xt7vdn3zt23p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vdn3zt23p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19220512  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 12, 1922 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 12, 1922 1922 2012 true xt7vdn3zt23p section xt7vdn3zt23p I

HE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

f

if- -

LEXINGTON, KY

VOL. XII

MAD1S0NVILLE

BY

LA GRANGE

SU- -

HIGH

Seamon of Asbury and
Trimble of Hopkinsville
Get Oratorical Medals

Friday.

Twelve

high schools,

were represented.
Thursday night the oratorical contest was held and gold medals were
awarded by Professor Mikesell on behalf of the University to Lyon Seamon
of the Asburg College Academy and
Trimble of Honkinsville High School.
The Lexington Herald cup, which the
edicor, Mr. Desha Breckinridge, has
offered to the high school which is
victorious in three successive state
oratorical contests, was given to the
Asbury College Academy for the coming year.
Friday night the finals in debating
were held and Madisonvllle High
School was victor over LaGrange
The representatives
High School.
from Madisonvllle were Thomas B.
Finley, Jr., William Morton, Jr., and
George W. Hickman, Jr., from
,
Foster Johnson, Emmltt Haut-erarid Virginia Manby. They debated
on the question of the retention of the
Dillingham Immigration bill, the winning team having the affirmative side.
Harry Giovannali, editor of the Lexington Leader, presented the winning
team with the Leader trophy, which
was won last year by the Lexington
High School; and Professor Mikesell
with gold
presented the winners
medals on behald of the University.
Miss Ellen Goodnow, Dayton high
school was awarded a gold medal and
silver cup by Professor Dantzler on
behalf of the University as the winner of the essay contest in which more
than 4,000 students took part. The
subject of the winning essay was.
"John Fox, Jr., A Criticism of His
Work." Maurice Stroud of OwenBboro
High School was awarded the second
prize, a silver medal. His essay waB
on "Why I Want to go to uouege.
S. S. Elam, editor of the Kentucky
School News, Frankfort, presented a
silver medal to Miss Frances Stahel,
Margaret Hall, Versailles, for the best
Stands
essay on "Why Kentucky
Miss
Educationally."
Forty-flftStahel's essay was fourth in the state
contest, third jblnce going to miss
Pearl Love, Bowling Green.
deMore than 200 members of the
bating and oratorical teams field and
track squads, students and faculty
atof the University and many visitors
tended the annual banquet of the
League held Friday
night In Dicker Hall preceding the
h

(Continued on page 5)

General Roger Williams and
Captain Johnson To Be

Present

P U B L I C IS INVITEL
Elaborate Program is Plan
ned for the Event

WINS

L TOURNEY

Louisville Male High Comes
Second. Nine Records

Were Broken
Berea Academy won the championship of the ninth annual Kentucky
tournament held on Stoll
Field Saturday, scoring 31 points, and
Louisville Male High, their nearest
competitors, finishing with 28 points.
Nine interscholastic records were shattered.
Daily of Berea, with 11 points, was
awarded the silver loving sup for the
high point man of the tournament.
First second and third in the various
events were presented gold, silver,
and bronze medals respectively.
The final standing of the schools
was Anderson County, 0; Berea, 31;,
Covington, 4; Cynthiana, 0; Apkfort,
10; Ft. Thomas, 6; Lawrenceburg, 6;
Lexington, 0; Louisville Male, 28;
Madison, 0; Madisonville, 1; Massle,
5; JManual, 17; Model, 0; Morton-Ellio10; Pineville, 8.
Brady, of Lawrenceburg, shattered
the pole vault record, clearing the bar
at 11 feet. Ernsberger, of Ft. Thomas,
and Sandford of Manual, tied for
second, dividing the points.
broke the
Hughes, of Morton-Ellio- t
high jump record of 5 feet 6 Inches,
held jointly by him and Wllhelm, and
raised the mark a half an inch.
Hughes also won the broad jump,
leaping 20 feet, 9M inches.
Crutcher, of Frankfort High, broke
the Javelin record by nearly nine
feet, hurling the javelin 149 feet
of Pineville,
inches. Brandenburg
beat the discus throw of last year by
almost ten feet, throwing the discus
113 feet.
In the afternoon Dailey, of Berea,
broke the mile record, running It in
4:46. Davis, of Louisville Male, ran
seconds,
the 220 yard dash in 22
of a second from the
clipping
record. His teamate, Moore, shattered
the high hurdle record, lowering It
of a second to 17 seconds flat. Miller of Manuel set a new 440 yard dash
record whon he ran the dash In 53
seconds. Dailey, of Berea, shattered
the record of the 880 yard run. His
time was 2:4
The summaries:
Morning Summaries.
Pole Vault Brady, Lawrenceburg,
first; Sanford, Manual, and Ernsbor
t,

