xt7tht2gb776 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7tht2gb776/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690418  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 18, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 18, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7tht2gb776 section xt7tht2gb776 Tmis

Kentucky ME MIL

Friday Evening, April 18, 1969

A&S Will Study

AAUP Requests

ROTC Changes

Partial Revision'
Of Student Code

By DANIEL E. GOSSETT

Kernel Staff Writer
The Arts and Sciences Council heard and accepted
for study a proposal from the Lexington Peace Council
and Students for a Democratic Society Thursday morning that would radically change the structure of the
ROTC program at UK.
Prepared jointly by the two groups, the proposal
challenges the relevance of ROTC on the grounds
that it threatens the autonomy of the University and
does not allow sufficient latitude for critical dialogue
on salient topics.
The text of the proposal is as follows:
"As citizens of these United States, whose government is proposed in the form of a democracy, we
maintain that a requisite condition for a democratic
government is a base grounded in an educated constituency.
"And, if the University institution is to fulfill its
obligation in the promotion of the intellectual growth
of its supporting community, it requires an autonomous
environment. We find ourselves, however, in the unique
position of supporting a situation which infringes upon
that very autonomy and integrity. This unhealthy situation is founded in the presence of the Reserve Officers
Training Corps program on this campus.
"Although we believe that the most practical, logical
and complete cure to this situation would be the complete
removal of ROTC from the University's rolls, we recog-- .
nize the rights of others who might desire to participate
in such a program.
Continued on Pae 8, Col. 1

''Mow'

Vol. LX, No. i:m

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Sol

...

Road Runner, the Kappa Delta entry in
the LKD Turtle Derbv. walked awav
wtn lne nonors yesterday as he (she?)
finished with the fastest time. Wenni
LaLiberte, the turtle s trainer, explained
Road Runner's success: "He showed more
spunk this afternoon than since we got

him."

Kernel Photo by Howard Mason

Is The Big Question In

There are no "ifs" about it the University of Louisville will be a state school by July 1, 1970. But the
"how" is another matter.
Action by the 1966 Ceneral Assembly assured that
UL would be maintained as a state educational institution no later than July 1, 1970. And UL will be
considered a state school by the Council on Public
Higher Education for budgetary purposes by this July 1.
But the legislature also directed UL and the University
of Kentucky to "develop proposed legislation providing
for closer affiliation" of the two schools for the 1970
legislative session and that's where the sticky question
of "how" comes in.

The two stories on this page dealing with the
merger as well as the related stories
on pages four and five are being published
simultaneously by the Kernel and the University of Louisville' Cardinal. The articles were
prepared jointly by Cardinal Editor-in-ChiNick DcMartino, Cardinal Managing-EditoTom Lyons, Kernel Managing Editor Guy Men-de- s
III and Kernel Assistant Managing Editor
Dana Ewell.
UK-U- L

ef

r

By DARRELL RICE
Editorial Page Editor
The
Executive Committee of the UK
American Association of University Professors (AAUP)
chapter today called for a revision of two parts of the
Student Code in response to the suspensions of five
students who were arrested on narcotics charges' last
'
Sunday.
Dr. J.W. Patterson, chairman of the executive committee, said the recommendations for revising the code
will be submitted to Dr. James Ogletree, chairman of
the University Senate Council, for the senate to act on
at its scheduled April 24 meeting.
The executive committee met in special session
Thursday night to draw up' its request for the revisions
in the wake of Vice President for Student affairs Dr.
Stuart Forth's suspension Monday of the students.
The request reads as follows:
"The executive committee requests the senate council
to place on the agenda of the senate meeting of April
24 the consideration of the revision of the Student
Code, specifically the
paragraph of Title
II, part C and the fourth paragraph of Title II, part
B, Section C. We are hopeful that the council will
propose or will provide an opportunity for others to
propose the following revision of the (first) paragraph:
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1

!

