xt7v6w96812z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7v6w96812z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19601123  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 23, 1960 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 23, 1960 1960 2013 true xt7v6w96812z section xt7v6w96812z Weekends Can Be Expected1
9

'One-Da- y
By JUNE GRAY

Arts and Sciences, which will of- students work part time, and they
fer 40 percent If Its courses on must have their classes in one of
two cycles,
More students can prepare Saturday.
or
This is the same schedule that
for one-da- y
weekends
the College of Arts and Sciences
semester. Approximately one-thir- d has followed for the past several
Since business now has a tendyears," Dean M. M. White said. ency to close on Saturday, it is
of all courses will he of"We have made very few changes." more convenient for students to
fered on Saturdays.
He gave three reasons for this attend Saturday classes and work
during the week.
The students most affected will change:
1. The main reason is that many
2. Sufficient classroom space is
be those enrolled in the College of

Kernel Staff Writer

Monday-Wednesday-Frid-

ay

Tuesday-Thursday-Saturd-

next

not available to have all classes in students schedule more classes on
five days.
Saturday. This would help avoid
3. The number of deaths of colthe confusion created by student
lege students traveling home on trying to enroll In closed classes.
Friday is tremendous all over the
Other colleges have scheduled ft
country. The University, however, smaller percentage of Saturday
has had very few traffic fatalities classes than the College of Arts
in comparison with other colleges and Sciences.
and universities.
The College of Engineering will
Dean White said that he Intend- offer 15 percent of its classes on
ed to encourage advisers to have
Continued on Page 8

KIE IE MIS IL
University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23, i960

Vol. LI I

No. 31

Peterson Continues Talks
On Elizabethtown Center
Dr. Frank D. Peterson, vice
president for business administration of the University, will
go to Elizabethtown Friday for
further discussion with city officials on the proposed North-centrEducation Center.

al

The search for a suitable location for the center has been
narrowed to three separate tracts,
now occupied by farmland.
Of the three, a
farm on
the south edfce of Elizabethtown
has been chosen as the tentative
site of the center. If approved, the
site would be purchased for
277-ac- re

$117,000.

After inspecting the location. Dr.
Peterson will return to Lexington
to confer with University President
Frnk G. Dickey on his findings.

Sports Center
Being Planned
A new sports center, designed to
increase interest in athletic
is now in the planning
siai?es, according to UK Athletic
Director Bernie Bhlvely.
The building will be constructed
on the field adjoining the intramural football practice field.
The proposed center will include
bowling lanes, tennis courts, an indoor swimming pool, and numerous
other athletic facilities. A similar
project was recently completed at
Purdue University.
Dr. Don C. Eeaton. head of the
Physical Education Department.
said students who take physical
education classes at the center will
have to allow themselves a free
hour before and after their class
In order to travel back and forth.

par-ticiDati- on.

;

Option on the farm must be exercised by Dec. 16.
Dr. Peterson fnid he was "highly
pleased" with response to the proposed center by Hardin County
citizens.
"The criteria for establishing a
new center are being well met by
the closing of the Ft. Knox Center," he said.

New Grill Nainetl
"The K Lair" Is the new name
of the grill behind Donovan Hall.
tie in
There was. a three-wa- y
the contest, and the thirty dollar gift certificate will be divided
among Larry Dykes, Kappa Sigma; Garryl Slpple, Haggin Hall;
and Bill Irion, Haggin Hall.

