xt7tx921dw7s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7tx921dw7s/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1929 journals kaes_circulars_001_4_185_02 English Lexington : The Service, 1913-1958. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Circular (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n. 185 text Circular (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n. 185 1929 2014 true xt7tx921dw7s section xt7tx921dw7s , _ 3 =-  *?;`
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p COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE , I . I  
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y Extension D1v1s10n ‘ I I ‘   .4
  THOMAS P. COOPER, Dean and Director _ I ` I    
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  CIRCULAR NO. 185 _ E. ° ‘  I‘V p  
' (REVISED) ~ ip ` ·' _' '· lr}
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TEXTILE FIBERS AND FABRICS -- 4  
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with _ Sketch of Fibers as Seen Under the Microscope  
A, Cotton; B, Wool; C, Flax; D, Rayon; E, Silk ‘  
by I » Lexington, Ky. ~ * i '  
Hur ` September, 1929 {  
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01 Published in connection with the z1gricultural extension work carried  
OIT bv ¤00pe1‘21ti0n of the College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky,   2
SOD with file U. S. Department of Agriculture and distributed in furtherance of ` _ C
the tht? Work provided for in the Act of Congress of May 8, 1914.  
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CIRCULAR NO. 185 p ~ “ .v _ _   el
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Textile Fibers and Fabrics . · , _ l  
V- By ISABELLE M. STORY P. V - ‘  » F     °
, Textile fibers are fibers which are capable of being woven   F V A    
, into cloth. A woven cloth is a textile fabric. There are Eve g .   p -,   ¢l
` principal textile fibers: silk and wool, which are of animal   , · F `K  _  
  origin, cotton and linen, which are of vegetable origin and ll _ ·, » p,  
L rayon, a manufactured fiber having a vegetable base. Certain F _' li T p  
A; properties such as length, strength, elasticity, luster and power . . ' , _ y v_ _  
of absorbing moisture are possessed in varying degrees by each F -    
T of these fibers and contribute to its value as a textile.  
F Long fibers are more easily spun into yarn than short fibers,  
_ and when woven they give a cloth of less fuzzy surface than .  
j short fibers. Mci
F Elastic fibers are stronger and more easily spun than in- F i.    
elastic fibers and give a cloth that drapes gracefully. V 'Qi
Each fiber has a characteristic structure by which it can be _ * . F  
identified when seen under a high-power microscope. _ A    
F The reaction of animal fibers to chemicals is different from p, ` p  
V that of vegetable Hbers. Animal fibers are destroyed by alkalis, p A  
A but not by weak acids. Vegetable Hbers are destroyed by strong A    
 F acids and weakened, more o1· less, by any acid. Alkalis, except A T Q  
F ill Concentrated form, do not harm vegetable fibers. The effect . p Ft . F  
_ Of either acids or alkalis is more pronounced if concentrated, or _-  
if allowed to dry on a material. . F  
 · Silk is the most expensive fiber to produce. There are two i  
. gtméral varieties; cultivated and wild. Cultivated silk is pro- i · I -5
duced by worms which are fed on mulberry leaves. It is fine, i f
Soft and smooth, and is used in the manufacture of all finer A  ;,} 
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