tion. Certainly tuition, which had already reached a
prohibitive level, provided insufficient funds.
The state as well began realizing' that it was not
fulfilling its responsibility to educate the massive college-ag- e
population of Jefferson County.
Taxpayers in the county pay a disproportionate percentage of the money which supports the state colleges.
Yet county students must either go to school across the
state, pay tuition at UL (which was more than $700
higher than the UK rate), or as was the unfortunate
case many times do without education.
The state further realized that in order to establish
a facility in Jefferson County the quality of UL, they
would have to invest a tremendous amount in capital
funds.
The obvious solution to both problems was some sort
of financial arrangement between UL and the state
which would lower tuition, allow for expansion, and
would provide a nearby institution for more Jefferson
County students.
Just as important was the maintenance of UL's
particular identity. And the crucial problem of the
coordination of
study in the state would
have to be resolved.
Plan Five sought to handle all these problems.
But the wording of the law does not specifically
instruct UL and UK to investigate merger. Rather, it
says "closer affiliation." Compliance with the law,
then, is possible in several other ways.
Most alternate plans would establish UL as an
independent state school; variations would set different
degrees of coordination with UK, the Council on Public
Higher Education, and the other state schools.
But no matter what plan might appeal to the committee members, the boards of both schools are finnly
post-gradua- te

For almost three weeks, committees from the Boards
of Trustees of both UL and UK have been meeting
behind closed doors to determine their position on that
"how" part of the legislature's directive.
Negotiating committees appointed March 25 from
both schools' boards will meet today in Louisville for
the third time to investigate the details of a plan that
would unite Kentucky's two largest educational institutions into "sister schools." One university, one chancellor and one board of trustees would form a governing
superstructure for two distinct campuses, each with
Ask it about the proposed merger with the Univera president, an administration, a faculty and a student
sity of Louisville and the collective UK will reflect
body. (The original plan named the top man president, for a second and then issue forth with platitudinous
but the designation has since been changed to keep
statements, circumlocutions, vague opinions and plain
the current nomenclature.)
old
reactions.
This merger proposal, which has been officially
Then it will turn right around and apologize for its
backed by both universities, was patterned after the lack of
enlightenment on the subject.
Plan Five of a professional consultant's report
The fact is, the UK campus knows very little about
on UL state affiliation made in 1967. That report was the
proposed merger, and individuals among the faculty,
citizens' group a com- student
commissioned by an eight-mabody and administration will readily admit it.
and Times
l
mittee headed by fonner
While merger and affiliation talk have been floating
general manager Lisle Baker.
around some parts of the UL campus for almost three
The Baker Committee was appointed in September
years now, it has just recently come into prominence
of 1966 by fonner UK President John Oswaldand fonner at
Lexington.
UL President Philip Davidson to help solve the educaThere was a brief flurry of speculation last year foltional problems of both the University of Louisville lowing the state legislature's
passage of House Resoluand the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
tion 91, which called for UL to affiliate itself with the
UL's plight at that time was clear indeed the costs state system of higher education by July, 1970, and to
of maintaining quality education far exceeded the revenue explore the possibility of closer ties with UK. But
available through traditional sources. Local government, shortly after that, UK's multitudes found themselves
which hid supported UL for many years, could not with an even more pressing problem the lack of a
afford the Muring price tag that came with good educa

next-to-la-

UK-U- L

st

Merge

committed to the Plan Five concept at least until they
find it unworkable or unattainable Meanwhile, the
deadlines for action" are fast approaching.
,
UL must submit a budget to the Council on Public
Higher Education sometime after July 1 to cover the
1970-7- 2
bienniuni. Administrative officials say they are
shooting for an October target date. The Council's approved budget must go to the governor by about Nov. 15.
And the legislature convenes Jan. 1,1970. Asa result the
trustee committees arehustlingtogatherdataforthe first
stage of their decision: Do UL and UK still agree that
e
the Plan
merger is the best arrangement for all
parties concerned? UL President Woodrow Strickler
estimates that the negotiating committee that ismeeting
today will probably reach a consensus to 'send to the
two full boards in about a month.
The subcommittees of the joint
board negotiating committees indicate the nature of the problems
that must be faced before merger.
Finances the motivation for most interest by the two
university populations will indeed affect every aspect
of the proceedings. This
will be reporting
as soon as possible.
.
Of the four financial areas tuition, salaries, adminisdebts the first two are the
trative costs, and long-termost knotty and most widespread in their effect.
If UL and UK are to become one institution, faculty
salaries must be equalized. Currently the average UK
salary is about $1,000 higher than a coordinate salary
at UL. While everyone agrees that professors at the
same rank with the same qualifications should get the
same pay, an equitable resolution of the details is
considerably more difficult to agree upon.
The tuition problem is even more sizable. Currently
Continued on Pace 5
,

