xt7tht2g8g96 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7tht2g8g96/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591209  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  9, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  9, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7tht2g8g96 section xt7tht2g8g96 Car Is Nation's Most Dangerous Machine

By RILL NEIKIRK
A total of 37,000 people was killed
because of motor vehicle accidents
Kernel Editor
fc
The automobile U the most In 1958, the National Safety Coundangerous machine in America to- cil says.

day.

sot

merely dangerous
because it to so hard to control or
maneuver. Admittedly, there are
machines in factories which require more skill and care to operate.
There are others which necessitate
more dexterity.
But an automobile Is dangerous
becaose there are not enoagh drivAnd it's

ers with the skill and carefulness
In operating It.
Look at the facts. They are
simple, but revealing.

read the above figures to know Just
That's why you should take safehow perilous driving can be. All ty precautions always in caring for
you have to do is get on the high- your car. It should be In tip-to- p
way, get overconfident at the shape. For example:
This total represents 21 percent wheel, and then
then youll
L Ascertain that your brake are
of the entire population death rate know.
In efficient working order. Slugof the entire population's death
It doesn't take much to cause an gish brake havo sent many drivers
rate due to all phases of accidents.
and pedestrians to the casket.
A turning of the
It was the second highest cause be- accidentchance. An Irritating head. 2. Be sure your tires. Including
A wild
horn
hind general accidents, as deaths behind you. Bright lights. Unnec- your spare, have adequate tread
from violence etc.
and are not In danger of blowing
essary speed.
There were only 33.000 people
out.
killed In battle during the Korean
But back to the automobile. It 3. A door can often be fatal.
War for the XJ3., so the accident Is a complicated machine. Internal Make certain yours has a safety
figure becomes more astronomical. combustion. Water system. Brakes. feature and lock it while driving.
It stands to rise higher with the Oil. Tires. Transmission. Doors. 4. Keep your windshield wipers
ever increasing number of auto- Seats. It Is much like a baby. It in good working order.
mobiles on the nation's highways. can't help Itself, but depends on
5. Always check any deviance in
But you really don't have to others.
your steering.

....

8. Keep your speedometer accurate. There may be times when

your speed exceeds your estima-

tion.
These, of course, are only a beginning for supervision of your
litautomobile. State police and
tle common sense could provid
yon with many more.
There are many things at stake
when you are driving an automobile in poor condition. First, there's
your license; then, money, (in the
form of a fine); the safety of your
loved ones and others; damage of
someone's property; injury of
pride.

Then there's your life.

ES.IE DSMwiiS IL

v.

University of Kentucky

Vol. L

:

V

LEXINGTON, KY.t WEDNESDAY, DEC 9,

No. 44

Platform Released
By Gampms Party

7

Campus Party vice chairman Bill
Jones yesterday announced that
his party candidates will advocate the following platform in the
Student Congress election Dec. 16:
1. To work for the encouragement of school spirit and the creation of campus traditions.
2. To bring about lower cost of
textbooks through the opening of
it
a
student operated

if

ti

To keep the library and book
stacks open until 11 p.m. on Sunday night.
7. To aid the University in perfecting a preregistration plan that
wil
not ' unjustly discriminate
against any class of students.
8. To work for the improvement
6.

non-prof-

.

1959

-r.

-'

t

r

inn ami

inr

in

rn

-

i

n

Fatal Step
srene from Act II of the Guignol production, "Our Town," shows
Penny Mason as Emily Webb and Lamar Ilerrin as George Gibbs
walking down the aisle after exchanging their wedding vows.
A

book store.
3. To. work for the general improvement of the University phone
system and the placing ofconven-ientl- y
located phone booths on
campus where they can be readily
available to students at no charge.
4. To make available Alumni
Gymnasium until 10 p.m. for student use.
5. To extend automobile privileges to sophomores not on pro-

bation.

