xt7v416t1k1t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7v416t1k1t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680912  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 12, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 12, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7v416t1k1t section xt7v416t1k1t Tie Kentucky Keknel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

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UNIVERSITY

19G8

Thursday Evening, Sept. 12,

OF KENTUCKY,

LEXINGTON

jr.

Vol. LX, No. 12

Protests Planned
To Greet Wallace
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Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

,

Long lines are common these days in the Complex cafeteria. In fact they
somctimcs reach the courtyard outside the cafeteria. Too many students
living in the Complex is the reason given for the problem. (Story page 3).

By BILL MATIIEWS
And DARRELL RICE
At least two campus groups are planning hostile receptions
for George Wallace when he speaks at Memorial Coliseum Saturday.
Approximately 100 members of
the history of the United States,
the Community Alliance for Re to
is extremely important for the
sponsible Social Action (CARSA) constitution of American demogave noisy approval Tuesday
This nation was built on
night to a suggestion to "do cracy. of
freedom
speech."
all we can to show the world
No definite plans were drawn
what we think of Wallace."
for the protests, but CARSA plans
Also applauded was the stateto meet today with Students for
ment of another CARSA leader
a Democratic Society (SDS) to
who said "Wallace has a right
a common strategy.
to come here and say what he plan
Black Student Union President
has to say."
Theodore Berry said Wednesday
CARSA members unanimously
that his organization has not
agreed to show their disapproval
made any plans so far to protest
of the American Independent
Wallace's visit. Asked about the
party presidential candidate general feeling of BSU toward
heck"peacefully and without
the Wallace appearance, Berry
ling."
"I think that's
commented,
The organization
passed a pretty obvious."
resolution
in part,
reading,
Wallace was invited to speak
"CARSA believes there should at UK
by the administration, the
be complete freedom of speech Associated
Women
Students
for all people of all viewpoints.
(AWS) and the UK Students for
This inalienable right, intrinsic Wallace.
AWS President Taft McKinstry
said Wednesday night she is requesting that no placards or banners be taken inside the Coliseum
Laura Scudder is running un- during the speech.
"This is a convocation at an
d
opposed in the
educational institution," she
area.
James Embry, Louis Merkley, said, "and not a political rally.
. . .1 hope
no one will take it
Jr. and Ronald Bell are candiupon himself to be disruptive."
dates in the Donovan-Haggi- n
Miss McKinstry added that
area.
The ballots for the election she expects placards and banwill be processed through the ners to be officially banned.
Nancy McLean, a CARSA
computer center and the results
will be made known the same steering committee member, said
she believes banning placards at
night, according to Bright.
added that, contrary the convocation would be inconBright
sistent because political literature
to a Kernel editorial Wednesday,
was allowed at the Focus '68
the filing dates were publicized
convocation last spring.
beforeliand.
But Miss McKinstry replied
He said notices were put in all
the dormitories and a story was that the Wallace speech "is a
in the Kernel office Sunday for presidential convocation, and the
final decision is in his hands.
Monday's paper.
"But somehow it got lost," Focus '68 was a student-ru- n
he said
on Page 8, Col. 1

38 File For Next Week 's Election

By LARRY DALE KEELING
Assistant Managing Editor
Thirty-eigh- t
students have
filed as candidates in the Sept.
18 Student Government election
in which 14 representative seats
will be filled.
The 14 seats represent three

districts

s,

South-Centr-

al

Thorn Pat Juul, one of the six Church, J. R. Turner, Robert
candidates, already, holds one Haggin, Lynn Montgomery and
seat in Student Government. If Johnny McCowin.
he shoukl be elected in all three
Eight students are running
districts, he would be able to against the six
cast four votes in the Assembly.
for the three seats in the
The other candidates running
district. This disin all three districts are Joe Isaacs, trict includes Kirwan and Bland-intowers and the low rises.
Joe Maguire, Robert Duncan,
Annette Marie Bruflat and Paul
The candidates are Woody
"omni-candi-date-

South-Centr-

g

and
students filed for election Johnson.
Nineteen
candidates
in all three districts, according
to Steve Bright, Speaker of the filed for the eight
North-Centra- l.