Five-typ-

UL-U-

K

m

Merger Opinions Divided At UK

gut-lev-

n

Courier-Journa-

el

What opinions there are seem divided into .two
camps, a minority which believes that UK stands to
gain little from the merger and a majority which believes that that is unimportant, saying "What's good
for the state is good for UK."
Dr. James Ogletree, chairman of UK's University
Senate which is composed of almost 200 tenured professors, said the Senate Council, "in its present level
of understanding, favors Plan Five as a step toward
the development of the state's higher education system." The council is the
executive body
of the senate.
administrators and faculty
Many of those
who have given thought to the issues in vol veil transcend
Plan Five and envision a master plan for the whole
state system of higher education. This is not to say
they have overlooked the difficulties involved in the
proposed Plan Five merger, such as equalization of
faculty salaries and tuition, avoidance of unnecessary
curriculum duplication and the loss of funds fiom
Continued on Vsgt 5
nine-memb-

top-ranki-

er

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, friday, April 18, 1969

PRISMATIC HIGHWAY
Iowa has its cubism too in the
lame afternoons fit also girl
hitchikers with mushroom

hot floods all across the state
IN VIOLET TEXTURED
in the spring
WATER
What Cheer, indeed
In violet textured water
childjourneys
Orphee float Inn
rusty nails in Iowa's sandy floating, while her
soil
voice sings and he
a warning
answers, disembodied.
White Man, go home
Memory of her seeing
because of the blues and floods
me, with pleasure in her
1000 night trains congregated in
eyes and pain of wanting
the arrangement
and of daring not to want,
of Des Moines
Poor fool, floating
a kind of bop mechanical rodeo with no body
dismal roads leading nowhere mourning, as he travels
except out to pinwheels, bro- to the island to become
ken
the voice, the maker
kalaidos copes
of arms so lightly stroked
Bruce Rogers
and burning deep insi

bas
Ave Maria

(burma shave style)

HailMary
Full of
etc.
Visit St. Lucy's
the glistening highway shrine
reminds me of the
Body
and Mennonites
who rescued us from the ashcan
starving and shivering in Davcn-- ;
port
THE

IS

KERNEL

KENTUCKY

1969-7- 0

STAFF

STUDENTS

TYPEWRITER CO.

TO APPLY!

Applications may b obtained from:
Mr. Let Becker, Editor, Room 113 Journalism Building
Mr. Charles Reynolds, Adviser, Room 109 Journalism Building

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Rivals'.

The University Theatre Arts
"The
Department presents
RivaLs," opening Friday night
April 18, and continuing through
performance dates April 19, 25,
26 and 27.
Reservations can be made by
calling extension 2929.

THE BODY
The body
is the

least.common denominator

and the most common impersonator

of
existence
Rick Rose

Farewell Film Fails To
Match Cream Quality

Editor's note: The Cream farewell film is currently touring the
United States.
By JOHN ZEH
College Press Service
In the spoken introduction to the film tff Cream's farewell performance, the narrator makes the statement that "only the deaf
don't appreciate them." Fortunately for the blind, appreciation
of the Cream does not require the ability to see.
Fortunately for Cream fans who go see this flick, too. It would
be hard for anyone watching the film to learn to love Cream on
sight alone. The music is great (although the amplification in a
theater may not be), but the photographic technique is poor.
After doing "Sunshine of Your
Love" under what must have pick up with the rest of the song,
been full houselights, Cream and improve as the song peaks.
These psychedelic images save
wails into "White Room," and
the film from becoming a monotoEfthe photog begins to groove.
fective, if cheap, spastic zoom nous sequence of songs by super
effects brighten up the screen. stars. "Spoonful" ends with a
moving out to Baker's cymbals,
During "Politician," close-ubecoming still. There Ginger raps
images of Jack Bruce and Ginger
about playing drunis, and cut
Baker are dramatically superimto the stage where he is playing
diposed. During "Crossroads,"
rector Tony Palmer has made a the drum solo in "Toad." The
sorry attempt at inserting still interspersed extreme close-up- s
photos of the performers. Back and slow motion effects makes
stage, Eric Clapton provides this an excellent study of the
stoned answers to straight quesdying drummer.
The flick comes to a quick,
tions from an interviewer seeking
a guitar lesson for all the kiddies unexpected end after only an
hour and 20 minutes with "I'm
out there in the audience.
on Top of the World" So Glad." The audience at Albert
"Sitting
Hall in London erupted in apis played through a filter of light-shodull at first. "Spoonplause and cheers before the
effects,
ful" comes on sounding like the group finished the song. Graspbest song in the show, but is ing the significance that Cream
interrupted by the narrator's rap is no more, audiences watching
(" . . . rock music it may be that the movie will join in.
True Cream devotees will be
this is the art of tomorrow").
And then the light-shovisuals glad they came to catch this
celluloid bit of memorabila, but
students of 'contemporary filmmaking will probably be disgusted. It's too bad the visual
'use
part doesn't match up to the
Cream's sound.
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STANDARI

