xt7vdn3zw66p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vdn3zw66p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610119  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 19, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 19, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7vdn3zw66p section xt7vdn3zw66p Editor Discusses

Today's Weather t
Cooler, Snow;
Low 32
High

ROTC Collection;
See Page Four

3,

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI I, No. 56

LEXINGTON,

KY., THURSDAY, JAN. 19. 19fl

Dean Welch
Appointment

AF Cadet Police
Finance Own Trip

Still Rumor

Dean Frank J. Welch of tlie
College of Agriculture declined
to comment yesterday on a
rumor that he is in line for an
appointment as undersecretary
or assistant secretary of AgriKenculture in President-elec- t
nedy's administration.
A story

day's

appearing

In

Courier-Journ-

that Dean Welch

...

w

To Inauguration

Jr

;

Wednes-

reported

was being conpost In the

sidered for a hih
Agriculture Department.
The Dean was quoted In the
story as saying he had not been
asked to Join the administration
and had no plans to leave the University.
When questioned by a Kernel
afterlate yesterday
reporter
noon, the Agriculture dean said
Another First
he still did not care to comment
Alvin Polk, sophomore in the Speech and Dramatic Arts Departon the rumor.
ment, receives a record for first place in a recent Music Humanities
contest. Dr. Robert B. Fitzgerald, left, head of the Department
Dean Welch served for 14
of Music, presents the award to Polk. Some 200 students entered
as one
months, during
the contest in which they were asked to select their five- favorite
of three directors of the Tennesrecords.
see Valley Authority. He returned
to UK In early 1959.
When Dean Welch resigned from
the T.V.A. he said that in order
to protect pension rights at the
University, he felt he had to leave
unless assured of a full nine-yea- r
aptxintmnt from President Eisenhower in 1960.
He had been appointed to fill
three remaining years of a r.ine-yeThe University Marching 100 left at 5:30 p.m. yesterday
term but left after 14 months.
The position he left was filled by to march in the inaugural parade for John F. Kennedy in
iirooKs
Lntteci w,..i. ;...,,., liY.'.l iv
iormer
nayes,
frnm
RlutpQ
s
the band members, the UK group included
Rock, Arkansas.

UK Marching 100
Goes To Capitol

All single junior men with
addresses have
n
L
i
vyiui:-uiiuuuru iuv uir ,rc- i ( .! iluii uifx,
uir
iirn iii.ii nicv win.
be required to live in a dormitory next semester,
.
Dean Leslie L. Martin said that
ll
letters were mailed to the Juniors room
part of lheir lary ir he
last week reminding them of the man's
is "essential to earnjob
requirement of which they were ing his way through school,"' Dean
first informed in September.
Martin said.
The information was carried in
Commuters, fraternity members
a Kernel news story at the begin- who live in
fraternity houses, and.
ning of the school year. At that of course, married students are
time it was stated that the dorm
exempt.
requirement was not new but was
Thp rionn's nffire hns hppn rp.
enforcing a standing Unhersity ceivmg seVeral requests for ex
regulation.
cuses every day. Dean Martin said
Letters were sent to 253 men. each
would be considered
Excuses will be given men who on its request
Individual merits.
The change was necessitated
when Haggin Hall, housing 573
men, was constructed. There were
(ipproximutely 70 vacancies in the
men's dorms last semester, the
dean said.

.ii

i

... ,...

3 Employees

Dismissed

For Larceny-

The Air Force ROTC Cadet
Police and sponsor corps will make
the trip to Washington to participate in the inaugural parade Friday. But the cadets must finance
their own trip.
Approximately 70 cadets and 21
sponsors will leave this afternoon,
Col. R. W. Boughton, head of the
Aerospace Science Department,
said yesterday.
has raised
The department
$1,645 of the $2,300 needed to
make the trip. Members of the
Cadet Police have agreed to pay
their own way in order to march
in the parade for the inauguration
of President-elec- t
John F. Kennedy, Capt. Dale Rook, a depart
ment instructor, said.
He said that it would cost each
man approximately $14 for the trip
and lodging. Everyone will have to
for their own meals.
Wednesday, the Aerospace Sci- ence Department
appealed to
ROTC cadets for donations to
the trip. They were asked
to permit instructors to draw the
money from the $10 deposit each
ROTC cadet must make at the be- ginning of the year or to make
contributions.
The action was taken after an

