xt7tqj77wq0x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7tqj77wq0x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680511  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 11, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 11, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7tqj77wq0x section xt7tqj77wq0x The Keotbcky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

Tuesday Evening, June

11,

19f8

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

r

f

Political Situation Scrambled

V

rf

Vol. LIX, No. 151

Kennedy Services Held

-

"

In
Appalacliia

'T'l"r""":V;
The sun casting a heavenly glow upon
him, Robert Kennedy presides at a poverty
High School
hearing in Fleming-Neo- n
during his February tour of Appalachia.
(For more pictures, see Page 5.)

he inspired

was

non-votin-

Netvs Analysis
Trustees selection committee,
but will have not vote in the final
of

selection.
But even without the vote,
the committee lias a substantial
amount of power in its hands,
and could be a deciding influence
in the selection of John W Oswald's successor.
Dr. Ralph Angelucci, chairman of the selection committee
said the committee decided it

"wanted student participation"
because "it's great to have their
interest If I were a candidate,
I know I'd want to talk to students."
the
approached
Angelucci
University Student Advisory

Committee USAC, which was
initiated up in April by Dr. Oswald to act as a liason between
students and the president and
his administration, and asked
that it select a committee
Rafael Vallebona, vice president of Student Government and
a member of USAC, said USAC
was chosen to select the students for the committee because,
"that is what we are

president Steve Cook and Vallebona selected ten students "with
approval of USAC," who represented "a cross section of the
student body," said Vallebona.
It was also decided that any
members of USAC wishing so
could be on the committee; eight
elected to do so
Pegeron said the students selected were "people who are per.
ceptive " . who know what's goOn the committee are:
ing on
a foreign student, two black students, an English graduate student, a member of UK's championship debate team, an Art
major, the vice president of the
UK Student Government and a
freshman coed
The ten chosen are: Ellis Bullock, Sheryl Snyder, Bob Valentine, Theodore Berry, Bonnie
Cox, Bill Rohan, Larry Heller,
Tim Futrell. Anita Puckett and

fanatic

Meis- -

felt had enough power in merely
presenting a recommendation.
Tim Futrell, Vice President of
SC maintained a voice plus a
vote would be better than just a
voice, but Robin Lowry said "it
would be presumptious if we were
to think we could vote . . they
don't want the students to take
over the administration build" Another member said one
ing
vote would not make much difference anyway.
Futrell suggested that since
the governing regulations of the
University are presently being
revised, an attempt should be
made "to liberalize" presidential selection rules, in order to
Continued on Pare

party had

...

the assassination

is a tremendous boost for Richard

Nixon "

A program to help disadvantaged high school graduates prepare
for college is being offered by the University this summer, be-ginning J une 17.
The program, which will run
It will also be available, howthrough August 7, is designed
ever, to students who do not
to offer tutoring in basic college plan to enter UK or LTI, but
subjects, counseling and guidwho display ability and desire
ance. It is being directed by to continue their education beKeller J. Dunn, associate dean yond high school.
of admissions.
Faculty members of the Col"At least 40 students . . . most
of them black student, have lege of Education, College of
shown interest in the program," Nursing, LTI, and the Departments of English and Matheaccording to Dr. George Hill,
matics are cooperating in the
one of the program's staff memproject. All teachers mostly UK
bers.
Dr. Hill, one of UK's two black faculty and professional staff
members and their wives will
faculty members, said that alserve without pay, Dunn said.
though the program is open to
all students, "a specific emphasis
"Volunteer teachers will conis being made to bring in black tinue guidance, counseling and
students."
tutoring throughout the freshman
He said two of the program's year and beyond if needed," he
main purposes are "to attract added.
black students to UK and to
Members of the campus Black
help black students succeed in Student Union are also
cooperatcollege, if they go to UK or not."
to the
"It will be really beneficial ing in attracting students school
program, and local high
to the black students," he said,
" . . . we'll try to get them counseling offices are helping in
to understand w hat college, life screening students.
is like."
The same type program is also
Known as the Col lege Prepara- being set up in Louisville through
the Jefferson Community College.
tory Program for University
Bound High School Graduates,
$10,000 was appropriated for
the program is designed primarthe programs, with $5,000 going
ily to help students who have to each one. Money will be availdecided to enter or may be conable for necessary texts, notebooks, lunch money and busfare
sidering entering UK or the Lexfor the pupils if it is needed.
ington Technical Institute.

