xt7vhh6c3p0m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vhh6c3p0m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19410516  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 16, 1941 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 16, 1941 1941 2013 true xt7vhh6c3p0m section xt7vhh6c3p0m The Kentucky Kernel

100 PcL Student
Owned & Operated

UNIVERSITY

V

OLUME XXXI

ODK To Present Troupers
As First Step Toward Pool
ALL-KENTU-

TO SING SUNDAY
Phi Mu Alpha
To Present Group
In Memorial Hall
College

The first
Chorus concert will be presented at
4 pjn. Sunday In Memorial hall,
under the auspices of Phi Mu Al-

pha Sinfonia, n$ ionaj honotary
music fraternity.
Bringing together for the first
time representatives of Kentucky
colleges for a combined choral presentation, the program consists of
two short cantatas. "The White Pilgrim" by Lewis Henry Horton, is a
sacred cantata made up of Eastern
Kentucky folk hymns. This selection will be conducted by the composer, who is head of the music
State
department at Morehead
Teachers' college. The University
Eimfonietta, under the direction of
Dr. Alexander Capurso, will accompany the singers of this first can-

tata.
The latter part of he program will
be the presentation of "The American Flag" by Dvorak, which will
be conducted by James Van Puer-seheaci of the music department at Eastern State Teachers

college.

Accompanist

will

be

Theodore L. Hunt, head of the Centre College music department, at
the organ, and Anna Ruth Burton,
arts and sciences Junior, at the

piano.
Soloists for "The American Flag"
will be Lucille Haney, alto; Harold
Newland. tenor. Miss Haney and
Borden are University students, and
Newland Is from Transylvania.
Soloists for "The White Pilgram"
include Wililam Black, baritone;
and Horace Owens, tenor, both from
Morehead; Miss Haney, and Harriett Abraham, soprano, from the
University.
Other University singers include
Anne Humphrey, Anita Roos. Doro
thy Lall. Jean Marie McConnell,
Joan Taylor, Jane Humphrey, Ada- line Boots. Anne Cowgill. Harry
Walllngford Robert Farriss, Howard
Moffett. Georce Roth, Clayton Rob
inson. Jack Thoman, Robert Bor
den and Leonard Allen.
Tickets for the Sunday concert
may be obtained at the Union in
formation desk. University book
store or from members of Phi Mu
Alpha.

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Initiating the drive for the

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DORIS SEWARD

SEWARD RESIGNS
TO ASSIST DEAN
AT SYRACUSE
YWCA Secretary

Accepts Fellowship
To Work On Degree
Doris Seward, resident secretary of
the campus YWCA for the past two
years, has resigned her University
position to accept a fellowship at
Syracuse university, Saracuse. N. Y.
as an assistant in the office of the
dean of women, it was announced
yesterday.
Combining
practical experience
and academic work during the two
years, she will be at Syracuse Miss
Seward will work on her master's
degree in student personnel and will
have charge of the womens' residence halls.
No one has been selected to take
her place, according to the dean of
women's office.
At the University, she has been
Mortar Board advisor, and a mem
ber of the American Association of
University Women and the Woman's
club of Central Kentucky. She has
been a member of the Woman's
club of Central Kentucky. She has
been a member of the American Association of Deans of women since
1938, when she was a senior at the
University of Indiana, and a member of the finance committee of the
YWCA southern region.

BalcP Ireshmen,

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Funk-house-

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MINOR OFFICERS
OF SGA NAMED
Group Appointed
To Propose
Amendments

"1

Defense Trainees
May RaveDejermenl

over

I'rople's Choice
"We want all you new repre-

sentatives to read the SGA constitution," SGA president Russell Patterson said at Wendnes- day night's meeting.
"There aren't enough copies

U

dead-lin-

Will Hold Offices
Joe Gayle, prjsident of Block and
Bridle, honorary animal husbandry
Iraternity, was elected president of
the Agriculture council at a meeting Wednesday in the Agriculture
building.
Others elected were James Ison,
chancellor of Alpha Zeta, honorary