attempt to raise $5,000 from local
businessmen had netted just S5t0.
Another attempt to raise money
a proposal in Student Congress
to grant $100 to help pay the expenses for the trip was defeated
Monday night.
In announcing yesterday that
the cadets would make the trip.
col. Boughton said that they were
fortunate In being able to stay at
Ft. Meyers Air Force Base only
half miles from the
center of Washington.
"Every hotel, motel, and house
from Washington to Baltimore will
be filled," he said.
The group will leave Lexington at 2:30 p.m. today and will
return Saturday afternoon.
After the parade the cadets and
sponsors will visit Quantico Ma-prine Base. Va., for dinner and
dancing. They will go sight-seein- g
Saturday before they leave for
Lexington at 3:30 Saturday after-finan- ce
noon.
The colonel said he thought the
cadets should march in the parade
even though the University Is
already represented by the March-cas- h
ing 100, which left for Washington
yesterday.

Drama Sophomore Wins
Music Humanities Prize

Alvin Polk, sophomore in the Speech and Dramatic Arts
Department, was awarded a gift certificate for the purchase
Lewis. Mrs. Warren Lutz. and Jerry
Ball, an instructor in the Music of a record Wednesday after winning a contest sponsored
Department, as chaperones.
by tne Music Department record library.

Junior Men Required
To Move Into Dorms
i

Eight Pages

The band in Its first appear- contest. open to some 200
After each selection, tell
ance in an inaugural parade, will Muslc Humanities students, was player). sentence
ln one
why you chose
particular work
ArenuT from the Capitol ' V i.hr" IV
- Poik-T
selections ranged from
YL
V,,
.
7.
Z
"
i. j. b. uaney, recora Strauss' "Death and Transflgura-an- d
Presidents' Square, and pass in ilbrartan
originator of the tion" to "Beethoven's Symphony
review in front of the official contest.
No. 7." The reason Polk selected
reviewing stand at the White
poH
Loulsvillian, the latter work was listed on his
House.
would probably select a entry blank as "For its exultant
said he
Judges will be posted along the
cermelodies and incredible rhythmic
line of march to grade individual work by Mozart with his gift
drive."
units in the parade. Trophies will tificate.
Mrs. Dailey said the entries
The contest began Jan. 9 and
be awarded to the best perform
ended Jan. 13. Judging was held were judged for their balance,
ing entries.
and ingenuity.
Dr. Warren Lutz. director of the last weekend and the winner an- - variety,
Marching 100, left Tuesday to at- - nounced yesterday morning. Judges
tend a planning meeting for all in the contest were R. Bernard
Kc'iituckiaii Queen
band directors. They will plan or- - Fitzgerald, head of the Music
eanization and position of the Department, Dr. Kenneth Wright,
University residence units '
music theory instructor, and Miss
bands in the parade.
planning to enter a candidate in
Activities including a tour of Mildred Lewis, professor of music. the 1961 Kentuckian Queen conTo enter the contest, the stuWashington are planned for the
test must submit their applicaUK group until 1:30 p.m. Thurs- - dents answered the query: "If you tion forms before Friday, These
day, said Miss Lewis, a chaperone. were shipwrecked on a deserted forms will be accepted In the
After this, the students will have island, what five records would Kentuckian office, Room 210,
the afternoon and evening free, you choose to have with you? (The Journalism Building.
The group will return Saturday, island is provided with a record

Z J.nT-

-

Three janitors emploed by
the University liave been fired
for stealing from domitory
rooms. Dr. Frank D. Peterson,
vice president for business administration announced y esterday.
The three, employed In Hugiu

Hall, the new men's dormitory, adand
mitted ' stealing cigarettes
money from the dorm rooms. Dr.
Peterson said. They were dismissed
immediately and turned over to
local police.
"Similar offenses by other employees will result in Immediate
dismissal," Dr. Peterson warned.
No information concerning the
residents cf rooms from which the
thefts were made nor the amounts
Involved was made available.