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Nine Officials Attend
Meeting Of Colleges
Nine University officials at- - Dr. Abby L. Marlatt, director of
t
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.
t.njwi tjie 74th annual Land ne scnooi oi norae economics,
Robert E. Shaver, dean of the
Grant College Convention in Colieg of Engineering; Maurice
S. Wall, associate dean of the
Washington, D. C, Nov. 6
-

13-1-

thousand delegates from
land grant colleges in 50 states
attended the general sessions and
sectional meetings.
Dr. J. A. Perkins, president of
the University of Delaware, was
xnsianea as presiaeni 01 uie group,
Representing UK were President
Frank G. Dickey; Dr. Frank D.
Peterson, vice president ior ousi- ness administration; Dr. Frank J.
Welsh, dean of the' College . of
Agriculture and Home Economics;

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"Since a University center In
Elizabethtown is under consideration primarily for their benefit,
we are highly pleased with the
interest expressed ly citizens of
Hardin County and adjoining
counties.
"We hope their support continues, and that they are willing- to
show tangible Interest In a site
being there."
Dr. Peterson said he would resume discussion with civic leaders
on financial support and services
they would be willing to offer.
Elizabethtown leaders have already
been supplied with an estimate of
first-yeenrollment figures and
space needs.
The site for the center will be
purchased with funds being raised
through public subscription in
Elizabethtown and Hardin County.

nr,

-

Smiles Aivay
These coeds, sponsors for the Air Force ItOTC program, have
been elected by popular vote of 950 ROTC cadets to serve as
hostesses for cadet functions. Unless otherwise indicated, the girls
are from Lexington. Left row, bottom to top: Lana Coyle, Spring-fiel- d;
Faye Drew, Nina Jane Snap, Carol Leet, Jackie Chestnut,
Kitty Hundley, Brenda Botklns, and Linda Tobin, Harned. Center
row: Virginia Fincel, Frankfort; Pixie Priest, Hartford; Diana
Merck, Clifton, III.; Kay Murphy, Lana Fox, Gerri Ranch, Miami,
Fla.; and Julie Howser. Right row: Betty Dawn Weaver, Ann
Woodward, Judy O'Dell, June Moore, Miami, Fla.; Barbara Wall,
Fairfax, Va.; and Peggy Olmstead, Coshocton, Ohio. Not present
for the picture were Priscilla Lynn, Liberty; Helen Graham,
and Melanie Fessler, Florence.

College of Agriculture and Home
- vi
IT
e Ty William A .Qoav
,
..
vice director, Agricultural r.xpen- CI W finvrtor
T"r
mant
associate director. Agricultural Ex- tension; and Dr. M. M. White,
dean of the Colieee of Arts and
sciences.
a proposal was adopted at Ihe
11
1111 JLP
JL
convention to revise the bylaws,
nossible an Increased rec
m.in
A team of four graduate students will go to the Brook- 0fT,iti0n of the activities of land
fTant coiicjes with other public haven National Laboratory in New York next week to carry
1

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Graduates To Experiment
7ifl! RiilfcKl
UUUlC rilOTTlIlPT
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out an experiment on a

institutions.

14-inc-

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hydrogen bubble chamber.

