xt7ttd9n446v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ttd9n446v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591125  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 25, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 25, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7ttd9n446v section xt7ttd9n446v Pictures Show
Students' Protest;
Sec Page 5

Committee Gets

Favorable Notice;
Sec Page 4

IiOlUU ID
University

of Kentucky

Vol. L

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 25,

1959

No. 38

ecoiid Demonstration Is Staged
n

a

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h

Countdown Starts Action;
About 500 Join In Rally

.

By REX BAILEY
again took up their "holiday"
Five. . .four. . .three. . .two. . .one shouts and other Jeering at faculty
. . .zero
a bell sounded and UK members inside.
students began another demonAfter one barrage of firecrackers

...

a white handkerchief was seen
stration.
A count down in the Student waving from the front door of the
Union Grill at noon yesterday by building.
about 100 students touched off a The mob then moved toward Mc-VHall, entering the .building,
rally protesting the Faculty's deshouting "rush 'em out of classes."
cision to hold classes today.
It was no secret that another
demonstration had been planned.
Locked In
Approximately 500 students joined
in the rally within a few minutes.
girls dorms were locked last
The
' Campus police were on hand as night at 7 p.m. as a precautionary
well as a local radio station's mo- measure. In order for a girl to get
bile unit reporting the event.
out of the dorm, she had to go to
A series of firecracker explosions the housemother
or assistant
soon brought more cheering stu- housemother, give a reason for
dents to the scene.
wanting, to leave, and tell where
Chants of "We want a holiday" she wanted to go.
erupted and the students headed
At press time last night the
for the Faculty Club.
state police were waiting for
The students circled the Faculty troublemakers. There, were 24
Club and began throwing fire- policemen equipped with German
crackers' onto the porch. They once police dogs in the SUB.
ey

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Mass Protest

One of the views of the approximately 3,500 students that turned out en masse in protest
of the Faculty decision.

An Editorial

Stupidity

M assive

UK Accepts Gifts

Gifts totaling $25,484 were accepted for the University Friday
by the Executive Committee of the
Board of Trustees.
When we wrote the editorial that appeared in yesterday's
Donors and their gifts include:
Kernel opposing the Faculty's ruling on the holiday, we were Louis Ware, $1,000 to the Ken-

not cogni2arit of the possibility that students would march
en masse around campus, downtown, and in front of the
president's house. After the riot materialized, we kicked ourselves a thousand times for writing an article, which actually
seemed to endorse the mass, stupidity of the rioters. And we would kick ourselves a thousand more times if we
felt any of the inciters of the riot thought that we were behind
their action.
The apparent lack of foresight of the instigators, of the followers, and the bystanders-waappalling; all they wanted
was to lodge their gripe with the public and to gain as much
publicity as possible. They did not represent the University;
they hardly represented what could be called students. They
were a group of selfish, asinine, and undisciplined individuals
during the riot.
The president stood up to them and was as reasonable as
possible; 'they scorned every word like puerile adolescents
and then marched headstrong downtown where they made
obnoxious asses of themselves. The people of Kentucky, already
suffering from lack of education, had every right to feel superior
to this group of students.
Sure, they .wanted a holiday. But, we ask, where were these
leaders when 'their only
same students, these same
real organized form of representation, Student Congress, was
dying a . slow death? Is it because this organization had
higher ideals than mass demonstration as a method to governmental action? Or is it because these leaders of this mess
are engrossed in the furtherance of their own selfish aims only?
Sure, we want a holiday, too. But we do not want a holiday
achieved by pressuring a Faculty group into action and leave
the door gaping open for similar rioting. We did not want to
see the tradition destroyed, but we do not want to see a tradition started where a riot is instigated every time the students
want something done. This is pure anarchy.
As Safety Commissioner Don Sturgill told the crowd,
"You've got what you wanted; you've made the front page of
every newspaper in the country." The students did not want a
holiday as much as they wanted publicity and pride for achieving such a great deed as defying the Faculty, administration,
police forces, and people of Kentucky in one night.
The riot, however, must have set many people in the crowd
thinking and drawing 'analogies to other events in history,
such as the recent furor raised in Cuba and the rioting in
Cennany during the days of Adolf Hitler. In fact, it was rather
unfortunate that old Adolf himself wasn't here to view the
mass, demonstration.
He would have been proud.
s

so-call- ed

for Dairy Manufacturing scholarships; Harkness Edwards Jr., Lexington, $100 for a Purchase Price
for "Graphics "59."
Lexington