In,,

'"ihii

lmmlkmmm mmmm

It's hard to Imagine but some day within
the next few years that area ( campus now
occupied by shovels, trucks, bulldozers, mud,
and the great hole will luk like this. This

,n m., wmtm

nmu

ifcju.iiuaw

What An Imagination

architect's drawing depicts the completed
science "building now under construction
between Kose Street and Kastle and Pence
Halls. When completed the $5.500.h)0 struc

"

" in

wi

H1H

J.l

jl1

ture will house the chemistry and physics
departments now located in those two
buildings.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Jan. 19, 1961

Ivy Educator Foresees
Colleges

Three-Yea- r

Twenty, years from now pres- tiize colleges won't have a fresh- nan year, participants attending
the Conference of Secondary-Bcho- ol
Principals were told Mon
day afternoon.
"This Is because students will
have done more advanced work in
high school Dr. Matthew Oaffney.
to Harvard President
assistant
Emeritus James B. Conant, said.
"It Is amazing how rapidly
changes suggested In Dr. Conant's

KIHIMtMT

HKIWTOH

ENDS TODAY
Hitchcock's
"STRANGER ON A TRAIN"
Also
"THE WRONG

MAN"

STARTS TOMORROW
2 SHOWS DAILY

First Time In
Lexington At New
Low Popular
Prices!
No Reserved Seats

first report concerning senior high
schools have come about," Dr.
Oaflnry told the 140 state high
school principals in attendance.
In the report. Dr. Conant rec- ommended that each high school
should have at least 100 graduates
per year and that English teachers
should have no more than 100
students.
Reporting on Dr. Conant's re- cently published book on Junior
High .. Schools, Oaflney said, . It
..
.
doesn t appear to maner wnemer
inninr hih is ft three-vefVinn1 nr nnrt nf a
school,
"What Is done in each grade
school Is ad- and the way the
ministered are what makes the
difference." Conant's assistant said.
conference was
The two-da- y
sponsored by UK, the Kentucky
Association of Secondary-SchoPrnicipals, Kentucky Education
Association, and the State De- partment of Education.

ACADEMY AWARDS!
Hf nm'C TVantnt!rn nf
WILLIAM WYLER'S

CHARTIDN
HAtt

HESTON 'JACK
STEPHEN

HARAREEI

RWYKKS
BOYD

All

SEN
PHONE

NOW
n't

111

"THE GRASSl
ISGHEENEk
noMournaMMMi

T

with general
T ONDON
ZAP) -- The death decision . was greeted
Tn,, Prlaon officers' As- sentence has been passed on 8Oclati0n expressed delight and the
car belonging to Thomas J.
grim old Dartmoor, a prison League for Penal Reform echoed

Ftt'Ofllv-T-

A

ll

Scott, president of Phi Kappa Tau
fraternity, was Involved In a breale- lng and entering case early yeater- aay morning.
Scott's car was stolen early
Wednesday from the Phi Tau house
parking lot by James Galloway,
Paris. Oalloway drove from the
house at 340 S. Broadway to a
service station at 1398 Leestown

n

A
uu.

r?onntv nntroimen lund him
thprp hirfinir under a irrense rack
at 4:33 a.m. He had 162 packs 01
cigarettes with him plus some tools
belonging to the station.
Scott learned that his car was
missing at 5:30 a.m. when the
patrolmen picked him up and took
him to identify the auto. He said
it was filled with auto batteries
and cartons of cigarettes taken
from the service station.

i

n fnrhiVl.linfr pven its the sentiment.
nf it my uke several years be
i,.ii. ,1 cm

Uritam S most Jiarucneu trim- - ,re tliri into action to tear down
pile of atone,
jnas fof mQre tj,an a centviry the
.
Thirty new prisons are contem
a Halt.
and
plated in the building program
d

