xt7vdn3ztf8p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vdn3ztf8p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331205  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  5, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  5, 1933 1933 2013 true xt7vdn3ztf8p section xt7vdn3ztf8p Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

UNIVERSITY

GRANTED.Pianists Offer

Pleasing Recital
In Memorial Hall
TO 50,000 WATTS
POWER INCREASE

Federal Power Commission
Allows Maximum of
Fifty Kilowatts
STATION TO RETAIN
SAME FREQUENCY
Sulzer, U. K. Radio Studio
Director. Appears In Behalf of WHAS
WHAS. radiophone of the
and Louisville Times,
was" granted permission Friday, by
the Federal Power commission for
an Increase of power from 25,000
to 60,000 watts, the maximum allowThe station
ed In this country.
will continue to operate on Its pres
ent frequency of 820 kilocycles.
According to the commission, the
operation of WHAS with so Kilowatts will result in a more efficient
use of the frequency, 820 kilocycles
and no appreciable increase in Interference may be expected to develop from the operation of WHAS.
A WHAS application was granted a hearing on November 22; when
Elmer O.- Sulzer, director of the
WHAS extension studio of the University, and the Rev. Newton King,
president of the Asbury Theological
seminary, at Wilmore appeared in
behalf of WHAS.
The Important use made by their
respective schools of the Louisville
station, was spoken of by the witnesses, and Mr. Sulzer emphasized
radioparticularly the rtoon-da- y
casts which are conducted by the
University over WHAS, and which
are picke dup by 13 "listening posts"
established by the University In remote communities In eastern Kentucky to furnish education and entertainment to rural Inhabitants
who cannot afford radios.
No opposition was made to the
grant for power Increase. The results of this grant will be to Increase many times over the potential audience of WHAS, to double
the circumference of the station's
service, and to overcome the ordinary effects of static and fading in
distant reception.
trial period
Following a
for testing on Saturday, the regular
50,000 watt service began Sunday at
8 a. m.
Courier-Jo-

urnal

five-ho-

i

KENTUCKY

OF

Jf

HASKET HALL
CATS. ALUMNI OPEN
SEASON TONIGHT

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5. 1933

VOLUME XXIV

WHAS

C?

ur

Brauer to Speak

Miss Caroline Pike and

Mrs.

Lewis Bradley Are

Artists
By HARRISON ELLIOTT
Miss Caroline Pike and Mrs. Lewn
is Bradley, Georgetown's
piano team, gave a most pleasing
recital in Memorial hall, Sunday
afternoon. Although their audience
was not as large as those which
have heard previous Vesper musi-calthis season, Sunday's hearers
heartily applauded the sincere work
of the
The pianists opened their recital
with a fine rendition of Mozart's
"Sonata In D Major." Of the three
movements of Sonata, the second,
"Andanfta," was played best, the
pedal work In the other two movements being such that the counter-melodiand Intricate embellish
ment were often lost In the bass
crescendos.
continued their
The
recital with Brahms' "Liebeslieder,"
a series of waltzes beautifully executed. The artists performed this
medley In perfect tempo, and
charmed the audience with the
smoothness with which they Interpreted the delicate rhythms.
The recital was brought to a close
with an exceedingly brilliant rendition of "Capriccio Brilliant" by
Mendelssohn. In this number Miss
Pike and Mrs. Lewis gave a quite
exhibiting
performance,
finished
wonderful technique and mastery of
tone.
pianoforte
duo-piani-

UK REPRESENTED

AT

PRESS MEET

Prof. Portmann, Carter, and!
Turnbull Attend Kentucky
Intercollegiate Press
Convention
CENTRE GIVEN AWARD
Wesley E. Carter, editor of The
Kernel, and Ned Turnbull, business
manager, attended the annual two-da- y
session of the Kentucky InterFriday
collegiate Press association
and Saturday at Georgetown. Carter, president of the association,
presided at the meetings.
Prof. Victor ft. Portmann who
r,
Mn.,(nn nn T,,nnn.
raphy" is the author of "Manual of
1

On IltlDOSSlbllltieS
Dr. Richard Brauer, visiting professor of mathematics from
Germany, will begin a
series of lectures under the auspices
of Pi Mu Epsilon, honorary mathematics fraternity, starting this week,
it was announced today.
The first lecture will be held at
4 p. m. Thursday In Room 108 or
McVey hall, where all forthcoming
lectures of the series will oe neia.
Doctor Brauer's subject at this time
will be "Proofs of Impossibilities:
The first few lectures will be about
the various phases of this subject,
and future topics will be announced

later.
The lectures will be In English,
and the public Is Invited.