Pep Organization
To Dine, Dance

yes-ters-

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Club's Third Annual Recital
Will Present Modern Dance
Ranging rrom primitive dancing
to modern swing, the evolution of
the dance will be interpreted by
members of the Modern Dance club
who will present their third an
nual recital Thursday and Friday.
May 22 and 23, at 8: 30 p.m. in the
Guignol theater under the direction
of Mrs. Mary King Kouns.
Included in the program will be
dance studies of the solar move- ment, high and low movement con- wast, Kentucky mood, rhythm oi
tropical winds, "A Pair in Spring"
and poetry and movement.
Sponsored by the physical education department the programs will
be given by 12 dancers, Martha
Adams. Louisville: Glenna Ballard.
Charleston, W. Va.; Letha Hicks.
Paducah; Jane Richards. Paris; and

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GARBER WINS
SENIOR

AWARD
National Honorary

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Will Present Rook

six-m-

Conttance Garbe, Lexington, has
oeen named winner of the award
presented by the national chapter
of Alpha Lamba Delta, freshman
women's scholastic honoiary, to the
senior woman with the highest accumulative standing. Miss Garber's
standing is 2.8.
The award, "World Famous Paint-ng,- "
edited by Rockwell Kent.
Vmerican artist, will bo presented
at commencement exercises June 6.
Although the winner of the award
s supposed to be a former member
f Alpha Lambda Delta an excep-io- n
has been made in Miss Garner's cpj-e-, since the fraternity has
jeen on the campus only two years.
To be eligible for the award, the
student must have attended th3
University for her entire four years
work.
Miss Garber is a member of Phi
3eta Kappa, national honorary arts
ind sciences scholastic fraternity;
Phi Alpha Theta, honorary history

raternity; the YWCA, and the
''rench, Span'sh, Philosophy, and

?o;,mopolitan clubs.

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'Male Animal'

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Will Be Shown
At Festival

r

"The Male Aniii.ai," Guignol
theater play which was presented on the campus playhouse
the week of April 21. will be
shown at the Kentucky Mountain Laurel festival May 29, it
was announced by Frank Fowler.
Guignol director.
The original cast of "The Male
Animal" will appear in the showing, which is to be at the Pineville High School auditorium.

re

JOE MASSIE

fraternityi

Elizabeth Wigginton, student
government representative, secretary; and Robert McConnell, president of the Poultry club, treasurer.
Other mambers of the council.
which is made up of the presidents!
of college organizations and stu- representatives,!
dent government
are Sonia Berkowitz, president of
Phi Upsilon Omicron, honorary
heme economics fraternity; Margaret Gulley, piesident of the Home
Economics club; Cyril Luckett, presi"
dent of the Dairy club ;Bill Johnstone, president of the University
club; John C. Dickens, president of the Agronomy club; and
James Crowley, junior representative in the student legislature.
Prof. L. J. Horlacher. assistant
dean of the college, is faculty adviser.