Home Secretary R. A. Butler
has decided to tear it down as
gO0n as room can be found for
.me rcn
i
In riAtv tail
... j
ujv uuuivco
planned under a three and one- -- million-dollar
half
building pro- gram.
n..n i land
hnnu nrisonrra
.
.
...
or the Napoleonic wars, iwnmiwr
became the Alratraa of Brltaln't
mr
ur II l mui: II mr i T uctawav
meant a fantastic battle with
nature.
High on the moors of Devon
the wettest place In wet England-Dartm- oor
is almost dripping and
surrounded by mist.
If a man got out, and many did,
the moor or the mist eventually got
him, The longest any Dartmoor
prisoner remained at large was
175 days. None ever made It com- -

noi.AV
writer

Students' going to Florida be- tween semesters will probably bring
back shells collected along the
shore.
The students' collections will
certainly look puny compared to
those displayed in the Zoology
Museum in the Funkhouser Build- ing.
And probably no single shell will
compare to the museum's
clam shell. Not all of the
shells which come from around
the world, are of such proportion.
Many are small and delicate.
Another display in the museum,
located in the basement of the
building, Includes a
wildcat, an unusual freak of
nature. Various animal skeletons
which can be seen are those of an
antelope, gorilla, hyena, and a
horse, Hanover, an outstanding
race horse of his time.
A feature of the museum Is a
stuffed bird case with every kind
of bird from a peacock to a crow
on display.
For the sportsmen there is a

collection of deep sea fishes caught
off the Florida coast including a
shark, dolphin, barracuda, and
sail fish.
Displays depicting the evolution
of various parts of animals' bodies
show how the animals adapted
themselves to changes. The study
0f the evolution of the horse is
m0st complete.
OPEN DAILY

Anv

HOW

a cell.

Proposals to rebuild Dartmoor '
were rejected. The
Institution Is crumbling. Main- .

Dunn Drugs
Prompt
RaliabU
DELIVERY
SERVICE

I

NOW

I

Fountain Service
Opt

KERR

WILL DUNN
i

DRUG COMPANY
Lime and Maxwell

iijiMva

"HIGH TIME"

Bing Crojby
Fabian Tuesday Weld
"HELL TO ETERNITY"
Jeffrey Hunter Patricia Owan

and Short Ordara
7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Sandwich

J

TECHMCOlOa

JO

L

FOR THE FINEST IN
REFRESHMENT TRY

When things get too close for comfort

iyM 0IC6
1

944 Winchester

Rd.-

1

DEODORANT
'

'

'

.

I

Old Spice Slick Deodorant brings you safe,
protection!
sure,
s
that skip.
Better than

-

STICK

J

Block from University
820 S. Limestone St.

1

PRESCRIPTION
SERVICE

13,624,000,000.

Very Big On
Flavor

.

RAPID

WORTH MORE DEAD
OKLAHOMA CITY (
last year apparently were
worth more dead than alive. They
had $5,724,000,000 worth of life Insurance in force while personal
income was estimated at

Bord en s

1Qfl

000 a year Just to keep it standing.

1:30 P.M.

Cnsvy GtiM
SHOWING!

.ninrfln.
ri7r.,..B

leuainc uc

secretary's

nncrirMHi
fcyelia

desLKned to relieve overcrowding.
There are 21,000 convicts Jammed
lnto 47 jaiis in England and Wales.
I
Ik... f n
uu
o.uuu 01' .1
uwui

.....

Clam Shell
In Funhhouser Collection P1'
pat
v.m.i stiff
300-Poun- d

R

TONER OF 11

Student's Car Famous London Prison
Stolen; Used Gels Death Sentence

ar,.yJ.,.v,,w.,p.
Better than creams that are areasv
and messy.

By land or by sea

NEW

PLASTIC

CASE

me set
FOR

INSTANT

1.00

I "'

hupo'"' I

tlvlHu

USE

you need this Social Security.

* 3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Jan. 19, lI-It Tays To Advertise
SOUTMMDf

Is Your Wardrobe Suitable?

Milliards Match

NKW YOHK The big fashion question for spring is, "Is
your wardrobe
Can you put two and one together and come up with an
easy fitting skirt, blouse and jacket combination? Does adding
one and one result in a dress very fun. whatever the Kilho"cUe,
topped with a light coat lined in ense ,s the characteristic thkt alj
a fabric that matches?
toppers share.