'Our Town Opens Tonight
9

by the Guignol Theatre. This play
By WAYNE SMITH
Thornton Wilder's '"Our Town," was first produced during the 1939-4- 0
season just after the play bebeing produced by the Guignol
Players, opens tonight in the Ouig-n- came a hit on Broadway.
Wilder has said that "Our Town"
Theatre of the Fine Arts Building.
is an attempt to find a value above
The play will run tonight price for the smallest events in
through Saturday ' with curtain daily life. . . . The past cannot be
relived. Living people, humans, octime at 8:30 p.m.
"Our Town" is the second pro- cupied with their petty occupations
duction in this year's revival sea- and small thoughts, know little of
son of plays previously produced true joy and happiness.
ol

Hanging Of Greens
To Be Held Today
traditional "Hanging of
Greens" ceremonies will be
the
presented today at 4:15 and 7:15
p.m. in the Great Hall of the SUB.
The decorations in the SUB Include an 18 foot Christmas tree
which will be lit during the ceremonies. Poinsettias placed around
the hall' complete the decorations.
The actual hanging of the
greens is done by students who
will drape laurel ropes down the
bannister of the stairway and
hang wreaths in each of the 10
windows. These decorations will
remain In the SUB until the
Saturday beginning the Christmas
vacation.
The program will feature carolers who are members of the Baptist Student Union choir and the
Christian ..Students' .Fellowship.
Their eld English costumes are
UK's

.

furnished by the wardrobe department of Guignol Theatre.
Student representatives of the
four organizations sponsoring the
program will read the story of
Chrlrfjias and explain the mean-

ing orthje holiday.
Christmas music will be presented by the men and women's
glee, clubs and a harp prelude
played by Miss Paula Choate. Mr.
David Bowman will provide organ
music throughout the day.
The program is sponsored jointly by the Student Union Board,
the YMCA, the YWCA, and Student Congress. The director of the

SUB Activities
Hanging of the
p.m. Great IlalL

Greens-4:15-7:1-

YMCA

Board

Si

Dinner-6:0- 0

5

YWCA Advisory
p.m. Room

205.

Increased Tuition Is
Not Financial Solution

In the first act of the play. Wilder outlines the history of Grover's
Corners, N. H., and something of
the character of its citizens. Then
he carries the audience Into the
"Gibbs and Webb households, arriving at breakfast time, and then
spending one entire day in the lives
of these people.
The second act concerns the love
affair between young George Gibbs
and Emily Webb. The love afair
culminates in a wedding scene and
the awakening of the young people to the adult world.
The third act shows the bride
after death, wishing to return to
the living. The other townspeople
buried in the cemetery on the hill,
show Emily how futile it would be
to return, because the past cannot

The answer to the financial problems of institutions such as the
University is not high cost or full
cost tuition, UK President Frank
G. Dickey said Monday night.
Speaking at a
dinner at the SUB, Dr. Dickey
said, "The land grant college was
fdiaded in order to provide low
cost education for all people who
might profit from it." He added
that a tuition increase would "take
us back to a condition we were
founded to change."
Dr. Dickey also dismissed highly
selective admission programs as a
solution. "Current talk about highly selective admission and the limitation of entrance and educational
opportunity to the gifted student,
if Implemented, would be In marked contrast to the aspiration of
the founding fathers for their
children," he said. .
Dr. Dickey's solution: "Seeking

be relived.
Members of the student cast are
Bush Hunter, stage manager; Penny Mason, Emily Webb; Lamar
Linda
Herrin, George Gibbs;
Brown Rue, Mrs. Gibbs; Larry
Strong, Dr. Gibbs; Lynn Smith,
Mrs. Webb; George T. Smith, Wal-l- y
Gibbs; Mary Warner Ford. Rebecca Giggs; Paul Richard Jones,
Mr. Webb.
Phil Cox, Constable Warren; 01-lMorgan, Mrs. Soatnes; Aivin
Polk, Simon Stimson; Bill Hower-toPhillip
Howie, Newsome;
Brooks, Sam Craig,; Sarah
1st dead woman; Linda
Crouch, 2nd dead woman; Tommy
Higgason and Don Galloway, dead
men; James Slone, Prof. Willard;
and Richard Meyers, SI CrowelL
Jo Barker, a senior in the Music

