where ; o 7  
Y . _ .:225
  Entered at the post,-oilice at Lexington, Ky., as second class matter, I VIr_    
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    ¤ i T a F r u s is v r r   •  
` · S 152 y THE KENTUCKIAN. _ *  
’ _ It this is not true ofother States,   _
It certainly is down here—  
T . - _ ., . _ t Kentucky I ~ ‘  
._ l S We’ve women down here in the Bluegrass State F  
1 i Who could wear any crown that’s made; · "   ·
' They’re queens in their homes, and their hearts are  
" - true, t  
And their beauty does not fade. ' . `   y
S We give them the homage that is their due, ·  
~- S To protect them we wonld die;  
T And _there’s no other State like the one they call  
~ ` home, t   _
V Beneath God’s shining sky—  
_ Kentucky! - O   ___. ____
V _ t —Courier-journ al .  
‘ A STUDY OF WORDS.  
Mus. M. A. Scovrmin.   .
t s—  
· F MAN’S first attempt at words .we know nothing.   '_-l T
® It is lost in that world of mist and conjecture where .  
` also are hidden most-or his beginnings. History’s S  
most remote trace is but an index pointing backward.  
The Hebrews have a legend that an angel came and  
· ‘ . ` taught man his first words. The Vedas deity language  {
D _ and teach that it was born of breath and mind. Modern f      
philologists generally agree, however, that it is born with l  
" ' us as is the effort to walk.   _
Language is that which most distinguished man from  
' the brute. The cock which crows today will utter the g   ‘
·~. sound that Peter heard, and which again was the same Q; Al
y · heard in the wild jungles of India before man domesti— A. ; -
  t t

    ..s.   i A or c —  r  — ‘   A  
-5%: , · i _ .~?{’j`;`i€i· 
  " L~ ‘ ‘ i A y » ·-»- »   .  
‘  T A STUDY OF WORDS. q 153 .  
  _ _ cated him. Whether from Shetland Isles or Arabian   _
  Plains, or Kentucky Blue Grass the neighing of the horse  
  is the same. The Texas cow boy hears today the same  
  lowing of the herds that jacob did. .   . p
"   , Man’s language is his chief legacy from the past and t  
  his richest bequest to the future. It has become the most , i- Q  
  Q plenteous source of his knowledge. It is that which ~ ‘   _ 
·   _ ‘ touches nearest his soul, possesses the least of earthy clay  
  and its consequent mortality. It alone throws a glow of   ’
  life over the dead past. We travel far to visit scenes 01 A  
  human experience——battle grounds, buried cities, massive l  
  A ruins and ancient relics, but the vastest structure ofrnan’s  
  ‘ genius lies about us. It is like solid masonry built by ·  
~   hands, and yet has power to grow and die like a thing  I  ,
  ‘``` "·—· possessed ot life. It is labyrynthian in structure where  
  the great irmilies of language are ramihed and interlaced. .  
  There is the American Indian with its power of agglutina-   A
  tion or growing ofwords together, its beautiful metaphors  
  and soft euphoneous cadences. We have borrowed many S _  
  A place names from them and should have borrowed many ·  
  4 more. For example, Kentucky, dark and bloody ground ; _ »  
  lVIississippi, father of waters ; Missouri, big muddy ; Ohio,  
  beautiful ; Rappahannock, quick rising water ; l\‘linne—  
  V haha, laughing water ; Chicago, wild onion ; Chautauqua, ` t  
  foggy place; Saratoga, miraculous waters, and many  
  others. How much prettier Chatterawa, rippling over _
  rock, than our own. Big Sandy. S ‘_
if gf   There may be seen in this labyrynth the Semitic lan- _,
`     guage with its glorious coloring and rich learning whose n ij
  ‘ iridescence shines along the remotest past. `It embraces _ %
ii;. ` the ancient Egyptian, from which we derive our system of A =
 if . months and years, weights and measures, and which as A _ i
  * has been said Moses spoke but joseph had to have inter- A Y
 _` `_ preted to him. To the Semitic belongs the Hebrew, in _ ~
Y--is   r s ° . V Fi? 