Will It Have Power Without A Vote?
He added that USAC "has
the best communication between
the students and the administration."
USAC chairman, Jean Paul
Pegeron, Student Government

nedy group had reservations for
a booth in the Student Center
for this week), said he is undecided as to whom he will support
He said, "I don't see how
Humphrey can be stopped now.
I thought Robert Kennedy was
the only chance the Democratic

Counseling For Poor
To Be Offered By UK

Student Review Committee:
By GUY MENDES
The 18 member student review committee tliat will interview applicants for the University's presidency is, in much reg
spect, similar to UK's
student trustee, or even the Paris
peace talks: it's not the final
step, but it's a move in the right
direction.
The committee will pass on
its recommendation to the Board

divided the

Phil Patton, head of the local
Students for McCarthy group,
said they received a telegram
from McCarthy's national headquarters instructing them to discontinue campaigning "indefinitely."
But he said they will resume
goto Humphrey."
Meisburg, who had planned to "probably Thursday," when Sen.
continue working for Kennedy McCarthy resumes his campaign
Continued on rage 6, Col. 4
throughout the summer (the Ken

the assassination.
Most local political workers
believe the majority of Kennedy's
support will be transfered to Sen.
Eugene McCarthy because of the
similarities of their platforms, but
they are quick to add that it
will not be enough to keep Hubert Humphrey from getting the
Democratic nomination
John Meisburg, who headed
the UK Student for Kennedy organization, said Kennedy's assassination "was something I was
afraid was going to happen."
He said that several reporters
he had spoken with during Kennedy's campaign for the Indiana
primary had "expressed the concern that he would be shot
"Simply because Robert Kennedy was the type of person he
hatred as well as love."

"He

masses by speaking out on the
it
issues the way he did
was good strategy, it won him
the primaries, but it also cost,
him his life."
Meisburg said the shooting
was "particularly shocking" to
him because he had recently met
Kennedy when he was campaigning in New Albany, Ind.
Meisburg said he thought
"about three fourths" of Kennedy's support, both locally and
nationally, would go to McCarthy. "A great many people were
for Kennedy the man, no matter what his platform was like,"
Meisburg said "Ithinkthese will

Robert F. Kennedy, over 100
townspeople and students took
part in a memorial service for
Kennedy in UK's Memorial Hall.
Five clergymen of different
faiths offered prayers and eulogies
for the slain Senator during the
services, which were sponsored
by the Lexington Association of
Religious Communities.
Guests books were signed
prior to the services and will be
sent to the Kennedy family
On the political side, all campaigning has been indefinitely
suspended, amid much speculation as to what will come of
the political scramble caused by

i

.;.

burg said

As the nation mourned and
thousands visited the gravesite
of slain presidential hopeful Sen.

2, Col. 3

-

--

.i

nun

iimim

rvttr--

uf7

Davidu Mangat.
The eight USAC members are
Allen Youugnun, Tuft McKinstry,
Tish Laswell, Lesesne Derin, Jo
Ann Bistany, Logan Gray, Robin
Lowry and Sandie Riegler
The committee met on the last
day of school, elected a chairman Taft McKinstry and discussed its power, the procedure
it would follow and the ureas
it would question the presidential
candidates on
A few members believed an
actual vote in the final selection
should be attained, while others

"

lv

,Tn

Review
Committee

1

Members of the Student Review Committee which will interview
candidates for the UK presidency, met before school ended to thV
and eg
cuss their duties. Made up ii ten ttudfiits
'
Student Advisory Committee inemrv.- -. the n'--" p
' 1i ir
u.
rcccomendation to the President i
fc
luve no vte in the final s iic(u