fice needs."
He added that these needs can be
met only if state funds are available.
"The shocking complacency
among our people frightens me,"
Dr. Dickey revealed. "There seems
(o be a subconscious notion that
merely ' because Kentucky has
managed to keep Its head above
water for 167 years, it is somehow preordained by the Creator
that, regardless of what we do in
the future, we shall manage to
compete successfully with our sis-

pageant is Fred Strache assisted
by Gay Good and Cliff Zeff.
The Student Unioa Board will
be represented by Judy Schrim.
YMCA by Tom Cherry, YWCA by
Henretta Johnson, and Student Department, will direct the
Congress by Taylor Jones.
choir for this production.

ie

n,

Mil-war- d,

e

of dining facilities in Donovan and
Jewell Hall Cafeterias.
9. To restore Student Congress
to a high place in the University
community, and to free the congress of faculty control..
Jones said that in forming their
platform they had sent letters to
other colleges and universities with
effective and efficient student
government organizations. He said
the replies will be used in carrying out the platform and changes
in the present system.
Optimistic about the election's
outcome, Jones said, "We will win
at least six of the eight seats in
the coming election."

press-radio-T- V

an operating budget from the commonwealth which we believe is
realistic and necessary to care for
the needs of a growing and effective university and continuing to
strive to find ways and means to
construct urgently needed classroom, laboratory, library, and of-

years of the "tidal wave" to which
we are to be subjected to at certain dates," he stated.
"We have attempted to convince
the people of our states that these
figures are not imaginary nor are
the hypothetical predictions, but
are actual counting of actual young
people."
Dr. Dickey said that it appeared
to him that we ''are far short" for
the tidal wave which Is now upon
us.
"I think it is inevitable that before we shall be ready we shall see
widespread, denial of educational
oppotrunity to young people."
We are not competing successfully in the total field of education,
he said, noting that Kentucky
ranks 49 among 50 states in salaries
for public school teachers, 41st in
length of school term and 48th in
the number of eighth grade graduates who complete high school.
Dr. Dickey said those who would
respond to this complacency on the
crucial education front would Identify two basic questions:
"Will the people of Kentucky
understand the importance of the
issue to the extent that they will
provide all that is necesary in the
way of money, material, and moral
support to build the educational
system we need rather than the
one we think we can afford?"
"Will we have the curricular pat-

terns and the educational philoso-

phies geared to the realities ' of
today and tomorow rather than to
of a generation
the problems

past?"
In closing Dr. Dickey said that
only through the unremitting effort, courage, and determination of
Kentucky's people can the University earn a position of prominence
ter states."
among the leading universities of
"We have heard for a number of our nation.

* ...

2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Dec. 9,
.

ww

mn

Mi

"'''

m

199
'"

n

"

UK Coed Compares Schools

i

In Germany And America
From Alabama to Germany to
Kentucky has been the school pattern for UK coed Ginnabeth Sutterland.
Ginnabeth, Junior psychology
major, has had a chance to view
college education from three different angles.
The daughter of an Air Force officer, she spent her sophomore
year at the University of Maryland, Overseas Extension, In Munich, Germany. This branch of the
university serves dependents of
American service personnel and

:
-

1

;

...

x

.(

'!)

....

.-

-

Alps.

i
1

typing for a Hungarian calculus
professor In Munich.
Also in her possession are three
beer mugs, two from the German

fair M0toberfest" and another
festival
the
from
"Fashing."
' Ginnabeth describes the German
people as Industrious, trustworthy
and punctual. She says that "the
personality of the average Oerman
is what the American people like
to think of themselves as being."
She has spent the past two summers in England with her parents.
They live 20 miles by 'tube (subway) from the center of London.
She plans to spend next summer
with her family.
pre-Lent-

abilities rather than his ability for
rote memory. She says also that
foreign teachers go deeper into
their fields while the majority of
American teachers seem to skim
the surface.
The school is located on the
military kaserne and classes are .them.
held on the top floor of the adThe pillows are priced according
ministration building. The 274 stuto the number of pounds of down
dents attending the two year col- in them.
The souvenirs were bought and
paid for with money which the
continent-hoppin- g
student earned

R

"THE MAN WHO UNDERAND
STOOD WOMEN"

4

Sitting Pretty

.

continent-hopping- junior psychology
Ginnabeth Sutterland,
major, is pictured with-twpillows made to order for her while
she was a student at the University of Maryland extension in
Munich, Germany.
o

Dr. E. M. Spokes, UK Department of Mining and Metallurgy,
was guest lecturer on the Earth
Science Lecture Series, Monday
.

d

secretary-treasure-

construction.