IBM Club, $794 for

the purchase of functional equiptucky Research Foundation for the ment for the Speech Center; KenLouis Ware Scholarship Fund; Dr. tucky Section, American Society
J. T. Kessinger estate, $1,000 to of Civil Engineers, $250, scholarthe UK Medical School for scho- ship for the year 1959-6Aubrey
larships, fellowships, and publica- Feed Mills, Inc., Louisville, $800,
tions; The Algernon Sydney Sulli- research in the Animal Husbandry
van Foundation, New York' City, Department.
$4,000 for the Algernon Sydney
Brown-Forma- n
Distillers CorpoSullivan Fund for 1959-6- 0
Louisville, .$2,500 to be used
ration,
Kentucky Utilities Co, Lexing- as- - a grant-in-ai- d
in support of a
ton, $8,000 to be used for the farm College of Agriculture and Home
house to be constructed at Dix Economics project dealing with
Dam; The General Electric Foun- parakeratosis in swine; Smith
dation. Ossining, N. Y., $340; Jun-j- Kline & French Laboratories, PhilLeague of Lexington, $2,000 to adelphia, $4,000
in support of an
the Art Department for High Animal Husbandry project.
School Art Studio Week Confer0;

or

They proceeded to the Funk-hous- er
Building, Margaret I. Kins
Library, Administration Building,
and Fine Arts Building. They entered the buildings shouting their
protests.
In McVey Hall the students beat
on the walls and one firecracker
was exploded on the first floor.
Throughout the demonstration
state police were on hand following
the crowd, but making no attempt
to stop them. The state policemen
were equipped with a movie camera
recording the proceedings.
After about an hour and a half
of roaming the campus the students dispersed.
During the uprising, Public Safety Commissioner Don Sturgill said
he had instructed the officers to
break up the demonstration with
tear gas, if necessary.
Sturrill said he was anxious to
Continued On Page 2

ence.

The General Electric Foundation,
to cover the total cost of education grant to UK; Model Farms
Dairy, Louisville, $200 to be used
$500

Dr. Straus
Is Named

V

V

To Post

"Vi"---

Dr. Robert Straus, head of the
department of Behavioral Science,
was named a member of the joint
to
Commission
study alcoholism in' both countries.
commission will
The
study and initiate research In order
to achieve a better understanding,
of the problems of alcoholism.
Dr. Straus was a member of the
interlum committee, which worked
out the proposal for this study, and
is one of four members of the commission who are to select a scien-

91

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tific director and staff to carry out
the research.

Dickey Suggests
No Roll Checks
UK President Frank G. Dickey
last night suggested that no roll
checks be made in classes today.
In a statement, he said:
"As has been stated previously,
professors will be in their classes
Wednesday, but attendance by students is a personal choice. My suggestion, and I emphasize it Is a
suggestion only, would be that no
roll checks be made on classes
Wednesday

Up In Flame

Faculty member was burned in effigy at the mass student
demonstrations Monday night. It was one of .the protests used by
students against the decision of the Faculty to give Wednesday off.
A UK

* v..
2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1059

Politics Influences British
Student Views Dying Traditions
Social Life, Reeves Says
at
By JUNE ALLEN DYERS

Through the years
UK, various traditions have been initiated
and then been disregarded.
One of the most recent to see its
last days is the "Beat Tennessee,
Take Monday off I" that ended last
year. This tradition was renewed
ill 1954.