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SLIKY ELECTS

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petition

SPECIAL SESSION
SET FOR TUESDAY
Students To Confer
With President
On Loan Dill

To attempt compromise with Acting President Cooper on his sugfor everybody."
gested revisions in the controversial
maiked.
student loan bill, a Student Government Association committee
"Yes there are. I put a numwill
meet with the acting president this
ber of copies in the SGA office
weekend and report to a special
tonight." said Richard P. Adams
meeting of the Student legislature
between puffs on his pipe.
at 7 p.m. Tuesday in room 204. Un"Well, where is the SOA ofion building.
fice?" a heckling representative
The conference committee comover near the wall asked naiveposed of Betsy Gottron. Jack Lovett.
ly.
Richard Adams. Doris Reichenbach.
and SGA president Russell Patterson was formed after the retiring
And then the i'iscussion was
legislature balked at accepting Pres.
on the SGA surplus.
Cooper's suggested changes at their
"Well where do we get our
last meeting Wednesday night.
money for the SGA in the first
Chief objection by the retinnc
place." another representative
legislature to the acting president's
asked.
recommendations was against placing Dean T. T. Jones on the administrative committee for the loan
fund.
LOVETTS MOTION
The committee was formed by the
retiring legislature on motion of
Jack Lovett and was indorsed by
the new legislature, which held its
first session immediately after this
year s body adjourned sine die.
Gottron. Lovett. and Patterson are
Joe Massie. Lexington law student, the representatives of the retiring
was elected to succeed Sam Ewing legislature and Adams and Reichenas president of SuKy. campus pep bach, members of the new legislaorganization, at the nroanizarion'n ture.
The counciliation committee was
ast meeting of the year, held
terday afternoon in the Union formed to speed action on the bi'l
and secure passage this semester so
building.
Other newly elected officers are that the bill may be put into effect
Mary Kemp,
Louise for the fall term, it was said by ito
wuson. secretary: Marjone Kan- - backers Wednesday night.
dolph. corresponding secretary; and; CHANGES ASKED
Changes in the bill asked bv Pres
Joe Gayle. treasurer, all of Lexing
ton. Prof. H. B. Moore of the Eco- Cooper are:
1
nomics department was chosen fac- That the clerical facilities of
ulty supervisor and "Daddy" Boles the present University lending agency be utilized by making Dean Jones
faculty advisor.
was
an
member of the loan
committee, and by having all applications and payments
cleared
through his office.
2 That the loan committee meer.
regularly each month, instead of
every two weeks, wirh provision for
called meetings:
3 That faculty members of the
Marie Brackett. Margaret Brown.
by the
Sara Revell Estill, Lois Hall. Trilby loan committee be appointedappoint1rW pphan
.f i rv VI t H.f h Pavtv University president since
charIotte gale, and Ethel Smith, all ment by the University senate sill
be useless after July 1
of Lexington.
4 That the committee
consider.
Accompanist for the recital Is
Mrs. W. L Elliott. Stage manager in addition to the need of the applyand electrician are. respectively. ing students, their ability to repay.
Frazier Robards and Winston Blythe.
5' That the fund for the first year
The program cover design was cre- - be S500 instead of S2.00O.
atefi kv Maraaret Warren.
6 That an additional part ol the
Ushers for the event will be mem- - SGA surplus may be loaned if there
bers of ,he nhvsical education de- - ' is the need, if the loan is safe, and
partment, P. W. Kurachek. J. J. if "there is sound reason for failine:
Huddleston. William McCubbin. and to combine the amount with th
James Wadlington.
present loan fund."
Tickets for the recital are 50 cents ORIGINAL BILL
each and may be purchased at the
The original student loan bid.
women's physical education depart- which passed
legislature March
ment or from the members of the 11 without a the
dissenting vote and
dance group.
was sent to Pres. Cooper for his ap-- I
proval. included the following pro
visions.
A
committee would be
established to administer the fund,
with one member appointed by the
president of the University, two by
the University senate, and three by
the student legislature. This committee would consider all applications for loans, considering student
need, purpose of loan, scholastic
standing, and ability to meet payments.
For each loan grante.d the petitioner would be required to sign
legally enforceable note payable in
one year and signed by a Kentucky
resident of 21 years of age or older,
either a man or unmarried woman.
j
Students would be ineligible for a
second loan unless the first w as
paid in full. This provision would
not hold in case of loans for medical aid.
INTEREST C HARGED
Six percent interest would be
charged on all notes.
Expenses of administering
the
fund would be paid bv interest on
the loans.
The loan committee would me:
someone

,

Ison, Wigginton

agriculture

presidenial

he-

SENATE POWER
Allen requested amendments to
replace the power of the University
Senate to appoint faculty members
of the SGA.
The amendments were requested
by Allen at the final meeting of
the retiring student legislature
Wednest-ayThe request was repeat- ed by SGA president Russell Pat- at a meeting of the new leg- Islature immediately after the final
session of the old group.
A
meeting
f the committee
which will propose the amendments
is lo be held at 4 p. m. Tuesday
in the Iniin building. James Collier announced.
"These amendments are nece- sContinued on Page Four