of
The scientifically famous bubble graduate students who will analyze
and
constitutional changes was held chamber recently won the Nobel with the help of the most modern
over to become effective next year. Prize for University of California measuring equipment, what the
bubble chamber has seen.
One of these would elevate the physicist Dr. Donald A. Glasser.
The bubble chamber enables the
council of graduate work and genThe team will be under the di- to catch
eral university extension work to rection of Dr. V. P. Kenney and
Dr. William D. Shephard, both as- - particle explosions in photographic
divisions.
The Army ItOTC has set. into motion a sponsor program
form and to preserve them for
The convention was keyed to sistant professors of physics.
Basically, the bubble chamber is systematic study.
the agricultural divisions of the
which will go into effect lefoie the end of this semester.
Dr. Shephard noted that Ken
land grant schools, according to a device which permits physicists
"The cadets wanted a iJonsor program for a long time, but could Dr. Welsh.
to track subatomic particles by tucky and the University is a leadMaJ. Cecil O. Dansby, assistant professor
not get it approved
The convention will be held In photographing the trail of bubbles ing competitor in high energy
of Military Scienc.
Kansas City, Mo., next yar. It they leave behind as they 'pass work.
"Col. Robert K. pucker, professor of Military Science, was Interestis held every two years at the through superheated liquid.
"We've perhaps the best equiped in the program and approved it. The constitution was then ap- Statler-IIilto- n
Upon return, the team will join ped laboratory and the most
Hotel in Washing- proved by the Faculty Committee Nov. 18." he said.
15 undergraduates and three other
ton, D. C.
on Page 8
Brigade and battle group sponsors will be nominated from junior
womeYi studwits. Company sponsors will be nominated from freshman
World News Briefs
and sophomore women students. Eight will be chosen in all.
Each sorority will nominate two women, and four each will be
chosen from the women's residence halls. Two are eligible' from Bowhouses. Seniors
man HalL and one from each of the four
are not eligible for nomination.
Applications have been distributed by Scabbard and Blade, honUNITED NATIONS, N.Y., Nov. 22 (AP) The Joseph Mobutu's victorious army roved through
orary military society. They must be returned by Dec. 10.
Leopoldville today, arresting and beating scores of
U.N. Oeneral Assembly today overrode a last-ditTo be eligible a sponsor candidate must be a full. time student, In attemDt to adiourn debate on seatine President United Nations officials in revenge for the death
good standing in the University, and approved for nomination by the Joseph Kasavubu pending a report on antl-U.of their field commander in an
battle with
tfean or women and her academic lacuiiy adviser. sne musi oe single violence in Leopoldville. Ohana made the move with U. N. troops.
and a United States citlien.
support of the Soviet bloc.
With the Congo army attacking the official
The cadets will entertain the candidates at a tea dance from 5
assembly headed toward a residence of Ghana, the world organization backed
Tnen the
p.m.. Jan. 5. in the Student Union. Building.. On Jan. 6 the cadets finai showdown with every indication It would ap- - down on its pledge to protect the diplomatic im- wlll elect the eight Army ROTC Sponsors.
prove by a wide margin the giving of the long munity of Ghana's charge d'affaires, Nathaniel Wel- Dani,by said, "The sponsors will have two uniforms, one for winter vacant Congo seat to a delegation headed by Kasa- - beck, an ally of deposed Premier Patrice Lumumba,
and summer. As for the material and style of the uniform the spoivsors vubu.
Welbeck flew home this morning on orders from
.
will be able to decide on that."
Mobutu after the young colonel's troops had forced
I fV,,,,
If
ill OU,0
The sponsors will participate in parades, " ceremonies, and social
him from the residence that was guarded by U.N.
'
LEOPOLDVILLE, The Congo, Nov. 22 (AP) Col. troops.
events.
Proposal

presentation

Sponsors To Be Chosen
By Army ROTC Units

scientist

split-seco-

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- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

1000

2.1,

Baptist Siiiden I Appoinled
Missidiiary To Alaska

University Anthropologist
Unfolds 'Canyon's' Past
'(EDITOR'S NOTE Deep In the
RrRf of the Grand Canyon lie
ncattrred traces of lost civilization. What they did. where they
disappeared and why are still
mysterlei even to the handful of
their descendants who still call
the canyon home. This article,
written by a former KERNEL
editor, tells about UK's Dr. Douglas Schwarti's search for the an-

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;

Dy RONALD J. BUTLER

Associated Tress Writer

A prehistoric record of human occupation in the Grand
Canyon ' is' opening new horizons of exploration for Ameri-

--

can archeolpgists.

s

The record dates back nearly
but only recently has
any methodical work been done to
study the American Indians who
first undertook to live in the canyon's rugged environment.
liack in 1929, some pictures were
made of corn granaries in caves
along the canyon walls, but it
wasn't until 20 years later that the
real story of the canyon's human
past began to Unfold.
The man responsible for ihe
work. Is Dr. Douglas W. Schwartz,
director of the UK Museum of
.

Anihropology.

Schwartz started surveying the
area in 1949 and In 1954 discovered
in leaves, some animal figurines
"

majde from soft twigs.

Ritual spears were stuck through
some .of the figurines, indicating
their Indian makers hoped, to better their chances in hunting
through magic. ,
.
Radiocarbon tests showed the
.

