xt7v6w969s36 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7v6w969s36/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680424  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 24, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 24, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7v6w969s36 section xt7v6w969s36 Tie

ECe MNEL

ECemttcecy

The South's Outstanding College Daily
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Wednesday Evening, April 24, 1968

Vol. LIX, No. MS

Second SG Vote
Set For May 2
By JANICE BARBER
Suspending bylaws in its
wake, Student Government Tuesday night approved May 2 as the
date for its second spring election
and appointed a three-maelections committee to supervise the
n

voting.

Elections held April 10 were
ruled invalid by the University's
Judicial Board, necessitating the
second election. SG vice president Raphael Vallebona indicated he would file an appeal
with the Appeals Board today
to overturn the
decision. Vallebona was the chairman
of the elections committee ruled
illegal because membership exceeded the legal three-ma- n
limit.
r
and
Earlier in the
e
meeting, the asthree-hou-

fifteen-minut-

sembly voted to cosponsor a conference on race relations with the
Black Student Union andYMCA.

Board. If the board does not act,
decision
the
the election will be held. If the
decision is overturned before May
2, the election will be canceled,
Terry said.
or affirms

Terry announced a new filing
for candidates for the
second race as 5 p.m. Friday.
The committee ruled that those
students who filed in the first
race need not refile. Those who
ran in the first race, but now
wish to withdraw, must present
signed statements disavowing

deadline

candidacy.

of order and procedure, spontaneous debate and hurried private conferences, the SG suspended sections of the bylaws
to appoint a new elections committee and to hold the election
this semester.
Under tlte suspended sections,
elections committee would have been appointed by absent SG President Steve
Cook, with approval of the assembly. The sections had also
provided a two week campaign
period between the candidate filing deadline and the election.

the

three-memb-

er

SG took the initative to apthree-ma- n
elections committee to supervise voting procedures. Members are T. Rankin
Terry, chairman; Pat Fogertyand
Jane Tieman Blair.

point a

The newly created committee
met in emergency huddle to set
the May 2 election date, with
assembly approval. The election
is contingent on any decisions
handed down from the Appeals

v iff J

X

Voting in the May 2 election
will be done on computer ballots. Terry said the new Digitec
system should aid in the tabulation of election results. Students
interested in manning the polls
should contact the SG office,
Terry said.

of "Let's do
a change," SG
became a sponsor of the racial
relations conference, voting $75
to help finance the program.
Among cries

Amid questions as to point

C4

for

something

"But What Can I Do ?" scheduled for 8 p.m. April 30, is to be
a monitored telephone conversation with leading figures in the
area of civil rights. Wayne Bizer
and James Embry represented
the conference interests at the
meeting.
Bizer said the telephone dialogue will emphasize the role of
the individual in the solving of
the human rights problem. Members of the audience will be
able to direct questions to the
telephone speakers.

''All
1

C

Presidential Debate

John Meisburg of the Students for Kennedy speaks
out for his favored presidential candidate, Sen.
Robert Kennedy, at a debate Tuesday afternoon,
Six students represented candidates at the affair

Student

on the Student Center Patio. In conjunction, a
mock election is being conducted today. (See story
on page 7).

Bash-W- ith

Cops?

By CAROLYN WHEELER
"I didn't think this was a wagon when officers entered the
Several UK students, after very becoming way for police apartment.
their arrest at a noisy party, testi- to act," she said.
Three students were charged
fied in Police Court Monday that
One coed and her date, a with operating a "disorderly
the investigating officers "kissed sailor back from Vietnam, house." They were Charles Eda lot of girls."
charged thev saw an officer with ward Thiel, 20; Michael Kohlas,
But the 35 party goers still his arm around a girl and a can 20, and Michael David Heekin,
were fined $10 and costs on breach of beer in his hand.
21.
of peace charges.
Hollye Kroger, 21, Keeneland,
The police testified that some was the only one of the 35 stuPolice said they were called
three times to quiet the guests students climbed into the patrol dents who decided to appeal.
at the party in an apartment
at 256 Lyndhurst Place.