Students who want to enter
the billiards tournament sponsored by the Student I'nion
Hoard must Men up in the game
room of the St B, by Wednesday,
Jan. 23. Ilriilge and table tennis
tournament application will be
taken In Room 122 of the SI B
until Fib. 17.

"

The nation's fashion trend set- trrs have created the bigRest coat,
suit and costume dress year in
American haute couture history.
It will be a coat and suit spring,
designers say, because the way
busy women work, play and travel
demands It. In a matter of hours
you travel at Jet speed from one
climate to another. And it is all
in a day's work or play for you to
move through a variety of social
situations without an occasion to
change clothes. Costumes let you
be flexible.
This spring's coat and Jacket ail- houette
are diversified. In
straight-lin- e
suits belted and box
Jackets end anywhere from a few
Inches from the skirt hem to the
waist. Or they are moderately or

Coats, suits and Jackets, too, rely
on textiles and their patterns for
If a humininsbird falls off Us
the costume"s personality.
d
perch In the dark, It can't find
Jumbo checks,
plaids, and monotone woolens, Its way back on again.
polished fleeces and ribbed wors- teds emblazed with color brighten
up the spring picture. Even suits
Commonwealth Life
with classic lines make a new ap- Insurance Company
pearance in meshy, spongy, lacy
or shaggy textures,
Oiddy, gaudy prints combining
Insuring More
the most unlikely hues appear as
Kentuckians Than Any
blouses, reappear In flashes as
Other Company
Jacket lining, and or top them all
as turbans
and
cloches.
The separate spring costumes do
not mix well outside the immedi- ate family. They are too happily
matched to each other.

TAKE A BREAK

In The Kentucky Kernel

DAVID NOYES

CLASSIFIED ADS
if

rbn.

a thi

1104

FOR

"tNT

Front furnished apartment.
Large bedroom, kitchen; private bath;
entrance; utilities paid. Reasonable. Excellent location. Apply 260 South Limestone.
6Dxt
FOR KENT

rOR SALI

SALE 978 CEI.IA LANE (Garrlen-side- i.
Immediate possesion.
Bedford
stone 3 bedrooms, 1
baths, entrance
g
room combination,
hall,
panelled family room, and kitchen, utility, room with hobby area, 2 fireplaces,
attached garage, attic fan. Well landscaped lot with tree. In perfect condition. Priced right. Phone
lOJxt
FOR
SALE or SENT 2 StromberR-Carlso- n
Stereo speakers, amplifiers and
mike head. Will rent $10 a night or
17J4t
sell $150. Phone Jean Bates
FOR

Single or double rooms for
4 doors from Fine Arts BMtf.
17J4t
Lane. Phone

FOR RENT

students;
316 Rose
FOR

RENT

FOR

Private rooms for
S. Limestone.

FOR SALE 10 volume set of Millers
Photographic History of Civil War.
Copyright 1911. good condition; $40 and
portable sun lamp. 403 E. Maxwell after
2 p.m.
19J2t

Ride January 24th or later
York or New England states.
Final destination Vermont. Call 6323.

For Information Call

402 First Federal Bldg.

Phone

Typelna to do In my home.
18J4t

RIDE WANTED
to New York City, on
January 26 or 27. Will share expenses
and help drive. Phone
after 7

Furnished sleeping room!.
bath. For male student or
1414
Cochran.
children.
night. 19J2t
day or

RENT

Private
couple.
Phone

No

FOUND
Glasses. Men's brown frame
glasses between Ag. Building and Med.
18Jlt
Center. Thone 6401.
MISCELLANEOUS

48 HOUR SERVICE
KODA COLOR FILM
PROCESSING
BLACK & WHITE
24 HOURS
PHOTOFINISHING
UK PHOTO
214 Journalism Bldg.

19J2t

p.m.

A combo with variety
FOUR SOUNDS
FIDE WANTED to New York Citv be- is available for your social events.
tween semesters. Call
or
Marpe Call Dick Walker.
Farrant or Gloria Burt 6255.
HOxt
19J2t

FREE
"Round-the-clock-

Dial
Phone Service
Mail and phone orders promptly
and carefully filled!