Freshmen beanies were once
quite popsUr, and no freshman
anything of his life
who thoni-n- t
would have been caught without
'
the required badge of Inferior
rank. The practice has gradually
dwindled, and today they are to be
seen primarily on freshmen foot-ba- ll
players and band members.
The May Day Parade was an annual event that vanished in 1955.

A keen competitive

Before World War II. "Hello
and social atmosphere once prevailed when fra- Walk" was observed at UK. The
ternities,- sororities, and campus sidewalk from the SUB to the
organizations invaded vacant to- Funkhouser Building was to serve
bacco warehouses in Lexington to In creating an attitude of friendbuild their respective floats.
liness among all students.
The last year this was held
When walking in this area, exgroups such as Interfraternlty cluding class breaks, it was the
council and Fanhellenlc united the practice to speak to each person
individual sororities and fraterni- who passed by. A revival of this
ties together to build two floats. custom was attempted In 1956, but
Fewer campus organizations par- It met with little success.
ticipated, and the next year May
Tradition has also been linked
Day was a thing of the past.
with the statue of President Patlapse without terson. Howeyer, It has never been
After a two-ye-

Social life is based a great deal
on political parties, was one of
the points brought out by Prof.
J. E. Reeves of the Political Science

Department.

He spoke to the UK Women's
Club Monday night at the SUB
on "English Elections and Electio-

neering."

Prof. Reeves returned in August
from Great Britain where he made
a study of elections. He said that
"where we go to Rotary meetings,
Klwanls, etc the English go to
political meetings."
In speaking to the group Prof.
Reeves used three other points as
basis for his talk. English campaigns are conducted by volunteer
workers, Issues are emphasized
than personalities, and
elections are orderly and free from
corruption, he said.
He said that "volunteer workers
believe in their party, this is why
they work voluntarily." The campaign consists of canvassing from
house to house with just the main
leaders of the parties televising
programs.
After talking to politicians, the
business men
many others. Prof. Reeves said
and
he got the general opinion from

ar

any replacement. Little Kentucky
Derby weekend was Initiated as a
substitute. After this year Lances
Carnhral seems on the verge of
leaving In a similar manner.

confirmed whether the tradition
quietly faded away as so many of
the others, or whether there has yet
been a cause
for It to become
active.

Second Demonstration Staged
Continued From Page 1
avoid any property damage, and
expressed fear that "thugs might
be in the crowd now."
Rumors of a Faculty meeting
scheduled for yesterday morning
were quieted by President Frank
G. Dickey.

The demonstrators took a dim
view of the many photographers
snapping pictures throughout the
demonstrations. A few attempts
were made to halt the camermen
from taking pictures.
It was learned the pictures would
be used to identify those involved
in the uprising.
UK President Frank Dickey said,
"A picture doesn't mean he (a
demonstrator) will necessarily re- -'
ceive punishment, but they (those
Who are identified) will probably
have to appear before the Student
Congress Judicary Board." "
The crowd of
students that
marched , on downtown Lexington
Monday night has been estimated
at about 3,500. As the demonstrators paraded down Main Street,
high school students1 and even
some of the Lexington townspeople Joined in. Many of the bystanders shouted their approval
and encouraged the students on.
As the mob enlarged in number,
the rioters' bravery increased.
After a short delay in rront of the
Phoenix Hotel they headed for
the police station. Th'e police
tion sign was torn down, but was
soon replaced by some of the more
law-abidi-

mobsters.

ng

After other demonstrations,
such as sitting down on Main
Street in front of the Lafayette
'Newsboy Repaid
The Alpha Tau Omega fraternity
last night took up a collection 'to
alleviate the damage caused the
crippled paper
"boy" Raymond
Dunn. He lost his papers in the
student action Monday night when
the group took them to start a fire.
The collection of approximately
$5 was given to him by members
of the. fraternity at around 7:30 last
night.
'
.
u-

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The Kentucky Kernel

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Hall.

They were charged with breach
of peace. Orause, in addition, was
charged with damaging public
property. They were released
shortly after the arrest under

man-on-the-stre- et,

$100

bonds.