  ` A  . .-.,,   c S ‘ · A l  
  A   Q,. ,.r.   _,    

   - . 154 I THE KENTUCKIAN. r ». t'   _·; 
  _ which have been preserved the Books of the Old Testa-— ~ -   _
  i I I ment, the language in which Solomon uttered his wisdom   ri ij 
  ‘ and David sang his psalms. It is the language of tha _  _’·‘ J
  I Jewish legendary store,,the Talmud. It embraces the g A »   r
  Armaic, peculiarly interesting to us because it was the   _
  tongue in which our Saviour spoke. It also includes the , i '  Q. .
{ A Arabic, in which was written that splendid phantasy, the `    I
j K n _Arabian Knights and the Koran, a "specim=:n of linguistic ` K _  
_ ‘ art and philological beauty." From this language we ·’ _ ‘ ·
  have derived our whole system of decimal notation, the _ V  
  ’ . foundation words of chemistry and astronomy. ` Y  
l _»ii l ~ The clues that thread this old labyrynth lead our own __ I  gi A
l . English to the tablelands of Asia, to the great Aryan _ ._  
family of language. p It includes the Sanskrit, the lan- I r  .
  guage of ancient India, in which is preserved the Vedas, , t  
  . ` . books of mythological superstitious, but mines of precious ,  _— ···» rr,
  philological gems, and where are found the germs of all-  it
  modern European languages. It includes the Persian, `   ‘ `
_. p the language of Zaroaster and the Zend Avesta; the _  
in Greek, thelanguage of Aristotle and Plato; the Latin of. I  at -
  Cicero, the Keltic, the Gothic, the Slavic andothers. A  
{ I The great framework ofthe English was brought by  
.. the Teutonic hordes across Northern Europe, the sofiened g it
* ‘ r outlines were filled in by those ithat came by the classic . —  
Mediterranean. The first impelled by the great Aryan I. I
  _ ·_ A wave westward were the Kelts, who left the shore of the A c
  Black Sea about izoo 13. C. Despite the work of cen-   »
  turies they hold their own today with an enthusiastic per- N _ 7  
"   _ sistency in parts of Ireland, Scotland, Isle of Man, Corn- I   g `
V ?f _ wall and vvaies. i -  j
  _ In the wake of the Kelis came another Aryan horde,   an
ji i ` the Goths, so—called from their battle cry, GOTH, mean- A
  " l ing soon or BRAVE. They took various names. GER- t i
p _ p IUANS were so called from GAR, DART and MAN, liter- t ` » ii I .
_ , » A r V t K . _   I
     ,  _     . r ( A A if if    

 `F  if? ”`»»:’‘  ii?       V »,   » <’·  ¥  "<     »—      if ”» 1    —  isi ·‘ .*.i   *   ‘ ; i   l
t    _ ;   y r » ’   f T T t   t J _ T · { »    `_*   ` ‘»_ F  
  .    A t     A  A t..r  
  _— . A STUDY OF worms. ISS q. A -  `. ,·  
Y  l ally DARTMAN; from the Franks we have the word     T
`_  _°»‘ l FRANK, implying the high moral virtues of the settlers of ‘ s  
  E France. The;Angles were so-called from settling in the   _
  =_  _ angles of the mountains, the Saxons from the curved "   _
  . sword or seax which they carried. From this race, which .  
 it conquered the Kelts or drove them to their fastnesses, we V _   _
  have received probably three-fifths of our words.  
 - The next great racial conflict that affected the lan- ,  
  guage was with the Danes, including the jutes and Nor-  
t i wegians, who belonged to the Scandinavian branch. l l '·,·  
  A They were blood#thirsty and intrepid sea kings, who for S  
 ” hundreds or years burned, fiayed and broke the bones of  
 . the Saxons. The last struggle, and that which aH`ected r   '
  most perceptibly the language, was with the brothers of V . ‘ "  .*
  _· --»» —~—, these vikings, who had conquered the Gauls in Normandy _ _ .  _“ ·
 iQ and had taken the name of Normans. Their language     V
  " ` was composed of Norse and bastard Latin. In England, J  
  after the conquest. it became the language of the court. . T i`  
 3. . the camp, the school—room by law; the fashionable lan- F , °  
 _ guage through polity. But fashion, and school-room,’ ·  
  and king, and army could not root fr0m the sturdy Saxon _ _   i
ij the beloved accents ot his mother tongue. He adopted ·  
  q the words of his conquerers, . but as grafts, merely. upon A `  
  S his own. From this union grew the language of Shake- l   ’
‘ _ speare and Milton and the English Bible—a language S  
  » peculiarly rich in synonyms and in capacity for growth.  