Six

Assembly, who released the lists
Wednesday night.
"There is no provision in our
constitution that says you have
to live in the district that you
run in," he said.
If any of the candidates were
elected in more than one district, he would be able to cast
as many votes as the number
of seats he holds, according to
Bright.

Afro-Americ-

il

nine-memb- er

ing."
The senate did not get around
to the
l
proposal Monday
pass-fai-

have

seats. They will compete with the
six candidates running in all three

districts.

They are Merrily Orsini, John
Cook, Herbert Creech, David
Blair, Charles Barrett, John
Cooper, Bob Bailey, Ed Woe-lan- d
and Mike J. Fallahay.
Also applying were Joseph
Hampton, John (Sparky) McDowell, Randy Owens, Dick
Barrie Greis,
Webb,
Roger

A&S 300
By DANA EWELL
Assistant Managing Editor
Students enrolled in
Culture, Arts and Sciences 300, may not be graded
on the pass-fasystem after all.
Dr. Thomas Blues, one of
eleven professors teaching the
various sections of the course,
explained to the class Wednesday afternoon thajt the seven essays required for the course (No
examinations will be given.) may
be graded on a letter basis since
the pass-fai- l
proposal for elective
courses has not yet gone before
the Faculty Senate for approval.
"It's all our fault," Dr. Blues
said referring to the teaching staff
of A 6c S 300. "Last spring when
we met to plan the course, we
would be
decided that pass-fai- l
the best system to use. We
had already
thought pass-fai- l
gained approval.
"But actually it had only
gained approval from the Undergraduate Council, a
Faculty Senate committee, and was placed on the agenda for the senate's Sept. 9 meet-

al

Pass-Fa- il

because of lengthy debate on
an
speaker policy.
Dr. Herbert Drennon, dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences, said he did not know
when the proposal would come
up for approval from the senate,
but even if it was approved this
fall he did not think it would
be effective until this spring.
"It is possible, Ijowever, that
an exception could be made for
A&S 300," Dean Drennon added.
Dr. Blues, too, is hopeful that
an exception will be made for
the course. "Everyone is for pass-failDr. Blues said, "and, especially in the case of A&S 300,
I think it is commensurate
to
the spirit of the course."
Dr. Blues explained that the
II faculty members involved in
the class are teaching it in addition to their regular teaching
load ami are not receiving pay.
"And the students who enrolled in the class did not do so
because they were motivated by
grades but because they wanted
to learn alxnit the American
Black," Dr. Blues said.
"It's a volunteer effort on
the part of the faculty and students to meet a particular need
,"

Woodall, Jolm (Champ) Daugher-ty-,
Nancy Knight, Lucy Knight,
John P. Stainback, Joe Weiner,
M. D. Zehnder and Jim Staton.
The North-Centrdistrict
elects three representatives
one
d
at large, one from the
area and one from the
Donovan-Haggi- n
area. The six
have to run
in the at large race, according
to Bright.
Opposing them in the at large
race is only one other candidate, Moises Urman.
al

Holmes-Keenelan-

"omni-candidate-

Holmes-Keene-lan-

.

May Fail

-

Op--

to make the black man visible
in academia."
Following is the context of
the pass-fa- il
proposal pending
approval of the Faculty Senate:
"Allow undergraduate students in good standing above
the freshman level to select a
maximum of four elective courses,
with certain restrictions, to be
basis to
taken on a pass-facount toward graduation but not
to be used in calculating a grade-poistanding.
"Courses taken on pass-fai- l
basis shall be limited to those
considered as elective in the student's program and such other
courses or tyies of courses as
might be specifically approved by
the Senate for the college or department. Prerequisites for such
courses may be ignored at student's own hazard.
"The student is expected to
participate fully in the course
and take all examinations as
though he were enrolled on a
regular basis. Students may not
basis to
change from a pass-faa regular basis nor vice versa
after the last date for entering
an organized class."