Beavers Are- Buddies

Their hearing was to be yesterday
1:30 p.m., but they received a
continuation until Tuesday, Dec. 1.
The two policemen and the firemen were treated at Good Samaritan Hospital and were reported
in good condition.

-

at

WANAQUE, N. J. (AP) Beavers, whose dam building sometimes
is a nuisance, have done a good
turn for the North Jersey District Water Supply Commission.
A band of them walled off a
three acre marsh, thus reducing
the chances silt might wash into
Wanaque reservoir during periods
The commission
of high run-of- f.
voted not to chase them away.
"They are doing a good engineering Job," said forester Albert
Hubcr.
The Interfraternity Council met
in a special meeting Monday at
OPfN DAILY tm P.M.
6:00 p.m. in Room 128 of the SUB.
The meeting was called by acting president, Charles Schimpeler
IwM Avenue Chevy Chaeo
at the suggestion of the Dean of
NOW 'SHOWING!
Men's Office to discuss the, Uni-- ;
versity Faculty's decision to have
"RIO BRAVO"
school on Wednesday.
John Wayn-Da- n
Martin
Ricky Nelton-WarBend
A motion was made that "IFC go
supporting the Facul- on record as
"A PRIVATE'S AFFAIR"
n
Sal
Carer
ty decision." After short discussion
'
(Beth feature in color)
the motion was passed and the
meeting adjourned.- -

IFC Supports
Faculty Ruling

Mi-Lad- y

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4:30 tV 10:40

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Van Heflin, Tab Hunter

Dial

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Gary Cooper, Rita H'worth

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Jai. Stewart, Lee Remlck

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(at 1:1 S only)
David Brian. Keen Wynn

COMPLETE

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RENTAL SERVICE
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120 S. UPPER

He explained
that there aro
many committees within the parwhen a new party member
ties,
comet along, he Is given a. posltioa
n a committee, which make them
feel Important and holds their

I

fireman injured 'in the fray.
UK students arrested were Robert
Bailey, 17, Donovan Hall; Roy E.
Potter, 18, 419 Huguelet Drive;
Dave Fv Grause, IS, of Fort

KENT'S

Is."

rather

Thomas; William L. Marshall, 19.
of 256 Cochran . Road; Fred A.
Schulta, 20, of 459 Huguelet Drive
and James A. Collins, 18, Bowman

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Hotel, blocking traffic, and making
a bonfire on Main Street, the students were finally persuaded to
go back to the University campus.
The crowd marched to the back
of the SUB and began shouting
for President Dickey. When they
decided their howling was in vain
they headed for Maxwell Place, the
president's home.
The crowd dwindled somewhat
as they approached Dickey's home.
After a series of yells of "we want
a holiday" and other various
chants, another bonfire was started on the presdlent's lawn.
snortly after the bonfire, was
built,,. Commissioner Sturgill and
the state police arived. Sturgill
asked the students to call off their
"disturbance," but was greeted
with jeers and catcalls.
A few of the students began
to speak receiving applause from
the crowd. One 6tudent who identified himself as a law student said
he had talked with Governor
Chandler. He said Chandler told
him he was on the students' side
and that "if the faculty had gone
to college it wouldn't have made
that decision."
Shouts of "we want Dickey" and
"boycott classes" continuously interrupted the speakers. Signs of
the "V" appeared when a bearded
Castro-typ- e
man was hoisted to
the front of the gathering.
The crowd began to leave about
11 p.m. when they again decided
their protests ' were in vain.
During the uproar at Maxwell
Place, Sturgill had threatened to
use tear gas to disperse the mob.
He said later that "it's bad stuff."
Sturgill stated if. they were to use
it they would have' waited until
the girls left.
The outbreak Monday night
ended with the arrest of nine persons; and two policemen, and a

the people that there was do corruption In the government whatsoever. He said that "at one time
England was more corrupt than we
have evee been, but now 14 Is f re
from any of this."
He watched the actual voting
and counting of votes which confirmed the general idea.
Prof. Reeves said that "there U
little actual difference in the parties but a strong belief that there