Kampus
Kernels
All students who desire to work
as news reporters on The Kernel
may report to The Kernel news
room at 3 p. m.. Thursday.
of the executive comlees
mittee and of the
are asked to meet
of
office, room 54,
in the Kentucklan
McVey hall, at 4 p. m. Friday.
Members

sub-com-

y

All candidates for the freeman
basketball team who did no report
Monday night to Coach Len Miller
report to Carey Burchett' in the
Alumni gym at 3 p. m. today. Many
more men are needed. Bring your
own equipment.
All fraternities and sororities are
asked to turn In snapshots to the
Kentucklan office, room 64 McVey
hall, as soon as possible. It is Im
portant that this be done if you
of your groups In
wish snap-shots

the Kentucklan.

There will be an Important meeting of the fraternity house mothers
at the Women's building at 3 p. m.

Thursday.

Eta Sigma Phi will meet at 3 p.m.
Thursday in the Women's building.
All members are requested to be
present.
There will be an important meetsociety at
ing of the Agriculture
7:30 p. m., Thursday, in room 205,
Agriculture building.

Through some mistake, the
meeting of the International
Affairs clans was scheduled
for Wednesday at 8 p. m. In
Patterson hall. The regular
meeting will be held tonight
at 7:30 In the" Training school
gymnasium. Thomas P. Cooper, dean of the College of
Agriculture,
will speak on
"Agriculture under the A. A.

Campus Representatives Are
Appointed by Y. W. and
Y. M. Heads

A."

EDUCATION MEET
TO BE HELD HERE
Social Science Academy and
lommercfal Education
Department Are
Sponsors
DECEMBER 9 IS DATE
A conference on commercial education will be held at the Univer-

sity, December 9, under the Joint
auspices of the Kentucky Academy
of Social Sciences and the department of commercial education.
The first session which will begin
at 10 a. m. will Include addresses
by Miss Katherlne O. Bracher of
the Gregg school, Chicago; Prof.
W. Harmon Wilson, editor of The
Balance Sheet, University of Cin
cinnati; and Miss Betsy Morton,
critic teacher in commercial sub
Jects in the University Training
scnooi.
A luncheon meeting will be held
In the University Commons at 12:30
p. m. at which Dr. A. J. Lynn, for
merly of the University of Chicago
and now a certified public account
ant in Louisville, will speak on "Ac
counting, a Requisite to Efficiency
In Local Government."
Members
of the academy will enter into a
discussion of the address after
wards.

Art Department
Gives Xmas Hints
To Busy Shoppers
Purpose of Exhibit Is to Aid
Buyers in Making Yule-tid- e

Purchases

WAA Will Present
Winter Horse Show

dish-war-

nt

BY TAU

BETA PI
Frat

d;

of Strollers who
AU members
with to affiliate with the organiSTIDtNTS ATTEND MEET
sation and who have paid their
1125 assessment must attend the
Three University students, John
meeting- - of the organization in
Whit hall, Wednesday, at 4 p. m. Wilmott, Polly Offutt, and Duke
and receive their certificate of ini- Payne represented the University at
the annual conference of the Kentiation.
tucky Federation of Methodist college students which was in session
A meeting of the Young Womcollege in Coen's Democratic club of the Uni- at Lindsay-Wilso- n
versity will be held in the Women's lumbia, Kentucky, November 35, 36,
and 37.
(Continued on Page Four)

the

Y. W. C. A.

of the
seal sale

one-four- th

Freshmen to Meet
Team in Double Hill
Tonight

Health Three

and

Y. M. C. A
seals Is to be

HOME EC

INITIAL GAME WILL
START AT 7 O'CLOCK
and One
Are on
Alumni Squad

by Miss
Peak, of

GROUP

HOLDS BANQUET
K. Department Celebrates
One Hundreth Anniversary

IT.