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WE URGE ALL INTERESTED

my flesh, of fire carresscd
and by carresses raging wild.
Here is his head, you lyric
darkness, singing of your
deaths for his, crying for
his life, rough god, in vain.
He goes fast, seeming slow
time slowing eager limbs
while up ahead a light
try once more to reach
the light but
too late for he must
look back to see but must not
turn, his life and art pull on
and gone the gift
of the lyre.
Ralph Charles Drown

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, April

18,

l9-- 3

Educators Blame Unrest On 'Minute Group
By DOTTIE DEAN

Ambassador Mantilla-Ortegdescribed some of the changes
which have occurred in Latin
America in the past few years
to approximately 43 students and
faculty members who attended
the speech at 3:30 p.m. in the
Student Center.
a

Kcmcl Staff Writer
Ecuadorian Ambassador to
the United States, Cados Mantilla-Ortega
was on campus
Thursday to deliver the keynote"
speech for Latin American Week
at UK.

Mantilla-Ortegsaid that in
the past few years many of the
Latin American countries have
been "trying with little success
a

low-incom-

to experiment with democracy."
But he said they have mostly
failed to establish the governments permanently because of

Ecuadorian Opens Latin America Week
-

WAS
thors of the document include
NCTON
( AP) The
heads of 21 of the nation's top council president Logan Wilson;
colleges Thursday blamed "a Harvard president Nathan M.
minute group of destroyers who Pusey; University of Pittsburgh
have abandoned hope in today's chancellor Wesley Povar; Chansociety" for recent outbursts of cellor Roger W. Heyns of the
campus violence.
University of California, BerkeThe American Council on Edley; Carnegie Corporation president Alan Pifer; and trustee Education disclosed that the edumund A. Stephen of the Univer-o- f
cators, along with several trustees and foundation officers, met
Notre Dame.
The report, emphasizing that
secretly in Chicago over the Easter weekend and drew up a de- most American campuses have
nunciation of campus demon- remained peaceful, declares:
"On the undisturbed camstrators which has been published.
puses and among the majority of
A council spokesman said the orderly students, however, there
d
are widely shared discontents
paper, titled "A Declaration on Campus Unrest," will which extremists are at times
able to manipulate to destructive
be distributed to its 1,538 memends.
ber colleges.
The paper refers to the cam"Moreover, even in the abpus demonstrations as "spectac- sence of violence there has deular events precipitated by . . . veloped among some of the young
extremists" which it says should a cult of irrationality and innot be permitted to obscure the civility which severely strains atof students, tempts to maintain sensible and
accomplishments
faculty and administrators "who decent human communication.
have serious interest in construc"Within this cult there is a
tive changes in society and in the minute group of destroyers who
have abandoned hope in today's
university."
The spokesman said the au society, in today's university, and
111

1,400-wor-

TODAY and

The deadline

for

nnancementi la
the flrit

7:30 p.m. two dajri prior to

publication

of Items in this column.

Today
All student organizations must return completed applications for registration for the 1969-7- 0 academic year
to Room 206 in the Administration
Building before April 21.
Applications for Dillard House are
available at 270 South Limestone and
412 Kose Street.
The Theatre Arts Department production of The Rivals, Richard Brins-le- y
Sheridan's 18 Century comedy,
will open 8 p.m., Friday, April 18 on
the Guignol stage. The production will
also be on stage Saturday, April 19
at the same time of 8 p.m. Reservations may be made by calling 2929.
The fifth annual Mountain Dew Festival will be held April 17, 18 and
19 at Prestonsburg
Community College. The winner of competition in a
receive the
variety of events will Dew Award."
"Brown Jug Mountain
A graduate student's Happy Hour
will be held today from 4:30 to 8 p.m.,
at Adam's Restaurant, 683 S. Broadway.