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Ward Participates
In English Council
Dr. William S. Ward, head of
UK Department of English. Is
participating in sessions of the
National Council of Teachers of
English this week In Denver.
A member of the executive com- mittee of the 53,000 member
council. Dr. Ward is presently
serving' as chairman ol the college
section. This Includes approxi- mately 6.000 members.
lle has won national recognition
for his work as editor of a pub- for Kentucky
English
teachers. This recognition sttmt

UK Given Portrait
Of Dean Holmes
M,M

chl0 OUtora, president of

th: National Federation

In the publication, "Kentucky
English Bulletin
Dr. Ward sent
a number of themes to 46 teachers
for grading. He then commented
on each paper after the result
were summarlzd.
He ls aIso crcdtted with being
rgely responsible for the organ- ,zatJon of the Kentucky Council
of Teache
English."
Ward will attend sessions of
the executive eounril through .to- day, and will preside over sessions
OI the c0fre section for the rest
or the wees.

of Women
tho National Federation of
Woman's Clubs, presented a por-th- e
trait on behalf of friends of Mrs.
Sarah B. Holmes, UK dean of
women emeritus Sunday in Holmes
Hall.
The portrait was received on be- half of the University by President
Frank O. Dickey. Mrs. Holmes gave
the response. Dr. Doris M. Seward,
UK dean of women, presided at the

'

-

presentation.
A reception for the artist, Sud- duth Goff, was held in the Holmes
Hall lounge following the

cere-llcatl- on

mony.

S,,V7,hrr "'chm' Mathematician Encourages
I IK Crarlnate Youth Interest In Chess

A University mathematician who
believes present school studies do
not Rlve youngsters enough mental
S
exercise is trying to stimulate an
interest among Junior high stu- game of
13
dents in the centuries-ol- d
chess.
A 1951 UK graduate in civil enMTne 8ame requires logical
gineering has been awarded a
thinking and the ability to vis- COO
$5
prize in Steel Highway
Eiidge Design Competition spon- - ualize geometric situations clearly,
.voied by the American Bridge Di- Hence u is an iaeai memoa ior
vision of the U. S. Steel Corpor-ntic- training students to think," said
Dr. A. W. Goodman, professor of

11

A

xV.VllClCCl

O

OCllOItirSlll

.

n.

He is Douglas M. Fraleigh. a
native of Pouphkeepsie, N. Y. who
now lives in Sacramento, Calif.
The ftruVt was sponsored by
Bridge to recruit orig- thinking by engineers. It at- traded 264 professional engineers,
SS college students and 103 en- tries from 28 foreign countries.
Fraleich's design won second
honorable mention in the profes- -

clonal Class.
-

mathematics.
"It is also fun," he added.
Goodman recenlty finished
teaching a group cf about' 20
dents at Lexington's Morton Jun-lior High School, and next week
will begin instructing interested
youngsters at Lexington Junior,

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

Professors
Granted
Job Change
Two University staff members
Friday were granted change-of-wor- k
status by the executive committee of the UK Board of
Trustees.
They are Dr. Otto Townsend
Koppius, physics professor, and
Miss Virginia Singleton,
in the Department
of Animal Husbandry. Dr. Koppius
has been at the University for
more than 35 years and Miss Singleton for more than 39 years.
In his new assignment, Dr. Koppius will compile a roster of former physics students who have attained distinction In their profession and will work toward the improvement of physics teaching in
Kentucky high schools.
will continue
Miss Singleton
keeping records on a part-tim- e
--

chest are as easy to learn as bridge.
He quickly adds, however, that
it is not a contest in which luck
plays a part, and, therefore, per- - basis.
sons who do not progress beyond
It Tays To Advertise In
the basic points will get beaten so
often they will eventually quit.
The Kentucky Kernel
In outlining tne game for his
students, Goodman uses a dem-- j
onstration board, a checkerboard.
nun suited pockets Dcneam eacn
square, and chess pieces which
project upward and can be moved
from pocket to pocket.

rUTDcPOOK

pXOthi

Than Text)

DENNIS
BOOK STORE
257 N. Lime

Near 3rd

Frof. Frederic Thursz of the Art
Department is in Washington, D.C.,
this week where he Is showing' a
collection of his paintings and
drawings.