'

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'Old Abe ' Helped Promote
Thanksgiving Celebration

farming until that time.
Under present . conditions, he - Students leaving campus today
says, the canyon would not sup- for a
day vacaport a population as large as that tion can be thankful to "Old
during the major occupation Abe" for establishing a national
period.
Thanksgiving holiday.
Tree ring records from the surThere seems to have been little
rounding area. including prehis- recognition of the part which
toric building timber, support the Abraham Lincoln played in nationbelief that the canyon once had a alizing Thanksgiving Day, yet in
larger rainfall.
the year 1863 he captured the New
Each ring in a tree trunk repre- England spirit of "fruitful fields
sents a year's growth, and rings
healthful skies" and incorformed during periods of ample and
porated it in a proclamation which
moisture are larger than during designated the first annual nadry spells.
Thanksgiving Day.
The animal life has changed tional October 3, 1863. Lincoln IsOn
only slightly from the days of the
Presidential proclamation
prehistoric Indian inhabitants of sued a aside the last Thursday of
setting
the Grand Canyon. Some of the November as a day of thanksgivanimals still found are mountain
sheep, beavers; antelope, and ing.
This day was designated because
mountain lions.
the, last feast day prior to
Many questions remain to be itJs observance of Advent by the
answered about the canyon Ind- the
Churches of America.
ians.
One is the effect the canyon's
rugged environment had on agri-- 1
culture.
Some of the corn found in granaries located in the" mouth of the
Nankoweap Canyon, one of the
four-and-a-h-

DR. DOUGLAS W. SCHWARTZ

figurines were made about 1,500
This age test Is based on the
fact that all living things absorb
carbon 14 during life and that the
radioactive isotope deteriorates at
a known rate after death.
This summer, Schwartz made his
sixth trip into the canyon and
found more granaries," a boulder
covered with stone cartings, thousands of pottery fragments, and
remains of about 50 pueblos.
This Is how the
a'rcheologlst describes the canyon's
human past from the Information
available:
The first Indians came to the
Grand Canyon about 3.500 years
agq and lived by hunting.
The figurines tell more about
their religion than is known about
many other prehistoric religions,
although little is known about
their everyday, life.
The Grand Canyon figurines apparently served as religious symbols in rituals to promote good
hunting.
After 1,500 B.C. the canyon
records are blank, and the next
date that enters the picture is
about 500 A.D. when agricultural
Indians arrived.
They came in from different
areas and were not related. This
moving-i- n
period lasted until 900
B.C.

.33-year--

-

A.D.

GENE CRAVENS

down into the valley when the
others left.
The first European contact with
them was made by a Franciscan
missionary in 1776.
Schwartz says the shift from the
rims into the canyon was the result of a passible change in rainfall, possible population pressure,
or pressure from nomads.
The huge canyon was formed
many millions of years ago, and
its physical structure probably has
changed little In the last several
thousand years.
However, Schwartz says, before
1,200 B.C. there may have been
more rain in the Grand Canyon
area. He adds that there seems
to have been adequate .water for

What should a student take to AlasXa this summer?
This is the problem faced by Jim Haynes, a Junior from Cumberland. During the Baptist Student Union Convention, Jim Haynes was
appointed to work as a summer missionary for 10 weeks in Alaska.
He will work with the local churches holding Bible schools, revivals, and census taking to help establish new churches.
When asked how he felt when he heard of his appointment, Haynes
said, "I almost passed out. It was the first experience that left me
limp. Winning the independent football championship last year was
a great experience, but this beats them all."
Six students are appointed from Kentucky to work as summer
missionaries. They are supported by funds raised by the local BSUa
across the state. Kentucky's goal this year is $900.
They plan to raise $400 before the Christmas vacation by having
students sign pledge cards.
Haynes is the vice president and promotions chairman of the BSTJ.