5

5

5

5

(g o3ud uo ponupuoo)

PRIZE COMPANY

TO

President

The annual state high school oratorical and debating contests were BEREA ACADEMY
held at the University last Thursday

MEMORIAL

DRIVE.

Next Wednesday will be "Tag
Day",by members of the
Circle during which time every student will ber solicited and asked to
contribute at least $10.00 to the
Memorial Fund to be used to erect
a building on the University campus for those who died in the World
War. This amount does not have
to be given all together,
but a
pledge may be made, payable in
four quarters.
Thursday will be "clean up day"
for those who have not been solicited. A list will be kept and the
names checked off as the student
donate.
Su-K- y

Su-K- y

Miss Ellen Goodnow Awarded Essay Medal- -

and

GUP TO BE

Su-K-

IN FINALS

representing the twelve districts into
which the state has been divided,

LOVING

KY NOTICE!

There will be an important meeting of the
Circle in the Journalism room Tuesday afternoon
and every member is requested to
be present as new members for the
forthcoming year are to be selected
at this meeting. The boosting of
the University and athletics depends upon the members of the
Circle to a great extent and for
this reason the best selection for
next year must be made at this
meeting. It will begin promptly at
3:30. Every member be there.
ARTHUR BRADSHAW.

TWELVE TEAMS HERE

&

No. 28

"The 1 3 th Chair" Great Success
DEBATING CONTEST WON

Air

MAY 12, 1922

The three companies of the Uni
versity battalion of Cadets will meet
in the annual Field Day exercises on
Stoll Field Tuesday May 16, for the
purpose of competing for the silver
loving cup presented to the company
showing the best training that day.
The prize, a lovely silver cup with
gold lining is the gift of IL Colonel
George D. Freeman and will be com
peted for annually by the University
companies of Cadets.
The program, which begins at 3:30
o'clock Tuesday afternoon
will be
composed of a review of the battalion
a demonstration of a platoon tackling
machine gun and a rifle drill with
music by the band. The contest will
close with the presentation of the cup
to the prize company and a final passing in review.
The group of judges for the competition drill is composed of some of
the foremost military men of the
country. They are Colonel Charles
Marrow, Captain George E. Jacobs,
Captain Carl B. Byrd, Captain Tuinn
of Greendale Reform School for Boys.
General Roger Williams, in charge
of the 5th Corps Area will be present
for the occasion and will probably
present the cup.
All students who are to take part
(Continued on page 5)

TAU

DELTO

HIGHEST

ALPHiTP

jRAT

AVERAGE

Thirty Five Percent of Men
Students are Members
of Fraternities.
A report of the standing of the
various mens fraternities on the
campus for the first semester discloses
the following facts, (1) that thirty-fiv- e
per cent of the men in the University are members of social fraper
ternities and that this thirty-fivcnt totals 262 men.
The University Y. M. C. A. awards
a silver cup to the fraternity making
the highest standing for the semester.
The Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity, hav
ing but two members last semester,
and knowing that tho object of the
award was to promote larger group
requested
that
scholastic standing
they should not be considered In the
contest. Their standing howovor was
2. It Is gratifying to note, on a com
parlson of the standing of previous
semesters, a marked Improvement on
the whole In the fraternity standing.
e

FIRST

PERFORMANCE

THE THIRTEENTH

OF

CHAIR'