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, June

11,

18--

J

Season 6tt

to

Centennial Brighter
With No Hoot Gibson

u

By D. C. MOORE

Can't take it With You" by KaufSummer stock theatre is upon man and Hart, "The Crucible"
the theatre goer again and almost by Arthur Miller, "Philadelphia,
anywhere people go there will be Here I Come" by Brian Friel and
some kind of outdoor drama, "King Lear" by William
"Hoot Gibson" hero epic or indoor "Sad Sack" Meoldrama for
In addition to the fine plays
theatrical audiences to witness the Centennial Theatre has bedie before their eyes.
with Actors
come affiliated
Many will wish they had Equity Association. Charles
Dickens the managing director of
stayed home in front of the summer television renins.
the Centennial Theatre says that
Summer stock is not always "for the Centennial to be granted
the best theatre, except maybe Equity standing, is like becoming
for souvenir hunters and tourists. an accredited university. It is
The summer stock offered by the the stamp of approval by the
union of professionals in the
University of Kentucky's Centennial Theatre in the Lexington American theatre."
area is different. There will be
The Centennial Theatre is
no "Hoot Gibson" epics or "Sad now a full professional company
Sack" melodramas, only profeswith a growing reputation andfor
sional theatre.
its up coming season the stock
The history of the Centennial company will present a fine comtheatre is short, this being the pany of actors. Among the actors
forth season, but this season in the company this season will
could be the best one yet. In the be David Semonin, Max Howard,
past, The Centennial Theatre has William Hayes, Bryan Harrison,
had to do w ith what came along, Margaret Kelly, Margaret Chrisbut it looks like this year that topher, Susan Cardwell, and
they have with them that extra Shakespearan actor Arnold Moss.
The Centennial Theatre Box
leverage that will produce an excellent summer of theatre.
Office is open and reservations
The Centennial Theatre will and information may be had by
do four plays this year: "You calling
Extension 2929.

A
X

4'

Shakc-spea- r.

f

11
The Kentucky

IERNELp.g

i

iwW

258-900-

ipM

1QiT'rtTTftgltrtiilMMwft

-

Mothers Are Trapped

By D. C. MOORE
Notice the Mothers of Invention's Album "We're Only in it
For The Money" and even if hip,
there is in it a certain insanity
that is sane.
Just take the album cover,
read the words to the music and
there is good deal of poetry and

If you

must
burn,
burn

carefully...
burn
legally.

--3

truth to what is printed as in
the lyrics from "Concentration
Moon" or "Harry, You're A
Beast."
Reading the words though,
will not prepare one for the music,
even when there is music, because of the torture in the mind
trying to escape from a concentration camp.
Somewhere there might be
lurking a final solution and that
is what this album is about,
putting the agony from that torture on display.
The one Mother responsible
for this work is Frank Zappa
and though the album is printed
like the Beatles" "Sgt. Peppers
Lonely Hearts Club Band," this
album can stand by itself.

The 1967

Scenes from jast Centennial Theatre productions are clockwise from top left: "Camino Real,
nary Invalid," "Dylan" and "Midsummer Night's Dream."

'J .cjV forest fires

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, June

11,

19C.8

Come toThe Party!
Don't bring a bottle

- BRING BAIL!
.

I,,

gi

m

im

Bids arc being opened tomorrow by the state for construction of a
University parking structure. The building, shown in the architect's drawing, will have room for 756 cars on four levels and
will also house the campus telephone exchange. It is to be located
on Rose St. across from Bradley Hall.

Structure

THE MlRlSCH CORPORATION

BLAKE EDWARDS

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CLAUDINE LONGET
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HENRY

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In Color

members of the State Board of
Higher Education.
But for a school such as UK,
which has only moved into the
realms of higher education in the
past few years, a student voice,
no matter how small, is a giant

step
Though students aren't equally represented with. the faculty,
if used in the right way, the

committee's recommendation

could be more powerful than the
selection committee intended it
to be.

For it would not be good
business should someone who the
s
And after recent
and student committee listed as one
demonstrations at the University its last choices be named presiof Oregon, students were given dent. If this were revealed, it
three positions on the selection would not be a very welcome
committee that will soon choose reception for a new chief admina successor for retiring President
istrator, and would put him on
Arthur Hemming
bad terms with the students from
Along with the three students the beginning.
will be three faculty members,
The student committee will
three administrators and three determine their selection by

12th!

JUNE

Continued from Page One
students even more of a voice
in the future.
That the committee does not
have an actual vote is regretable.
Other institutions in the same
situation have formed student
and faculty committees will equal
power

Riv e

Last year at the University
of Michigan, three committees-stude- nt,
faculty and alumni-we- re
formed, each with the same
authority The three committees
passed their recommendations to
the school's Board of Regents,
who made the final decision.