"

AT

LUCA.

Coffee
Shop

500 Rose Street

GO ORDERS

NOT INCLUDED

SORRY

....

Introducing

McKenzie Massage Studio
157 S. LIMESTONE
Phone

Your specialist

in steam bath and massage.
McKenzie invites your visit
Ralph

STEAM BATH $1.50
MASSAGE $3.00
BOTH $4.00

One-derf-

ul

Jacket of Champions

9 to 5:30,

Open Monday through Friday

for All Sports!

COUPON
This coupon when brought in will entitle
owner to a $1.00 discount on a steam
bath and massage.

PUT MORE FUN IN YOUR LIFE

CRYSTAL ICE CLUB
GARDENSIDE PLAZA
SHOPPING CENTER

MORNING

50c Adult

p.m.; 3:00-3:4-5
p.m.; 7:30-10:p.m.; 7:30-9:5- 0
p.m.;
p.m.; 7:30-9:3-0
p.m.;
0
p.m.
p.m.;

McGregor drizzler
$12.95

$11.95
SIZES

(LONGS . . .

)

America's favorite year 'round jacket

2

)
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preferred

d

g

p.m.
2

..

men everywhere. Tailored for acby
comfort with deep cut pivot
tion and
armholes, under arm cloth breather holes, double
Famous Drizzler cloth, a
protection shoulders.
cotton, is comrayon, 40
sturdy blend of 60
pletely showerproof, fully washable.
sports-minde-

Ice Skating Indoors Or Outdoors
10:10 a m 1 00
MON. THRU TMURS
FRIDAY
10:30 .m..l:00 p.m.; 3:00-3:4-5
SAT.
10:30 m..l 00 p.m.; 2:30-3:3-0
0
SUNDAY
p.m.; 4:30-7:0-0

p.m.
p.m.

t

SESSION

I Children

OTHER SESSIONS
$1.00 Adults

75c Children

Club

Restaurant
. . . Now Open

mm

For Your
Convenience

50c
RENTAL SKATES
ARRANGE A PARTY NOW
Coll

"DON'T HIBERNATE

l

329

permonth.
or

SALE
Cushman motor scooter.
Needs some work. Best offer over $.10. FOR RENT Furnished apartments for
Phone 8801 before Friday.
19J2t one, two or three. Private entrance,
utilities paid. $35 per person. Ci'lt
1959
FOR SALE
Austin Healey I960,
19J2t
3.000 mile engine. 12,000 miles on car.
Perfect. Phone 6725.
19J4t
FOUND
FOR

17J4t

FREE

Coffee

n..n

C.py deadline 12 o'cUrk
before puhllrstl.n.
W.jrn. Janes

WANTED
to New

Consultant

Friday, Saturday (not Sunday), Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday Nights from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

FREE

'i Mile South of UK Canipui
1533 Nicholasville Rd:
BASIL OVERTON
Minister
Phona

The rarest North American bird
Is the ivory billed woodpecker.

WANTED

Coffee

CHURCH OF CHRIST

WANTED

EXAM SPECIAL
FREE

3

MEN'S SHOP

ICE SKATE!'

MAIN

FLOOR

* Passing The ROTC Hat

With the many necessary college
expenses such as tuition, room, and
board come the marginal and sometimes questionable costs of texts (resocial
quired and supplementary),
life, clothing, and for those unfortunate enough to be enrolled in Air
Force ROTC "voluntary contributions."
From within the ranks of the local
AFROTC detachment come some
commercial schemes more suited to
the office of a late 19th century industrial robber baron than to an
academic department of a state university and a branch of the United
States armed forces.
In the past, AFROTC cadets have
found themselves asked to "voluntarily" contribute to a fund to provide Christmas baskets for under"volunLexingtonians,
privileged
tarily" purchase Military Ball tickets,
and buy life insurance from a local
Air Force Reserve member.
It is difficult to conceive of the
average freshman cadet failing to
"volunteer" some amount of money
at least once during the several trips
through the ranks made by the
Christmas collection team (which
formerly was also an inspection team,
dealing out demerits on other trips).
The Military Ball incident of two
years ago found cadets having demerits "fixed" if they bought ball
tickets or produced proof that they
had bought tickets.
For years an Air Force Reserve
lieutenant colonel who sells insurbefore AFROTC
ance appeared
uniform and,
classes in a moth-eateunder the guise of helping plan the
futures of prospective Air Force officers,, extolled the virtues of his in
n