Testimony indicated that the

officers lost their uniform hats,
night sticks and chemical irritants when met by coeds on the
third call, about 1 a.m.
Everyone in the apartment
20 men and 15 coeds was arrested.

Bizer said the list of possible
conference
includes
speakers
President Lyndon Johnson, the
Rev. Ralph Abernathy, Cleveland Mayor Carl Stokes and entertainers Sammy Davis Jr., and
Marlon Brando. The only speaker
Partygoer Dana Lynn Frankel,
who has already accepted the 20, Holmes Hall, testified that
invitation is the Rev. Mr. Aber- the police were "kissing a lot

of the girls."

nathy.

Kernel Photo by Howard Mason

'Graduate's' Schedule

Dustin

Hoffman, Academy
Award nominee for his performance in "The Graduate," will
appear in Lexington Thursday
on behalf of Sen. Eugene McCarthy's candidacy for President.
Mr. Hoffman, who will arrive
at Blue Crass Field at 6:40 p.m.
Thursday, will be accompanied
by Sam Brown, McCarthy student campaign chairman in New
Hampshire and in Wisconsin.

Mr. Hoffman is scheduled to
speak at 7 p.m. in the sorority
row area before his 8 p.m. appearance in the Complex Cafeteria to appeal for student volunteers to work preceding the Indiana Primary on May 7.

UK students Ann Stewart and
Thad Jaracz will be Mr. Hoffman's hosts during his visit in

Lexington.

Becker And Rice To Head Kernel Next Year

Lee B. Becker, newly selected

Kernel, aneditor of the
nounced the appointment of his
staff Tuesday night before the
Board of Student Publications.
Darrell R. Rice, a junior journalism major now serving as an
19G8-C- 9

assistant managing editor, will
be the managing editor. He received the outstanding junior
journalist award at UK this year.
Guy Mendes, a sophomore
journalism major, will be the associate managing editor. Mendes

has been with the paper for two
years and has served as sports
editor and staff writer.
He was the recipient of last
year's outstanding freshman
award from Omicron Delta Kappa, senior men's honorary.
David H. Holwerk, a junior
in English will take over as editorial page editor. He has been
a columnist for the Kernel the

past two years.
Thomas E. Derr, a junior majoring in business management,
will Ik business manager and
will be assisted by advertising
salesman Mary Magee.
Becker selected to serve as

assistant managing editor Dana
Ewell, Terry Dunham, Chuck
Koehler, Uz Ward and Janice
Bather. Miss Ewell and Dun-

LA.

Li--

.

LEE BECKER
Editor-InChie-

f

s-

-

1

DARRELL RICE
Managing Editor

ham are currently working in
this capacity with the Kernel.
Other staff appointments are
James Miller, sports editor, and
edJoe Hinds,
itor. They currently hold tliese
positions.
Mendes will serve as the Ker

nel's summer editor, with Derr
as business manager during tlie

summer months.
Becker, a junior journalism
major, will take over as editor
in the fall. He has worked with
tlte Kernel a y
and

was an assistant managing editor last semester.
Becker will work for the Wichita Eagle during the summer

under the

pair's

internship

pro-

gram and now is working with
the Lexington Herald

1

r-l- s

rJ
J-

-

Kernel Photo by Howard Miwn

GUY MENDES
Associate Managing Editor

DAVID HOLWERK

Editorial Page Editor

* 2--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 21, 19f8

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 21,

1908- -.;

If

16- -

Kernel Photo by Dick Vare

UK President

Dr. John Oswald reviewed some 500 Army and Air
Force ROTC cadets Tuesday afternoon. He presented awards to
eight cadets, with the top honors going to senior. Army cadet
James E. Fegcnbush and to senior Air Force cadet Joseph J.
Farcht. The purpose of the review was to honor the President
and to allow him to observe the cadets' drill technique.