IV

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means of informal interviews with
the applicants. At the review
committee's first meeting, topics
the applicants would be queried
on were discussed.
Some of the topics were: the
role of the Negro students on campus, freedom of speech on camtuition, the stupus,
dent trustee, the In Loco Parentis
te

doctrine,

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tems, freedom of the press, an
academic review board, the role
of athletics at the University
and the role of Student Government
What type person the student
committee will finally decide on
remains to be seen; but most of
the members seem to agree it
should be someone along the
lines of a John Oswald And a
representative voice of the entire
student body shonld emerge, because, except for the eight USAC
members on the committee, the
n
of
group is u goal

LEXINGTON'S
STORE

Invites you to open a student charge account. . . . That is if you don't already have
one. . . . Just fill out the enclosed form and

back-to-scho-

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rmi

Parking

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Your winter clothes can be stored, mothproofed and fully insured free.
Plus you will receive a 20
discount if you show
your I.D. card.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, June

11,

l8-- 5

7j3
J..

tit'

j,

,

I

11

of

I

It
-

-

il

4:
Out

Kennedy In Kentucky
chairman of the Senate subcommittee on employment and manpower,
Robert Kennedy toured Appalachia last February for a first hand look at rural
poverty. He spoke with impoverished residents and gazed upon the ravaged land
which they inhabit. What he saw touched him deeply.
Act ing as

XjjLjt---r--

.

Kernel Photos By Rick Bell

M

f

what

MfMfcwhA

it t.ai

Vietnamese Students Romantic, Apolitical

By STEVE D'ARAZIEN
College Press Service
SAlCON(CPS)-Th- is
generation of Vietnamese students is
quite unlike its current American
counterpart. It is largely a silent
generation, closely resembling the
in
generation that prevailed
America in the 1950 s
The political consciousness
which SDS wants to encourage
in the United States is not present here. Nguyen Thi Xuan
stuHuong, a bright
dent at the Faculty of Law (a
college degree is not required for
legal study) was asked why she
opposes the National Liberation
Front
"Because they take away your
freedom," she commented. When
someone observed that she had
no freedom, she tried another
tact: "Because they take away
your money."
That is a conditioned response
in many Vietnamese students
The truth only comes from personal exposure to the reality of
the war. Some months later Miss
Huong reported she had seen
American soldiers shoot an old
woman and a child. "1 knew
they were not VC. I wanted to
yell 'Americans go home, but
they might have shot me," she
told me.
Two tendencies are peculiar
to Vietnamese students-romantici- sm
and disinterest in politics.
The Vietnamese students ate
fond of listening to sad songs
about the tragedy of war and unfulfilled love. They are anti-wa- r
songs (and are therefore banned
by the government as detrimental
to public morale) but they are not
activist songs like Fhil (Xh's "I
bin't marchin" anymore."
The expressed feeling is one
of passive resignation, of acceptance of a "cruel fate" and an

inability to change anything. The
movedefiance of the anti-wa- r
ment in the United States is not
to be found among these stu-

dents.
The apolitical attitude of the
indents is the same attitude
that has claracterized the Asian
peasants (and ghettoized Blacks
in the U.S.) for centuries. This
is a land which has been ruled
for centuries by a mandarin elite
Unlike the United States there
is no tradition of popular government on a national scale.
Religion also plays a role. In
Vietnam varying degrees of Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism
mingle with traditional ancestor
worship and animism.
The central thrust of Buddhism is inward, to achieve renunciation and personal nirvana.
Recently the militant Buddhists
d
have been emphasizing an
social gospel strain present in Buddhism and this aspect
of the religion holds possibilities
other-directe-

for

"radicalizing"

the

Vietna-

mese

Neither Taoism, nor Confucianism (which emphasizes
morality and obedience to
family and state) advance the
development of popular government in Vietnam
For some of the students, the
silence is a function of their tacit
agreement with the Vietnamese
government. An identity of interests exists between these students and the government. Like
the government, the viewpoint
of these students is a function
(i their class. The Vietnamese
class system is much more rigid
than its American counterart
because of the Vietnamese tradition of mandarin nile Education
still remains the privilege of the
rich in Vietnam.
Until recently Vietnamese stu
al

dents have been draft deferred.
As members of the Vietnamese
elite, many of the students were
automatically granted military
commission, if they were unable
to be further deferred as government employees or graduate students. But now the lot of the
Vietnamese students may change,
due to American pressure and a

new mobilization law may force
all the students to face the fact
of the war they previously
avoided.
Actually, the Vietnamese students do not have much chance
to develop political ideas independently They hear only their
government's point of view The
exposure is constant propaganda is on the radio and television,
in the newspapers and at the
movies, blaring from loudspeakers into the city streets and at
manditory government rallies.
All of the media are government controlled News unfavorable to the government is censored from the press Even President Johnson's speeches when
he talks about negotiations are
as attested to by
censored,