    A few of the words the Saxons have dropped are EYEBITE .  
  ` for FAc1NA;rE, [?’OD’S-SPELL for '].`ES'1`AMEN'l`, IN\ifIT for  
  CONSCIENCE, GOD’S-ACRE for cEME·rEnv, FLr·rTEn-Mousn A  
  for BAT, FonErAL1< for 1¤1zEFAcE, AFTERTHINK for RE- 5 t
l i>ENrANcE, STAR coNNEn for Asrnonoitnn, Bocimn for .
‘ i Aurnon, RIEDDLER for MEnrALoR. llis simple BOARD . _ _
F _ A . became Norman TABLE, his ox Norman BEEF, his sw1NE   if; V
¥ Norman nonx, his nousn Norman MANOR or PALACE. y S   `
  .`._ ‘_   _ _- a  
rr       ..,. . _ _ — t — ·  
_ "' "*¢.. V" r #—- ~·· 4.-;;;:-— ts ».·-,.,rf"‘, —r-?

   a A A r A  t t Q   - i  i    ~
IQ , 156 THE KENTUCKIAN. »  
  ‘ Some words may boast of a lineage which can be   °
QQ - traced to a hoary antiquity; again, others are but the  
L growth of yesterday. Our very early forefathers in In+ _  
  dia thought that the day was kindled as a fire every  L
ig. morning, hence the word DAY has that implied meaning.  
  We still use for the days ot the week» the old mythologi-   _
  cal gods which the Saxons brought from the East with -  
  them. Wednesday is WODEN,SDAY the highest god’s day;  
  Thursday, THORS or THUNDER’S day; Friday, FREYA, ,   A
  the highest goddess day; Saturday the day oi SEATER or   _
-   . . SATURN; Sunday, the sUN’s DAY; Monday; the MOON’S»  
= _ V ° DAY and Tuesday, TU’s the god of war’s day. The Ro- R g  
  · man names for the months have supplanted those of the  
., Saxon. Vile have JANUARY from the Roman ]anus god _   _
Y, of the year instead of the Saxon K\’OLF—l\IONTI-I, the Ro-  
  _ man February from the festival of puriiication, instead of `   Q `F  
  A l the Saxon S1-ROUTE-KAL12. Ancient usage places kale  
T · and jowl in high rank. l.\/[ARCH, god of war and hus— Qt
. bandry instead of SAXON LENcTE-MoNTH because it was  
‘ ~ ·j longer than the others. Al’RIL from Aprilis was the Sax- ,i
`; , on OSTEl{ Moxrru because then they celebrated Easter,  
_ the goddess of light and spring. Gay adornment and ii
»_ easter eggs are probably as old as the race. It corres—»
.° , ponded to the jewish passover. Both have been infused l _
. i with a higher meaning because of the promise to live V
  again through Christ’s resurrection. l\’[AY, the Roman   V
  ‘ goddess, mother of Mercury, was the Saxon TR1-M1Lc:1 °‘   -
"   MONTH because they then milked their cows three times a.     ,
_   _ t day. ]UNE, Roman juno, Saxon, l\/IEDE MONTH, because ij
  the cattle fed then on the meadows. JULY for Julius Cae-    
gf _ sar was the Saxon HEY MONTH, Auousr, Augustus Cae- F  
  sar was the BARN MONTH. As handed to the Romans, g
¥ March the twenty-ii-fth began the year so SEPTEMBER was ~
A n left the seventh month. It was the Saxon’s GI{IST MONTH,

 A   ·* · = =·?¥Ti> · ‘ J · ·   ·   · . ` 1 $·;;_;‘*’:i  X  
l   _ K .___ i   i s
    » ~ » ‘` ·  
  . I . §I§ii°¥ .
