xt7vdn3zt223 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vdn3zt223/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19201022  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 22, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 22, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7vdn3zt223 section xt7vdn3zt223 Best Copy Available

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

1

LEXINGTON. KY., OCT. 22, 1920

VOL. XL

KENTUCKY

DOCTOR M'VEY ATTENDS

LEST YE FORGET

Best Wishes of University Men Follow
Centre to New England.

Educational Meeting is Held
During Inauguration of
President Burton.

Y

President McVey has returned from
a trip to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where
he attended an educational conference
at the University of Michigan, during
the Inauguration of President Burton.
At this conference speakers who were
representatives of the best educational
thought, discussed some of the present
day problems and difficulties In modern education.
Emphasis was brought to bear on
the necessity of bringing Into the pursuit of the courses of study the same
energy and purpose that students show
in campus activities, the idea being to
secure earnestness of purpose and to
secure a higher type of and better educated graduates.
The representatives were entertained at the 'Michigan Union, a building
erected by the alumni of Michigan at
a coat of $1,300,000. It is used as a
club by the students and faculty. It
lounging rooms,
conitalns cafeterias,
billiard rooms, dancing halls, and
everything that goes to make a perfect community house. In speaking
of thds building Doctor McVey said:
"We need a building Of this kind here.
It would, be of great benefit to the
students and faculty."

Final Registeration

Served.
Officers were elected and plans made
regularly at least
once a month at the meeting of the
Louisville club last Monday afternoon
in the Little Theatre.
The meetings
will be social In nature and will probably be held In the now Stroller room
or the Y. M. C. A. rooms. The next
meeting will bo at 3:45 p. m November 3. Refreshments will be served.
The purpose of the club is to bring
together the students from Louisville
and to foster a cooperation between
the University and the students in the
high schools of Louisville.
The following officers were elected:
president,, Robt. J. Raible, Arts, '21;
vice president, Mary Elizabeth James,
Arts, '22; secretary, Katherine Weak- ley, Arts '21; treasurer, Horace Clay
Miller, Eng. '23.
An assessment of twenty-fiv- e
cents
was declared to pay for the refreshments at the meetings.
to hold meetings

!

LEGAL FRATERNITY
PLEDGES NEW MEN

Phi Alpha Delta, the honorary law
fraternity, which was reorganized on
Junior Women
the campus last year after an absenco
of several yours, has pledged a numAll Junior women should soo Fanber of men and will continue to take nie Holler at once for Information
an important part in the activities in cards to be filled out for the 1921
the College of Law.
The pledges are: Noal Sullivan,
Jack Hewitt. It. P. Hagan, It. S. Hayes,
H. I. Stewart, A. L. Ashby and Sam

Centre-Harvar-

j

d

j

t;

Cole.

WATSON ANNOUNCES SUBSCRIPTION

necosfiry that the fraternity

Could you use $2.00? Of course, then get to work and win tho Kentucklan
contest,
subscription
which starts Monday. Twenty Dollars in Gold will bo given to tho one who gets tho most subscriptions
for Tho Kentucklan. A second prize of $10.00 will bo awarded tho one who comes next In the race,
and a Kentucklan will be given tD every ono who sells more than fltty . Subscription blanks may bo
obtained from Fred Houston-Shaor C. V. Wat3on, In tho Kentucklan room, in tho basement of tho
Library building.

The chapter of Phi Alpha Delta was
established at the University of Kentucky In 1911, but duo to the fact
that itho entire chapter enlisted in the
service in the spring of 1917, It was
bo re-

established last year.
The members of the actlYO chapter
are: R. H. Tomllnson, Clyde Burton.
M, K. Eblen. Dlllard Tumor, Milton
Itevill, Berl Boyd and Carl Lipo.

