xt7vhh6c399t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vhh6c399t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1987 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, 1987, no. 1 text images Kentucky Alumnus, 1987, no. 1 1987 2012 true xt7vhh6c399t section xt7vhh6c399t ; V >   _ <_   Z, S; ` _ g > · Q., ., _ ,. , .‘}_ V
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 _ University Archives
.. Margaret I. King Library - North
K     "" » University of KQDUJCKY
*'.;?»* 5*/ -~        Lgnngton, Kentucky 40506 ‘
- · It r   `
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 Q  gl  _;   eb  ©.)lID TlIH@ R©@©1l~ 241) =· »‘\ftll¤em¤S9 GA Nvilga ig ggagce l
PRE—GAME BRUNCH at The Northwest Hilton, Atlanta, per person — $9 '”°n, Aria 3  
GEORGIA BUS TRIP — Leave Commonwealth Stadium October 23, at 8:30 a.m. via charter ma $
bus to Atlanta; set-ups and ice on bus, lunch in route included. Two nights at the f l
Northwest Atlanta Hilton Inn, Friday evening dance, pre-game brunch, transfer to i
and from Athens and game ticket. Retum on Sunday, Oct. 25 with lunch included in
Knoxville (no luggage handling). MEMBER PRICE...$175 UK VS V - ,
Race I ANDy .
gxxrxrnieiaismrnr (Nw. ·n ¤ Nmirnriie, TN I lfH:¤j°,Y°A’;/Dance  
PRE-GAME BRUNCH at The Vanderbilt Plaza, per person — $11 anderbirt gl" 7 `  
VANDY BUS TRIP — Leave Commonwealth Stadium Nov. 6 at 1:30 p.m. via charter bus to /828
Nashville; set-ups on bus. Two nights at the Vanderbilt Plaza Hotel located by campus I
and 1/2 mile from Dudley Field. Friday evening dance, pre-game brunch, transfer to ,
and from Dudley Field and game ticket—all part of package. Retum on Sunday, Nov. 8 _ ` I
(no luggage handling). MEMBER PRICE ...... $165  
· ' ' `  I I .
.1. .. "——   L * °\‘ .
  (Nov. 1141) ¤ Gainesville, IFIL y   I     
PRE—GAME BRUNCH at The Holiday Inn West, per person — $11 gi t     A
` is   7/ l
-.. ...................................................................................... E · r
My check, payable to "UK Alumni Association" is attached. I understand that a full I
refund will be made ifl cancel my reservation prior to August 15. There is no .
guarantee a refund can be made after August 15.
Name _Rutgers pre-game brunch @ $15 pp  
Mailing _Georgia pre-game bmneh @ $9pp Q
Address _Georgia bus trip @ $175 pp {
_Vandy pre-game brunch @ $11 pp
A _Vandy bus trip @ $165 pp
_Florida pre-game brunch @ $11 pp
Phone#
RETURN TO: Athletic Trips, UK Alumni Association, King Alumni House, Lexington,
Ky. 40506-0119
1

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I Th the    
    9 A L U M N U S
I . - ;
I "’"""*` (D
Q COVER
I President SI Mrs.
Otis A. Singletary , , ,
I A11 H1StOf1C&l Perspcctwc
I 1987 OFFICERS History professor emeritus Carl Cone takes a look at the 2
I _-I-_  I 8-year presidential tenure ot Dr. Otis A. Singletary. O
PRESIDENT
` J. Thomas Tucker '56
{ Shelbyville   • '
I PRESIDENT-ELECT OI`l&·
I Jack Guthrie ’63
Louisville Gloria Singletary, the wite ot UK’s eighth president, brought
TREASURER grace and charm to Maxwell Place and a high level ot energy
I M'$· IOS F ’Vl°"*$ '38 to the arts scene in Lexington. O
2 Lexington
— SECRETARY  
Joy Brumtield '48
Isrmgwn TiII1€1i11€
ASSOCIATION STAFF;
F J DEIREETZRIAS A special souvenir insert notes many ot the signiticant events in ( 
Gy YUITI IS I · · · · 1
y ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR UK sdhistow which took place during Dr. Singletary s
sob c. wIIII¤R·sI*ss PVGSI €¤€V· ‘
EDITOR
Liz Howard Demoran
I68 P O
artmg Thoughts ,3
ASST. EDITOR
K J h ’86 . .