..'A

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Nunn
Speaks

Knurl I'liotu by Howard Mason
Gov. Louie B. Nunn talks with Dr. William
Seay Dean of the College of Agriculture,
before delivering a speech to a meeting of
the Agricultural Extension Agents Wednesday morning.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

Dy

KERNEL, Tliurslay, Sept. 12,

19G8

'Cin' City Is Where It's Happening Baby

JEANNIE LEEDOM

Kcmcl Staff Writer
Visit "Gin" City.
Cincinnati is the place to go
for entertainment. Located only
85 miles from Lexington, the
"Crcater Cincinnati" area serves
as a camouflage of excitement for
UK students who enjoy retreating from campus on weekends.
On the cultural scene, Cincinnati offers the Flower Conservatory, the Natural History Muse

um, the Cincinnati Symphony
Orchestra, the Zoo Opera, band
concerts at Eden Park, the Cincinnati Gardens and the Art Museum.
The Playhouse in the Park,
located in Eden Park, conducts
special student performances in
the mornings and afternoons this
fall with picnic facilities and
beverages available on the
grounds. The opening play of
the season will be George Ber

THE PIECE GOODS SHOP

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FASHIONS?

YOUR OWN

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nard Shaw's "Saint Joan," running from October
The Cincinnati Zoo features
special attractions including the
snake house, the monkey house,
the lions' den, an amusement
park and a kiddie train which
covers the zoo area.
Downtown Cincinnati is surrounded with places of interest
as well as an excellent shopping
area. For a small fee, tours can
be taken to the top of the Carew
Tower, the highest building in
Cincinnati. Trips to Convention
Hall or Fountain Square might
also prove interesting.
The main drag at Cincinnati
centers around the University of
Cincinnati. This is where it's
happening. Everything from coffee houses
to hippie shops

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For those with hearty appetites, Cincinnati offers a variety
of foreign restaurants featuring
Chinese, Japanese, French and
Italian foods.
Lazy moods can be satisfied
with cniises down the Ohio Hi ver
on boats like"The Mark Twain."
Various restaurants lining the
river bank also contribute to the
melancholy atmosphere which
enhances a lazy mood.
Sports fans can enjoy the excitement of the Cincinnati Beds
baseball games; or, as the season
breaks, Paul Brown's Bengals
and the Hoyals basketball team
will be getting into the action.
For racing fans, Hi ver Downs
and Latonia Hace Track are located within the "Greater Cincinnati" area. These tracks feature harness racing and Thoroughbred racing.
For an exciting conclusion to
an evening on the town, the
Playljoy Club provides excellent
entertainment for those people
lucky enough to own or borrow
keys. This nightclub features wining, dining, dancing and watching Playboy Bunnies.

Art

PHONE
254-437-

2

Additions

Behind Sears

LARGE SELECTION
COLLEGE

Invites all University Students
and Faculty to shop during the
month of September
with a
10
DISCOUNT

fv
v

A

FABRICS

dark-parlo-

The Kentucky
IERNELp-j--

110 EASTLAND
SHOPPING CENTER

FASHION

to bK)kstorcs to exclusive fashion shops is found in this area.
r
Some of the groovy
coffee houses in this district
are the Pickle Barrel, Sam's,
Duffs, the Varsity Mug, the
Dorm and more on the hippie
side the Blind Lemon.
UC students are nowtheown-er- s
of the Majestic, a showboat
which they have converted into
a playhouse. Student plays can
be seen while the river atmosphere is enjoyed.
Calhoun Street is the main
hippie district. Around this area,
neat little shops like the Eye
Opener, the Black Onion, the
Trivet and the I leadquartcrs open
the psychedelic mind and send
it into the wonderland of confusion and exploration.

r

SHOP MON. & FRI. 'TIL 9

P.M.

On A Get Acquainted Purchase
o CREWEL
e KITS
RUGS

o YARN

NEEDLEWORK

QUILTS

Your Complete Art Needlework Center
Discount

valid only with UK identification

The Art Gallery of the University of Kentucky has added
two new members to its staff.
Joining the staff are William Hull
who will serve as Director of the
Art Gallery and W. Gay Heading,
Jr. who will serve as Assistant to
the Director.
Hull is currently executive
director of the Kentucky Fine
Arts Commission and formerly
served as associate director of
the New York State Council on
the Arts. Heading, a Lexington
native, is a graduate of Washington & Lee University and Case
Western Reserve University in
Cleveland. He is presently curator for the II eadley Jewel Museum
in Lexington.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept.