I

at

e

CONTEST FOR 1921 ANNUAL

AMATEUR

T

PRIZES FOR BEST ACTS

j

The chapel i3 already jumping up
and down and clapping its hands in
expectancy, for it realizes that its happiest holiday, Amateur Night, is close
at hand. She knows that at 8 o'clock,
Saturday, October 30, she will open
her arms and welcome many to her
annual celebration.
Milton Revlll, president of the Strollers, and Herndon Evans, stage manager, have already received several applications from prospective actors,
who would like to contribute to the
festivity of the evening. Application
slips may be procured at the post office and must be filled aut and handed
in before noon, Monday, October 25.
The bulletin board in front of the
Administration building will announce
Tuesday. The
the dates of
s
six best acts presented at
will
be chosen for public performance, Saturday, October 30, when a prize of $5
will be awarded for the best single
act and another for the best doublo
try-out- s

I

Reaches a Total

REGISTERED

Would Be Strollers Must
Send in Applications
by Monday.

in-

Kentucky, held its first meeting Monday, October 18.
A temporary chairman was selected
to ask forsuggestlons In regard to the
further development of the Order. A
REPRESENTATIVE GO-Ebox party at the Ada Meade has been
planned for Thursday, October 21.
WILL BE CHOSEH FRIDAY
Other forms of entertainment were
arranged, such as smokers and dinners, the dates of which are to be anKentuckians" to Be nounced later.
The "Fish" present were: Earl WalSpecial
Selected
lace, Raymond Ctonnell, Bruce Fuller,
Chapel Next Week
John McKenzIe, Larry Thompson,
Baron Faulconer, James Server, W. D.
NEW PLANS THIS YEAR Thompson, Authur Shanklin, Irvin
Scrlbner, Curtis Benjamin, Ed. Gregg
The contest to select the "Fair Ken- Richard Hagan, Charles Bourland
tuckians" for this year's annual will and Homer Baker.
be held In the chapel Friday, October 29. It has aliways been either a
beauty or a popularity contest, buc CORRECTION IN LIST OF
this year will be neither and yet both. FRATERNITY PLEDGES
In other words .the most beautiful
girl, the most popular girl, the cutest,
Due to a typographical error the
best, most stylish and most talented
list of the pledges of the Sigma Alpha
girl in school will be voted on, and
Epsilon and Delta Chi fraternities
In this way the most representative
were confused in the last issue of The
group of University girls will be reKernel. A correct list is given below:
presented in the Kentucklan.
Delta Chi
O. R. Lancaster, Georgetown; John
Wireless To Receive
W. Cook, 'Smith Grove; Sam Martin,
Cambridge Results Millersburg; C. A. Carter, Wm. Worth-ingtoLexington; A. C. Bottoms,
When Centre and Harvard clash to- Lawrenceburg; J. A. Dobbs, Morgan-town- ;
morrow the results will be heralded
Galvin Lisman, Dixon; H. C.
far and wide. First in everything as Hoffman. Carrolton; D. A. Wolfe,
usual the University will use the new- Georgetown; P. B. Rouse, Paducah; L.
est way of receiving the results and R. Ringo, Owensboro; L. T. Smith,
wJU announce them on Stoll Field durBowling Green.
game.
ing the Kentucky-SewaneSigma Alpha Epsilon
The University wireless station in
Cresap Hays, Ellzabethtown; Flem
the Civil and Physics Building will Clardy, Hopkinsville; Henry S. Jackreceive the news df it ds possible to son, Franklin; John Albright, Mt. Verget In touch with the messages sent non; Earl Martin, Greenville; Edward
out from Cambridge and those attend- Byars, Ledtchfleld; E. E. Slier, Wiling the game here will have first hand liamsburg;
Tom
Hall, Henderson;
Information of two great contests. The John Dundon, Paris; A. T. Rice, Paris.
game between Kentucky and Sewanee
will hold the Interest of the South,
MEN TO SUE
while the eyes of the entire country SERVICE
will bo focused on the
At a meeting of the Executive Comargument.
mittee of tho Board of Trustees ot
the University with a committee
SOPHOMORE CLASS
representing the former service men
ELECTS OFFICERS it was decided that in order to obtain a judicial interpretation of the
The Sophomore class meeting, call- Scholarship law the service men
ed for the election of officers was should file suit in the Court of Appeals.
Suit will bo brought at once accordheld at 3:30 o'clock, October 14, In
chapel. The names of the nominees ing to Raymond Rodgers, chairman of
had been posted on the bulletin board the service men's committee.
In the Main building the previous
The points at Issue are: should the
week. The following officers were University pay room rent of the men
elected, secret ballot being used: L. u. to whom scholarships wero granted,
nnd should those applications be grantRingo, president; Louise Connell,
Katharine Conroy, secre- ed, which were filed after August 20,
1920.
tary; A. B. Cammack, treasurer.