QYEQBEEZLIP President Singletary talks about events and people and future \
COORDINATOR plans in this exit interview with the Kentucky Alumnus. ‘
Ada D. Retbord '39
STAFF:
Brenda Bain
Julia Brothers
Linda Brumtield
Mm} my Class Notes  
B d D II II .
Egmjyncgaqihy A class by class update ot alumni. i
Ruby Hardin
Ennis Johnson
Betty W. Nelson '52
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_ University ol Kentucky Alumnr                 iz ~\._j' `T " 9 ig; I`}
Association, 400 Rose Street,     _   ~ ;’;e·/W or   _   { . ___ ‘»   I `/·
Lexington, KY 40506.01 IO, IO;   . '.   ` v’·   " ~ ,/ {F
**5 d~·=$·¤¤I·m¤ members-     ·‘ It   ‘ J *
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K ·)
(Qi
 
  Otis A. Singletary will retire june 30, 1954-1961, the year he was promoted
  1987 after 18 years as president of the to professor. In that time he published
V I -   University of Kentucky. He served two scholarly books and received three
\ I _.¤’   three times longer than the average for awards for teaching excellence, two of
 ` American university presidents. Among them by student choice.
· »   UK’s eight presidents, only james K, Having already been drawn into
i?}  Patterson and Frank L. IVIcVey administration at Texas as associate
I   presided in the Main Building for a dean of arts and sciences and as
  .’’’   . longer time. Since August, 1969, when assistant to the president, he became
    Singletary began at UK, there must chancellor of the University of North
. ,   have been little that went seriously Carolina-Greensboro in 1961.
    wrong and much that went right. His Before being called back to Austin in
  was not a do-nothing administration 1968, he served a year as director of the
  that merely drifted with the currents of _]ob Corps and two years as vice
  *‘'   opinion. president of the American Council of
.; -’·,   An 18 year administration is Education. He was vice chancellor of
F tiii   remarkable enough, but ending because academic affairs at the University of
  PQ   the president reaches retirement age Texas when the University of Kentucky
  ;‘_t·    rather than ending because of weariness began to court him.
  or opposition is unusual. The board of trustees accepted the
‘?  Along the way Singletary could have __ _ _ g ' _ v_ _ _’ _ A
  gone elsewhere but chose to remain and     Tb.  in    "' " _;   ·V
  finish out his presidential career at UK_     ·#{_§_,,[\ W. ‘&> gh  {   ·‘  
  All of this seems to say that Singletary    .!_;.·:i    F, __   ' ‘ {Vw 1 °
  and his family have been happy at UK. ·"=  ‘  i " '  `¥·*'·•'¤§,[fK“ V V  
  He has served the University and the   , Iég \}1§I~i . _ v i_ V _ _ ,
  `_,_’   state loyally and well. In his time the W Z? ,v xi ` f _·__ . `  F  ‘
  __l}_ i   University grew in academic and `          · · r v_
  physical stature disproportionately to  E; ig; V _§_;,i_g ' .;i` ` E .g ’}_.
  the increases in state funding. *,1 *`·———Q_ .= ;=_"‘·=5 · " i     i_"
J’_,;f_i,;;;  In the fall of 1968 when the search       ‘   1 `
  committee began to study applications ·;_     sl. _ _z;'%"’i I i
  for the presidency, one set of if     Q [ v'”;i§-`2 V ~ ’· _
  credentials stood out so prominently ‘   H .[   3 fi
    that by November the committee had   · , .. ; —__r ? A. ` _}
    agreed on the man they would like to  f i I, in ‘ _ ». `
fi   pursue further.   Lg "" _ 1 “ {
i _»,-·     H5; was 47 years old and     _ "= i 5
  unquestionably had a richer, broader,   _  
  and more varied educational and     -. . ,   g
  administrative background than any   _ . · ~ .-, t §
VQ:  previous president of the university. He   ..   5
  ig   fulfilled all the criteria a search   gates ,0 MGXWEH Plow
` _ .__.   committee might think described the
i»i.ii “ ,·'i   kind of president they would like to
    recommend to the board of trustees.