Then came a population explosion, and the Indians began to
rr.ove into the canyon from the
rims. This migration was at its
peak by 1,000 A.D., and a century
later the rims were abandoned.
The major Indian occupation of
the Grand Canyon was from 1,000
A.D. to 100 A.D., when the entire canyon again was abandoned
except, for a small area inhabited
by the Havasupai Indians, who still
live there.
Evidence indicates the Havasupai started moving into the towering cliffs by 1.100 A.D., perhaps to
escape raids, then moved ,back

..Lincoln repeated his act ,ln
and every year since then,
the President of the United States
has issued a proclamation establishing a Thanksgiving Day In
1864,

alf

November.

irS

irs a Dittr
The Daffod'! Spring

Ccnecfy

side canyons, is being analyzed to
see if it differs from corn in other
parts of the Southwest.
There also is the question of
their relation to other Indians, the
problems of adjustment to a new

BEN
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The glamor girl f
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LAURENCE

The enrvings Include a scorpion,
the outline of human footprints,
and a number of curled lines.
They may have been part of the
magic ritual for hunting and protection or they may have been

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

f

I

77

7 77

"

3

23, 1900 -- 3

i&oz Activities
MRS. T. S. BLANKENSIIIP
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Martin,
Nashville, Tenn., announce the
recent marriage of their daughter,
Mary Glenn, to Thomas S. Blank-enshi- p,
son of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas A. Blankenship, Nashville,

RECENT riNNINGS

Margaret

Gaddie, "Zeta

Tail

senior home economics
major, from Campbellsville, to J.
W. Fuller, Triangle, senior civil