By NORMAN GARLING
of Association
Tonight, at 7 o'clock In the
at Dinner
Alumni gymnasium, students and
Lsxlngton fans of the hardwood
TWENTY-SIINITIATED
court will get their first glimpse of
Home Economics department
The
University
the 1933-'3- 4
basketball celebrated
Its one hundredth anniteam when they make their season's versary of the founding
of the
debut against the Alumni.
American Home Economics associaAlong with this somewhat thrill tion with a banquet Sunday night
ing spectacle, would-b- e
critics will at the Lafayette hotel. This wns
also the observance of the birthday
also be able to see the Kitten
make their second start of of the founder of the association,
the year when they play the Var- Ellen H. Richards.
Decorations consisted" of yellow
sity "B" team.
According to "Pisgah" Combs. and russet roses, and yellow candles.
Twenty-si- x
pledges were initiated
who Is In charge of the Alumni '
candle
squad, the Varsity will have a tough !nt,?.,tn Economlc club
time making anv henriwnv nunlnct '
President McVey, in an address.
ths old grads, as they will have sSrecsed
the need) of a cultural
three
men and one background
for
' man
playing with as a knowledge homemaklng as well
of the mechanics
them.
Alumni who probably will play of housekeeping.
Dean Cooper stated that home
are Louis McGlnnls. Snicer. Sale. economics
has a great influence on
Bronston, and McBrayer
in use
the
Other former University basket ery growth home. of power machinin the
Dean Holmes in
tossers Included on the squad are
her talk expressed the need of a
Gayle Mohney, Oeorge Skinner,
professional attitude toward
William Trott, Elmer Gilb, J. C.
as well as toward other
Wallace, Sid Wallace, Will Milward, phases
of home economics.
William Kleiser, Burgess Carey,
The speaker of the evening. Miss
Turkey" Hughes, "Al" Portwood,
Oneta Liter, spoke on the life of
Ab" Klrwas, "Pisgah" Combs, Paul Ellen H.
Jenkins, Len Miller, Lawrence challenge Richards and said that the
of modern times was for
Crump and Ellis Johnson.
Just such
Thus far. Coach Rupp has not economics. another leader in home
given any starting lineup, but the
Eva Mae Nunnelley gave a violin
Varsity will have many tricks up solo accompanied by
Sarah
their sleeves. They have been preHazel Allison gave a readparing rather strenuously for this ing,
"What We Eat," showing the
take-o- ff
inasmuch as it is the first confusion of advertising in foods.
game and because the performance
creates a basic impression on the
Greetings, Ruth Forman; Duet,
spectators.
niara Innes. IVrrt.hv
The second game of the evenine.
in which Coach Len Miller's Kit-- , Mae Nunnelley. Sarah Whlttlng-ten- s
will partake should Drove Just Kill' Wplrnmp 1ir Rt a r i EVi'lrertn
as Interesting, if not more so than Home Economics 'and the Univer
iimiii rvem,, as yearnnir souaa sity, Dr. Frank L. McVey; Home
Is composed of men who were for
Economics In Modern Life, Dean
merly
high school players. Thomas P. Cooper; The Life of
on Page Four)
(continued
Ellen H. Richards and Her Influence on Home Economics, Miss
Oneta Liter, University of Louisville; Pledging of Phi Upsilon Omi-croInitiation of Home Economics
club; Closing song. Alma Mater.
Officers of the Home Economics
club are, president, Ruth Forman;
Harriet Williams;
secretary, Dorothea Wilford; treasurer, Mary Louise Scott