·``·‘'   He had earned a bachelor’s degree
"   and a Phi Beta Kappa key from
j   Millsaps College and a 1954 doctoral
.   degree in American history from
if  Louisiana State University. He taught
-_     C&I`l COHC at the University of Texas-Austin, from

 t
1 T H Ee
search committee’s recommendation 0n winning football season. That, institution, had been of concern to I
May 27, 1969. unfortunately, did not happen. In any Frankfort. Nebulous proposals for
The Singeltarys at once cleared up a case, the Singletarys revealed dealing with the problems concerned
point of concern in those days. Threats themselves as enthusiastic, genuine fans the University of Kentucky. One of the
to Maxwell Place by a projected library of intercollegiate athletics, a plus proposals, considering the merger of ~=
expansion unsettled many among the among most friends of UK. the two institutions, presented
public, especially alumni and One who was close to Singletary in irreconcilable difficulties. Looming
townspeople, During the preceding &ClIl'1il"liStI‘21tiOD afiirms that in his first ahead was the 1970 session ofthe
year the Kirwang had temporarily year, the new president seemed General Assembly with its tradition of
rissooged those {ears by reopening the comfortable with the way things were political solutions for higher education
doors and turning on the lights of going. If the statement refers to the problems. Heeding mounting
deserted Maxwell l>leiee_ The board left internal operations of the University sentiment, the legislature brought
it up to the new president to ehoose generally, it omits specific reference to Louisville into the state system with a
between living at Maxwell plaee or off certain tensions in the medical center separate identity, budget and board,
ernnpns Certain eonipns ggeneies and with the basketball coach who but with a mission more restricted than
dmoled at the possibility of setting was bcgrudgingly approaching that of UK. In that session the
themselves up in the revered old house, 1`€fif€m€Ht Hg€· legislature also elevated UK’s Northern
But the Singletarys decided to live in If it refers to other matters that were Kentucky Community College to a .
the traditional president”s home, imposing th€IT1S€lV€S during that fiI`St free-standing, four-year university,
revealing a keen appreciation of alumni year, the statement is little short of Because the total appropriation for  
and local feelings. Their decision amazing. Events of the late ’60s were higher education was not increased ¢
calmed apprehensions. As much as disturbing to well-wishers of the sufficiently to fund the existing ‘
anything else the Singletarys could have University. They would have severely institutions adequately, let alone the
done so early in their tenure at UK, shaken 21 less resilient 3Hd S&l1gui¤€ ‘two new ones, money was squeezed
that decision won friends and person in the first year of a presidency. from the budget requests of the six
influenced people favorably. In the early years of the Singletary existing state universities, leaving them
The only other thing that Cguld have administration the question of the with only token increases.
been so influential in getting them off i`U[U1”€ of the Uf1iV€fSitY of L0l1iSVill€, 3 The University of Kentucky suffered
to a good start would have been a financially stricken, municipal—county the most. Where formerly it received
V . i . stij ··r,v ti, i.,,j   about 62 percent of the state’s total
i — I   =ii   outlay for higher education, the
V I I , . it {   proportion declined after 1970 to about
  .,»   .   * i 4-2 percent.
  — Coming so soon after the budget cut `
‘ :r_r   Ii _ » of 1967, this one ushered in a decade
,_.·'¤;   I   ·' and a half of financial stringency. V
it     I Even though the period of prosperity
.;,,  _ ·"   · for UK in the mid—sixties was unusual,
p \   3 {   )   1 nevertheless, in that brief time people
_;‘ , I i     _   somehow persuaded themselves that lt
    _ `  .     W   was permanent. The experience of the
  _ >  .     "   ·   late ’60s was sobering and in 1970 the t
 g_g’ °`_  '  \ »     \ fj {   addition of two more institutions only ‘
      , , V ’ , 5,} gr   compounded the problem of financing
  t t``.     _ ‘ _ r`   Q ·· .,.   higher education for the state. The ;
 _ =_  ’    t_ _ . V   X slight increases in absolute dollar `
  _.=   · - a.···· W E Y, - jj   figures of the post-1970 appropriations
  gg    L"? ~   tos   l \ •   ,i yl   were offset by inHation and other rising
i  . ‘ . `/7 ¤ ` · nt costs.
` ‘ *"’   I     " gy    gg { T · ’?·_"*`2’.,f‘>' The budget cut of 1980 reemphasized
    i " `V ` ' V the tradition of stringency that
  characterized the history of the
  " A { __ University.