STARTS

TOMORROW

DAILY

I'M PM.
V

Chavy

Avanu

Euclid

? VoiiDERnii

VR
DUS'L SHOCK

lift"

.

a WZ, TH

A

Chaaa

"HUNCHBACK OF
NOTRE DAME"
Gin

US

and THURSDAY!

TODAY

Anthony

flip

NOW! 2 HITS!

r.

OFCM

evening.
Dr. Spokes said Kentucky mines
He spoke at a meeting of Sigma are recovering between 60 and 90
Gamma Epsilon, geology honorary, percent of the total deposits, deonj "Exploitation of Mineral
pending on whether they recover
pillars in the operation.
Current mining metnuds, mine
lie also 'noted that the most ecosafety, layout and modern pros- nomical method of mining in many
pecting, uin hydraulic, airborn, areas is by "bulk caving," where
and electromagnetic devices, were the ore is mined out and the rock
above the deposit is allowed tofill
distussed.
The talk was Illustrated with in the excavation.

...

LOVERS"

FOR

2Wt OBCWllC
JWWfWJO m

Sigma Alpha Epsilon recently
elected pledge officers.
They are John Williams, president; Gregory Monorief. vice presishowing the dent; and John Paul Broderson,

slides he
problems of soil conservation vs.
surface mining and details of mine
had-prepare-

"HOLIDAY

SAE Pledges
Elect Williams

Dr. Spokes Gives Lecture
On Mineral Exploitation

en

Every weekend there was a trip
planned; to Holland for the Tulip
Festival, to the points of interest
in Germany, to Rome, Paris, Vienna, Salzburg, to Switzerland, and
during spring vacation, a complete
tour of Italy.
Throughout her travels, she has
picked up several souvenirs but adWebster's Dictionary is not good
mits that moving around so much
reading, New World says.
limits hercollecting.
Two pillows which she Is particularly fond of were made to
HIATCRt
order in a small German shop. The
AND INDOOR SEATS
pillows, each 36 inches square, are
stuffed with real down. Olnnobeth
chose the material and instructed
the pillow maker as to how many
pounds of down to include In
ENDS TONIGHT

embassy personnel.
While there were teachers from
several countries, Ginnabeth had
American teachers for all classes
except . engineering math, which
was taught by a German.
She says that foreign teachers
depend on a student's inherent

rX

'n
r:J

lege live in dorms. Social functions
are held in the officers' club.
During her year at the Oerman
university a hotel was rented by
the school for a three -- day house
party for a Christmas and spring
formal. At the Christmas party
they went skiing and ice skating.
In the spring there was water
skiing, boating, and skiing in the

PLUS

Ernest Borgnine

Lollobrigida
Quinn, Jtan Danet

IN

"OMAR KHAYYAM"
Cornel Wild, Dcbra Paget
(Both feature in color)

I

it THE RABBIT TRAP''

a

.'.