"Fair

Social Meetings Will Be Held Regularly; Refreshments to Be

With a total of 1,233 students, registration at the University of Kentucky
is twenty per cent larger this year
than ilt has ever been.
Of the 1,233 students who have registered, 12 have left school for various
reasons, leaving at present a student
body which numbers 1221. Of those
enrolled, 798 are men and 398 are
women. There are 19 students in the
graduate school.
The enrollment is divided among the
colleges of the University as follows:
.College of Arts and Science 519.
College of Agriculture 2G2.
College of Engineering 323.
Ccfllege of Law 73.

"The Royal Order of Fish," an

DS

ELECTS OFFICERS

of 1,233.

FOR

terfraternlty society which was organized last year for the purpose of
promoting better comradeship among
the fraternities at the University of

re-re- ad

LOUISVILLE CLUB

STUDENTENROLLMENT
EXCEEDS ALL RECORDS

SKITS ARE

Society Makes Plans
Interfraternlty
For the Ensuing Year.

The campus philosopher pauses to remark:
It is a good time for the
the
Freshmen to
Senior Rules. Remember
Frosh, that ignorance of
the law excuses no one.

Tomorrow afternoon at Cambridge,
Massachusetts,
the Centre College
eleven will meet .the Harvard aggregation in what promises to be one of
the greatest games that has ever been
played. What the result will be no
one can tell, but one thing is certain
and that is the Colonels will fight to
the last mfoute to bring victory to
the Bluegrass State.
Although outweighed Centre has a
faster team than Harvard and boasts
and
the service of two
one of the greatest full backs of all
times. McMillan, Weaver and Roberts
will cause the wearers of the crimson
to use every bGt of energy and strategy they can muster to stop them and
even then It is doubtful if they will
succeed. Centre has a wonderful team
and although she has engaged in no
real tames this year it is plain to be
seen that the Danville team has the
ability to cope with any team in the
count ry.
The students of the University of
Kentucky are behind the Centre team
and wish the Colonels success in their
eastern venture. It will mean a great
deal to Kentucky to have a team from
this state trounce the New Englanders
and show the world that the East la
not the only section" of the country
where real football teams are found.

GUEST AT UNION

ROYAL ORDER OF
FISH REORGANIZE

STUDENTS

BEHIND THE COLONELS

No. 4

i
j

try-out-

'act.

Freshmen, if the glamor of the footlights and the thrill of applause does
not spur you on to ambition, perhaps
the love of cbntest or even the need of
an extra meal ticket may goad you to
an effort. If you are afraid to try the
rocky road to fame alone and are a
disbeliever In the adage, "he travels
fastest," persuade a friend to let you
act as butler, maid, coachman or whatnot, in his skit. You will then be
classed as one in a double act. Of
course If you win the prize, you will
then have but the price of a meal instead of the whole ticket, but you may
be a member of the Strollers, "Which,
after all, Is the point."