PLEASES LARGE AUDIENCE

Mary

Lyons, has Strong:
Support in Leading Role
as Madame La Grange

TO

PLAY

Elaborate

SAT. NIGHT

Stage

Setting

Adds to Production

Unique in the dramatic history of
the University was the mountain folklore play presented Monday afternoon
and night in chapel. The play, "The
Prophet of the Big Smoky," was a
dramatization by Professor Mikese'J,
based on Charles Craddock's book by
the same title, and was presented by
a cast composed entirely of mountain
students in the University.
Rare insight into the character of
the Kentucky mountaineer was displayed both on the part of the producer
and of the actors. Special mention
should be given J. S. Hays who played
the part of the mountain parson, the
Phophet and to Paul Bieknell who
played the role of the host. Other
members of the cast were:
Dorindy Cayce
Ann Riddell
Lenore Patrick
Mother Cayce
Katherine Elliott
Dancer
Max Howard
Rick Tyler
Ralph H. Woods
Sheriff
Blacksmith
Fletcher C. Walker
L. C. Fielder
Obediah Scruggs
O. W. Cain
Hirm Dole
D. V. Sublot
Nathan Hoodendin
R. T. Johnson
Attorney
C. M. Clay Portur
Attorney
Judge
Sidney B. Nettl
Especially entertaining was tho old
fashioned square dance which was executed in the last act by Ann Riddell.
Lenor Patrick, Kathorlno Elliott, Max
Howard, Paul Bieknell and S. B. Meal.
An additional feature that contributed much to the success of tho ror- formanco was the singing ot moun-- !
tain ballads by a troup of students
who came over from Berea College
Among the well known ballads that
they sang "Sour Wood Mountain,"
"Green Willow Tree" and "Lltile
Moheo."
The following students oam; from
Berea: Miss Irma A. Forman, music
director, Betty Herndor, Dora Gross-cup- ,
M.
Mabel Dhaley, Catherine
Haley, Gladys Barnes, Jlmm(') Norton,
Florenco Bakor, Fannie Lo: Reed.
Charles T. Morgan, Lloyd Rackloy,
Dan Wlntormute, Seth C. Whtto.
This was tho last of a very jjuccess-fu- l
serios of Little Thoutro programs
given at tho University this season.
It differed from the otunr three pro

The best dramatic talent of the
University combined under the name
of "Strollers," In existence for the
past thirteen years, during which
time parctlcally every phase of theatrical production has been undertaken
was far surpassed last night in the
first production of "The Thirteenth
Chair" at Woodland Auditorium. The
largest audience that has ever witnessed a Stroller performance on the
opening night in Lexington was in attendance last night, and was held under tension for two hours during
which time Velllers masterful mys
tery drama was produced with professional acting by University students.
The rising of the curtain at 8:30 last
night revealed the most elaborate
and richly colored setting ever used
in a Stroller production. The scene,
an Italian drawing room of the wealthy
Crosby family in New York was a
deep blue, with grey border, a mantle-piec- e
of stone,
heavy oak doors,
French windows and a hand painted
picture on the right side wall, chairs,
devans, upholstered in blue and gold,
table lamps tables, all of which were
made by the students of the Art Department and students in the wood-shoof the mechanical College. The
lighting effect was arranged
by a
switchboard made in the Mechanical
College under the superlnvision of J.
W. Owens, senior in that department
and was operated by Henry Harper.
The play because of the fact that It
was produced in its entirety by the
students themselves, reflects credla-blupon the University. This work
is done apart from their regular
courses and Is not credited in anyone
class or department, and those taking
part and giving their time and talent
so generously to the success of "The
Thirteenth Chair" did so because of
the love of it. And it Is for no other
reason that such appreciation as was
expressed after the performnace last
night was in small only part of the appreciation felt by those witnessing the
production.
Mary Lyons who carried the heaviest role In the play Interpreted the
character as Madam La Grange, an
old Irish woman, ns perhaps no other
student in the University could have
done. This difficult role was given
her over a hundred applicants who
tried for the part, and with tho burden
of this part and tho success of the play
within her hands, staged a comeback
with tho most masterful piece of professional acting ever seen on an amateur stage.
Frances Smith, was charming as
Helen O'Noil, because of her dainty

(Continued on pago 5)

(Continued on Page 5.)