  I A STUDY or worms. 157 . A .  
 g~— I Ocrroimn, eighth, was the Saxon’s WINE MONTH, No-  
if  TEMBERVWEIS the S.axon’s WINDE MONTH and DEcEMnER;   i
 l his WINTER MONTH. In this month was the old yule log,. I -  
  Santa Claus jollity which still mixes in with Christmas. I  
  YEs sm and NO sm are combinations of the Teutonic;   .
  ‘ JA and NAY, yes and no, and the Latin s1RE, elder person,.  
  -.,q r To say yes sire implied great reverence. So also we have: 1  
  _ come to use the second person plural YOU instead of the ‘ p   _
  singular Tuou. It was used first in addressing royalty to.  
  `· imply that there were more than one in so great a person-- —  
  age. Some of our verbs have come up from the battle   J
‘   with Time considerably maimed. It would seem that GO  
  had become terribly confused in some aiiray and had p -   ‘
  · picked up the past of XVEND. So the verb TO BE and  
  I. many others. They ever stand the mutilated forms of ` _ ` .   .
  what was. `   V
  SU1E1z  
  NAMES and SIRE NAMES and came into use after the con-  
  quest. The oldest pedigrees go no further back in sur- ‘—  
  _ names than the Early English period. i  
V We do not always preserve words as we receive   `
them. The Italian Eomo cA1·0 for instance meaning full.  
  sized sheet we call EooLs CAP. The French FRERE MA- _  
  soN, brother worker, we call FREE l`v{AsoN; the French   `
  DENT DE moo, lion’s tooth, we call DANDELIOTJ ; the Ger-  
’~-   ; I _ man XVEISSAGER, wise sayer, we call >v1sEAcRE. The  
  French taught us the polite reference of always drinking ` l
  the last cup to LE BON PERB, the good father, which we I
    have corrupted into the BUMPER. SIGNING oNE’s NAME
:"*" · points to a period of general illiteracy. GooD BYE was - ·
g once spoken Gon BE wxru YE. _ ·
’ _ _ With new introductions came new names. The first .
BAYONETS were from BAYoNNE, CAMBRICS from CAMBRAY, y ` _
tl ` T ·
  A . ;  
  ..., g Es, -   I ~ ·   ~-eg -—— ~       #:‘  
V » ` I  —‘  , """‘*’ * ’___ii;·;r`·»¤·....~,·,,.s.,, .·;.»·.

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  V V>‘.   A ii i T l A i` · ”`7,   `
  it s A       c
  l o 158 » THE KENTUCKIAN. —  
  y r T _ nA1vfAsK·from DAMASCUS, cUR1zAN·rs from Co1z1NTH. The p  T   `
  Q   . , first TARIFF from TARIFA. ‘ `  
  With the revival of learning came many Greek and   'iii-
  Q . Latin terms. Most ofthe general and abstract terms are -  
`Ei; from that source. .   _
  ‘ From nicknames we have quaker, puritan, round- _  is
  ‘ head, whig, tory,`lV[ethodist, Calvinist and many others. , »  
  ’ Every wordtcould we but interpret it bears the recordl i  
  ` r V of human experience. The power of words has been ob-   . l
il . . , served by the writers ofall times. Emerson calls them  
il _ "fossil poetry." French F‘concentrated poems." Math-  fi.
§y ews says "cannon shot are very harmless things when   »-_i V
  ‘ piled up for show; so are words when piled up in the T  
ill! _ · pages ofa dictionary with no mind to select them and I   »
<{Qj · send them home to the mark. But let them receive the _   s
r   V vitalizipg touch of genius and how they leap into life."  