' ‘ The sound financial management of
Upon his appointment, Dr. Singletory meets the press. the Singletary administration was
.4 tts

 S I N G L E T A R Y Y E A R S
_ sometimes misunderstood and unfairly . — _ ~ X _ __   · ¢,;.,_ ·    
criticized. Limitations upon salary T       {    ‘     3   V _   `» `   'L
1 increases, recruiting, and new     i i         jr
programs could not be avoided. The if     tit`? iilt   ` pf   l   _` ‘  ` `
‘ money simply was not available. The ‘ i   V     \ ’     T. ’ yipi 1 A , `
increase of external funding helped . _ , Ji·   . •       i     rz _ _
brighten the outlook. Research grants ’_                   v ~ · _.,`¢,g,(I Z
and contracts, and the young   dg   ° ’,_, "  _        [ j 7*  — * .  J-. jh [   .
development program seeking private 8 A   [_   Q _ if     ‘ - I
and corporate gifts, became vitally ’   1 A ’ 1 1   J i     I j
important. The successes of the efforts i..  gw · .·         ‘- ,i_. ·   ;7`f`;`
to increase them were remarkable. In A   ° ? `   ,,·—   A l ,'.     , —·
1984-1985 the three major new projects §   .         T _     U T    
on campus—the Lucille Parker Markey T   ie;  t . T if   if   F, , deg 5.   t
Cancer Center, the John Gaines ‘ _     i · , M . LT   `fi _ ·`;  i it
Humanities Center, and the Maxwell   _ °_’_‘&g» » _ V _- Q_ V        
H. Gluck Equine Research Ceriter—     ?   _,   .     l     _    
Y were all made possible by generous gifts   — ·--~=~· 5   V     l           ‘
from the persons whose names they A       .,`\"i*   A   ii il ;§;    
  Private giving totaled 23 million in f           .i~. ·   5 i       5
1985, a 25-fold increase in the annual — \ gi"   L      g*" if _        t i Es `
amount over the first year of the - r i D     `   ..   `_’    1 ` T
administration, and almost a three-fold ·   i" in ""1   T`? if
increase gver 35 recent gi year as 198} Student protests erupt on the compus in l970.
President Singletary and his
administration devoted mueh time and a year of ferment, it seemed as though firmness to avoid the panic that might
effort to cultivating private giving The the term would end without a campus have plunged the University into
yields increased enormously. upheaval. Then, as the saying goes, tragedy. The events of that week are
This success reflected a change in "All hell broke loose." Campuses recalled mainly by the words, Kent
attitude among the public and alumni erupted across the nation after the State, which became part of the
and an enlarged understanding of the Cambodian invasion, and at Kent collective memory of American higher
University. Public universities, like State University National Guardsmen education.
private institutions, need to supplement shot four demonstrating students on After those May days, student
income from traditional sources and May 4th. activism expressed its aspirations in
V alumni and friends are responding to At a board meeting the next day, the more responsible ways and received
this need. new student government president more attentive hearing. When a student
Another source of external funding is announced a demonstration for the trustee addressed the complaint of
private and government research grants following day. The board postponed student under-representation in the
and contracts. These amounted to commencement. University Senate by proposing an
$12.5 million in 1968-1969; $26 million The next two days were the most increase of student membership from
‘ in 1977-1978, and $38.4 million in dangerous the campus ever knew. five to 40, his proposal was seen as an
 ` 1984-1985. The total for 1985-1986 Gatherings of students and strangers attempt to win for students the balance
was a little over $51 million. That is the milled about in the vicinity of Barker of power in situations when faculty
i largest one-year leap since the Hall, headquarters of ROTC. The city might be divided. The trustees accepted
Kentucky Research Foundation began police were present, and the governor a compromise number of 18.
to administer grants and contracts 40 called out units of the National Guard. As one trustee said at the time, it was
years ago. Arrests of demonstrators occurred but not always easy to be a trustee in those
Along with the financial pressures there was no untoward violence. A fire days. Later the Senate membership was
1 upon the University in 1969-1970, ruined the Euclid Avenue classroom recast to 125 faculty and 25 students.
there was a drumfire of complaints building and had a sobering effect. The The administration encouraged the
from student activists conditioned by campus quieted down and the semester widening of a student role in a way that
the unsettling persistence of the melted away. fostered a sense of responsibility.