Tomorrow
Charles Hodges and Marilyn
will present a student piano
recital Saturday, April 19. at 8:15 p.m.
in the Ag Science Auditorium. Admission is free.
The First Church of Christ. Scientist, will present a lecture by Noel D.
Bryan-Jone- s
entitled "The Light By
Which We See," Saturday, April 19.
8 p.m. The lecture will be held
at
at First Church of Christ, Scientist,
606 East Main Street.
Sch-raed- er

Coming Up
brunch will be held Sun2
p.m., at the
day, April 20,
Koinonea House. This will be the
last meeting of the year, and elections will be held for next semester.
The University Jazi Ensemble, under the direction of Wm. Harry
Clarke, will be in concert Sunday,
April 20, 8 p.m., at the Student
A Hlllel

12--

Center Theatre.

The concert

in the processes of orderly discussion and negotiation to secure significant change."
The paper says less restive
students and faculty members
are. "moving to deal with the
cult's destructive tactics."
It states further that disruption and violence have no place
on campus and that the academic community must deal
promptly and directly with disruptions.
The paper recognizes "the
right of and even the necessity
for constructive dissent" but says
violence will not be tolerated.
Though it says violations of
law must be dealt with by police, the paper emphasizes universities must attempt to deal
with demonstrations before they
reach a stage of requiring police
action.
.

(re-fcri-

Hopkinsville Gets New Classrooms
ton
FRANKFORT
Outlaw Construction Co., Hopkinssubmitted an apparent low bid of $616,000 for construction
ville,
of an academic facilities building at Hopkinsville Community College, Gov. Louie B. Nunn announced Thursday.
The new building, comprising a basement and two floors, will
have space for classrooms, offices, locker rooms, toilets, a bookstore
and
lobby and mechanical equipment areas. Theprb-jec- t
includes slight alterations in an existing building.
'
(AP)-Mil-

multi-purpos- e,

Starts 7:30
Adm. $1.50

ILL

GDGDtUHEHLE

ME-(BDaiOTES-

WALLACE'S
fcOOK STORE

FLOWERS

TOMORROW

Mb.

The ambassador said, however, that these and other problems must be dealt with effectively in the immediate future.
"The impatient generation
to the Ecuadorian youth)
are exerting tragic and frightening pressures. Solutions must be
found immediately."
He also discussed the Alliance
for Progress and mentioned that
President Nixon had indicated
that "the U.S. is ready to meet
with Latin American countries
to revise the outdated principles
of the Alliance."
But he also said what Ecuador really needs is more trade
rather than aid from the U.S.
"We really need both trade and
aid, but they sliould not be conflicting objectives."

such factors as the lack of education found in the countries, the
and such problems
as sanitation.
"People expect prompt and
radical changes," he said.
"Around one half of the countries are now ruled by dictatorships but all 20 republics arc
trying to find solutions for their
urgent problems. However, no
one from outside can find these
solutions for them. A solution
which might be good for one
could be fatal to another. They
are each separate entities."
Mantilla-Orteg- a
mentioned
that the illiteracy rate in Ecuador is around 35 percent and that
many children are refused admittance because schools are
overcrowded.

For Any

Kent. Cliff and Paul will be In
concert at "College Life," Sunday,
April 20, 8:59 p.m., at the Zeta Tau
Alpha Sorority House, 327 Columbia
Terrace. Everyone is welcome.
There will be a meeting of Dillard
House aplicants Monday, April 21, 7
p.m., at 270 S. Limestone.
The UK Choristers and the University Chamber Singers will present their ifinal concert of the current season on Monday, April 21,
8:13 p.m.. at the UK Agricultural '
Science Auditorium. The concert is
open to the public.
James Boon, piano and harpsichord, and Rodney Farrar, cello, appear In concert on Tuesday, April
22, 8:15 p.m., at the Agricultural
Science Auditorium.
Dr. Lester R. Bryant, Department
of Surgery, will speak on "Functional
Impairment of the
Lung
after Acute Atelectasis," April 22 at
4 p.m. The lecture will be given in
S
Room
of the Medical Center.
All interested persons may attend.
A panel discussion on "How The
Needs For Preschool Education Are
Being Met In The Intercity Schools."
will be held Wednesday. April 23,
8 p.m., at the Lexington
Public Library. The discussion, sponsored by
the Lexington Montessori Society,
will feature Mrs. Robert Sloane,
readiness Instructor for the intercity schools; and Dr. Carl Tatum,
a UK professor of education in the
area of child development.
Prof. Duane Marble, a Northwestern
will discuss
University geographer,
of remote
geographic
applications
devices on Wednesday, April
sensing
23. 3 p.m.. at Margaret King Alumni
House. His talk Is sponsored by the
UK Geography Dept.