P Macaulay speaking of Milton’s nicety of word arrange-}   ’ ‘
  ment says "substitute one synonym for another and the ’  
A r {t whole etlect is destroyed. The spell loses its power, and T   T
ji ` he who should hope to conjure with it would find himself r  
_ as much mistaken as Cassim in the Arabian tale when he   K
stood crying "Open Wheat," "Open Barley," to the _  
  door which obeyed no sound but "Open Sesame." Solo- n  
  mon says "Words litly spoken are like apples of gold in  
i"  pictures of silver." Some poet has written, T   v `
._   , T "A frivolous wordsa sharp retort,   °
  A (lash from a passing cloud, T T   i
i T ° Two hearts are scathed to their utmost core; ‘  if
  I Sweet love lies dead for evermore, _ »    
J.; g Two faces turn to the crowd, {Q
T   ` Masked by pride with as lite long lie Ft .
E   To hide the scars of that agony." A T A
§L " i;4 `_A  

   -- ‘ ¤ L -;’·r=¢i = .
 we  ‘ g TnE,oLD CHAPEL BELL. 159 e  
r    ` E L . Another has written, l l  
A  "I have known a word more gentle . . _ ;   ‘
   ‘‘'`» Than the breath of summer air  
  T In a listening heart to nestle ._ .  
  · And to live forever there. _'   · V
  Not the beating of its prison ` 4   L_
 jg — · Stirred it even night or day, .   ·
  Only with the heart’s last throbbing  
  - Could it ever fade away. _ L  
  . . THE OLD CHAPEL BELL. C  
    SYLVESTER Horicnws. l   E
  Q HE Turkomans sing of the glorious ring of  
  i C The bell that is king ofcafe and mosque, j_  
  Wlierever they wander they ever grow tonder   ·
ii? = _ Oi bells that swing under the Moslem kiosk. _   A
  But the old iron tongue in the bell that once hung in  
.   ‘ The belfry that swung in, the music it wrought  
  Was to me nearer and clearer and clearer ii _
3; _ Than cymbals with error Mohammedan fought. V  
  ’ An exile recalling the mellow tones falling  
  y L From minarets tall in theland of the Czar, T L  
  Sings of none sweeter in tone or in meter, j
  1; In Ottoman street or in Russian bazaar I y
  Than was the welling of melody swelling · i
r _ The old chapel bell in its ponderous glee, V  
i L L e That groaned with the burden of melody heard in
il The classical guerdon it Hung o’er the lea. ‘ ‘

   16o THE KENTUCKIAN. _` l [_  
,1 ‘ >·
  _ I’ve heard the bells crashing and horribly clashing, ° .   V
  _ Through lurid waves lashing a midwinter storm ; l 3  
  Sinking and swelling, in thunder tones telling, g . ~ " 1,.
  Their terror indwelling their sudden alarm ; j
  But not all the clamor of the fire fiend’s hammer   .  °
  Could dispel the calm or the magical spell - I l
  That followedtunbroken, by whisper or token, _ V  .
  The slow midnight stroke of the old chapel bell. » ` t V
  I’ve heard the rich chiming ofother bells timing .  '-
  High mass sublime in the cathedral aisle.  1
  A E Aspirit could grant them no sweeter anthem  
—· From the silvery chant in the "Land o’ the Leal." L  _·
». _ But to me nearer, and by far clearer, l gt 
4,  A Than was its clearer voluptuous swell, L  
  · ls memory’s golden songs that the olclen , - Jp   
  Time long ago told in the old chapel bell.  
— Q AUNTIES TRIP TO COLLEGE.  .
  WILL.4 Bowman.  
  ELL, as I am alive and breathing !" exclaimed Mrs. · .5; 
    Reuben Stanley, as she stood at her window one  
  t afternoon in early January, "it` there ain’t Mr.  T;
5;; Raymond coming down the road. VVhat can the boy .7  _.,>  `,
~.   mean coming out in such weather? But I am very glad to —  
  see him coming, forl was growing mighty lonesome with -{,f  ll
L   ` L Reuben away and only the iire for company," and she » * `;
»a`. hurried out to meet the young minister, whose heart she —r.  
  had completely won by her motherly oilices.   _
  He was a bright—faced, boyislnlooking man of twen--  
T f ty-live, a former K. U. student who had taken charge of ` `  
ii, ‘ one of the churches in the town early that autumn, He  
i i s;

 T  ‘   4:.‘§,*i Tar     -`~ ' .`;¥=‘    ?'Y`·é P - i l  i= · » ’’ a ‘ “ to — .   "     L
 Q L L g '’1-  · S I . I  
4;:*EEr
,¥ t AUNTIE’S VISIT TO COLLEGE. 16I   l
  was a great favorite and a frequent caller of the Stanleys,  
`4   V and had cheered many lonely hours for the old couple.  