Vietnam war. Most students had enough good Student—l`aculty participation
Toward the end of April, 1970, after sense and the administration enough became institutionalized and is now
UK 5

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` old enough to appear traditional. president run the University while master’s degrees and 129 doctoral f
i The Search Cgynmittcc {Oy Pyssidcm fulfilling their important advisory and degrees. These figures indicate that the l
  Singletary’s successor consisted of five authorizing role. importance of the University’s graduate ’
l trustees, four faculty members, one The gains made because ofthe good offerings are as they should be for the
from the community college system, relationship between Singletary and the flagship university with the chief '
and for the first time, one student who board were often achieved quietly- research mission in the state system.
is president of the Student Government they have been registered in a dignified The Medical Center also has grown f
Association. Critics of student and assured manner that has won for steadily. Today, as the `
conservatism overlook the fact that in the University, the trustees, and the Commonwealth’s major health  
recent years many causes of student administration, public confidence rare resource, the Medical Center  
discontent have been erased, and that in the history of public agencies in the encompasses more than three million =
responsibility for words and deeds has a state. square feet of space. Its colleges have
sobering elleet. Enrollment figures are a means of awarded almost 16,000 degrees, some
Singletary himself looks upon the expressing gains. Including the 400 certificates, and trained
formalization of a student role in community colleges, the total approximately 2,500 health professional
university governance as an important enrollment of the University in 1986-87 residents. Its college faculties include
    5 —     l l     ` ,     tt'. ‘   ii      tlmct 5 5 l““Cl* 55 5. V5 umafy
, 5   _` {       ,      ih         H'l€I]'1bCI`S plus   PYOTCSSIOHHI
  Q   4 l  .     .¤‘..:.£· *  ~—:``~     I librarians. More than 4 000 staff and
.¤. ma t 2 = ·    si   l M . X     —>>.e Q  ·   A r . . ’ .
.;   _) _ .,   { 2       ~      1» E i I   the Medical Center Library, with a
l .   { ..;*5 +,,3           M _,_            `,`°     _ collection of some 160,000 volumes,
_  4  . _, l ib  ss—t    if 2,000 iattmais, and 2,000 audio-visual
l it il  ii 5 5 { ~ V ii    "esf i ii       ititl€S, Support the Medical Center’s »
  · T A .     T     5 5 * t    d national research and service l
 5 tilt . 1    ‘   ~‘‘—. i ..—..··. =     , .,   ,   C “° ’ ’
 , it I   .i    g   Y. ¤     ·     és g   needs. Student enrollment for
~ ·‘ ·· t —.   _ ‘ ‘ V .   Q     ·     "  1985-1986 was approximately 2,150.
{Q ,  gg., t, _   A ` gg; ,   l   _»_,V: _       This figure includes 384 residents in
.   ``>` ` ` V 4 .   §  —_     allied health, dentistry, medicine, and
  _ i  as- LQ ' i § _    rr ~\ pharmacy. Itdoes not include many
  _ _ i . `     4 l   0 students from outside agencies who
    qs. ‘     _? I   obtain clinical training at the Medical
  `     ‘ _ S li   » '   ~    lt Center. _
  A; ’ gy      { *5* ·  t  _! /  gg. y   The increased number of students
‘   . *' `     A       and faculty and the introduction of the
                U   new programs necessitated continued
  = S,  ‘ _ •    `   *it—i     V  i       expansion of the campus.
  »     ¤ ·      T iff 'iii f l  A in   »ri./  ° 4 Student recreational activities, the
President Singlelory turns of the podium to thonlt Gov. l\/leirthci Loyne Collins for her role in securing agricultural and mcdical Sclemics all
ti $5 million ononymous gift tothe Equine Center. acquired U€W f&€ili[i€$ during
Singletary’s tenure. The Seaton
at‘liiev<·tnent of his administration. is ii ygcoyd 4(j_55()_ (jn [hc Lcxiiigigii Center, an enlarged Shively Sports t
nonetlieless important for having been Campus alqmc there sm 2],150 Center, playing fields, Commonwealth
*""""“l’ll*l“"l *9 ‘lUl*`flY- His students, an increase of 84 over 1985 Stadium Qfld South AgTiCUlU1F9·l
relationship with students is one of trust Wiicip with [hc sclcigiiw; admissions building, the Tobacco Research
ilml 'mlluill "*`*l)*"`i- policy in effect, some feared a decline in IHSUIUKG, and HOW th€ Maxwell Gluck ’
ln the charged atmosphere after the c¤m]|m(;m_ Equine Center form an arc to the east
early seventies, the administration The community college system, now and south ofthe Medical Center.