Sale of tuberculosis
conducted locally for the first time
this year, heretofore having been
handled directly from the state of
flees at Louisville.
Seventy-fiv- e
cents of every dollar
collected for the sale of one sheet
of seals will be spent within Fayette
county, it is to be used for pre
ventative purposes and none of the
money will go for the support of
the sanitorium which is supported
mainly by taxation. Case finding
testing, supervision of
cases, supplies and medicines for
Indigent patients, health building
among children, and education will
be made possible by the money
brought in by the sale of Christmas
seals.
Miss Rebecca Dudley, chairman
of the Social Service group of the
Y. W. C. A., will have charge of
the women's sale. She will be as
sisted by the members of her com
mittee who are Rebecca Van Meter,
Mary Ounn Webb, Adele Headley,
Sarah Kinney, Jane Allen Webb,
Mary Ford Offutt, Virginia Ruffner,
Alice Dougherty, Dorothy Grimm,
(Continued on Page Four)

bas-kete-

home-confin-

'

-

home-maki-

ILK. TO SPONSOR

PRESS MEETING

Whit-tinghi-

Annual Convention of Kentucky High School Papers
Will Be Held Dec. 8 and 9;
McVey is on Program
The annual meeting of the Kentucky High School Press association
will be held Friday, and Saturday,
December 8 and 9 at the University.
the University
High school newspaper and the
University Department of Journal-Iswill sponsor the meeting.
Delegates will register at 0 a. m.
Friday in Room 53, McVey hall.
After lunch In the University Commons, the afternoon session will be
called to order by the president.
Miss Robertson, Mt. Sterling. Dr.
Frank L. McVey, Miss Marguerite
McLaughlin, Thomas R. Underwood,
and Joe Jordan, will deliver ad
dresses.
The evening session will be in
the form of a banquet at the La
fayette hotel. Saturday morning,
contest prizes will be awarded and
round table discussions will be held.
After t.he group discussions, the
meeting will be adjourned.

Y. M.

TABULATES

DRIVE RESULTS
than $175 Pledged in
Student Finance Drive;

More

Final Count to Be Made
Tonight

More than $175 has been pledged
in the student finance drive of the
Y. M. C. A., according to tabula
tions made at a meeting of the
senior and freshman cabinets last
week. A final count of all pledges
will be made at a meeting of the
organization at 7 o'clock tonight In
the Y. M. C. A. rooms in the armory.
The money pledged by students
will be used in financing the work
of the organization for the current
year. Among the activities of the
Y. M. C. A. are the publishing of
the "K" book for freshman students
each fall, and "College Night," when
all students get together with
before classes start
each fall.
Approximately 25 students and
members of the faculty attended
the annual state conference of college Y. M. C. A. organizations held
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at
Eastern State Teachers college.
John Carter, president of the University organization last year and
retiring president of the state association, opened the conference and
served as chairman until the election of Sam Beckley, Eastern State
Teachers college, as president for
the coming year.
A special session of faculty members was held at noon, Saturday.
Those that attended this meeting
from the University were: Dean
T. T. Jones, Dean lysle Croft, Prof.
E. H. Bureau, Dr. Hairy Best, Prof.
P. E. Karraker, Dr. Jese Adams,
Dr. HUme Bedford, Prof. Brinkley
Harnett, and Prof. C. C. Ross.
Speakers at this meeting were
In 1900.
Entrance into the fraternity Is Bart N. Peak. Father George O'
Brien, chaplain of St. Joseph's hosbased upon scholarship and leaderThe pledges pital, and Fred A. Wullls. Paris.
ship in engineering.
are selected from the upper
Student delegates to the confer
of the Junior and senior ence from the University were:
classes.
John Carter, Robert Trigg. Aaron
Officers of the local chapter are: Akers, Astor Akers, John Spragen,
Walter Stealer, president; HamilJack Carty, Bill Bryan. Lee Uailher,
Enwwt Gordon
ton Greenup,
Gait her, Collier Halls,
secretary;
Combs,
and Thoma James Stevens, Ballard Floyd, and
Todd, treasurer.
Leslie Scott.