Webb Explains
Draft Developments GAYLE TO HEAD
To Selectees
AG COUNCIL

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Men students, who are subject to
reclassification under the Selective
Service Act July 1 and who are
training themselves for a "necessary"
skill in the delense program, should
file questionnaires
with the dean
of their college to obtain occupational deferment, it was declared
by Dr. W. S. Webb lasi mgnt.
Explaining the recent develop- ments in the act to over 200 men
in Memorial hall. Dr. Webb reported
that the training considered "necessary" for defense program consists
of the following classes:
Engineei iiig
civil, electrical,
chemical, mechanical, mining and
metallurgical, agricultural, and sanitary.
Geology
geophysics melerology,
hydrology, cartography.
Chemistry. Dentistry, Pharmacy,
Physics, Medicine. Biology and Bac-- i
tei iology.
Students who have not received
questionnaires
but who may be
called between July 1 and September 15 should follow the same pro-- :
cedure. Dr. Webb said.
Men who plan to enter the Uni-- ,
versity in the fall term, but are
hesitant because of the chances of
being dratted, should return to school
because they will be deferred until
the end of the semester under the
"current semester" rule, the speaker
added.
The discussion last night was in
charge oi the University defense
council: Dr. Webb, chairman; Pro-- j
fessors C. C. Carpenter. C. S. Crouse.
George Roberts. Jesse E. Adams. A.
By SANFOKD ALVERSON
Gone are the good old days when E. Evans' and Mrs. Alberta Server.
Speakers were introduced by Actthe seniors ruled the University ing
President Thomas P. Cooper.
roost, and enjoyed many more priviALL UNIVERSITY MEN
leges than they now have. DisapNot only the men whose deferment
pearance of distinctions between as students will expire on July
between but any University man who is called
upper and lower classes,
senior and freshman, has greatly between July 1 and September 15
diminished the advantages the sen- when the fall term will begin, should
ask for the occupational deferment
ior held over his subordinates.
Whpn rhp TTnivpritv n;n in its if he honestly thinks himself morf
to the defense effort througr
infancy, senior men were allowed
the continuance of his training. Dr
by tradition to wear corduroy trous- Webb said.
ers and carry canes. No other class
"And he should not feel himsel
(Continued on Page Four)
unpatriotic." Dr. Webb declared, add
ing that the defense program wa
aced with shortages, "serious ii
mumnmr- B
some cases, oi trained men.
Dr. Webb eplained that student
who are to be reclassified July
and who think themselves deservinf
of deferment should obtain a ques
tionnaires from the dean ol thei;
college immediately and state theii
positions on the questionnaire.
will be sent
The questionnaire
to the University defense counci
and to the draft board, which governs the particular individual foi
a decision on deferment.
"It must be remembered." that
no group is deferred as such. It i'
entirely an individual proposition.'

Frosh Fished
From Statue,
Obeyed Seniors

of a committee

Appointment

Debate Team
Holds Finale

hair-cutti-

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the SGA consitution and naming
treasurer,
of the SGA secretary,
'
and committee members highlighted
the first meeting of the 1941-4- 2 student legislature Wednesday night.
The committee which will propose amendments especially one to
a judiciary body and
establish
others to replace the appointments
confrom the University Senate
sists of Bob Ammons. Richard
Adams. James Collier. Doniphan
HOOMEROUS COLLEGE BOYS
Stanley
l)jula. Montondo und Bernard pihnsou, above, will be Burrus, Russell Penna. and SGA
president
Patterson.
Retiring SGA preskent Bob Al- -:
gdi men jor ODk's presentation of the UK Troupers tonight in
len requested the amendment, estab- the fust step toward a University swimming pool.
lishing a body similar to the fed- eral Supreme Court one which
would have the power of interpret- ing the SGA constitution in disputes such as the recent argument