SUCCESSFUL

PLAY ENDS

LITTLE THEATRE SEASON

Hays and Bieknell Given
Special Mention for
Excellent Portrayal

p

y

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
444.4.4.4444.4.4.4.4.4.4..4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4..4.4.4.4.4.4.4.444.4.lf4,,l

Alumni Notes
CALENDAR

Lexington, Mny 13 (Second Saturday), luncheon 12:30, I'hoenlx
Hotel. Miss Margaret Whltte-more- ,
Extension Worker, will
give n short address.
Lebanon, May 13. (Second Saturday) evening.
Detroit, May 27 (Last Saturday),
dinner, Dixieland Inn.
Denver, June 1 (First- - Thursday),
12:30,
University
luncheon

talk to the high school students that
we fool sure will hrlng results. In the
afternoon she mnde a splendid address
at tho Womnn's Club." Susan Spalding, ox, Secretary.
X

X

Sweetwater,
tern Reserve University nt Cleveland. sec Military Institute,
Tenn.
xx
X
X
That John II. Way '13, Is a busy man
no one could doubt In addition to
Binding For Theses
Tho Graduate School Committee hns
his duties as district agent of the
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance met tho problem of binding Masters'
Company nt Carrollton, Kentucky, ho Theses by voting to nccept tho typeIn Kentucky, Ten- written copies unbound, with the sum
Is representative
nessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, of two dollars to cover the cost of
Ohio, Indiana and Illinois of tho Car- binding. The Committee will then
rollton Furniture Company, identified supervise tho stylo of binding. Tho
with the Probhlser Cabinet Manufac- responsibility of the enndidnte ceases
turing Company of Sturgis, Michigan, with tho receipt of this sum.
All these nre due May 15 and Noand White Furnituro Company,
North Carolina. After graduat- vember 15, respectively, for recommeeting Mr. Way taught in tho Carrollton mendation to the
EdHigh School for three years. He has ings of the Bonrd of Trustees.
been In the Insurance business since ward Tuthlll, Secretary of Committee.
1919 and has recently gone into the
furniture business. He is married and
has two very attractive children, a
boy and girl.
New-bur-