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Jack Lcmmon
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MS-50-

The Odd Couple

use the

Mm MM

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John Cassavetes
Ruth Gordon Sidney Blackmer
Maurice Evansand Ralph Bellamy
Produced by Wam Castle
Wnlien tor the
Roman Polanshi

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aaurioDr-Paramour
Prime

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From the novel by Ira Levm
fecrmcoior
SuQi)PSiliOiMaiureAuOJsnces

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Dinner Theater
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by

The Kentucky Kernel
The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second ciass
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And

* A Timetable: Steps Toward Closer Affiliation
Only UK's President Oswald and Lisle Baker out of 15
members were in favor of the plan.
November The report of the Lisle Baker Committee recommending Heald, Hobson s Plan Five with
minor differences was made to the two presidents.
December The UL Trustees accepted the Baker
report "in principle."

More than four years of formal plan-

ning and negotiations will be behind
the University of Louisville when it
state institution
becomes a
in July, 1970.
While the most surgical phase of the
deoperation is just beginning the UK-Utermination of the form of the
affiliation-ccrtain- ly
those efforts
could never be successful without
some careful groundwork by all the
parties involved.
The following timetable provides a
brief outline of the major actions that
have molded the current status of UL,
and will certainly affect the future of
all public institutions of higher education in the Commonwealth.
full-fledge-

d

1968
Jan.

1

L

Jan.

17- -A

November-U- K
Trustees decided that they wanted
to have a Joint meeting between the UlUK Boards of
Trustees.
Dember-U- L
concurs at its Trustees' meeting.
n
President Strickler appoints a
negotiating comfrom the Board of Trustees.
mittee

joint meeting of the two Boards'

com-

Question In

fa The-Bi-

Continued from Pafe One
a Kentucky resident pays $1,050 in tuition at.UL; he
would pay $2S0 at UK. The two figures must be brought
into line at some point, yet UK students would balk
at a tuition hike in order to let UL into the system.
UL students hardly would like to bepayingmore money

five-ma-

to attend what isbilledasamcrgcdinstitution. To lower
tuition at UL to $280 would create a tremendous burden
of enrollment which the school just could not yet handle.
Probably the tuition equalization will be somewhere
between the two extremes. (Compared to most states,
Kentucky has very low tuition rates. Neighboring Tennessee charges $150 each quarter, or $450 a year).

1969
first Joint meeting of the two Boards
March 23-of Trustees was held in Louisville. Announcements
that
were made to the press about the
would deal with specific problems. The Governor, who
is chairman of UK's Board, attended the meeting.
The

The State Legislature convened.
UK Trustees accepted the Baker

Report.

'Mow'

mittees for affiliation negotiations met and decided that
UK would introduce legislation that would merge UK
and UL (including the community college system).
Feb. 1 Woodrow Strickler was appointed Acting
President to succeed President Davidson.
Bill 133 passed both houses of the
Feb.
Legislature. The bill deleted the references to "medical
and dental" aid in the law governing state support to
UL. This meant that the state could grant aid to UL
for any purpose, rather than for just medical and dental
'
'v
education.
(.ate February Gov. Louie Nunn submitted his first
budget, which included $6.2 million for UL. Those
at UL who had been working on the budget had been
talking in figures as high as about $20 million-th- is
included a considerable tuition decrease, building and
of the
development costs, and the immediate phase-on
which came from Louisville and Jefferson
ion figure continued the
County. The
of the medical and dental programs and
support
added $4 million for tuition reduction. While it was a
300 percent Increase, it left UL in a tight position. Tuition was decreased for the fall to $1,050 per year for
Kentucky residents from the previous $1,200 (which had
applied only to Jefferson County residents). The proposed plan to reduce costs to $900 a year had to be
dropped. This was not done because no additional money
was available for the inevitable increase in operational
.
;"
costs.
''i Feb.
6 After extensive exploration of the
General Assembly by Dr. Dee Akers, UL's legislative
s