BORDEN
Freshmen gripe today because
they have to wear dinky blue caps,
and wail when they are oeclared
fit for ROTC, but it's a lucky thing
for them this is 1941 instead of 1919
when University traditions reduced
the greenies to the lowest rank.
Most of us here today know very
little about some of the traditions
which formerly dominated the campus and made merry with the
average freshman's life. Many of
practices have passed
the old-tiway, while others crop up at some
time of the year. However, tradi
tions of any type tend to aici the
student's appreciation of college especially when it's all over.
Prior to 1919 it was customary to
clip the hair of incoming freshmen.
The result was not only temporary
embarrassment to the frosh, but a
permanent record in the school
yearbook. As today, pictures of fraternities and classes were made in
October, and the yearly spring edition of the yearbook looked more
like a catalogue of correctional
inmates than a book of
college students.
Growing protests emerged with
the conviction that this "barbarous"
custom should be supplanted by
one which would keep the freshThe debating team met the team
men in their places without provfrom National university, Washinging that Darwin was right about
ton, in the final debate of the seaour incestors. The "scroogie" or
son in McVey hall Tuesday after"skull cap", which came in with the
noon.
Ford and the raccoon coat,
Martin Snyder, Lexington, and
camreplaced
on the
A. Lawrence Herman, Pineville, took
pus.
the negative side of the question:
AS DEBATERS ENDED SEASON
"Resolved: That the United States
r,
Extreme left is Martin Snyder und extreme right, .1. Lawrence
Not long ago. Dr. W. D.
commonwealth
dean of the graduate school. Sherman, University debate team members, shown ending then and the Britishpermanent union
should form a
was halted in the Administration
final debute of the season against Harry ('abertnan and Ann immediately."
building by a man who queried
The debate, hs are all others ot
officer of the day?" Muiphy. renter, of Sattonal University, Washington, D. C.
"Where's the
this type, was a
debate.
By ROBERT

s.

T

Hsl Ughts

by he quesion. Dr.
replied,
embarrassed,
Funkhouser,
"I don't know."
Soon after, the dean met a former
registrar, and asked for an explan- ation of "officer of the cay". The
registrar said that the "officer of
the day" was a landmark of early
days of the University.
Incoming freshmen, required to
take ROTC as today, were given
a week's service in patrolling the
building.
Administration
Their
prime service was general flunky,
having to run errands for any person who asked. Whenever anyone
wanted to send out a message, he
bellowed for the "officer of the
day."

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"Hand-to-Han-

Taken aback

Was Catalog"
Of 'Inmates'

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Le-tel- le

Keriifl

Old, New Legislatures
Appoint Committees;
Loan Bill To Come Up

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long-want-

University swimming pool,
Omicron Delta Kappa will present
the UK Troupers, student acrobatic,
dancing, anc: singing group, in its
first University performanse at 8
p.m. today in Alumni gymnasium.
Eighteen acts will be presented
by (he group which is to be directed
by Joe Huddleston and Mary King
Kouns physical education instructors.
The Troupers show, patterned after the Gymkana presentation
which was given on the campus
during the first semester, appeared
in Louisville's Armcry before 4.000
persons in January, and later before
a crowd of 1.000 at the Brown hotel.
TICKETS
Tickets may be purchased today
from members of ODK and after
6:45 at the Alumni office. No seats
will be reserved for the show. Admission is 25 cents. Chi Omega and
Kappa Delta sorority bought a block
of 25 tickets yesterday "to get us
the swimming pool," Dan Doggett,
chairman of the ODK ticket sales
committee, announced.
The Trouper's program will begin with a parallel bars act by Harold Butner, Bernard Johnson,
Stephenson.
Steve Graban,
Billv Valentine and Billy Tucker.
TRILBY WILL SING
Second number is a vocal solo
by Trilby McKeehan. singer in the
recent "Collegiate Follies."
A tap dancing act by Charlotte
Dawson
Sale, Jody DiGiacomo,
Dixie
Hawkins,
Jae Marshall.
Payne,
Macklin, Mary Elizabeth
and Ethel Smith will be the third
number.
Bernard Johnson ana Douglas
Montondo as clowns will follow.
Harold Butner and Dick Stone
d
will then present a
act.
The sixth number will be an exhibition ball room dance by Louel-le- n
Penn and Wilmore Garrett.
TUMBLING
A tumbling act by Harold Butner,
Bernard Johnson, Douglas Monton- do, Robert Taylor, and Lytelle Ste
phenson will follow.
The water Lily will then be presented by Martha Adams. Glenna
Ballard, Marie Brackett, Margaret
Brown, Sara R. Estill, Lois Hall.
Letha Hicks, Trilby McKeehan,
Mars' Elizabeth Payne, Jane Rich-arflCharlotte Sale and Ethel
Smith.
The clown, Bernard Johnson and
(Continued on Page Three)

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NUMBER M

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Are Amonq JjK Traditions
1919 Yearbook

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MAY Hi,

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Student Group
To Present 18 Acts
Tonight In Gym