The one-ma- n
exhibition will he
held In Jefferson Place Oallery,
Washington, D. C, Nov.
23-2- 9.

GoverniiigCoiincil
Installs Officers
Eight recently elected Shawnee-tow- n
councilmen were installed at
last week's meeting of the Married
Students Governing Council.
Those chosen in the first Shaw-neetogeneral election were
Bridwcll, Building A, District
John
wn

1;

Clayton Riley, Building B, Dis-

trict 3; James Rice, Building C,
,
District 6.
Dick Trauth, Building D, District 7; John Murphy, Building 'D,
District 8; Al Dempsey, Building
E, District 10; Richard Hood,
Building F, District 11; and Jerry
Waters, Building F, District 12.!

"I always

wanted a good

nt

stop wishing!

jS

r'

He believes chess is a game for
young and vigorous people. He
points out that the-- present United
States" champion. Bobby Fischer,

.

Now you ran have that portrait
you always wanted of a lovd
a professional portrait
one
you will always treasure.

...

how?

rnlu 1 & vaa rm rA anH that rhcc
immortal Paul Murphy was in his
prime at the age of 20.
Goodman plans to eventually
visit all the Junior high schools
in the county to expose the students to the game and' may later
rganiie a tournament for them.
The UK professor hopes the" students will pick up with each other
where the lessons leave off. He
maintains that the rudiments of

STORE

Thursz Exhibits
Art Collection

picture
of her"

Drop in any time. Purchase
one of our Portrait Gift Certificates . . . and give it to the one
whose picture you want.
it's inexpensive . . and it's the
It's easy
nicest gift you can give anyone.

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Central Kentucky's Largest

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ADAM PEPIOT STUDIO
Wellington Arm

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* Protect

Punish-A- nd
incident, the
During the exam-themeasly stand of the University immediately brought out an abundance of discussion of ethical values
on campus, and many students and
faculty members expressed their convictions on the case.
ft

But, after the administration remained reticent and attempted to
wrest out of the case with the least
amount of publicity, the incident
amounted to nothing more than just
that discussion. Cheating is still in
a most popular position and we are
sure the end of examination stealing
is not anywhere within reasonable
sight.
Now, after the hectic weekend of
Homecoming has passed, another
discussion of values may be forthcoming.

The disqualification of the winner
of the Homecoming queen contest
has the campus buzzing; undoubtedly
has a sorority, fraternity, or two
angry; and has brought up the reand
current problem of
what should be its consequences.
rule-breaki-

ng

Whether you consider the selection
of a Homecoming qucen important
or not, the decision made by the
committee has to be lauded; it indeed
might have been an unpopular one,
for depriving a winner, especially a
deserving one, or glory , may never
seem justifiable to the public.
But a single student committee has
apparently shown more regard for
ethical standards and what should be
done to uphold them than our elders.
The ' punishment indeed was harsh;
but rules will never be followed
properly if it isn't.
case now becomes
more and more galling. To allow a
person to escape with only mild
punishment practically invites students to cheat and steal and steal and
cheat. The Homecoming Steering
Committee, however, closed the door
tightly upon any further breach of
election rules by showing it had some-in- g
more than a
outlook.
in the

exam-the- ft

"bend-with-the-win-

d"

And that takes guts.