Student Government VP Rebuts Column

WORLD REPORT
From the Wire of the Associated

At an
panel
for freshmen women last night,
AWS-sponsor-

Press

Student Government
Tim Futrell issued a rebuttal to David Holwerk's colVice-Preside-

countries two more than last
INTERNATIQNAL
PARIS The Paris office of year proposed Wednesday that
the Assembly of Captive Eurothe Cencral Assembly again this
pean Nations said Wednesday year take up the question of
that 186 civilian Czechoslovaks whether to seat Communist
were killed, 326 badly wounded China in the United Nations.
and hundreds arrested and deNATIONAL
ported to unknown places during
Euthe first week of the Soviet bloc
CONCORD, N.H.-S- en.
invasion.
gene J. McCarthy and New York
Mayor John V. Lindsay will be
MOSCOVV-T- he
Soviet govfourth party running mates in
ernment newspaper Izvestia said
New Hampshire Nov. 5, unless
Wednesday that the appeal for
they ask to be taken off the
"freedom for all" in Czechosballot by Sept. 25. The "New
Izlovakia is
vestia declared that freedom as Party" filed Wednesday voter
reunderstood in the West cannot petitions with more than the
be allowed under communism. quired 1,000 signatures to place
McCarthy's name on the ballot
UNITED NATIONS-Elev- en
as its candidate for president,
Communist
and non aligned and Lindsay's for

12, I9A8- -3

umn, which emphasized Student
Government's
ineffectiveness,
"significantly and grossly incor-

rect."

Futrell informed the freshmen
women of areas in which Student Government has been active.
"The very Sunday men were.

He discussed the new bus
service. "I know it was my own
suggestion that parking fees be
used to finance the bus service."
He informed

students that

Student Government President
Wally Hryan, as a mcmlxr of
the Pioard of Trustees, "sits with
the very people who make the

decisions."

He also summarized the activities of the Stiklent Center
Hoard.
Futrell concluded "Stiklent
Government plays a very vital,
significant role on this campus.
The key to the misconception
is that it is more than just its

assembly."

J

I

ij

vice-preside-

moving into the dorms Student
Government had three hours of
conferences with Mrs. Lindley
of the Housing Office and Miss
Fond." Uppcrclass males have
been released from their contracts
because of the overcrowded situation.

f:

j

New Sport
At Complex Cafeteria
Line-Standin-

g

The abnormally long lines at
the Complex Cafeteria are due
to the crowded conditions in the
dormitories, according to Lawrence Jeffreys, director of Food
Services.
It has not been uncommon
lately for the lines to extend
well into the courtyard during
the evening meal. While Mr. Jeffreys claims that increased personnel efficiency should speed
the lines somewhat, he added that
the problem could never be completely alleviated since the Complex currently houses "about 300
more students" than it was designed to handle.
Blazer and Donovan Cafeterias are evidently not having
this problem at the present time.
Although the lines have been
moderately long after the 6:15
p.m. closing time, he said that
lengthening the serving time
would not help. "We will never

close while

there are students

waiting in line."

The closing time last year
the cafeteria was 6:30 p.m.
Mr. Jeffreys said that "just a
trickle" of people came through
the lines after 6:15 last year and
that the money gained by shortening the hours would be spent
to improve the food.
When asked about instances
when the cafeteria has run out
of vegetables and other foods as
early as twenty minutes before
closing time, Mr. Jeffreys said
tliat this should not occur after
a few weeks, when a regular
pattern has been established. The
line supervisors will then be able
to predict more accurately how
many people will come through
the lines at any given time and
be better prepared for them.
Mr. Jeffreys closed by saying
that in all instances "the customer comes first."
for

j

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pabll-catio-

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OLE...