150 Suspended At KSC,
Including Student Leaders
By ROBERT F. BRANDT
Some 150 students at Kentucky State College in Frankfort have been expelled or indefinitely suspended due to their
"boycotting of classes and block-

ing the interests of the college,"
several KSC students and student
leaders report.
The students were "thrown

out" during their Easter vacation and told to appeal their

cases, they said. Meanwhile, they
are not allowed on state property
and have nowhere to live.
(KSC students asked that their
names not be used since many
are about to have appeal cases
brought up before the school's

administration.)

Classes were, let out early
for spring break at the college
in hopes the situation would
"cool down." Rioting and arson
had occurred on campus and
several buildings setNafire.
Four KSC students presently
are facing arson charges in Frankfort Police Court. An arson charge
against Joe Moore, a student,
was dropped Tuesday afternoon.
Among students who have
been suspended are the president

and the

of the

president-elec- t

KSC Student Government. Students claim there is'no student
leadership" because most of the
Student Government now is not
allowed on campus.

Several student leaders have
charged the administration with
"taking things into their own
hands," and prohibiting the right
"to due process."
Students would not speculate
on what would come of the situation, but said they were going
to the Kentucky Student Association for help.
"You can't use our names
(in this news story)," one student
said, "or they'll never let us
back on campus."
"The thing we are fighting,"
one student leader said, "is not
so much the fact that we were
suspended, but the way the administration went about it.
"They waited until we were
home on vacation," he said, and
then suspended us without any
consultation. We were informed
by letter.".
"Since we have returned, they
have blocked our entry onto the
campus by making it necessary
for us to get police permission
to go on state property."

Just o short drive South on

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The Kentucky Kjernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 40500. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4086.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

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1Q--

MID
Of

AND

MOOtkf

Moi

t ?DM

noowc

"Kin

* He Wouldn't Go Down
Audit's

...

one, two, three, let ole Hcrbie speak,

.3,

f7

You know wc don't give a damn,
Next stop is commie land.
And it's five, six, seven, open the Kremlin gates.

I ain't got. time to wonder why,
WHOOPEE!! We're all gonna die . . .
with apoligies to Country Joe and the Fish
Herbert Apthcker came and went with all the flourish of a limp
noodle. He was impressively brilliant in the way he handled his talk;
his rational explanation of the communist system had to impress all
those gathered. And strange to say, no one came away spouting the
Marxist doctrine, carrying the Red flag, or sporting a "better Red than
dead" lapel button.
His talk was no doubt a fine addition to the list of speakers appearing on campus this semester.
All the hoopla as an advance to his talk proved to be nothing
more than a decent public relations job to guarantee a nice crowd
at the gathering. What he said was important, and the fact that he is
a communist has nothing at all to do with the importance of his intellect.
That he was allowed to appear here is a feather in the cap of those
concerned, and to those people we offer our sincere thanks for not
who voiced so strong a criticism
listening to all those
of his appearance.
But most of all, we want to thank the world for people like Herbert
Aptheker, that brand of individual willing and able to keep firm their
belief in a cause. This is what's important, and this is what we so
need as an example on this campus.

w

I

anti-intellectu-

...

But They Tried

When the Student Center Board decided not to allow SDS to hold
a seminar with Dr. Herbert Aptheker Monday afternoon, they issued a
statement which blamed the cancellation on a "breakdown in communication between the two groups." But while there was a break
down in communication, the cancellation revealed things more important than the inability of the New Left and the student bureaucracy to cooperate.
It is clear that the Student Center Board does not understand
the nature of its own programs. Dr. Aptheker's visit was not a social
event, where the prime consideration was planning and execution of a
smoothly run program. Rather, his talk in the Student Center Ballroom
was an academic affair the presentation of an intellectual analysis
for the consideration of an interested, articulate audience.
Obviously, any appearance by Aptheker should have been handled
as an intellectual event, with the makeup of the audience open to those
members of the University community who desire to discuss and learn.
Unfortunately, the Student Center Board, unaccustomed to dealing with
the intellectual life of the University, decided it had to act as social
policeman and rap the hands of the wayward SDS. In the process
they also stepped on the spirit of free inquiry which is rare enough
around here as it is.