Alpha,

engineering major, from Cincinnati.
yCora Nelle, Zeta Tau Alpha
Tenn.
Junior home economics major from
The former Miss Martin Is a
enr-freshman majoring ln home eco- Lexington, to Larry D. Dixon,
gineering major, from Lexington.
nomics. Mr. Blankenship Is a
Pat May, Transylvania College
fophomore transfer to the College
student' frpm Dayton, Qhio. to
of Commerce.
Bill McCray,' Lambda Chi Alpha,
Junior electrical engineering maJUNIOR PANIIELLENIC
Junior Panhellenic recently jor from Frankfort.
elected Sharon Perkins president.
:
Other officers Include Paula
Owens, vice president; Diane
secretary; and Emfiy Delta Sigma Pi, men's profesSchorr,
sional commerce fraternity, reVance, treasurer.
cently Initiated 13 pew members.
DELTA SIGMA PI
The initlates'are: John Williams,
Sophomore, Junior, and senior Edward' Derry, ' Pat Bean," 'tJen
Art Club
students ln the College of Com- Carter. Jerry Strieker. John
Newly elected members of the University ArJ
vice, president;, Gall Peterson, Cave City, sec- Thompson, Ted Monroe, Wayne
Clnb are (from left) Galaor Carbonell. Havana,
retarj, and Ronald Meaux, Lexlnfton, treasurer. merce may contact the following T.
..-- '
'
Bunch, Johnny Williams, John
Delta Sigma PI officers for ln
president; Mr. Evelyn' Elton, Leilnrton,'
Cuba,
McDaniel, 'James "D. Sympson,
formation concerning the fraterDonald Riel, and John Livingston.
nity:
Dr. Cecil 9. Carpenter, cean of
Roderick J. Tompkins, president; Tom Cambron, senior vice the College of Commerce', spoke
president; Larry Ransey, vice on "Trends In Business Educapresident; Don Martin, secretary; tion," at a banquet following the
Willard Cavanaugh, treasurer; Dr. initiation.
Faculty members present ' inDonald Soule, faculty adviser.
cluded Dr. Ralph Pickett, Dr. RobN.S.I.D. MEETING
ert Haun, and Dr. Donald Spule,
Lucy Milward, Arts and Sciences
W. W. McLendon, executive diThe National Society of Interior faculty adviser.
Fophomore representing Kappa rector of the local association,
NEW YORK, Nov. 22 (AP)
'
Kappa Oamma Sorority, is leading stated that any contestant still has Actress Sandra Dee says of her Decorators will meet at 4 p.m. "Alumnae 'and undergraduate
in the "Miss Christmas Seal" con- an excellent chance to win. Each engagement to singer Bobby Dar- Monday, Nov. 28, in Erikson Hall members of the Cincinnati chap.Lounge.
ters were also present.
test by 17 votes.
student can help his favorite can- in:
by sending his contribution
Trudy Webb, Kappa Delta, is ln didate
"I'm on cloud nine."
ffcond place, with Ann Evans, with a marked ballot.
Miss Dee, 18, disclosed their enmm
r
J
I
Delta Delta Delta, and "Cookie"
McLendon went on to emphasize gagement Monday. She and Darin,
Lcet, Alpha Gamma Delta, tied the importance of contributions to 24, met while making a picture in
for third place.
the Christmas Seal campaign. Italy.
The contest is in its second week Kentucky has the highest TB rate
Featuring a Complete Line of Cosmetology
Darin returned from Rome a
and all other contestants are close in its white population of any few days ago. Miss Dee arrived in
behind, with few votes separating state in the union.
New York Sunday night and was
.
The Latest in Hair Styling
first and last place.
"To provide a future, free from met at the plane by Darin.
tuberculosis, each person can inETHEL KOHLER, Stylist and Color Artist, and MISS
They rode into town in a limousure his chances by contributing sine and when they arrived
EDNA BLACKWELL, a well known Operator in the
what they can."
"Sandra was engaged and a very II field of Cosmetology, along with our Professional Staff fj
j
All
contributions should be happy girl," says her press agent.
(JP) Kirksey
OKLAHOMA CITY
Darin gave her an emerald cut
if.
Nix could be one of the most dig- mailed to the Blue Grass Tubercu- diamond engagement ring.
losis and Health Association, 1410
$17.50 Permanents on Special for $15.00
nified ice cream servers in the
The singer, who rose to fame
or given to one of
He's a state Court of Crim- Forbes Road
ration.
the
The contest will with his hit recording of "Mack
Make Your Appointments Early
inal Appeals Judge who operates close contestants. 15.
The Knife," now is in California,
December
II
during
hours.
a drive-i- n
OPEN TUESDAY AND THURSDAY EVENINGS
he plans to meet Miss Dee here
but
'
BY APPOINTMENT
The winner, Miss Christmas Seal, soon to visit relatives in New
will be presented with an engraved Jersey. She is from Bayonne, N.J.,
It Tays To Advertise
287 South Lime
trophy from the tuberculosis
fj
Phone
and he is from Lake Hiawatha,
In The Kentucky Kernel
N.J.

-

K77 : 7 7,: 7 ,
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Initiation

Offices

Sandra Dee,

Lucy tyltlwiYcl Leads Ln
Christmas Seal Contest

"

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Bobby Darin

Get Engaged

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* The Kentucky Kernel
University or Kentucky

port oflW t Ltn(tnn, Kentucky ai icrond clw mttrr nndrr the Art ol March S, 1879.
hnol vef erert during holidayi and
Published lour timn a week dnring the rrfular
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Knttrrd

tt the

im.

Bob

Anderson, Editor

Newton Stencer, Sport Editor
Managing Editor
Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Bobbie
Stuart Goldfarb, Advertising Manager
Alice Akin, Society Editor
Skip Taylor and Jim Channon, Cartoonists

Mse Wennincer,

WEDNESDAY NEWS STAFF

Mkrritt Deitz, Newt

Michele Fearinc, Associate

Editor

Stewart Hedcer,

Sports

Vandalism In The Dorms
The recurring problem of vandal-isin the men's dormitories and the
placing of ' responsibility for damage
caused by such acts recently came to
light again.
Only in the University's newest
dormitory, Haggin Hall, which is so
constructed that the outer doors can
be locked and each resident has entry
to his section alone, can vandalism
be eliminated and responsibility for
damage to facilities be pinpointed
with any accuracy.
In the Quadrangle halls and Donovan Hall, such a. simple solution is
not possible. As these dorms are not
locked at night, anyone can enter and
assessing the residents of sections
where vandalism takes place to pay
for the damage is singularly unfair.
All the residents of these dorms have
free run of the buildings and almost
anyone a resident or prowler from
the street could be responsible.
So far this year, we have heard of
several damaged telephones, stolen
mirrors, and jimmied soft drink machines. Most of the damage has been
limited to the Quadrangle with a few
instances of vandalism reported from
Donovan Hall.
m