surance to his captive audiences.
Now the AFROTC has come up
w ith its slickest scheme yet. By merely
signing a form conveniently provided
by their instructors, cadets may authorize the AFROTC to take as much
of their $10 military deposit fees as
is needed to raise $5,(XX) to send the
cadet sponsors to the inaugural
parade.
Cautious cadets who choose to
make cash contributions are asked to
sign their names that they might renotes." With final
ceive "thank-yoexamination time at hand, many
cadets no doubt expect their "thank-yo- u
notes" to be in the form of better grades.
This whole scheme smacks of
psychological coercion. The
feelings of most students (and apparently of Lexington merchants who
came up with only several hundred
dollars toward the necessary $5,000)
were summed up in a letter we recently received from a disgruntled
student who said, "I wouldn't give
$5,000 to see them go to hell, let alone
Washington." Still the AFROTC persists in plaguing its cadets with its
activities.
money-raisinIf the University administration
is aware of the Air Force ROTC's
many schemes, we cannot see why it
has not acted to bring them to an
end. If it is not aware of such goings-on- ,
it is its duty to remedy this lack
of knowledge and act quickly and
effectively.
Such questionable practices, typical of more undesirable elements of
our society and reminiscent of political systems contrary to the traditional
American system, have no place in a
university environment.

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'But tee only need $5,000 to get to Washington,'

THE READERS' FORUM
Not Thoughtless

To The Editor:
Wanda Mahoney is correct in saying she did not know everything concerning Catherine CamplR'll. Speaking as the girls at the University of
Kentucky who knew Cathy lcst, we
would like to set her straight on a
few matters.
First, Cathy did hear from her
family. Iler sister called the night before the incident to wish her a happy
birthday and to say there were presents waiting for her at home.
Second, her friends in the dorm
gave her a surprise party on her
Amherst selects its student body birthday Tuesday with ice cream and
from the presumed cream of the crop. a cake inscribed, "Happy Rirthday,
Within this group, however, even the Cathy."
admissions experts cannot always
Third, that day her roommates
predict which students will perform
gave her presents and teased her in
best. This must raise doubts in their the traditional ways befitting birthminds as to whether they are turndays.
And fourth, all the girls of Jewell
ing down many students, supposedly
marginal, who might be just as capHall are behind Cathy and are prayable as those who are admitted.
ing for her return to a normal happy
The survey at Amherst revealed
life. None of the girls have made any
something else that must have shaken unkind remarks pertaining to her
In fact, they plan to send her
college authorities. The students
whom instructors find most promisan autographed hound inscribed with
ing, most interesting and most crepersonal messages and wishes from
ative are not necessarily those to each girl.
whom they give the best marks.
Does this sound like a group of
Of the 141 students singled out by thoughtless people who have no feelthe instructors, almost 30 percent are ing toward one of their dorm mates?
actually in the bottom half of their We think not.
Tat Mohan
classes academically. Over half have
Tni'DIE Pl'CKKTT
grade averages below 80 percent.
This led the dean to conclude that
(We understand that the preced"intelligence test scores and marks in ing letter not only expresses the feelschool are not always true indicators
ings of the two Jewell Hull residents
of the worth of a student or even of
who signed it, but the feelings of all
the power of his intellect."
the women who live in Jewell Hall.
The Editor. )
Roth professors and admissions officials can be fooled, and often are.