  Leaving hat and overcoat in the hall, he followed t .  
" Mrs. Stanley into the sitting-room and was soom com-  
_ — fortably established before the glowing fire. r   _
  . "And inow you must tell me why I was refused ad-  
mittance when I came out to see you last week," Mr. Ray- r     ,
{ _ I mond said. "Some one told me later that you had been  
 · away. Did you have a pleasant visit?"  
.  l. ‘·Yes, indeed," l\Irs. Stanley replied. "But Reuben  
o . and I were happy just simply because we were with Louise. I I  
. My granddaughter? Oh, no, my niece. I took the little   L
.  · orphan child when she was only twelve years old, and a  
j 1 brighter, sweeter girl never grew up in Kentucky than . ‘   L
Jp   Louise Vi/vest. Her bonny face always wears a smile, and  
i  j ` as yet she has known no care. She was always ambitious —   -
`trr  I and ever since she was a little child had said she was   ,
:Q  going to college, and so four years ago, when she was  
  ready to enter. she decided upon the State College and  
  begged to go there. Reuben and I had always given in “  
  to her, so, of course, we did not say "no" now. Lgt
  "VVhen I was a girl we had a governess to teach us,. , ‘   ·
  anda boarding-school was selected for Anne, but Louise  
A Q;  was determined to go to college. So Reuben wrote to his  
  old friend Professor White, who is a teacher of arithmetic » ·   A
_  il there, and he promised to look after her. She went, and .  
  in a short while there was no place like the college with  
  her. She always was glad to get home for her holidays,  
    but this year ’long about Thanksgiving she began writing  
I   for Reuben and me to come down to Lexington and spend  
"'   Christmas with her. At tirst we didn’tmuch like the idea l r
Q ,‘_i   - of Louise not being home for Christmas, but as this is her ~ .
  senior year we just give in to her. Well, nothing would
  do but we must get there one day before the holidays V
S- " `7   ` “ ii   2*:-;,·;·f.{`.e§;,Q;I; , _     .   ;~ —,·· serv  .  ~—~—;: ; I  I

     p V,   . ` p “ V'     U   ,f w‘.' °?* *‘;'` f?"%.¥iIif`  `-»‘  A   
    1 5*  ··`‘>A i  » >     - »‘·’'·    ‘ ‘ i;  '‘      ’ ‘ ‘`   ‘‘ W 1;_    -·' E [ii   ‘ J r   4 ‘’ VF     ‘
al = . , = ‘ »
i s . _ 162 . THE KENTUCKIAN. I .   `
  if began, in order for us to see the school in working order, I  
  I and we got to Lexington at 9 o’clock Wednesday morn- » »  {
Ii   ` ing. Louise met us and she was for all the world like a A  
i . little child, she was so glad to see us. We went up to  
.   I 4 _ her boarding place, and in a little while on out to the I   p
  _ V college, and I must say that a prettier place than that col-  
  lege I never saw. When we got up to the Mainliuilding ·  
  l . we met the President, and a triendlier, inicer spoken old `  l ·
  gentleman I never had occasion to shake hands with,.   I
  - There was a lady there, too, to keep the girls company,  `'A
Ii ` and be nice to them, and Louise said, "to give them gen-  
~ gz _ eral good advice." We went up to the chapel exercises, r _ __,_ { ‘
; _ and a man with the best face I ever saw read a chapter ,  
ij; from the Bible and prayed. ,He turned out to be Reu- p  
  l .» ben’s old friend, and we stopped to speak to him. We l  
  ‘ older people all standing there kinder made Lou