"K" BANNER IS
STILL MISSING
Students are Urged to Aid in Finding
of Kentucky's Standard.
What has become of the "K" banner? Many and varied have been the
theories.
The banner disappeared
from view some time after the football season last year and as yet has
not put In Its appearance this year.
Perhaps some thoughtful person took
It home to care for it during the summon Perhaps some ono took It to
decorate his room or fraternity house.
At any rate It Is missed at tho football games and rallies.
Every ono Is urged to assist In locating the banner. It has been missed
on every occasion. If you know the
thoughtful person who took it homo
to care for It, but who was not
thoughtful enough to return It, pleaso
remind him that It Is needed. If someone took it merely for a selfish purpose, reason with him g'ehtly butt
firmly.
Imagine our team on foreign fields
without tho encouraging sight of the
old "K" banner.
What can take Us
place on our own field? Get behind
every ono and help locate our sacred
emblem. Tho success of every rally,
every parade nnd every game depends
upon its return.

I

* Best Copj
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
FRESHMEN
GIVEN

BY

ENTERTAINED

UNIVERSITY AT ROTARY

CLUB

LUNCH

Teachers Will Be Given In- College Men Assured of Aid
struction by Department
of Business Men ; Tigert
of Extension.
Makes Talk.
STUDY AT HOME

members of the
classes of the University of Ken- tucky and Transylvania College wero
guests of the Rotary Club at
cheon Thursday,
After the meal the members of the
club assured tho now collegians that
tho business men of Lexington not
only heartily welcomed them but wore
ready to extend every possible aid
during their college careers.
Tho speakers wero 'Introduced by
Rotarlan J. W. Porter, chairman of the
of the
day. The acknowledgments
guests were made by Professor John
J. Tlgert, of the University of Ken- tucky, and Coach Jim Park, of Transylvania. Talks on "What I Know
About Fresmen" iwere delivered by
Rotarians Ed. Bassett and Sam Halley.
The Freshmen present at the uncli-eowere: R. K. Lawton, Robert Tylds-leHenry Stephens, C. F. Smith, Elliott Wllkson, Irving Rlgdon, J. R.
Snyder, Stewart Singer, Robert Miller,
C. B. iShacklette, Coleman Arnold, Raymond Clark, John S. Shon, Robert B.
Clem, Samuel Smith, Jr., John C. Ar- nold, Frank P. Unkenberg, R. W. Mc-tBee, C. Anderson, Hugh Williams, J.
W. Cumm'ack, C. H. Wolfe, G. W.
ner, Weber IClark, T. C. Clardy, New-hig- h
ton Field, Robert Vanarsdall, J. E.
True, Milton Hall, John Blair, John
Perryman, R, Cross, Marion Insko,
Witcliff Moore, C. M. Sander, G. C.
Brown, Alfred Sturgess, Henry Campbell, Ed. Wiley, Millard Wilson, Robert Miller, Sam Martin, Harvey Baker,
C. L. Barnhart, W. C. Borders, George
Bradley, J. G. Burrows, E. B. Cartmell,
A. L. Cooper, D. H. Con, George B.
Elliott, Jay E. Evans, E. Ri Fryer,
Orris Gearhart, G. Keene Gray, Len
M. Griffin, Burt V. Halbert, Zack S.
Logan, Charles L. Martin, Elgin Powell, Paul Clifford Powell, Mark T. Rat- liff, Rigdon K. Ratllff, W. Bennett
Roach, Vivian O. Robertson, Thomas
J. Shepherd, Francis J. Simmons,
bur B. Sloan, J. B. Stevens, William C.
Stevens, Garnett L. Tiller, Edmund H.
Taylor, J. Myron Woolery.
Sovonty-fiv-