patches

of white

scattered

throughout the paiK'rs. (Negotiation is a bad word here.)
Objective accounts of the recent history of Vietnam are unavailable at bookstores in Saigon
Possession of hooks expressing
a "neutralist" viewpoint can lead
to arrest as a subversive. Law
which uitlaws Communism and Neutralism, as loosly
interpreted by military courts,
nukes serious discussion of politics impossible.
So most of the Vietnamese
students have resigned themselves to
silenc e and
have closed their minds. The
exclusion of honorable dissent in
Viet rum has polarized the society
10-5-

d

into visible sunnorters of the
government and theirclandestine
opposition

It is one of history's ironies
that the Vietnamese students are
consigned such a passive role in
a war which will probably be

judged to have great historic

significance, while back in America students are playing a large
part in turning the country
around, and are being tested by
fire in the process.

By David Holwerk

On the Wednesday of Robert Kennedy's assassination my mother
woke me early. "Robert Kennedy's been shot," she said. She said
it with the gentle abruptness of shock, shook me once, and left
the room. She needn't have shaken me, for I was awake.
The television was on in the living room, the newsmen on the
screen looking sombre and rather sleepy themselves. We sat and
watched live commentary, filmed commentary, tapes of the scene
in the crowded hallway, still photographs of the same scene,
countless other things.
They all flashed by with little impact, only certain phrases
and images sticking: The terse voice of a Mutual Broadcasting
newsman "Is it possible, ladies and gentlemen? Yes it's ossible . . .
my gxl . . ." Pierre Salinger and his wife on the back of a police
motorcycle. The image of Rosey Creer, huge, strong, black, disarming and protecting the assassin from the mob which could have
killed him if it could have gotten its hands on him.
What we would have done without the television is hard to
say. Later that day, while I drove, I kept the radio on and heard
many of the same voices recounting the same events in the same
weary, voice. The professionalism of the broadcasters was wearing
thin, even on the radio. On the television screen, there were occasional obvious breaks in the smooth coverage we have come to
expect.
But then we had come to expect a smooth, orderly function
of the woikings of this nation. Pcrphas this expectation was unwarranted, for we had warnings in the deaths of John Kennedy,
Martin Luther King and others. Still, up until that Wednesday
morning we were pretty well on even keel. The political machinery
of the country was functioning pretty smoothly to all appearances.
But when it became obvious that all wasn't well, when it was
obvious that there was some deep problem which could not be
ignored, no one showed it Intter than the news media.
They were just as disorderly in their thoughts as the rest of
us, they were just as unable to cope with the lack of order which
the whole nation suddenly had to face. And when they tried
to insure us that order remained in the midst of chaos, they were
not successful.

* The Kentucky

Iernel

The South's Outstanding College Daily

Univuisity of Kentucky
TUESDAY, JUNE

KSTAHLISIIEI) 1891

11, 1968

EditoruiLi rcjncsvnt the ojriruons of the Editors, twt of the University.
Guy M. Mcndcs, III, Editor

Things That Never Were

Robert Francis Kennedy, a man
who was striving to return what
he called "domestic tranquility" to
a country where it had ceased to
exist, died from an assassin's bullets on June 6, two months after
auother of the nation's leaders, an
advocate of nonviolence, was murdered in the same manner.
Words are tragically inadequate
and cannot possibly express the
grief in our hearts. Our deepest
sympathies go out along with those
of the rest of the nation and world
to his courageous family a family
that has had so much, but has lost
so much more. One can only wonder what the many children of
that great family must think of a
world which has taken from them
a father and an uncle.
The killing can, of course, be
attributed to a lone, frenzied assassin, but the whole blame cannot rest on the shoulders of one
deranged individual. Though one
individual pulled the trigger, our
society acted as the firing pin that
launched the bullets on their gruesome course.
We are the ones who have allowed our society to erode into
one in which violence is common
place, where a human life means
little and where people can be
lead to outrageous acts because
they are shown no other alternatives.
For the second time in two
months, and the third time in
four and one half years, blood
drips from all of our hands.
Something must be done. There

are cries for more police power and
less personal freedoms to combat
the unpleasant aura which has
enveloped us (some conservatives
even relate the violence back to
the academic freedoms necessary
in higher education). Also, there
is a special commission set up
by the president to study the violence in our land.
These are not the answers to
our problems. We certainly need
no more laws, only more observance in the basic ten. A police
state would have been the last
thing Robert Kennedy would have
wanted. As for the commission,
will it be possible for a group of
men to find a rationale behind
irrational acts?
No. What is needed is a revamping of a society where, because of war after war, killing after
killing and assassination after assassination, the human life is no
longer sacred. We must shake off
our indifference to violence and
teach love, friendship and peace
instead of promoting mayhem, murder and destruction. Surely, this is
an idealistic undertaking, but when
the future of our nation is at stake,
it cannot be unreachable.