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COLLEGE CHORUS

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Senii-neekl-

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OF KENTUCKY

I.rAlNC. TON. KKNTl'CKY, FRIDAY,

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Any student would be granted th?
privilege of examining the record?
1 of the loan committee, but anv information so gained could not ic
used as evidence, publicly or privately, against any of the loan applicants.
t
The loan fund ot sJ.uoo would b.
J etaken from the SGA surplus.
t
The first passage of the bill brouHt
to a close almost a year of controversy over establishment of a
j
loan fund.
The measure was introduced eariv
in the first semester by Jack Love';,
arts and sciences senior represenwill swing out tative, and was later combined wrh
Dame rei ilal parts of a similar measure introduced by oniphan Burrus. arts ai.cl
sciences senior representative.

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MODERN DANCING

l.oeils hurlotte Sale (left) and fine lluhuid
with this 'iew step nl the limit annual M"dein
May 22 2).

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

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UEUBER
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Lexlncton Board of Commerce
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REMIND

IVIED WALLS

This is i he first lime in the history of journalism ih:ii a i omprchensive examination, word
by wok!, jiae ly ac. has Ixen oficl li ihe

liouis

THE EDITOR'S CORKER

lown in

by Rob Amnions

of MrVf-- tea vcsicitlav.
and for two days lx fort- ilia I. ihere was a
of iK'UTiicrs as never before has
heard in that sector. In ihe uloomv iewriier
room there sal drooping over various brands of
lyjiewriiers ihe shadowy forms of some sixteen
Waller I.ipitmans. Dorolhy Thompsons and
Joseph F'uliiers. They were lant;in away furiously, and pages were flying all over ihe room.
Ii was examinaiion i:me in ihe journalism department . . . comprehensive lime for ihe senior

y.

1 1st is what blunt,
d
Boh Allen, retiring president of the
student body, warned as he turned
eve-- r
tlie gavel to new prexy Russell
I'uiunon this week.
"It's sort of fun for a while. he
tald. but you don't have much to
tiiow at the end of the year."
lumping to a close a year as head
cf the SGA in which he almost
yanked the
body out of its first-yeL"ipor and started things clicking.
Allen had plenty of complaints to
make against the life of a student
government president.
Chewing on his
wad
of Mum. the short,
former
),:Mdent jerked out in curt sentences the story of his experiences
villi the SGA in an interview
at the library where he works.
no
SO MI CH
"Being president isn't so hard."
lie chewed out in typical Covington
jentences. but there's so darn much
io do.
"It's the most exasperating job
I've ever had."
And Allen, who has worked his
way through four years at the Universitypolishing rifles for the military department, waiting on tables
i.t the Colonial restaurant, checking
cut books at the library and carrying a paper route while making a
standing in tough
ought to know what he's talking
it bout.
"I had to sppnd an average of three
hours a day on student government
1 u.sin.'ss."
he estimated.. "and I figure
I could have made about $300 dollars
in the time."
Allen had to give up all his jobs

f

thin-haire-

sinple-handed-

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ALLEN

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but the library position when he
took over the presidency. He also
could not keep the meal job at the
restaurant which had paid for his

meals.
STANDING DROPS
The position cut deeply into his
University standing too. he declared.
During his first three years in pre-mwhile he was working several
hours a day Allen made a 2.2 standing. The first semester in the presidency he made a 1.6 and says he'll
"be fortunate to pass at all this semester."
When you're president of the student body, he said, everyone feels
that your time is also their time,
and you have to spend hours running trivial errands that should be

ed

done by other officers and committee chairmen.
In addition to being on several important committees
he
said, the president has to serve as
a goad to almost every committee
chairman. Letters, conferences, telephone calls and a hundred other
little details all take up more time,
he declared.
PROBLEMS MULTIPLY
"Take this for instance," he explained. "Sometimes I'll go ask some
faculty member about a problem,
and before I can leave he has
brought up two or three more.
"Now, it's not that I don't like
the work, but it takes up a lot of
time that could be spent otherwise.
"It would be a good job if you
didn't have to go to school on the
side."
ALLEN CRACKS DOWN
Most people on the campus were
surprised when the news was out
that Allen had been elected president of the student body. But as
scon as he was in the chair things
began to snap.
For Allen it was another job, and
he began putting out just like the
summer when he worked twelve
hours a day in front of a bake oven
as a journeyman baker all the time
he was going to summer school and
making straight A's on the maximum number of hours allowed.
Soon things began to move. The
new president hounded committee
chairmen until they called their
committees to meetings. He talked
with people and found out what
students wanted and then tried to
get some action on it. And for once,
the SGA turned up at the end of
the year with some Items in the
credit side of the ledger.
And Allen turned up with a 1.6 instead of a 2.2 and a minus figure on
the bank balance.

i

and

ish when you
someihing. A

They Say.