The General Assembly of the State
of Kentucky at the session of 1920,
an act requiring the public
school teachers of the State of Ken-tucky to prepare themselves In high
school subjects. Realizing tho dlfflcul- ties facing the teachers In meeting the
requirements of that act, and realiz-lug at tho snme time the Immense
problem Involved In keeping the
schools going and at tho same time
preparing the teachers In high school
subjects, the University of Kentucky
after due deliberation, and after re- celving the approval of the State
Superintendent of Schools, tasked the
Attorney General of the State if there
wore any legal difficulties in the way
of the University's offering extension
courses 'in high school subjects. On
receipt of an opinion to tho effect that
there are no legal difficulties involved,
University has decided to announce
a full four year high school course.
For Whom Intended.
In offering this course, it is not the
purpose of the University in any way
come Into competition with high
schools or other institutions doing
Pupils attending
work.
school will not be admitted to
these courses without the specific
consent of the superintendent, principal, or other school officer of the
school where he Is supposed to attend. Teachers in the service, or
others who for any reason cannot attend their own schools will be admitted to the courses.
Credit.
Full entrance credit toward entrance
to the University Will be given for
these courses, the amount of credit
being indicated in connection with
each course.
The courses will be prepared by the
regular lUniverslty faculty and the
various departments of the University
will mark the papers of the
students, so that the student will come
into immediate contact with the professors In the various departments of
the University.

1

1

Books.

o

n

o

iPassenger

The courses outlined in ithe various
high school subjects will be based on

Porter

As Usual.
Is it raining, Porter?

No, it is raining water!

the text books adopted by the State
for high course for which the student registers
Text Book .Commission
must be completed within one year
schools.
The student will furnish his own from the date of registration. In cases
books. The University will furnish a of unavoidable delay the time may be
printed list of tho books with the extended but specific permission must
names of the publishers. These may be obtained from the University.
Each assignment in a course will be
be purchased from a local book store
themselves. the equivalent of one week's work.
,or from the publishers
The University does not deal in books Each full course will therefore be outthirty-siassignments.
in
and cannot undertake to furnish them lined
r
Courses extending over a
to students.
Each student who enrolls will All will be outlined in eighteen assignout an application blank for high ments.
Fees.
school subjects furnished by the UniIt is not the purpose of the Unlver- versity. On receipt of such applica- iion blank and the required fee, the sity to make money on these courses
University will forward to the student hut rather to offer the service on the
the beginning assignments for the lowest possible working basis. There
particular course for which the student .will be a uniform fee of $7.00 charged
for each year course and $5.00 for each
registers.
half year course.
Examinations.
A student should not enroll for more
Students will not bo required to report at tho University for examina- than two courses at a time. Where
tions on completion of tho course. The tho student has plenty of spare time,
county superintendent of schools or however, it is possible that he can
other school officer In tho county may complete four courses in a year.
Certificates of completion will be
hold examinations and certify to the
University that tho examination was given on completion of one year's
held in accordance with tho rules and work, and again on tho completion of
regulations published by tho Univer--; tho second, third, and fourth years
sity for tho eonduct of such oxamlna-- respectively
Students may register at any time,
tions. In all cases, the examining of
ficer must be acceptable to the Uni- but courses will not bo ready for distribution beforo December 1, 1920.
versity.
correspondence
Then subjects offered Include: EngStudents taking
courses in high school subjects may lish literature, American literature,
register at any lt1mq. As a rule, rhetoric and composition, grammar,
paper's are marked throughout tho English classics, elementary and Inyear. It is possible that some courses termediate algebra, plane and solid
may bo suspended during the summor geometry; first, second, third and
fourth year Latin; Amorlcan history,
months. In bucIi cases, students
general history, civics; general agriing the course will bo notified.
Tho student may proceed as rapidly culture, general science, physiography
as he wishes with a course, but each; and household arts.
x

half-yea-

Prof. Miller's Book
Given Commendation
In a recent issue of the American
Journal of Science Professor Charles
Schuchert of Yale University gave a
review of Professor Arthur M. Miller's
book on tho "Geology of Kentucky."
Professor Miller is nt the head of
tho Department
of Geology and
Forestry of this University.
In his article Professor Schuchert
years
said: "As a result of twenty-fiv- e
of local endeavor, Professor Miller
of tho University of Kentucky describes tho essential geology of his
State." Complimenting Professor Miller's book he said: "This book will
do much good In spreading a correct
knowledge of geology throughout Kentucky, and will serve as a reference
work for Amorlcan geologists. We
congratulate
the author upon the
successful conclusion of this his favorite study and his long labor of lovo
for his fellow citizens.