ELEVEN TAKEN IN

three-gaite-

Campus representatives
Fayette county Christmas
of thp Lexington Public
center have been appointed
Augusta Roberts and Bart

all-sta- te

First Sheepskin,

n;

Awarded in '88,
Returned to UK

Mrs. Charles Kay, Springfield,
Ohio, Returns Document

to Alma Mater

By HELEN ALFREY
A very significant document

was

FIVE INDUCTED BY

PHI DELTA KAPPA

returned to the University Thursday, after an absence of 45 years.
to be included among the historical I National Honorary Education
Fraternity Holds Initiation
records and other Important papers
of this institution.
at University
It is the diploma that was grantTraining School
ed to the first woman graduate of
this University. It was conferred
The first semester initiation of AlIn 1888 upon Miss Belle Clement pha Nu chapter of Phi Delta Kappa,
Gunn, Lexington, who is now Mrs. national honorary education fraCharles S. Kay. Springfield. Ohio. ternity, was held Saturday, DeMrs. Kay donated it to her Alma cember 2, at 4 p. m. at the TrainMater to be kept as a memento.
ing school.
The initiation was
The diploma is signed by Dr. formerly scheduled for last week
Kennedy Patterson, who was but unexpected matters prevented
James
president of the University for 41 Its being held.
years, and other members of the
Candidates for the initiation were
faculty of 1888.
Mr. Odis L. Whitney, Great Cross
This valuable keepsake was ing, teacher of vocational agrlcul
brought here by Mrs. Kay's son, C. ture; Mr. George D. Taylor, prin
Robert Kay, a Louisville newspaper- cipal of the Williamstown high
man and also an alumnus of the school; Mr. E. F. Hartford, super'
University.
He brought it at the lntendent city schools, Williams-towrequest of his mother.
Mr. H. C. Haggan, head of
years since her graduaIn the
the department of agriculture,
tion, Mrs. Kay has been continuous- Morehead State Teachers college,
ly interested in the University and Morehead; Mr. Ralph Purdy, grad
has sent four of her children to uate student, from Wilmore.
study at the same school that she
attended.
She has two sons and
two daughters that are graduates Y HOBBY
They are C.
of the University.

Saturday

n;

Robert Kay, Mrs. Albert W. Morse,
Claribel Kay. Miss Florence
Kay, and George W. Kay.
Is remarkable that the Univer
It
sity is the recipient of this diploma
after the conferree has been away
for so many years. However, it will
be one of the most priceless souvenirs, and much gratitude U extended to Mrs. Kay.

ne

Funkhouser Relates
His Kecent Travels
,

GROUP
TO BE FORMED
Under Direction
of Marjorie Powell Will He
Added to Y's Activities;
First Meet Is Tonight

Tap-Dancin-

g

More than 200 alumni and former
students of the University from
Kentucky and several other states
were registered Thursday at the
Alumni association's registration tables at the Lafayette and Phoenix
hotels.

The annual house decoration
contest among sororities and fraternities in the observance of
Homecoming day was won by Alpha Gamma Delta sorority and Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. Judges
were wart Peak. Major B. E. Brewer, and Dean T. T. Jones. SuKy
circle sponsored the annual competition and awarded cups to the
winners.

Strollers welcomed many of their
past members Thursday morning at
a breakfast at the Lafayette hotel.
Both the Kentucky and Tennes-

see bands performed in many unique
formations before the game and
between halves. The two bands,
marching down the field tTgether,
played "Battle Song of Liberty."
"U. of K. Homecoming,"
a new
song written by Harrison Elliot, wus
Introduced by the Kentuc
band.
Dr. and Mrs. Frank L. McVey
alumni and friends late
ed

Thursday afternoon at a

tea

at

Maxwell Place.
The Homecoming dance In the
Alumni gymnasium Thursday night,
which concluded the day's program, was attended by approximately 1000 students, visitors, and
alumni. Music was furnished by
the Kentucky Colonels orchestra.