i

I

Betwixt Us

I
g

g

i

j jt

ij

jj

f

j

j

BARNES & HALL
DRUGGISTS

East Main St.
Prescriptions a Specialty
Fine Assortment
of
NUNNALLY'S

CANDLES

seml-nnnu-

MILLER

"When I left tho University In 1912
went with tho Big Four Railway
Club.
Company and wns variously employed
Carrollton, Juno 13. (Second Tuesby them until September 25, 1921. I
day), luncheon.
became manager of the
X
X
Gravel Company at
Another engineer who has come
Prominent among those making a
The
Ohio residence 738 Commonfight for the preservation of the feder- wealth Ave. The Kernel is a source back to his native state to continue
Electric Co.
al constitution and the personal and of great pleasure and a credit to the his work, is John J. Lemnn '19, who
corporate rights guaranteed by it are University." Thomas E. Earle.
is now snles engineer with Watt and
Fourth St. Cincinnati, Ohio
Woolworth Building
Company of Plnevllle, Kentucky and
Charles R. Brock '00, of Denver, and
X
X
Electrical Supplies
This firm Is
United States Senator A. O. Stanley
to 233 Northern Knoxville, Tennessee.
"Send the Kernel
Wholesale
ex-- ,
of Kentucky.
Phone 982.
Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, as I will handling heating, ventilntlng and reare lawyers of renown and, in make my home here In the future. frigerating equipment, electrical equipBoth
Distributors
for the General
making addresses and in writings Include several back numbers as I ment and mine supplies of all sorts
Electric Co.
CORRECT ENGLISH
attention enjoy the paper more than I do a and is doing splendid business in the ,i.
have nttracted nation-widWARNER P. SAYERS.
Mr.
to their views and to the menace of good show," writes Charles Stuhlbarg Kentucky Mountains.
Leman
1
How To Use
Sec'y, Sales Mgr.
r
Com
recent happenings and tendencies.
'21. He was formerly with the Bar- went with the
imIndiana,
"An inactive and complacent ma- rage Coal Company at Louisville, and pany of Indianapolis,
'i"i,4"i4Mlt4"tt4t,4'4"t'4"t'4'4'4''4'"l'j"ll
JOSEPHINE TUCK BAKER, Editor
jority is permitting an active minority is now with The Cincinnati Cap Com- mediately after graduating and conA Monthly Magazine
to make dangerous and threatening pany, manager of the mail order de- tinued with them as sales engineer
l
$2.50 THE YEAR
Dues and the Kernel
encroachments upon the fundamentals partment.
until entering on his new line of work
$2 a Year
with the Kentucky firm. His address
of our Constitution of Government,"
Send 10c for Sample Copy
X
X
Box 256, Pineville, Kentucky.
said Mr. Brock in an address before
For all Former Students
"Every page of the Kentucky Ker is
)
Alumni Secretary, University of
in
the Colorado Bar Association,
toxX
nel contains items of interest to those
Denver.
Kentucky, Lexington.
"I enclose herewith my check for y,
of us who are old students. For me
Correct English Pub. Co.
In Chicago Senator Stanley declared
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS
it has created such a strong longing seven dollars which I wish applied as
"Wise and partriotic men of all politifor college days that I anticipate follows: two dollars for alumni dues
cal parties are today vividly conscious
coming back for Commencement to and the Kernel; five dollars to be used
of the fact that we stand at this hour
Nancy to help defray expenses of the camacquaintances."
old
renew
at the edge of the abyss, that the Elizabeth (Betty) Davis '20, Head, paign to raise the $300,000 fund. In
abolition of the autonomy of the State
Department of History in High School, addition, let this be your authority to
means the destruction of the liberty
draw on me for fifty dollars quarterly
Wauchula, Florida, Box 613.
of, the citizen and of the life of the Reor such means of payment as meets
XX
.
750 Frelinghuysen Avenue,
public."
"I am enclosing information desired your approval. The boll weevil and
There is a tendency for men of afNewark, N.
and check for two dollars." Stephen the depression hit us at the same time
fairs to replace the professional poliE. Caudill '10, who is resident engineer and we have to arrange our expendiBoston Buffalo Chicago New York Philadelphia.
tician and to seek to end the rule of
with the State Highway Department tures so as to make as light a burden
the propagandist and lobbyist with a
Hayden, Alabama, formerly at War-io- as possible." T. H. Burruss, Jr. '11,
MANUFACTURERS OF WEATHER
private interest not always in accord- at
Madison, Ga.
ance with the welfare of the masses.
I

Alumni Directory

Maasillon-Greenvill-

e

Mas-slllo-

!

F.D.Lawrence

I

SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS

e

It

Waren-Webste-

-

--

I Carrier
I
f

Engineering corporation
J.

I

r.

X

X

ASHLAND

X

CLUB ORGANIZED

Eastern Kentucky Has Organization
to Aid University Program
Alumni living in Boyd county have
organized the Ashland Alumni Club
with Mrs. Mary Elliott Flanery, ex-- ,
Kentucky's first woman member of
the General Assembly, as president.
Mrs. Flanery has received some mention in the State press as a candidate
for Governor.
Arthur T. Bryson '13 (Dart) was
elected
Thomas
Burchett ex-- ' secretary, and John W.
Woods '96, treasurer. The meeting,
held on May 2, the evening of the New
York club's annual assembly, was
featured by addresses by Dr. J. D. Williams, John M. Waugh, Mr. Bryson,
Mr. Flanery, and Dr. F. L. Allen. Mr.
Woods was toastmaster.
Charter members t)f the club included also; Miss Elizabeth Bartram, ex;
Mrs. Juliette Gaines Bryson '13; M. L.
Chowning ex; W. S. Patton ex; Otto C.
Gartin ex; W. H. Flanery ex; Miss
Dew Flanery ex; Miss Anna Lewis '16,
Lee Hunt '13; Stanley J. Rldd '13; Iley
B. Browning '16.
X