Our Lazy Teachers?
expected to handle a full teaching
load in addition to our research work."
.Thus, finally, perhaps, the reason

for our professors' apparent lazyness
in attending Commencement, regisliiq recent article on the new Com- - tration ,etc, is pot lazyness at all.
rnencement procedure, it was menQuite the contrary. They like to eat.
tioned that the faculty's presence will To get a promotion they must do
no longer be required. Shortly afterresearch and get their name published.
ward, we read in the Kernel that the To do research and get their name
faculty had approved a new preregis-tratio- n published,, they must devote, the
plan which permitted them to. major portion of their time to their
absent. themselves from registration. work .and. neglect
I expect- to read shortly that they unimportant details, such as registrahave voted to excuse themselves from tion, Commencement and teaching.
the arduous duties of meeting classes.
Their teaching quality inevitably
Disregarding the dangers in such must suffer and in turn our overall
a trend on the part of our profes- - education suffers. Perhaps it should
sors, and aside from the obvious inbe pointed out to the faculty that the
equalities and problems associated student body pays - their salaries,
with' the burlesque preregistration directly and indirectly, and some stuplan, just reading about these cute' dents are interested in education and
little moves leads the average student the level of instruction they receive.
(and others, throughout the country,
It's progressive and modern to
who receive the Kernel) to the opinion that .UK's faculty is just plain streamline "school administration, but
let's be a little archaic and emlazy.
phasize instruction, rather than reHowever, a little study reveals some search. Promote faculty members on
additional interesting facets of the a basis of teaching ability, not abfaculty mind. Many recent promostract theories. Give them time in the
tions within faculty ranks have been classrooms, not in the laboratories.
of those active in research work. This The results might be startling.
is commendable. We think it is
' wonderful that we have many disMore Letters
tinguished research men in all fields
here. They are certainly an asset to
The student demonstration yesterUK in many ways and a credit to our day and Monday night has prompted
commonwealth. But, to quote one a flood of letters from the readers.
staff member, "There is entirely too They are found on Page 8 of today
much emphasis on research. We are Kernel.
time-consumin-

g,

-

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Entered t the Port Office at Lexington, Kentucky as second cUi matter under the Art of Man ft,
week during the regular school year "cept holidays and timu.
PubUkhed four times

I"

SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Bob Anderson, Managing Editor

Bill

Neixuuc, Editor

Stewart IIeocer.

Sports Editor

Paul Zimmerman and Carole Martin, Assistant Managing Editors
Dick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographers
Alice Akin, Society Editor
Stuart Coldfarb and Paul Dykes, Advertising Managers
Beverly Cardwell, Circulation
Perry Ashley, Business Manager
j

Bob IIerndon, Hank Chapman, and Lew Kinc, Cartoonists
Staff Writers: Jerry Ringo, Jim Phillips, Bobbie Mason," Linda Hockensmlth, Robert Wenninger,
George Smith. Robert Perkins, Edward Van Hoek, Rod Tabb, Lawrence Lynch, June Byers, Ann
Harris, Beverly Cardwell, Diane Cupehart. Al Royster, Jan Berryman, Bob Jobe, Mary
Tearing, Pat Hulker,
Miller, Herb Steely, Norris Johnson, Bob Kraser, Emajo Cocanougher,
Curtiss Smith, John t'ltzwater. Garnett Brown," Richard Hedlund. Christa Finley, Allen Travis,
Mk-hel-

Sue McCauley, Phil Cox, Robert Radford. Beverly Pedigo, and Maxuie Cates.

WEDNESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Mekeda Davis, News Editor

The Readers' Form
I flew to the

Come To Stanford
To The Editor:
The news of the Kernels success in
the recent Sigma Delta Chi national
newspaper contest was distinctly
pleasing, both personally and jn relation to my regard for the paper.
The award more than justifies a year
spent trying always to maintam-lLe- ..
highest standards, even when (and
I'm sure you have also discovered
this) the effort was sometimes misunderstood, ignored, or scorned.
The other bit of significant
the administration's handling of the exam-thecase left me
with quite the opposite impression, it
was distinctly galling. The University's "punishment" is tantamount to
endorsement of a crime wrdckvttir
primitive societies deemedlheirou
and the refusal to make public the"
disciplina