Library Adds
History Collection

U. K.

Manuscripts, Scrapbooks, and
Monographs Are Given
By H. II. Fuson
Thomas D. Clark of the history
department announced that H. H.
Fuson, Harlan, Ky., has presented to the ' University library, a

collection of 293 items consisting of
manuscripts, scrapbooks, and monographs concerning the history of
eastern Kentucky.
Mr. Fuson Is a practicing attorney
in Harlan and a member of a prominent eastern Kentucky family. He
is author of several books and articles, and in former years he was
connected with the Kentucky school
system.
According o Mr. Clark, his collection is on? of the best in eastern
Kentucky, and was presented
to
the University on condition that it
would be maintained as a special
collection for reference work only.
The University now is making ar
rangements to care for a special
collection of diaries, Journals, ac
count books, and all other available
material relating to the history of
Kentucky.
Students knowing the existence of
such material are asked to notify
the University library.

RADIO

COURSES

CONTEMPLATED
Two

Courses Are
to Be Given by Radio from
University Studios of Station WHAS
Non-Cred-

it

it
Two
radio courses will
be offered by the University in the
early part of 1934. These courses,
open to anyone within reach of a
radio, will mark the beginning in
systematic adult education by radio. Those who complete the courses
satisfactorily will be awarded a certificate.
These courses will be broadcast
from the University studios of station WHAS. They have been prepared with the idea of being of
genuine interest and value to the
largest possible group of listeners.
The courses are "The Geography
of Kentucky" and "The Search for
All Knowledge." The former course
will be given by Lewis Cass Robinson, associate professor of Geology,
in ten weekly periods, starting Monday, January 8, .from 1:15 to 1:30
p. m. The latter course will be given by L. L. Dantzler, head of the
department of English, also in ten
weekly periods, beginning Thursday,
January 18, from 1:15 to 1:30 p. m.
To enroll in these radio courses it
is necessary to write the director of
the radio studios at the University.
stating the desire to be enrolled and
enclosing 75 cents for each course
After enrolling the student will
listen to the series of lectures and
take notes. At the conclusion of
the series of lectures an examina
tion will be sent to each student.
The examination papers will be returned to Mr. Sulzer, who will refer
them to the lecturer, who will re
view it and return it to the student
with comment, as well as the Ru.tio
certificate.
No college credit will be allowed
for the possession of a Radio certificate, nor any implications herein
made as to their ultimate use in
that respect. The real value of
the radio courses is the addition
made to the intellectual Interests of
non-cred-

This week's Y. W. C. A. activities
include the forming of a new
Hobby group tonight and
an important meeting of the music
group Wednesday afternoon. The
first meeting of the
group will be held at 8 o'clock tonight in the Recreation room at
Patterson hall. Marjorie Powell
will teach the class. The fee will
be 50 cents for the six lessons. The
accompanist will be Miss Imogene
Young.
The Music group, under the direction of Elizabeth Hardin, will
meet at 3 p. m. Wednesday in the
Women's building. The group is
planning to give a musical program
at the Veteran's hospital this week.
Other Y groups which will meet
this week are as follows:
The last meeting of the sophomore commission was held Monday
night at 7:15 in the Women's building. The subject for the discussion
has been. "Developing of Personality." Members of the commissions
have rotated as chairman each
waek A new series of discussions
will be started after the holidays, the student.
Tap-Danci-

Dr. W. D. Funkhouser, dean of
the graduate school and head of
the department of Eoology of the
University, was heard in a brief
description of his trip around the
world at the regular meeting of the
Women's club of central Kentucky
held Saturday at the Lafayette
hotel. The club's largest attendance
of the year was recorded at the
meeting.
Doctor Funkhouser told of his
scientific work in more than a score
of countries including Japan, China,
South Africa, and others. He also
told of the customs of the various
countries, their manner of dress,
their foods, and also touched upon
their economic conditions.
Mrs. Charles F. Norton, chairman
of the history department of the
club, introduced Doctor Funkhouser. Mrs. J. A. Edge, president of
the club, presided at the meeting.