X

New York Club Elects Officers
Officers of the New York Club elect

at the annual

meeting in the
Waldorf-Astorihotel May 2 are J. I.
Lylo '96, president; H. H. Lowry '09
vice president; Carroll G. Taylor '10
secretary and J. Esten Bowling '15,
treasurer; the executive committee
Mr. Lyle '9C, Haward P. Ingels '05,
Reuben Taylor '15, H. K. Brent ox and
Perry West '01.
ed

a

X

X

Lebanon Club on the Job
"Wo thought you would like to
hear that we still have an enthusiastic,
energetic alumni club at Lebanon tho
members doing everything possible to
bring the advantages of the University before the people.
"We were very proud indeed to be
able to have Miss Cornell, Head of
the Home Economics Department,
with us. She made a very appealing

X

.

"Change my address on the Kernel
from Sneads, Florida, to 337 Second
Street, North, St. Pettersburg."
W.
K. Clore '15, salesman with the EgypCompany of
tian Syrups Products
Carbondale, Illnois.
X

X

ex-1-

O. T. Dunn '02, asks that his address
be changed to 1521 East 66th Place,

Chicago, 111. He is with the Illinois
Central Railway business address
Room 1000 Central Station, Chicago.
X

X

John March Land '21 is assistant
construction engineer with the Carey-ReeCompany at Richmond, Kentucky.

d

X

X-

-.

"I 'sure do' enjoy the Kernel especially our page it is just like a letter
from home. There are a lot of alumni
in Oklohoma and in running around
the state I see a few of them: in
Ardmore, Smith Gill an Alpha Zeta
man: in Ada, H. H. Felix '16 old Slim
was as pleasant as ever; and Roy
Creech '21, in Ingersoll. Logan Green
and S. J. Caudill, both '16, are in
Tulsa. If we were nearer we could
form a club." Thomas B. Gordon '17
"Prep" is Entomologist with the State
Board of Agriculture of Oklahoma.
His address Is Capitol P. O. Box 72,
Oklahoma City.
X

X"

xx

"Have good news for yout and for
me. I am moving to Schenectady,
New York, and with the
of other alumni there we will soon
have a Kentucky Club that will let
them see that Kentucky is on the map.
"Mr. Wilson (R. C.
has accepted a position as draftman with the
General Electric Company. Send the
Kernel to him at 413 Hulette Avenue,
Schenectady, which will assure the
Kernel an ardent reader. I will be
with my mother at 456 Columbia
Avenue, Lexington, until after Commencement," Yours for Kentucky all
the time. Olline C. Wilson "11.
X

X

How I wish that I could see one
other alumna or alumnus from Kentucky so that I might have some news
for the Alumni page. Not one have I
seen since I left Kentucky last September. You can well imagine how
welcome all news in the Kernel is.
One of the secretaries In my Office
always reads "Squirrel Food" with
much interest. She says that it throws
new light on my character just how,
I do not know. Perhaps she sees now
why my sense of humor perverted or
otherwise.
Sussess for the drive I hope that
your solicitors get as much joy from
it as ours do who are in the midst of
the campaign for tho 1922 budget for
the Young Women's Christian Assocla
tion of Dubuque. There may havo
been a reaction after the war but people are now wanting to give where
they are convinced. Julia L.
'16 Y. W. C. A., Dubuque, la.

George F. Reddish '19, has just
completed his work in bacteriology at
Yale University and will receive his
degree in June. He is now doing
some special research work for the
Flelschman Yeast Company in the
Yale Laboratories and will continue
X
X
there until July first. His address is
"In response to the appeals that
1116 Yale Station, Now Heaven, Conn. have reached mo, I havo sent my conHo lives at Edwards Hall.
tribution to the Memorial Building
X
X
Campaign Headquarters in Louisville.
Tho announcement has been receiv- You may bo sure that I shall do .all in
ed here of the engagement of John my power for Alma Mater In this most
Dacasta Maddox and Miss Margaret worthy cause, and my regret is that I
Stewart Mutch, of Cleveland, Ohio. am not nearer the scene of action, to
Mr. Maddox Is a graduate of the class make my efforts more effective.
of '18 and lias been with the Babcock Enclose is my check for $2.00 for re& Wilcox Company
at Barberton, newal of my membership to the
Ohio, ever since leaving the Univer Alumni Association for the next year.
sity residence City, Club, Barberton.
Oscar V. Petty '20 Head Depart- is a graduate of Wes- - mont of Modern Languages, Tennes
The hrldeto-he