The youthful,

sandy-haire-

d

champion of the poor is gone, but
his searcli for domestic tranquility
must proceed.
To use the quote from George
Bernard Shaw which Robert Kennedy used many times: "Some men
see things as they are and say why.
I dream of things that never were
and say why not."

NRA Be Hanged
and which
on national television

Appearing
Sunday morning, Democratic Senator Joseph Tydings of Maryland
expressed fears that no meaningful
firearms legislation would be forthcoming despite the wave of public
outrage following the assassination
of Robert Kennedy. If the Senator
is right, the reasons for this congressional intransigence may be as
important as their lack of action
itself.
On a strictly political level, it
says a great deal about the power
and influence of the National rifle
Association. The NRA views the
unrestricted right to hold arms as
one of the primary bases of freedom
in this country. Although this right
has been successfully refuted in
every medium by any number of
commentators, the membership of
the NRA still floods Congress with
mail against firearms control. And,
though one recent m1 I showed 70
percent national approval of gun
control legislation, members of
Congress still take their demonstrably meaningless mail volume
as their guide.
This dubious voice of the people has as its ally the powerful
munitions lobby, which does a
''andsome business in guns and

gun equipment,

feels

that it has a great deal to lose.
If, however, the opponents of
firearms control see a great erosion
of their personal, individual freedoms, they might do well to examine their own motives. The strictest legislation yet proposed would
in no way prohibit the recreational
use of firearms, nor would it in
fact prohibit the ownership of firearms by people of legal age judged
to be of mental and emotional
competence.
It might be argued then that
those who most vocally protest
against firearms legislation are
those who are either criminally inclined, are below legal age, or are
mentally incompetent. This is, of
course, a fallacious argument. Rut
it does suggest the widespread misunderstanding of firearms control
which certain groups can use to
further their own monetary interests and fanatical views.
Meanwhile the necessity of lire-arlegislation has become a gruesome fact for millions in this nation. This is no time for congressmen to sj)out about the level of
their mail against gun control. The
majority of the public wants action now, the NRA be hanged.

In Cold Blood

Fear Merchant

There is a certain breed of men
in this country that, while attacking supposed Communist movements on every occasion and professing to be saving our land from
the hands of the Reds, actually
promote the cause of the Communists by spreading fear and division in our country.
Lexington has its own "fear
merchant" in Robert Weaver, minister of the Tates Creek Christian
Church. Although he is no H. L.
Hunt, Mr. Weaver has done a fair
job from his pulpit in arousing
the community to the danger of
Communism and liberalism, especially on the University campus.
Mr. Weaver recently concluded
a
series entitled "God and
Country." Promoting the series
were prime time television commercials which urged the townspeople to come hear a true definition of freedom of speech "a definition which does not include subd
version on
grounds."
He drew large crowds to his
Sunday evening orations in which
he leveled many attacks on the
University and its administrators.
Refore the SDS National Council Meeting was held on campus
in late March, Mr. Weaver warned
that the SDS members were gathering to plot a period of violent
revolution. After the Columbia
riots, Mr. Weaver with an
smile on his face said, "It
happened as we had predicted." It
was not an unnoticeable hint that
the Columbia demonstrations were
planned at UK.
13-pa-

rt

state-owne-

After a rejxut by the University
on UK's SDS chapter cleared it of
rash charges leveled at SDS by a
Grand Jury report, Mr. Weaver

What Mr. Weaver didn't know
was that the report was not voted
on only the "Nature of a University" statement by President Oswald was presented to theTrustees
for a vote to determine whether it
would be recorded in the minutes.
Mr. Weaver had much to say
about the "umbrella of academic
freedom" and the atmosphere on
campuses these days. He said our
colleges "are teaching our students
that they have no mind, no soul.
They are undermining God . . .
the whole attitude of higher education is that we must oppose

God."
Speaking of education he said,

"We should go back to the ways
of our forefathers; it was a narrow
way, but it proved to be right."
It's obvious Mr. Weaver should
stick to the L