Alpha Cams and Alpha Sigs
Win Awards for House
Decorations

ll.

se

m

By VIRGINIA ROBINSON
Once again the University Art
has brought forth something really useful.
With the idea In mind of producing an exhibit illustrating the
fact that articles may be beautiful
as well as practical, members of
the Art department have incidentally supplied the answer to "What!
Only sixteen more shopping days
tiU Christmas?"
On the shelves in the glass cases
on the first floor of the library are
e,
articles of pottery. Jewelry,
cosmetics, toys, silver, rugs,
clothing all collected from ten-cestores and costing only twenty- five cents or less.
The articles are placed on the
shelves so that ever a person with
no understanding or appreciation of
art can notice a symmetry and forethought of arrangement. Each ar
ticle was chosen for the sole pur
pose of displaying to the public the
revelation that manufacturers are
becoming more ambitious to pro'
duce attractive designs in attractive
colors at attractive prices.
But what has this to do with
Well, in case you've
Horseback Riding C I a s s to Christmas?
been considering sending Christmas
Sponsor Event at
cards this Christmas, until you "get
Ag College
on your feet again," Just take your
self over to the library nd let the
The horseback riding class of the Art department change. , our mind,
W. A. A., first offered this semester, will present a Winter Horse
show, or "Up and Down Derby," at
8 p. m. Thursday, December 7, in
the Stock Judging pavilion of the
College of Agriculture.
The show is being offered as a
W. A. A. sport, and will be open
to the public. No admission will be Honorary Engineering
Initiates Eight Seniors and
is inWlldan Thomas
charged.
structor of the class and Lucy Jean
Three Juniors at Ceremony
Anderson Is manager of the sport.
Last Tuesday
Prizes, in the form of ribbons,
will be awarded in all events. A
Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineerprize will also be awarded to the ing fraternity initiated eight senstudent who has made the greatest iors and three Juniors last Tuesday
progress in horseback riding since night at Mechanical hall.
the class started. Judges for the
Those initiated were: C. W. Kaufshow will be Dean Sarah Blandlng, man, Nicholasville; F. E. LeBaron,
Benton and Captain Binghamton. New York; D. K.
Lieutenant
Congleton of the local national
Lebanon; J. C. Cleveland,
guard corps. Prof. Roy Moreland, Versailles; C. E. Westerman, Anand Ed Madden, Bluegrass horse- chorage; L. V. Raley, Lebanon; L.
man.
M. Gross, Lake Placid, New York;
The program follows: Or and and J. C. Bishop, Murray, seniors;
March; riding for form (winner W. B. Cundiff, Somerset: H. M.
to be decided by elimination); talk Shedd, Lexington, and O. L. White,
on "Origin of Horses"; pacing Mlddlesboro, juniors.
d
horses,
and
Monday and Tuesday the pledges
talk on "Outstanding Blood were required to carry sledges with
Lines"; Jumping for form; talk on them as a symbol of their profestypes of horses, illustrated by out- sion.
standing horses in each class; a
Tau Beta Pi is the oldest honorhumorous skit called "Initiation"; ary fraternity, having been estaban apple race, with the parti- lished In 1858. and a chapter was
and
cipants mounted.
Installed on the University campus

textbook In the Department 01
Journalism.
A medal for the best story which
has been published by a student
publication this year was awarded
to the Centre .Cento.
Sessions were held Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. Delegates at the conference, represent- elght scttioois in Kentucky, were
entertained with a banquet Friday
night. Dr. W. T. Rainey, of the
editorial staff of The Lexington
Leader, was principal speaker at
the banquet.
The spring meeting of the Kentucky Intercollegiate Press association was tentatively scheduled to
assemble at Transylvania college at
a time to be set by representatives
from Transylvania. At that time
presentation of awards will be increased to include medals for the
best stories in four fields of writing: namely, sports, news, feature,
and editorial.

More than 200 Alumni
And Former Students
Varsity 'It'
Here for Homecoming

Christmas Seal WILDCATS, GRADS
Sale to Be Held OPEN 1933-'- 34
By UK Students U.K. NET SEASON