Abolish Women's Hours

"Wfien hopes and dreams are
loose in the streets, it is well for
the timid to lock doors, shutter
windows and lie low until the
wrath has passed. For there is
often a monstrous incongruity between the hopes, fwwever noble
and tender, and the action which
follows them. It is as if ivied
maidens and garlanded youths were
to herald tlxe four liorsemen of the
apocalypse. "
Eric lloffer
The semester is almost over,
but in the few remaining weeks
there is adequate time to do away
with the restrictive and bothersome
rules regarding women's hours. The
necessary steps should be taken
by the administration immediately
and those steps are the complete
abolition of sophomore, junior
and senior hours, and freshmen
hours for those with written parental consent. Away with the double
standard. Men have no hours.
Dormitory women are plagued with
a sign-osheet that continually
serves as a reminder of unjust
Is this
University restrictions.
equality?
Dormitory buildings are obviously a service offered by the
University to students. It would
ut

be an impossibility for 15,000 students from all over the state, nation, and world to find close-binexpensive, and comfortable housing each year. But women's hours
is not part of that service. Rather
it is an abridgment of student
freedoms. They are restrictions that
for people of the same age group,
exist not in the world outside the
University's territory.
We suggest that the Administration cooperate fully in granting
to women the same privileges concerning hours that it grants to men
dormitory residents. The day of
blind obedience to unfair, unnecessary restrictions is over. Students are fully aware that they
have been fourth class citizens, and
if it ultimately becomes necessary
to form protest marches after
"hours," march on the Administration Building, or just plain make
noise in order to eliminate hours,
then judging from the results of
the student power movement rapidly gathering support on American
college campuses, these methods
will surely be used.
Therefore, the wisest move on
the part of the Administration is
to work on removing these "hour"
rules so mat by this fall there
will be none.
y,

"W atch out for dis guy's jabbing accusations,
and low deals!"

cut-dow-

ns

ifciXv:

Kernel Forum: the readers write
To the Editor of the Kernel:
The recent outburst of
behavior in Donovan Hall brings to light
a great paradox. Today's college students
are readily taking on an image as the
d
intellects and
individuals of
both the world of today and the world
of tomorrow. They are presumed to be
somewhat sophisticated as compared to
unfortugoers. It
nate that many individuals in this university cannot live up to their presumed
position.
Why must a Jew, or for that matter,
anyone, be persecuted? Why can't the
supposedly
college students
learn to take people for what they are?
Too often, people tend to have too many
preconceptions because a given individual
is of a certain denomination. Stereotyping
and discrimination are problems which
must be overcome in order to have an
adequate understanding between people
of all backgrounds. If we, the educated,
cannot overcome these problems, then
what can we expect of the rest of the
world?
Richard N. Levy
anti-semit- ic

open-minde-

non-colle-

well-inform-

Freshman

To the Editor of the Kernel:
A winner speaks out: after
sitting
meetthrough the portion of the
ing that was open to the public I was
convinced that the Student Covemnent
elections should be held again.
But, tliis one point sltould be made
very clear The act of not recognizing
the past election results was not stimulated by the wrong actions of any of
the people participating in any of the
elections, but it is being held again
because of the faults of the election
committee, and it is also true that these
mistakes of the election committee were
not planned but accidental.
Every person in the election was jeopardized equally. We sltould not be glad
that there is going to be another election,
but glad that the faults of the present
system were so excitedly brought to light.
I hope that everyone will run
again
in the next election, perhaps more, for
it is clear that great help is needed in
the "locked student government office
under the stqs of the Student Center."
I also feel that the past election results, though not to be recognized, were
accurate samplings sltowing who the students wanted to head their government.
Otto Daniel Wolff
A fit S Sophomore
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Foster Cvkernun, campaigning in the
tme Kentucky political tradition, has

lashed out against taking a stand on one
of the most important issues confronting
this nation, while, at the same time,
bringing up a lesser issue that he hopes
will bring him votes.
He has criticized a Senatorial candidate for making Vietnam an issue. If
Vietnam is not an issue for a United
States Senatorial candidate, then what
is?