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dent Center Ballroom. Admission 50
cents. Everyone is invited.
The Student Center Board is showing a movie, "The Endless Summer,"
Friday and Saturday at 6:30 and 9:15
p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. in the
Student Center Theatre. Admission

Exclusively

Coming Up
The APHA Student Wives Club Is
holding its annual fall tea Sunday
2 p.m. in the Pharmacy Library.
Associated
Women Students dorm
representative elections will be conducted Tuesday, Sept. 17.

Found

At

Embry's

0M

A

Tomorrow
The Arnold Air Society and Angel
Flight w'.ll sponsor a jam sessionFriday from 2 to 5 p.m. in the Stu-

The Kentucky Kernel
The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 40500. Second class
pobtage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once (luring the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications. UK Post Otflce) Box 4UU0.
Begun as the Cadet in ltttrt and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1815.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Jbditors.
SUBSCRIPTION

Every Friday Afternoon from

Live Music hy

featuring

4-- 6

the Blues Carma

PJHliL COIPELAN

RATES

Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from Alee
KERNEL

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From Columbia, South America
the Ruana . . . Ole! 100 wool
and handmade individual patterns of bright and muted
shades. . . .
We order for you, your own
special choice . . . one size
fits all . . . $36.

membership
meeting is scheduled for 8 p.m. in
Student Center Room 204. All students Interested in membership or
projects are invited to attend.
YMCA-YWC-

RUANA
RUANA

'

1

is 50 cents.

Today
The organizational meeting of the
Wildcat Pep Club is scheduled for
7 p.m. in the Blue Room of Memorial
Coliseum.
Associated Women Students Freshmen Symposium. "Lick Your Freshman Year." will be presented at
Blanding 3 and 4 and Holmes Hall
at 10:30 p.m.
The Young Republican Club will
meet at 7:3J p.m. in the Student
Center Theatre. Russ Mobley, 6th
District congressional candidate, will
speak.
Sl'des of Peace Corps work In Venezuela will be shown, 7:30 p.m.. Student Center Room 363. Sponsored by
the Recreation Department.
The Draft Counseling Service provided by local reserve officers will be
available for students every Tuesday
and Thursday afternoon from 5 p.m.
until 7 p.m. in Student Center Room

307.
A Joint

!:

!

TODAY and
TOMORROW

Announcement for University creeps
will be published twice once the dsy
before the event and once the afternoon of the event. The deadline U 11
a.m. the day prior to the first

l:

t'

fhAik

;

M

JL

v

$.10

TELEPHONES

1321
Editor. Managing Editor
Editorial Page lull tor.
1320
Associate Editors, Sports
News Dsk
Advertising, Business, Circulation U19

825

EUCLID AVE.

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1

* No Student Voice
In its discussions of what policy
to adopt towards shakers on this
campus, the Faculty Senate might
do well to consider that one very
important voice is being ignored
in its own deliberations.
The student body, which is,
after all, the main beneficiary of
campus speakers, has had no say
in the plans which are being considered. A National Student Asso

ciation endorsed proposal was put
before the Senate Monday, but
the group defeated that plan. But
even this proposal did not officially
have student support here.
What the Faculty senate risks
by ignoring the wishes of the student body is the squashing of student expression here for the sake
of free expression by visiting speakers. The contradiction should be
obvious to our illustrious faculty.