OPEN

54$

'

iaV
BEGINS

. ruwt
PRICE

6:30

7Sc

Starts

TODAY!

pnpiM

r
I
I

APPLIED MAGNETISM 405-40- 6
Reactions of water, hair, women

l

i

II

II ill I

'

Wr I nC

A

I

Hi

'

1

JUL1S

UaMlk

p"i

nil

-- Cro wf her, Tim

t

OASSlNS

mumm IQ

2

si

'

Professor D. Juan.
10:00-11:0-

0

p.m. Saturday

Examination of why men usually use water
with tlieir hair tonic. Demonstration that wahair resembling explosion
ter causes dried-ou- t
Jn a silo. Practical applications of 'Vaseline'
llair Tonic; proof that 'Vaseline' Hair Tonic
replaces oil that water removes from hair.
Definitive interrelationships of water to 'Vaseline' Hair Tonic to hair to women to things
in general. Laboratory evidence ,of reverse
magnetism between women and messy hair.
Positive correlations between alcohol and dry
hair (Rag-mop- 's
hair, cream tonics and clogged-u- p
Third Law). Required before Christmas
.vacation.
Prerequisite: ANIMAL MAGNETISM
Materials: cne 4 cz. bcttle '.Vaseline' Hair Tcnic
203-20- 4.

RfllL f.WW- - DAVID VfflNE
I

1'.

V
I

iMlii

rrrtt;
Hull frl ka

in

.M

N0t

INC

JtiLLLiL
I

a rata noHttu

J

paooucriM

- TJIUFFLERS 'The World's Longest Lasting"

Installed FREE with LIFETIME

it's clear,
it's clean,
it's
Vaseline
HAIR TONIC
'VatallM' to thi rtflfUr:
aj Catakwigft PtaTl IM.

GUARANTEE
Also

Complete Exhaust Service Including Lake
Pipes, Dual Sets and the ONLY LIFETIME
GUARANTEED

FIBERGLASS

MUFFLER

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

The Mufflet Shop
"Central Kentucky's Oldest" .
321 Virginia Ave.
Phone

--

4-25-

55

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday,

Dec. 9, 1959

UK Lawvers Tn Trv Pat Preiser's Towns end Is Speaker

Doctor Urges At Annual ODK Banquet
Less Visitors
at

First Case Of Rape

The first rape 'case ever to be be Mrs. Lovett, her husband, the
tried in Lafferty Circuit Court will sheriff of the county in which
be held at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow.
the crime took place,' the examThe trial is one in a series which ining physician, and a minister.
is held to give law students pracThe prosecution will call on the
tical experience in preparing and defendant, his employer, and a
trying civil and criminal cases.
neighbor of the plaintiff, to give
Attorneys for the defense In the testimony In their defense.
trial will be DuLaney O'Roarke
The Jury will be drawn from
and Richard Vlmonl. Irotiertitinjr Interested students in the College
attorneys will be Leslie Aberson of Arts and Sciences Immediately
and Ken Snee.
prior to the trial. ,
The prosecutrix, WUma Lovett
Attorney for the prosecution
has charged William I. Rapem said, "It Is the most heinous crime
with violation of Rule 435.090 of ever committed in our fair comthe Kentucky Criminal Code.
monwealth. The culprit shall not
Witnesses for the defense will go unpunished."

The doctor of Patricia Preiser,
UK coed seriously injured in an
automobile
Saturday
accident
night, has urged that groups of
students refrain from visiting her.
This request was made by the
doctor at Good Samaritan Hospital because of the large groups
visiting her. The doctor said only
one or two people will be allowed
to visit Miss Preiser briefly.
Her condition was reported to
be "about the same" yesterday.
Miss Preiser, Education senior
from Williamson, W. Va., suffered
a concussion when she struck the
dashboard of the car driven by
Olson,
20,
Arlington
Dennis
Heights, 111.

Da iry Judging Team
Rates Second Overall

The UK Dairy Judging Team the Dairy Way, and a. member of
placed second among 17 teams at the Dairy Club. He has received
the International contest In Chica- American Dairy Association and
go last week.
American Guernsey Cattle Club
Members of the team are Roger scholarships. Caudill placed eighth
Wces'te. Carl Caudill, Glen Goebel, at the International contest and 15
;:?id Stuart Berryman. Robert Wal-- a at the national.
Goebel, an agriculture extension
member o fine UK Dairy
major from Taylorsville, is presi.:.. If. 'ached the team.
dent of the Agriculture Council.
Woe?te, a senior agricultural rco-i?- o UK
club, and Phalanx. He is
rics major from Alexandra, Is a member of the Dairy Club. Block
a rrembrr of the Dairy Club, New-n.a- n fc Bridle, Lances,
YMCA cabinet,
Club, and the Spike Shoe IFC, and SC. Goebel placed nineth
Society. He was third among 99 at the national contest
and 14 at
contestants In the national con- the international contest.
ies', and tied for third among 51
Berryman, a senior dairy procontestants in the international duction major from NicholasviUe,
contest.
is a member of Alpha Zeta and
Caudill. a senior dairy products the Dairy Club. Berryman was an
major Irom Morehead, is editor of alternate on the team.
t--

So-c!c- fy

15-1-

8.