! to make "Every day a good day"
with the help of the following Kentucklans
J. I. Lyle, '96
J. E. BollingM'15
E. T. Lyle, '00
H. Worshara, '16
L. L. Lewis, '67
R. Waterflll, '20
M. S. Smith, 08
J. H. Bailey, '26
R. L. Jones, '12
W. B. Thornton, '21
R. R. Taliaferro, '13
G. E. Zerfoss, '21

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SEE OUR WINDOWS

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R. S. THORPE & SONS
(Iacerperated)

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
Where The

Dollar

Does

It's

Duty

ADA MEADE THEATRE
Superior Photoplays Properly Presented
Home of First National Attractions
Continuous From 1 to 11 P. M.
Correct Musical Settings on the New $10,000
Roberts Morton Organ

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
FRESHMEN WIN OVER
SOPHS BY
Game

2-- 1

SCORE

Pitching
Duel
Between
Lafferty and Van Arsdale
Tho Froshmnn nlno defeated the
Sophomore hnaohnll team
Monday
afternoon In a olopoly con tout tl game.
Tho contest was a pitching duel between Lafferty, of tho Freshmen, and
Van Arsdale, of the Sophn, with tho
former having a shade the best of tho
honors.
The Sophs scored In tho fourth on
a single, a sacrifice, and tui error. Tho
Freshmen tied It up again in the tiamo
frame when Miller singled, rent to
third on two infield outs, and made a
clean steal of home, while Van Arsdale
was napping.
In their half of the sixth, the Freshmen scored tho winning run with two
out, when Wilier made his second hit
of the game, took second when "Van"
walked Lafferty, scoring on Leach's
single. This was the second hU. of
the game for. Leach also.
Lafferty pitched an excellent game,
but his work scarcely surpasses that
of Van Arsdale who also turned in
a creditable workout.
By winning this game the Fresh'
men have gained undisputed posses
sion of first place in the das' race.
E.
R.
H.
The score :
1
2
5
Fresh men
3
1
4
Sophomores
Batteries: Lafferty and Leach; Van
Arsdale and weisenberger.
The standing:
W.
L.
Perct.
3
1,000
0
Freshmen
1
2
666.
Sophomores

Juniors

REMEMBER MOTHER

a

1

333.

2

0
3
000.
Seniors
The Seniors forfeited to the Juniors
Tuesday afternoon.

SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS
TO BE MADE MAY 16
New Student Council Officers to be
Introduced at Chapel
Dean Melcher has requested that
everyone be present at chapel, Tuesday, May 16, when awards will be
made to the two fraternities having
the highest scholastic standing for
last semester. Another feature of
this chapel will, be the introduction to
the University of the
president and
of the
Student Council, Sam Ridgeway and
Otis Jones.
The fraternity having the highest
standing will be awarded a large silver cup which has been given by the
University Y. M. C. A. The second
award is to be a Kentucky banner,
given thru the agency of Dean Melcher. The presentation of the awards
will probably be done by President
newly-electe-

I
i
I
I

:

"PEELING OF T BELLE"