In the light of the number of instances of vandalism, the directors of
men's housing should consider some
new method of halting such destruction. If the damage is done by dorm
residents who can be identified, then
assessing them for the amount of
damage is a fair solution. So long as
the dormitories are left open, however,
we do not believe that such an answer is equitable.

It should be determined if locking the outside doors of the dormitories and issuing keys to residents is
feasible. We feel such a plan would
work and should be considered. In
the meantime, dormitory counselors,
residents, and campus police should
be more vigilant in an attempt to
protect University and personal property.
Particularly during the coming
Thanksgiving and Christmas vacations the police should patrol the area
to discourage prowlers. The unoccupied dormitories offer a tempting target which thiefs and vandals could
scarcely afford to pass up and dormi-.tor- y
dwellers cannot affort to pay for.

f

Gobble, gobble

Messy Fraternity Row
We note with pleasure that some
of the fraternities on Huguelet Drive
have begun to clean up the area
around their houses, but there is still
room for a great deal of improvement.
The area on Fraternity How has
shown signs of needing a slum clearance project. In an area peopled by
those who like to consider themselves
among the campus elite, the situation
has at times been disgraceful.
Uncovered garbage cans overflow
alongside nearly every house causing
not only an untidy but an unhealthy
condition as well. Hemants of Homecoming displays and party decorations
are stacked or thrown against the
sides of other houses. All along the
row just one Dempster Dumpster container can be found.
Most fraternities on the row have
done a commendable job of improving the appearance of, their houses.
All have added shrubbery, planted
flowers, and constructed patios, but
they have - permitted the improve

Preventing A Tragic Fire
Just as the great Titanic, to the
sorrow of many, was deemed unsink-ablso are Keeneland and Holmes
Halls supposed to be fireproof. .

e,

Residents of Holmes Hall, all 300
of them, must scurry to one of the
dormitory's three exits during a fire
drill. Those living in Keeneland must
converge on a single doorway to find
safety regardless of what section of
the building they live in.
These dormitories are not the only
ones; similar arrangements exist in
other University housing units. Many
units have not even been instructed in
fire drill procedures.
Technically, these arrangements
may meet the requirements found in
fire safety codes, but the human element which usually excites and brings
irrational actions in times of crisis has
been ignored.

It is this type of negligence that
has been responsible for disasters at
numerous schools and theaters
throughout the country. Even where
several exits have been indicated, peon
ple are often trampled by
panic-stricke-

safety-seeker-

s.

But with the one exit from Keeneland Hall, what would be the consequences of a fire? Fire has countless
times shown its unwillingness to observe man's theories and predictions.
It can develop where every possible
precaution has been taken.
Fire can develop even in fireproof buildings and, although actual
flames may not spread far, smoke can
fill such buildings, making them as
lethal as gas chambers. We need only
look back to tlie Chicago school fire
several years ago in which more chil

dren suffocated than were killed by
flames.
Because of the great danger involved, we urge University officials
to draw up alternate escape routes
and inform dormitory residents of
them. If the exits of many of the
buildings were blocked, many could
perish because residents are familiar
with only one or two escape routes.
We should also like to suggest
another solution to the problem if
no other answer can be found steel
fire escapes. Although they are cum-- i
bersomeand unattractive they are effective.
And they save lives.

Gold Problem

The answer to both questions is
the same:. West Germany. In 1048,
when the rescue operation in West
Germany was well under way, the
formerly erring, but free and capitalistic country, had no gold reserves.
She was in debt to the ears. Now this
showcase of free enterpris