-

Jrevtl with

COMPLETE

i

i

RENTAL SERVICE

Eifrope

IPIMTT

mi

H

120 S. UPPER

ImWmmmKmttlmmWWMmWmWtKtttKf

s.V.

--

;.;

60

!;tt..,

mL

Omr

4-65-

$998
'ovrt tnttitd

CO'fO
low-co-

trip

it

tlt&it

to M.sico

$169 vp, South Amoriia 699 up,
Hawaii Study Tout S39S up ogd
Around the World $1198 up

WORLD TRAVEL

,

.

....

'.y.'..Y.vyy--

or

5

J Many

0T?a&

?fff

00

$675

Orient
43-6-

wear
TEL.

-

1

Alio

j

-

sv

ITSS

)

MEN'S

w
4

i

n

m-tif- i

For ALL Occasions

f I7A

Uftbe'evoble low Coif

g&

3fffl
HUci

GO FORMAL

of

a

every passible occasion throughout his life.
Dr. Townsend has written numerous articles about Linroln, and
he has a rare collection of papers
and books on his life. At the banquet, he was wearing the watch
that Lincoln wore when he was
shot.
The banquet honored John
Bondurant, Jerry Shaikun, Dick
Watkins, and Dr. Townsend. They

a

George Duncan Elected
To National ASAE Post

George Duncan, UK Agricultural
Zrgineering student, was elected
national vice chairman ol the student, branch of the American
of Agricultural Engineers at
Cornell University recently.
The annual meeting of the organization will be held in Chicago
Dec.
Duncan will assume his

Dr. William Townscnd, a grad- were Initiated into ODK Friday
uate of the UK College of Law, afternoon
the Presbyterian
I".!h,e
V??K Church.
Initiation Banauet
Thirty student and faculty ODK
night
members attended the banquet inA noted authority on Lincoln,
cluding Dr. Herman Donovan, foi
Dr. Townsend pointed out in his
speech that Lincoln was- not mer UK president, who Introduced
passively made a famous man by the speaker.
the events of his time but by meeting the challenge of leadership at Have
WORLD
FUM

I

(

4--

3

a

,,..,

'u'
co7rs

. ,.

f

A

duties as national vice chairma;
at the meeting.
Among his duties will be working
on the national
publication of
ASAE,

the National Student Jour

nal. He will also begin planning
for next year's convention to be
held at Ohio State University in

June.
.
:,

Duncan will be accompanied to
the Chicago meeting .by Bernard

4
4

Shackleford, Agricultural Engineering freshman, and three faculty
members, Dr. Blaine Parker, Ker
mit Mills, and Ed Smith, all mem
bers of the Agricultural Engineer
ing Department.

Good Opportunity

MECHANICAL

i
4

,4

,4
.',

ENGINEER
Recent Graduate
APPLY

fcn Aiii

Browning Mfg. Co.

mmmii

.i

f.i--

r

f

tj

V J fr y in'f'

1111

,

if

mtifrn-f- i

f

1

ki

'nr...wia--

iili"niiirrif

Jt. St. -

r

JbrJm ericas second largest telephone system.
r

419 Southland Dr.
344 WmI. Maill

Nowhere in the United States is the economic "grass" greener
than in the great agricultural areas of our nation. New farm

Ml MS

AlUratte
Srvi. Tailor for SO
ytars. GarRet rfitt4 altered and
women.
rtttylod for mo

TUXEDOS

RINTID.