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
MEETING TONIGHT

es

es

NEW SERIES NO. 23

* Best Copy
THE

ae Two
the University; and what it contemplates doing in the future.
The Kernel will attempt to satisfy
PUBLISHED ON TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
series of inthis need through
Mrmbtr
formative editorials explaining fully
Natianal Collrtt Prrat Asaoclaiton
Kentucky Inttrcolli-iiat- t
Pra Association the workings of that group. Let It
Lexington Board o( Commtrca
be understood that The Kernel will
not take sides upon the question for
of Hit Major Collrtt PublA intmbtr
ication, rrprewnUd bj A. t. Norria Hill as far as we are concerned there is
nd St.. Nrw York City; U3 no argument or doubt about the
Co.. 1M K.
W. Madison St., Clilcato; 1004 and Avt , praiseworthy work
that the council
Sraltlt; 130 Maplt Avt., Lot Anftlea; CaH
is doing in behalf of the athletic
Bldg., San Francisco.
association. The articles will merely
be a presentment of facts, carefully
ftlstxtatcri gollcoinlf ?rf6
marked as to truth, that will clearly
(p--nti) 114
lM'ti
show how the affairs of the athletic
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THS STUassociation are conducted.

The Kentucky Kernel

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DENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY
KENTUCKY, LIXINOTON
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ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Jant U. Hamilton
Joe 8. Rt liter
Edwin Tatteruon
John P. Day
ASSISTANT

EDITORS

Edward Watu
Virginia Lee Moore
Woodson Knight
Jack Wild
Arthur Muth

ti(rarr

editor
Feature fditor
Art Editor
Society Cdlior
Ant. Society editor
Eleanor Htllenmeyer
Nancy Becker
Virginia Boiworth
Francet Bush
Lucy Jean Anderson
Mary Chick
JANE A. MATTHEWS
STARR MENDEL
JOHNNIE CRADDOCK
ELIZABETH HARDIN
WILLIE H. SMITH

SPECIAL WRITERS
Lorraine Leper?
Virginia Robinson
Naunerle Calhoun
I

IARY C. TERRELL
ASSISTANT

td

Shannon
Jay Luclan

Aeus Editor

.

NEWS EDITORS
Ben F. Tavior

John St. John

REPORTERS
Mary A. Brand
Florence Kell-- y
Bag Kash
Malcolm Shotwell
Harry Kremer
David 8alyers

Wallace Brlggs
BiHy Huston

Charles Bennett
Isabel Preston
Walter Rlddell
Leo Spence
Will H. Wasson
Billy Arthur
J. DELMAR ADAMS
JAY LUCIAN
HENRY McCOWN
8 PORTS

J.

B

Wellt

Earl Bourgeois
Frank Borrlet
Jamet D. Stephen:
Carl Boont
Helen Allrey
Charlotte Coffman
Miriam Rosen
r'argaret Cllnkscalea

dt.
Asst.

ports (ditor
Sports tutor
Sports Editor

WRITERS
Max Lancaster

Norman Oarllng
NED TURNBULL

BuilMlS Manager

ADVERTISING STAFF
Ernie Shove
Dave Difford
Ike Moore
C. V.

C

7FMAN

Circulation Manager

THE WOLVES HOWL
Following
the resignation of
Coach Harry Gamage, persistent
and groundless rumors concerning
the business affairs of the University athletic council have gone the
rounds of the city and campus.
Townspeople, the type of persons
who sit in the stadium and shout
"kill the coach" and similar
outbursts have led to the
passing along of these rumors by
some students also guilty of this
deplorable practice.
The sum and substance of this is
to the effect that If the athletic
council kept their "fingers out of
the pie" everything would be running smoothly as concerns the athHas
letic affairs of the University.
any intelligent person or persons
ever doubted the fact that the
council is doing everything In its
power to keep the athletic situation
at the University on a high plane?
If there Is any doubt, no person
has translated that doubt into a
proved fact. Until any such statements have sound basis in truth, is
it not unfair so to condemn a group
of men who are striving to go forward in the face of criticism? No
person can condemn a man or set
of men for trying whether or not
they enjoy marked measure of success.
Students, prone to join in the
howling chorus, are evidently confused as to the duties of the athletic
council. To listen to their idle prattle one would gather the impression
that the Individual members of the
council receive remuneration for
their services. Such is not the fact
but it is surprising how many students will actually believe another
accusing student who takes it upon
himself to "guard" the rights of
the student body. One student endeavo