How To Pick Ablest Students
At Amherst College in Massachu-

setts, the dean of admissions asked
the faculty to give the names of students in their classes who seemed
to them to be "unusually creative
and imaginative," the sort they most
enjoyed teaching. He received, in all,
of the
141 names, roughly
one-fift- h

upperclassmen.
lie then set out to discover what,
if anything, these 141 students had in
common. His purpose was to find
some "common characteristics that
would enable (Amherst) to choose
more of the same in the future."
His analysis revealed that the students had little in common that could
have been detected when they were
admitted to Amherst, except that all
were considered good enough students to be admitted to one of the
nation's finer small colleges.
Most came from the top quarter of
their high school classes, but some
didn't. Most made a good impression
in interviews before admission, but
a few made a poor impression. The
proportion of public school to private
school graduates correspond almost
exactly to the proportion in the student body as a whole.

-- DesMoines Sunday

Register

The Kentucky Kernel
of
Kentucky

University

lecond cUl matter und tht Act of Mnrih 3. 1879.
Entered at the post offic t LuiiiKton.
we.k durii.K thr r.uuWr li.l year exi.pt dunuf holiday! i)d emt.
Publubed loiu limn
YEAH
SIX DOLLARS

A SCHOOL.

Editor
Newton Spencer, Sportt Edi'or
Managing Editor
Hobbie Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Stuart Coldfarb, Advertising Manager
Aijcb Aun, Society Editor
Skip Taylor and Jim Chanson, Cartoonists
Dob Anderson,

Mm Wenninger,

THURSDAY NEWS STAFF

Korris Johnson, News Editor

IJili

Tevis Bennett, Associate

Newton Spenckr,

Sport

Selling Heeonl Straight

To The Editor:
In Friday's Kernel, Miss Carolina
Hernandez chooses to criticize the
press for releasing the name of the
girl charged with starting the Jewell
Hall fire. In the course of the letter,
she blithely blames the press for refusal to print the names of those
involved in last year's cheating incidents.
While I will not comment upon
the policy of this year's editor, I know
enough about the circumstances of

last year's cheating cases to point out
the fallacy in her charges.
We did not protect the students
caught cheating; the UK administration did. We asked the dean of men
for the names of the students and
would have printed them; we were
refused. We were told, although we
did not necessarily believe, that it
was the right thing to withhold the
names of those apprehended and
punished.
It was implied in Miss Hernandez'
letter that an effort was mi le to protect the strong and punish the weak.
I'm sure she knows, as an honest girl,
that all cheating is a weakness and
reflec ts moral deficiency. I hope, also,
she feels that the press is not the
grotesque and irresponsible demon
that she pictures. Relieve it or not,
the people who control t lie prcsj
have access to the same ethical standards of our society that she has.
However, I won't criticize Miss
Hernandez for deliberately depicting
the press in this manner; I only say
she did not know the facts.
Rill Neikihk

Tin Film Series
To The Editor:
To you for you kind editoiial
and to the students who have written
appreciative Utters to the Kernel concerning the English Department's
Film Series, let me express gratitude
both for myself and the Film Series
Committee. And in view of the approving comments on the W. C. Fields
festival, let me call attention to the
fact that in our next film "David
Coppcrfit Id" W. C. Fields plays the
part of Mr. Mieawber. Those who
saw the festival last week will be
interested to observe the difference
between Fie lds' art in the shorts and
the more
Dickens
portrayal.
W. C. Fields, however, is only
one of an excellent cast in a fine
production of the Dickens novel.
Other notable performers include
Lionel Rarrymore, Rasil Hathhone,
Freddie Rartholomew, Madge Evans,
Edna May Oliver, Lewis Stone, and
Elsa Lanchester. The date is March

U.
W. S. Waiuj, Head
Department of English

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Jan.

19,

19&1-

-3

Spindletop Development To Begin In Spring

ID VAN HOOK
Krrnrl Staff WritVr
Tlir coining of spring will
find the first stage of the
Spintllctop Research Center
development in progress with
the completion arid dedication
of the administration building.
By

Hailed as one of the great advances In Kentucky industrial
research, the center is beginning
to take form, somewhat slowly but
yet surely.
The (roup of government, education, and Industry leaders working on the renter! development are
waiting anxiously for the completion of the first buildinf to be
constructed for the renter,
Floyd I. Falrman, president of
the Kentucky Utilities Company,
T.ho is serving as president of the
Spindletop Board of Directors, said
hat the administration building
Is scheduled for completion