equipment has increased productivity. New home conveniences have brought a higher standard of living, and demands
grow for an even better way of life.
Part of this better living has been the demand for more and
better Communications;
It follows that as these rural areas expand and prosper, so
does General Telephone. For these Ere the areas we serve.
In Wisconsin, for instance, dairy farms are producing more
milk of better quality from fewer cows. Wisconsin country
homes are bright and up to date. Their standard of living is
equal to or better than that of their city brothers.
In this one state, Gen Tel plans to spend more than $30 mil'
lion in the next few years improving and increasing telephone
services and facilities.
.
This is a typical example of how we strive not only to meet
today's communications needs-b- ut
to answer tomorrow's.

ill

See RUSSIA for
J

yourself in I960

by Maaplnlour
the
American conducted Student Teacher Economy-tour.
I
a
summer departures.
routes at Joweat costs, from
best
O RUSSIA BY MOTORCOACII. Beginning Helsinki or Warsaw. See
country byways, rural towns plus Moscow, Leningrad. 17 days.
B DIAMOND GRAND TOUR. Russia, Crimea, Ukraine, . Czechoslovakia,
s

r

!

Poland. Cermany, Passion Play, Bayreuth Festival, Berlin, Scandinavia,
...
Benelux, Austria, Swilxarland.
Q COLLEGIATE CIRCLE TOUR. Cruise Black Sea, see the Caucasus.
Ukraine, Crimea, Russia, White Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Scandinavia,
Benelux, Berlin, England, Luxembourg, France.
EASTERN EUROPE ADVENTURE. New route. Bulgaria, Roumania,
sww- hiway through Southern Russia, Ukraine, Crimea, Moscow, White Russia, Chechoslovakia, Poland, Krakow, Dresden, Berlin, Cermany, Austria.

a

I

.1

-

Maupmtourwr;ry:f

1

--

-ri

Rtnk Dairy Farm, Sun Prairi; Wucomin

Greener pastures

Maysville, Ky.

Pnrif--

J

.w

v.-

GENERAL

TELEPHONE ELECTRONICS

(feswtsuu)

oway

kU 44

4

* In Student Congress

1

v.

The Inanimates

.4

AM)

There exists in our society an extensive, if not amusing, fetish to have

the students hardly had time to settle
on campus this fall. But then there
our pictures taken, to have them precame the real irritants, as the president-elect
served for future reference for imbeing ineligible, the vice
pressing children, and to have them president-elec- t
resigning, and an actdisplayed in public media for undering president being appointed.
standing and impression. It is a pracSC, we felt, had already had too
much to happen to it to degrade any
tice that is highly respected and millions of dollars are earned by the further. But then the Executive Comnation's photographers each year.
mittee, it was found, had four faculty
But Monday night, the University's voting members and the SC agenda
official student organization, Student even had to be approved by this
Congress, did not' have a quorum and committee before legislation could be
had to call off its scheduled meeting, brought before the group. Then the
even though it had been arranged to congress voted to meet only every
have photographs made of the group other.week for a dearth of business. It
for the UK yearbook, the Kentuckian. had bludgeoned itself with its own
The meeting must have been discourweapon.
aging for the acting SC president, who
During this time, both the president
had informed the congress the meetand acting president had written the
ing before that Kentuckian pictures Kernel threatening to resign if the
would have been taken.
congress was not given more power
When students even shirk having to function as an independent ortheir pictures made for the annual, ganization, apart from the administhere are adverse indications they tration. It resulted eventually in the
any responsibility revoking of the Executive Commitj simply don't have
or scruples on whether tbeir organtee's faculty votes, but not in relaxization rots with apathy, perishes with ing of administrative rule.
lack of adequate representation, and
Things then settled down that's
is buried with not even a single deed the trouble, they have settled into
for the benefit of UK students.
cancerous complacency; now we wonThere are three plausible reasons der how many of the actual student
why the absent members failed to leaders themselves care about their
attend the meeting. First, they may organization. There is nothing more
have been hamstrung with some other disgusting in government as a repimportant engagement; second, they resentative, who, filled with disintermay have had examinations or
est and amour propre, shirks yea,
ments; and third, they just didn't care. even publicly his duty to represent
We. are rather of the contention
the people who elected him. It is
that there were not that many im-- : sheer inefficiency and incompetence,
portant engagements, and that the SC reminiscent of a hobo attempting to
representatives should adjust their escape the world and its hardships.
schedule to their job because of its
As a UK student, don't be too surpotential significance to the students.' prised if your student organization,
The third applies most aptly.
Student Congress, is soon the subject
It was vexing enough to us when for dirges in, bewailment of its
the congress was caught with its
death, that is, unless some
trousers down last Spring in the ijjidst responsibility and leadership is reof fraud; it was even more vexing stored quickly to the group.
when a rerun election came off before
They're digging their grave now.
self-inflict- ed