Serviceable Clothing

Made the Justright Way
At Lower Prices
We are showing a splendid
assortment of distinctively
new and smart patterns in
high grade service giving
woolens for Fall and Winter
at prices that will appeal to
College men who want to
save money.

MISS WHERRY ADDRESSES
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

Miss Pauline Wherry gave a talk on
social service work at a reception
given by Prof. M. A. Cassidy Thursday
afternoon at Senior High Sschool in
honor of tho teachers of the Lexington
public schools.

We call your special attention to a line of

Serviceable Wool

CLASSICAL CLUB
IS REORGANIZED

Worsteds
that

always dependable
The Classical Club was reorganized
fabric which will .give you
in the Y. M. C. A. rooni3 last Wednesday. Brief autobiographical sketches
the maximum amount of
of the members were given In lieu of
wear.
formal introductions.
The following
officers were elected: E. E. Slier, presiCome and let us show you these patdent; Pauline Hogg,
terns. Remember we guarantee you
Elizabeth Ellis, secretary-treasurer- ;
a perfect fit and absolute satisfaction.
Florence Edmonds was named press
agent.
Although it was the club's first
meeting a very Interesting program
had been arranged. John Davis, a graduate of 1920 and winner of the Rhodes'
" We
You "
Scholarship, gave an Instructive talk
on the founder of the Rhodes'
Lexington, Ky.
145 West Main St.
Scholarship, and what he has already
learned In advance about the University at Oxford, England. Lucy
gave readings from the immortal words of Socrates.
At the conclusion of the program
THE CADEN DRUG COMPANY
delightful refreshments were served,
and the meeting was adjourned.
TASTE OF THE COLLEGE
REMEMBERED THE DISCRIMINATING
The Classical Club is designed
primarily to promote scholarship in
STUDENT IN CARRYING WHITMAN'S.
the Latin and Greek department. This
club promises to be one of the Hvest
organizations on the campus.

Justright Tailoring Co.

r

Fit

Whit-wort-

h

A WAY TO SAVE MONEY!

3,300 REGISTER AT YALE
Yale University opened its 220th
year with an enrollment of 3,300 students, which Is one of the largest
ever recorded. This year for tho first
time in the history of the institution
the Freshman classes of Yale College
and the Sheffield Scientific School
have been united under one

THE STORE THAT

Five Dollars on Each Club Enrollment.

Becker's Pressing Club
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Available
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
LAW JOURNAL WILL

QUIRREL

FOOD
Ode to the Bed Bug.
(Written in tho handwriting of a
girl' and signed, "Anonymous").
Tho bed bug Is a friend of mlno
For ho bites mo both before and behind.
When In tho dark I Ho awake,
Ho comes to mo for food to take.
Note We can't print tho rest' hero.
It will bo road privately on request.

Organ of Kentucky
Association.

Official

Bar

Freshmen, It will cause you to
Ineligible to play football next
season.
c'cr.vn,

bo

cooked dinner all
by myself and you never said a word
nbout It.'
He "I know dearest, but I hate to
bo always complaining.
I

typesetter made a mistake

Terrell Now when a man sees n
and Instead of saying "Many years of cow out iln the moonshine
and thinks
uninterrupted bliss" ho wrote "Many
it Is a ghost, what Is that?"
years of uninterrupted bills.
Hukle "Too much moonshine."
Was ho right?
I

Lavln got left In Cincinnati last Saturday and came over to Oxford in a
taxi. He drove up to the curb and let
Farquhar "There are two sides to the driver assist him to descend. Watevery question, why I could almost son paid the bill and immediately
make a good speech for the Democra- Dobbio walked over to a group of girls,
tic party."
real pretty. Well you ought to have
seen them, they acted like Wallace
"Speak low If you speak love."
Reid had come to town.