He then draped himself in the American flag which seems to have become
common in Kentucky politics and lashed
out at a student organization at the University for having ideas different than he
believes his voting constituency to have.
True he claims he is for free sjx'ech, but
this attack is just an appeal to the
the Communist witch-hun- t
phithat seems to now be reaching
losophy
Kentucky almost twenty y ears late.
If Foster Ockerman thinks he has the
qualifications to be a United States Senator, then he had better study the Vietnam
issue and be able to make intelligent comments on it.
If Foster Ockerman thinks he has the
qualifications to be a United States Senator, then he had better have the courage
to stand up to Kentuckians and tell them
that there is no longer a Communist
threat, instead of just courting the status
quo.
If Foster Ockerman thinks he has the
qualifications to be a United States Senator, then let him lead the X'ople of Kentucky in solving the real problem of race,

leace, etc., insteadofallowingthemtouse
their energies on mythical problems (Communist conspiracy) that do not exist.
If Foster Ockerman thinks he has the
qualifications to be a United States Senator, then let him be a leader of intellect
rather than a ixIiticiaii in the past Kentucky tradition.
Bill Prebble
EDITOR'S NOTE: Jerry lucre's name
was inadvertently omitted.
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I realize that
journalism majors are
not required to have a minor in mathematics, but I would still hoi that they
should le able to count to 16 or even
to 20. In an article pretending to list
the "16 representatives elected" to the
Student Coverninent (Kernel, April 17,
page 3), only 15 names were given. "Among
the 20 unsuccessful candidates" were 21
names.
Seriously, I woukl like to know vtho
the 16th representative is.
John Strange
Engineering Senior

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, April 21,

1968-

-5

'Kernel Forum: the readers write

To the Editor of the Kernel:
In light of the staggering statistics
with w hich we are constantly bombarded,
one cannot but be appalled by the grossly
unbalanced government spending on
foreign affairs in general and on the
Vietnam conflict in particular. The figures
of government foreign expenditures and
defense expenditures are in themselves astounding, but when one sees
them in the light of factors of immediate
national interest such as the alarming
rise in crime, the growing racial unrest,
and the degrading effects of poverty, it
is time that the realization were reached
that the time has come to act. While
our leaders quibble over some "far reaching political ideology" which they fear
as a threat to our nation, they are virtually turning their backs on internal problems which are devouring our nation
nowl An equally shocking fact is that
not only the government officials, but
the average citizen seem either oblivious
to or unconcerned with these problems.
In the city of Los Angeles, during
an average week, more than 2,500 major
crimes are committed. Twenty-fiv- e
women
are raped, four citizens are murdered,
190 others are beaten, knifed or shot,
153 robberies are reported, 445 cars are
stolen 637 larcenies involving $50 or more
are committed and 1076 housebreakings
are recorded; all in one short week!
Police chief Thomas Reddin cites the
following reason: "We need 10,000 men,
but we can't even fill our authorized
strength of 5383." While the nation's
crime rate is growing six times faster
than the imputation, a national survey
of 36 major police departments disclose
that not one is up to authorized strength,
and U.S. Assistant Attorney General Fred
Vinson, Jr. puts the national police shortage at 50,000. We ask why, but the answers are really quite simple. While our
government is spending billions of dollars in Vietnam and in other foreign
nations, patrolman in Dixon, Tennessee,
start out at $2,400 per year; in Durant,
Oklahoma at $2,760; and in Clasgow,
Kentucky at $3,000. In Seattle a cable
splicer earns $375 a month more than
policeman and on and on it goes.
This past summer saw massive racial
revolt take place in several of our large
cities. In the wake of this revolution,

hundreds of thousands of dollars damage
was done and many lives were lost. This
summer will surely see new outgrowths of
this situation as slum conditions worsen.
The degrading condition of the ghetto
and slum areas breeds unrest violence,
crime, and finally riot and revolt.
But instead of channeling portions of
to correct these
money and
man-pow-