settled into a course directed toward with 14 colleges, has exceeded the Across Rose Street, the Warren Wright
improvement within close budget Lexington campus enrollment in each Medical Plaza, the Medical Annex, the
limitations. This required mutual ofthe past four years. Exclusive ofthe College of Nursing, the Morgan
t·onlident·e between the president and Medical Center, about 1,00() faculty Biological Sciences building and the
the trustees, and that relationship serve these students. ln 1985 the College of Pharmacy extend as far
existed throughout the Singletary Lexington campus awarded a total of north as Washington Avenue.
administration. The board let the 3.887 degrees. Of those there were 693 On the opposite corner of the campus
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 1
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i other important changes have taken   __;·V_ . -     V » _ M ·
’ place. Women’s basketball and       ‘‘‘`‘"~·’·`·       Z        V   _i .` M
volleyball took over the ‘$House that   ` if ``Vr  ‘  __,\ g AI____      
Rupp Built," while men’s basketball     g »"'     .
‘ left the campus for games downtown in   G          
Rupp Arena. With the abandonment of   ‘   L   _·~ _     ifi  
Stoll Field after the 1972 football i' g   UA; y ‘ "iéif  ‘.‘· 77; ‘ ``VR
season, space became available for the  _ V *f ·  L · '   "» .
Singletary Center for the Arts at the V l     T _ K   2/-* T
I corner of Rose and Euclid, a building , •‘   V  ‘
{_ with a program that is hailed as a ·_ dg xg ·
bridge between town and campus. The A é=' ·c
Student Center underwent a second   ig,
major expansion to include a bigger ° j'  .
and better bookstore, Campus Visitor’s _ j'  ii
Center and meeting rooms.   ._ I
Behind the Coliseum on Maxwell   J i   .
Street, certain University property was   ·
renovated for the Gaines Humanities     __ `
Center, an innovative development for        
A the Honors Program. The new North in A   ___ · _`‘’’ E  Q
Library in front ofthe original King   x % {Q  .
gjggggyt;g.d,;,0a;j;,$1g,;j;i;_g;;g gg, D. $..91....,, righ1,wiTh Ut'. as president D. 101.. amid.
{O yield Y0 an eastward €XP&n$iOn Of up the growing conviction that you four presidential administrations at UK
King LlbY€n`Y- don’t try to fix something that ainlt the teams had more winning than
Tncsc Snncnims tell of new ventures broke. losing seasons; in each of the last four,
to improve the education of UK When the time comes, for whatever the [Cams had more losing than
students. The programs they house reason, to replace a football or winning S€aSOnS_ ']`hi—Oug]] ]93(3_
CIITIEIYICC the I`€pUtHtlOI'] ofthe bdSl(€fb21ll CO3Cl`1, H L1I'llVCl`Slly pI`€Sl(l€Ut Sing]C[a]·y,S tcanjs had Only 5 yyinljing
University as does the development suffers incalculable tortures. The public and Oiic bi—cak-C\»€n SCHSOHX Ami that
program which made many of them attaches enormous importance to this Caymm bc bcuiusq Of any hosiiiiiy Oy
possible. The success of the program responsibility and the president`s own iiidiiigeyciicc iii ilic Aqiiiiiiiisiiqiiiiiii
T attests to the attention paid to President well-being could be at stake. The Building tgwgrd {bOtb;i]]_
Singletary’s message that a public president at UK works with the board Singletary has an offsetting
university is an appropriate object for of trustees in governing the University advantage perhaps unique among
private benefactions. That people are and, with the directors ofthe separately university presidents. The basketball
i still listening is evident in the Hilary incorporated Athletic Association, of program has been an invariable winner
` Boone Faculty Club on Rose Street and which he is chairman, in administering beginning with the 1927-1928 season.
the F.rvin_]. Nutter Training Facility at the athletic program. By the 194(ls the basketball \*\lildcats
the Shively Center. ln Singletaryls time two new football were so dear to the hearts of "most"
‘ One of the most striking successes of coaches and two new basketball coaches Kentuckians that their uninterrupted
the Singletary administration is the w