publication of tho Kentucky Law
Journal will bo resumed this year,
uiiniig me msi mree years us ap
pearance has been Irregular on account of the unusual condltlona arising as n result of tho war. Tho re- organization of tho Journal Is
... .,, rn,.
comctl ,)V a tho
,oso of Law nn(1 by mombora of tho
bar throughout the State.
The Kentucky Law Journal will appear as a quarterly this year, the first
issue bearing tho date of November
15, and the last the date of June 1.
Dlliard Turner, graduate student In
tho College of Law, has been elected
He will bo assisted by
George Gallop, Clyde Burton and Berl
Boyd.
H. W. Sullivan wna elected
business manager, and Prof. William
Goblc will serve as faculty advisor.
For several years the Kentucky Law
Journal, published by the students of
the College of Law of the University
of Kentucky has been accepted by the
Kentucky Bar Association as the .
official organ of that organization. I,
Articles for the varidus issues are
written by the ablest lawyers In the
State, by the members of the Court
of Appeals and by the faculty of the
University.

you nrc really critical of clothes

you will want to

"Do right and fear no man."
"Don't write and fear no woman.'

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Clothes for Younger Men

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smart lines and latest
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editor-in-chie-

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"

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CALLOWAY'S
FCOTEALL SUPPLIES, SWEATERS, KOADAKS

ALASI

I

Where are the ears of yesterday;
Her hair has hid them all away.
ears, I once adored,
Those shell-likIn whose pink curves my woes I
poured.
She, (protestingly) "Don't do that."
j
Honors-garde- n
He, "Why .dearest, don't you crave To hairy wads I cannot pray
Where are the ears of yesterday? ! !
"Whs your
a success last affections?"
year?"
She, "Yes, but don't you think this Someone, I think, should interfere,
"Decidedly, my neighbor's chickens rather public?"
Lest other features disappear.
Next year, perhaps, eyes will be gone
took first prize at the poultry show."
Then chins, then noses won't be worn,
Little girl with golden hair
Until regretfully we say
"She has a wonderful face, she cer Ruby Hps and darlin' eyes,
tainly would make Mack Bennett a
Where Is the face of yesterday?
Little girl, I'll say you're there
world of money!"
But I long to kn'ow the why.
Paul E. Dixon, '15, is meeting with
"Mack Sennett does not care about
If the price of rouge should rise
success in the practice of law at
their faces."
If peroxide took a jump
'
Bowling Green. He has offices in the
Tell me, tell me, angel eyes
Warnlng- - Don't let the girls get you Would your beauty take a slump?
Cook building.
Trip to Market Ends at Alter Head
line Nevertheless It will have to be
resumed.

If

sec the newest styles in

estate."

I won't get cold In the winter for
sit between Cook and Burnham.

Is

PUBLICATION

OUncial announcement
has boon
lmide by the College of Law that tho

Deeds Count.
Don't they know that they cannot
"Wlinil n mnn rnnrfa n wnmnti U ta
communicate with Mars unless they rfecdg ilmt count nQt won,g ,,
nouiy ncr 10 uo on mu iuok out ior
"Yes, and especially if they are real
the signal.
A certain

RESUME

e

DEVELOPING

AND PRINTING

46 West Main Street

Lexington, Kentucky

.

College Men"
We take this opportunity to

extend you a hearty welcome

return to Lexington.
To you men who have patronized us in the past, we
wish to express our sincere
appreciation and an earnest
assurance that we will offord
you even better service now,
if favored with your business. And you new men !
Come, in, and let's get acquaintedWe would enjoy
serving you also.
on your

fashions
newest
Suits
Overcoats

Hats

PRESSING, REPAIRING
About Our College Club Rates.

CLEANING,
Ask

BECKER
DRY CLEANING COMPANY

Phone

621--

CLEANERS THAT SATISFY

.

Cor. Lime and High

.