To the Editor of the Kernel:
We should take a hard look at some
of these professors who are teaching our
young people. Perhaps the
Activities Committee will do that job for
us. Let's speculate on how it might work.
I think that when it really gets underway
the cleanness of the sweep may be in
direct proportion to the number of committee members, because each individual
may have different ideas on what is

Perhaps the first committee member
to speak will suggest that we got rid of
the Communists on campus because they
are atheistic, and America is founded upon
a belief in Cod. The next committee mem-le- r
suggests the Birchers must go because
the methods they advocate for attaining
Thetwo
their objectives are
committee members then accuse each
The charges
other of being
are heard and supjwrted by the full committee; both memlers are expelled and
replaced by new appointees.
Another member makes a motion that
beCatholics be declared
cause of allegiance to a foreign pope.
Motion carries. The single Catliolic member of the committee files a minority report. He then moves that Baptists be
because they long
declared
opposed the American ideal of equality
of opportunity for all races, and they
will not accept federal funds for their
colleges. The Baptists on the committee
object, saying that it is nost American
to maintain the separation of church
and state. The Catholic then points out
that nothing in the constitution calls
for a wall between church and state,

appalling conditions, the government's
solution is to remove the Negro and
white from these surroundings
and send him overseas to die for its
idealistic goals.
Closely related to racial unrest, but
not confined to cities, is the
condition of many white and Negro families living in small towns and niral areas.
One is really amazed to know that in
a country so rich that billions upon billions of dollars can be spent in foreign
countries for the relief of poverty, a
man can be stmck down in the peak
of his earning years as a "blue-collworker" with a chronic illness and his
wife be forced to find work paying twenty-fiv- e
dollars a week with which she must
support a family of seven children. Can
we as a society be so blind that we
cannot see our own problems for looking
at those of others?
In the words of Jesus as recorded in
the 23rd chapter of Matthew, verses 25
through 26(in Today's English Version):
". . . You clean the outside of your cup
and plate, while the inside is full of
things you have gotten by violence and

referred to President Johnson as a stupid,
old man who is not with us. In the same
breath Mr. Stacey told us his father could
not understand him; that his father, like
President Johnson was from another generation and not with us.
I would like to know what is
being
"with us," who is "us," and just what
is it that they or we believe. I wonder
if Mr. Stacey is not assuming a lot if
he presumes he speaks for this generation.
I strongly suspect that when Mr.
Stacey
grows up, or shall I say matures, he will
find that his father and President Johnson are wise old men after all and that
their age does not make them so terribly
different from our generation. Of course,
I could be wrong. I am still learning.
Another of the speakers was Mr. John
Lansdale, an economics major who has
been quite outspoken in support of the
war in Vietnam. Mr. Lansdale is not the
best public speaker I have ever heard
and I was never completely sure of w hat
he was advocating. His main point seemed
to be that of admonishing the various
antiwar groups and the way in which
they express their views or opinions.
Oddly enough, both Mr. Stacey and
Mr. Lansdale, although supporting opposite sides of the Vietnam argument,
were very similar in many ways. Both
appeared to be interested in only a small
part of the war and they had a very
narrow view of the war. Again, both Mr.
Stacey and Mr. Lansdale continually contradicted themselves when questioned and
were not sure of their argument. They
were unable to prove or disprove anything.
Last, but most impressive and convincing of the three speakers was Dr.
Jacobs, Marine Colonel in the Reserve
and Professor of American Literature at
UK. Dr. Jacobs did not badger the class
jwith his opinions. He merely offered a
lew facts about why the United States
is in Vietnam, the situation we are in
and what result complete pull-oin
Vietnam would have on the United States.
By comparison, Dr. Jacobs illustrated to
me how very narrow is the outlook and
the extent of knowledge which Mr. Stacey
and Mr. Lansdale possess about the war.
I am sure I will be considered apathetic
by many intellectuals and many readers
of the Kernel but I am taking a "middle
of the road" stand. At the end of this
series of lectures I continue to have faith
in the American system of government.
That is, the people elect public officials
and they in turn function i