Unhappy George
It appears that Albert B. Chandler will not be the running mate
of George C. Wallace on the American Independent Party ticket after
all. A Wallace aide suggests the reason: the prospective alliance "came
unstuck" over the civil rights issue.
If this is correct, it is certainly to Mr. Chandler's credit. At no
time in his long political career, including terms as Governor of Kentucky and U.S. Senator, did he ever deviate from a policy of decent
moderation on Negro rights. It would be sad to see him now, at the
age of 70, compromise that good record.
It seems reasonable at this point to ask whether Mr. Chandler
can in good conscience support the Wallace ticket, in view of what
he has learned at first hand of its deeply racist nature.
Mr. Wallace is a man who has used every ounce of his influence
to prevent integration of the schools in his own state. Mr. Chandler,
by contrast, sent the National Guard into Clay and Sturgis at the
time when school integration was hotly resisted there. His instructions were: "Don't let anyone keep anybody from going to school
who wants to."
Mr. Chandler is a man who has taken just pride in bringing Negro
athletes, including Jackie Robinson,' into full participation in major
league baseball. Former Governor Wallace, by contrast, is a man who
said after a political defeat in 1958: "John Patterson outniggered me.
And boys, I'm not going to be outniggered again."
Mr. Wallace has been careful not to use such overt language on race
in his present campaign for the presidency. He does not need to. The
Ku Kluxers who make up an important part of his following already
know him as their kind of man. He can gamble for the votes of less
violent segregationists all over the country without fear of losing his
base of support in the Deep South.
Not many people have doubted the true nature of the Wallace
campaign. Mr. Chandler has had a chance to see it face to face.
There is still time for him to withdraw his support of a candidate
he cannot rim with.
The Courier-Journ-

am
Anybody Remember
How It Looked Before?

A Free Forum
The University's decision to ex- Wallace will say anything new or
tend speakers' invitations to the offer any solutions of the real probmajor Presidential candidates is lems of this nation while here
one from which the whole UniverSaturday, it is important that he,
benefit. Not only should as all other speakers, be allowed
sity might
the student body benefit from hear- the forum which the University
ing the views, but the whole at- provides.
This is the whole issue in the
mosphere of the community of
scholars could be improved by such area of academic freedom and freedom of speech. Whether the speakappearances.
At the moment only American er is George Wallace or H. Rap
Independent Party candidate Brown, the burden of upholding
George Wallace has accepted, but that freedom falls squarely in the
even his appearance would be one lap of the University community.
which the University should wel- This time it has responded in a
come. While it is doubtful that laudable fashion.

The Kentucky

Iernel

TJie South's Outstanding College Daily
ESTABLISHED 1894

al

University of Kentucky

THURSDAY, SEPT.
Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

12. 1968

By SCOTT WENDELSDORF

John Kenneth Calbraith, who has been
lauded as the
by
TIME, has written: "Vietnam is not one
issue. It is the whole issue."
The distinguished professor is seldom
wrong in his analysis of contemporary
society, however, in this case, he is irrefutably so.
The war in Southeast Asia is not the
whole issue. It is merely a minute part
of a larger issue, but one symptom of
a much more serious disease many times
more critical than the current localized
outbreak would indicate.
It is imperative that this nation look
beyond Vietnam to the larger issue, the
larger problem: this nation's dedication
to and obsession with a foreign policy
and economic imof
perialism. The war in southern Vietnam
of this
is but an isolated
policy, a policy whose harvest promises
to be infinitely more hellish than the
jungle war could ever hope to be.
Let us examine our situation. The
American military-industricomplex is
the most awesome structure in the history
of all civilization, because of it, America,
containing 5 percent of the world's population, consumes 50 percent of the world's
resources. How is this possible?
It is issible because from United Fruit
Company in Latin America to Shell Oil

in Africa, our investments, our foreign the victim peoples. New rationales were
factories, our world wide corporate system needed, and so was bom the philosophy
the main
have been draining off the wealth of other of Colonialism-is-good-for-yonations while leaving their populations point being that with the invasion of
OUR companies and interests and the
in poverty.
off of THEIR resources came
As Carl Oglesby, former president of siphoning
the SDS and one of the more brilliant also the blessing of our advanced
and a kick into the modern
political minds in the country wrote. technologythe
age.
politicians grew just as fat,
"On the face of it, it is a crime that' and But
the people for the most part remained
so few should have so much at the exjust as poor.
pense of so many . . . How intolerable
We simply could not understand why
to be born moral, but addicted to a stolen
the knowledge that most of their country's
and maybe surplus luxury."
Indeed, our self image as the great wealth was going to the West to conhumanitarian champion of the world tribute to our unequalled fortune sliould
threatens to become a sham before our anger the "underdeveloped" world.
With the final fall of the European
very eyes.
It has been America's task throughout empires and their influence came the increased need to solidify our hold on the
her history to justify this system of economic imperialism and thus delay its masses of the world, to secure their
comexposure to the world and especially to allegiance to the military-industrithe American public for what it is.
plex.
The first attempt at this was the
The answer to insure the
philosophy of "free enterprise" and its of friendly governments in aperpetuation
world tired
corollary the white man's burden. In of
oppression, poverty, and western exsliort, we said, "True! We are taking
ploitation was the ideology of
your resources, but we are giving you
We couldn't call revolution bad
civilization in their place." The veneral
per se, so we called revolution
disease that we introduced into the third
Then
selective qualities
world, I suppose, was free of charge. and the excessestaking
of communism, we proUnderstandably, this verbal garbage ceeded to show that it was always against
the best interests for the people of the
of the McKinley era soon proved insufficient to calm the rising indignation of country in question. Any advance of conh