Sunday, Mny U, hns been sot aside
as "Mothers Day" on which day every
one honors their living mother by
wearing n colored flower; and n whlto
one If she hns died. Students nro re
minded not to forgot their mother on
this dny oven tho they may bo far
away from this loved one. Their aro
many ways of expressing this effectlon
or honor, by sending flowers, or writ
ing to her, tho latter probably being
tho moat effective.
AH that I am my mother made me.
John Qulncey Adams.
All that I nm, or hope to be, I owe
to my angel mother. Abraham Lin
coln.
It Is the general rulo that all superior Inherit tho elements of their superiority from their mothers. MIchelet.
A father may turn his back on his
child; two brothers and sisters become Inverterate enemies; husbands
may desert their wives and wives
their husbands. But a motheVs love
endures through all; in good repute,
in bad repute, In the face of the worlds
condemnation, a mother still loves on,
and still hopes that the child may turn
from his evil ways and repent, and she
can never be brought to think him unworthy. Washington Irving.
IMPORTANT
The second annual Engineer's Day
will be observed by the students and
faculty of the College of Engineering
during the afternoon and evening of
May 26. All engineering classes will
be dismissed that afternoon and visit
ors will be received and shown thru
the various departments by the stu
dents.
In the evening from 8 to 12 a masquerade dance will be given In Dicker
Hall for engineering students.
The
dance is to be given under the auspices of the American Association of
Engineers. Plans have been completed
for the erection of a pavillion adjacent
to Dicker Hall, so that sufficient room
may be had for the dancers. Last year
the Engineers Ball was one of the
best dances of the social season, and
there is every reason to believe that
the one this year will be even better.

scorn opera

co.

Just now nnd then tho Poet laughed
not enro for verso,
And thus It
better half
Is sometime Just a curse.
I do

Tho Hackwork
Half finished
Is like my wife
To mnko her

Get Your Hair Cut at
W. B. MARTINS
BARBER SHOP
115 S. LIMESTONE

and the many sins
In tho world,
In heated pins
tresses curie.

Sho girds her-huswith corsets stout,
My arms around her waist
Aro like a stevedores about
An lronbound packing case.

Haircut
Shave

SPRING
SPECIALS

Her cheeks, so yellow In the night
Blush rosy with the dawn,
Sho slips from bed at peep of light
And puts the roses on.

TIE PINS

Her eyebrows, yellow as tho flowers
That perfume garden air,
Aro blackened by the very powers
That also do her hair.

Monogram and

CUFF LINKS

Initial

For a college education, there are

1. The men

at the head of the

2. The

ability of the Teaching

McVey.

Council Election
Results
Given Out by Committee
Votes for Student Council president
were cast as foland
lows: College of Arts & Law, Ridgeway 53, Jones 141, Heath 118, Total
312; Collece of Engineering, Ridgeway 151, Jones 42, Heath 23, Total
216; Agriculture Ridgway 31, Jones
20, Heath 50, Total 101; Total Ridgeway 235, Jones 203, Heath 191, Total
629.

Constitutional amments were passed
by following vote: For 476, Against
36.

BERL BOYD,
WILLIAM FINN,
JOHN CRENSHAW,
Election Committee.

Bradshaw Elected Head of
Su-K- y
Circle for 1922-2- 3
Circle
At a meeting of the
held in tho journalism room Tuesday
afternoon the following officers were
elected: Arthur Bradshaw, president;
MarSneed Yeager,
garet Lavin, secretary; Dorothy Blatz,
assistant secretary; and Carl Reltkine,
Su-K- y

treasurer.
Arthur Bradshaw took charge of the
meeting immediately and discussion
of the part that the Circle is to take
In the Memorial drive on tho campus
next week was held.

Trifari-Paganln-

639-X-

l.

Equipment,

Staff.

buildings,

labora-

Cost.

5.

In all these respects the University of

ing a higher institution in which to carry

East Main St. Opposite Phoenix
Lexington, Kentucky

on their education.

Headquarters

Arts, Sciences,

for "Frat" Jewelry

All

Departments,

cation, Mining,
Mechanical

including Liberal

Agriculture, Law,
Civil,

Edu-

Electrical

and

Engineering.
Address

PRESIDENT

FRANK L. McVEY

University of Kentucky

It

From The Air

the air.
"How has this come about?" we ask.
The new impetus given to radio development may
be definitely associated with the development of the
high power vacuum tube, for that made broadcasting
possible. And the power tube originated from a
piece of purely theoretical research, which had no
connection with radio.
When a scientist in the Research Laboratories of
the General Electric Company found that electric
current could be made to pass through the highest
possible vacuum and could be varied according to
fixed laws, he established the principle of the power
tube and laid the foundation for the "tron" group of
devices.

til

and

environment.

only
but news, speeches,