YOU ARE WELCOME

Shoes and

Haberdashery
Now ready
at the

College Fellows S h op
Graves, Cox & Company
Incorporated

AT

Phoenix Fruit Store
FOR-

FANCY FRUIT AND DELICATESSEN

PERSONAL SERVICE
always the endeavor of our officers and employees to see that
receive personal attention to your Individual requirements
whether the business being transacted Is of large or small volume.
It

Is

you

Our facilities are always at the disposal of your friends and
quaintances.

THEFAYETTE

NATIONAL BANK

LEXINGTON,

KY.

ac-

* Best Cop
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
THE

KENTUCKY
KrMny

every
I'ulillRlictl
CoIIcro year

the

!' the
University of

KERNEL tcrminc which two candidates nro

d

greater degree.
Let one of
these he chosen nt the second meeting and tho result Is true majority
In

throuRhnut the
t
1oJ' of
Kentueky.

ntutti-n-

The Procrustean Bed

rule, the Ideal of democratic nations.

Kentucky Kernel In the official
wllh
It I"
of the UnlverMty.
nil
n view of furnlnhlnn to It" nuhnerllwrii
the collene new of Kentucky, toother
with r tllRent of Items of Interent
of other Ktntos
the unlverMtlc

A Department of Prejudice

The

nnl

HARVARD

Centre College Invades
unopened to Kentucky nthlctes. Her football team, as
a reward for last year'a brilliant season, Is accorded the opportunity of
putting Kentucky on the foothnll map
of tho country. She goes forth to
battle as the best team of the South,
wtith the honor of Kentucky in her
hands nml with the best wishes of nil
true Kcntuckinns. Every little henrt
tug is a pull for Centre.
But November 13 will be another
brown horse of a different color. On
that day, Kentucky meets Centre on
Stoll Field. We can let bygones be bygones and be good enemies ngaln. Wo
hope to accord them the compliment
they paid us last year.
But now, just for. this week-end- ,
we're Cor you, Centre, and want you
to win.
Tomorrow

Cnnadn.

Hnlere.l nt l.oxInRton
mall matter.
Editor-in-chie-

n

second-clni-

i

f

ROBT. J. RAIBLE, '21

Managing Editor
Martha Buckman,
Associate Editors

Kmmett Swliwliclm, '23 DonnM Dlnnlnc, 'SI
Mary Archer Ilcll. '21 A.lcle Shule. '21
Lucille Moore, '21
Mary E. James, '22
Thompson Van Dercn, '21

Reporters
Katherlne "Weakley, '21
Anna Louise Connor, '23
Irene McNamara, '23
Kathorlno Conroy, '23
Dorothea Murpl'y, '22

By Troy Lawson Perkins

"My truth Is the truth"

territory hitherto

milmrrlpllon. One Dollar nml Fifty Cent
n Year. II o Centu the Copy.
1'oMofllce

VS. CENTRE.

Blilc Itache. '23
Clarahel Kaye. '21
Ailallne Mann. 22
Rather Harrls.'22
luiyinontl Kirk, '23

To those who live east of the University and who take pleasure in walkBusiness Manager
ing, it will be an agreeable surprise to
H. B. Lloyd, '21
know that the watercourse which bars
the pleasant path from the campus to
Advertising Staff
the corner of Rose street and Rose
Uurton Prewllt, '22
Lane 'the one where you have to
13. Claunch. '21
J.
Harold F. Walts, '23
climb a sty In front of Doctor Patterson's residence and another one down
Circulation Manager
by the toolhouse has been bridged
Glenn Tinsley, '22
with a bridge which even a Freshman
may cross with dignity if he so desires.
STROLLER TRYOUTS.
The Kernel is pleased to note among It makes accessible the most pleasant
campus.
those who are to try out for the Strol- walk on the
year a tendency to select a
lers this
r
struggle with "kats
After a
higher class of entertainment to
present as evidence of their ability In pajamas" we are forced to admit that
dramatics. The idea that a clog dance Squirrel Fo