nmnism became part of some monolithic
plot to conquer the world.
I n ot her wo rd s ALL R EVOLUTION S
BECAME COMMUNIST
AND ALL
COMMUNISM BECAME BAD.
Thus were perpetuated the governments serving well the interests of America while ignoring the needs of their
own people.
This ideology has been used to perpetuate totalitarian governments and to
convince the American people that what
we do in the name of the military-industricomplex is really done in the interests
of national preservation. It contends that
the crushing of the Dominican Republic
revolt in 1965 led by rebels seeking to
the constitution destroyed
by the fascist military junta was in the
best interests of the Dominicans and
Americans since the junta was
as most fascists are, and the
rebels, by definition, were communist.
We perpetuate the totalitarian Francois
Duvalier of Haiti who is the worst dictator in the history of the world. Why?
Because he is
This nation opposes communism not
because it would be bad for certain
people but because it would end American domination in that particular part of
the world.
Vietnam has taught us the folly of
this policy-a- nd
the tragedy.

-

al

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept.

12,

lS

Scholars Emphasize Detached Intellectualism

By nonERT JOHNSTON
NEW HHUNSWICK, N. J.
(CPS) Young radicals last week
besieged the convention of the
American Political Science Association in Washington, D. C.
with a series of demands aimed,
they said, at nuking political
science relevant to contemporary
tx)litical and social issues. Rut
at the same time, speakers at the
fourth annual Socialist Scliolars
Conference, at Rutgers University, emphasized the need for
more detached intellectual work
to build a broader, more solid
base for social improvement.
Some of tlie SSC speakers and
issues raised:

from
Lasch,
Christopher
Northwestern University, decried
America's lack of a revolutionary
tradition and called for the emergence of a revolutionary culture
tied to political and economic
action "revolution mast be born
from the deepest feelings of the
people,.but Americans have never
had to look deeply into themselves:"
Warren Sasman, from Rutgers, said intellectuals betray
their most appropriate function
when they place personal involvement, no matter how important
the cause, ahead of the life of
the mind "to analyze social ills,
to know the world and to draw
conclusions from it, and to translate social needs into new social
e
arrangements, is a
job;
and it can't be accomplished
with half-tim- e
on the picket line;"
Ernest Mandel, editor of the
Belgian weekly La Cauche and
participant in the French student-worker
demonstrations of
last spring, declared that the
French experience clearly proved
that "a socialist revolution is
possible in an advanced, indusfull-tim-

trial country" "the students
alone decided neither the course
nor the outcome of the demonstrations; it was decided the first
day of the general strike by workers who made a united commitment to running their own lives;"

Eugene Genovese, from Sir
George William University, in
a paper on Harold Cruse's The
Crisis of the Negro Intellectual
argued that Cruse understates
and underestimates the strength
and depth of American racism
toward blacks and misjudges the

xtrntial relevance toward the
of a black

of racism

problem

nationalist response "Cruse is
silent on the opjjortunism and
treachery that have pervaded
every nationalist movement in
history;"
'Academic Racism'
Sterling Stuckcy of Northwestern University, also commenting on Cruse's book, laid
the blame for the present "crisis
of racism" at the door of the

"academic

establishment,"

which, "unmindful of black histo