The Breach Of Briefs
Despite loyalty oaths, ROTC lectures, motherhood influence, and democracy, a new political order, displaying an ostentatious pink banner,
has moved in at the' University. They
call themselves the Panties.
In their first public display, the
subversives lofted high above the UK
flagpole the emblem of their idealism,
and thus threw the campus into an
uproar. Fear, utter trepidation, has
crept among us as the Panties have
swung to the offensive. We cringe
at the ominous possibilities.
For this enemy has gotten down to
the very nudity of things. They have
stripped us of our confidence, peeled
us of our complacency, and disrobed
us of bur courage. "The Hanging of
the Pinks" was not just an incident,
nay; it is to be evaluated with sobriety

and graveness. The Panties are trying men's souls.
We demand action. It is time for
and reconnaissance
counterspying
missions by our standing forces, the
ROTC or its secret service thereof.
Infiltration must be checked at all
costs. A congressional investigative
committee should be established by
Student Congress to preserve pur
security and apprehend the Panjties.
legislation.
We need
And, as the ROTC, Pershing
Rifles, Student Congress, and the Offices of Dean of Men and Women
deter this serious threat to our safety,
we can sleep safely at night under our
covers, knowing that everything is in
good hands.
We feel sure the Panties will be
anti-Pant-

ie

raided.

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Entered

u

second class matter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
th Poet Offic at Lexington. Kentucky
week during the regular school year except holiday! and exams.
Published four times
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

(

Bob Anderson, Managing Editor

Bill Neikirx, Editor

Stewart Hedcer,

Sports Editor

Paul Zimmerman and Carole Martin, Assistant Managing Editors
Dick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographers
Akin, Society Editor
Alice
Paul Dykes, Advertising Managers
Stuart Coldfarband
Beverly Cardwell, Circulation
Perry Ashley, business Manager '

Bob Herndon, Hank Chapman, and Lew Kinc, Cartoonists
Btaff Writers: Jerry Ringo, Jim Phillips, Bobbie Mason, Linda Hockemmlth, Robert Wenninger,
George Smith. Robert Perkins, Edward Van Hook, Rod Tabb, Lawrence Lynch, June Byers, Ann
Harris, Beverly Cardwell, Diane Capchart, Al Rjyster, Jan Berryman. Bob Jobe, Mary
Miller. Herb Steely. Norris Johnson, Bob Fraser, Emajo Cocanougher, Michel Fearing, Pat Hulker,
Curtiss Smith, John Fitswater, Garnett Brown, Richard Hedlund, Christ Finley, Allen Travis,
Sue McCauley, Phil Cox, Robert Radiord. Beverly Pedigo, and Maxin Cates.
WEDNESDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Bex Bailey, Associate
Mereda Davis, News Editor

'

Tl

ST

i

A
1

Jj A II

.

I

t.r

4'

V'"

fX

.

'

j

i(
.

"Hurry, or you'll miss the hanging of the Greens,"

The Teacher's Lament
A

Paradoxical I'edagopic

By BOBBIE MASON

I used to be an inferior. I bought

high priced textbooks and attended
classes and saluated my professors,
submitting my virgin ears to their
worldly lectures.
I was subjected to their reign of
terror I memorized by the chapter,
I gave up my sleeping habits, my
beliefs w