Lesson in. Futility

diH-su'-

Well-meani-

v

-

sus-ciin-

-

-

-

Ihe other solution lo ihe problem is a nunc
cjital disiiihulion of
ies. lo prevent
a ic in icne c of this year's situation. I he constitution provides lor a better division of duties.
e

Inn unless ihe 'iidiv ielual officials and committee

means.
VT

All his friends call him

The most logical solution seems to be a salary
for the president. We don't see whv this has
Ikcii opjKised so much. Other campus positions
which carry heavy
v and much work
are paid, and no one objects to lhat. Many
schoeils have a salary for iheir student president,
with the result that higher class candidates can
tin for i lie job.
We realize, of course lhai a $30 appropriai ion
weiule! not fully pay a president for his time and
services, but it would Ik? just enough coupled
with ihe prestige and honor to make the presidency ihe most songhi-afie- r
position on the
campus.
It alvi would Ik- valuable in case ihe SGA
ever should gel a president not willing lo do
his part
the legislature would have someihing
eonercie lo use against him. We feel I hat. however, this situation would never occur,
inoie serious, higher lyK men would Ik- able lo
hole! ihe presidency.
We would like to see the new legislature pass
another bill similar lo lh.1t passed last veai.
-

present coeds are more
beautiful, and the men less handNo doubt,

some, for skin defects of today's
are only 14.2 per cent as an
average compared to 38.7 per cent
of yesterday's lassies. Present men
students have 54 per cent defection
By JOE HODGES
the average of 1930 men students compared to 49 per cent. However,
only in rare cases would this afIf the time comes for this coun- was five feet, eight and
try to take up arms, in the present inches, and 139 pounds. Women of fect the physical fitness of a perv ovld ctisis. University of Kentucky
today measure five feet, four and son.
inches, and 120 pounds,
Miidetils. both men and women, will seven-tentUnder the rating system. 21 per
I;" in better phyieal condition than as compared to five feet, three 3nd cent of 1930 college
women stood
Mutle-inches, and 115 pounds a "very satisfactory"
of a decade ago. according seven-tentexamination
to statistics from the department for 1930 women students.
compared to 33 per cent of present
'. hygiene
MAYBE THE LOVE BIG
day
and the men students
Whether or not today's students
Perhaps the love bug bites slightly of ten years ago showed 13 per
- as strong as
Me.those of 1930 can- harder en present
than in cent ' very satisfactory" compared to
not b determined, but the physical past ytars because heart defects of 1.9 per cent. Nevertheless. 57 per
are les-s- . and apparontly university coeds today are 3.2 per cent of 1930 women students ranked
On-iphysical condition better.
cent compared to 2.3 per cent of "satisfactory" to 44 per cent for
s,
Men .students of today are one the 1930
but today's men stuMen students have present
h
i.iiri
inches taller, and changed very little. A 29 per cent dents ranked 57 per cent "satisvend pounds heavier than their defect is shown today as compared factory" to 38 per cent.
and today's women to 3.9 per cent ten years ago.
Apparently there is no answer as
Mudents are one inch taller and
Men students of today should be to why the average present Kenivipounds heavier. The average belter marksmen, and women bet- tucky student is larger,
in betand weight of present men ter knitters since' eye defects of the ter physical condition and
unless it is
is five feet, nine and one-hb- prese-n- t
students are one per cent the supervised physical education in
and 144 pounds while less thai, st iKlcnt.s eif 1930.
the jMibllc schools
co-e-

four-tent-

co-e- d.

co-e-

r

co-e- d.

-

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.iiel.-nt-

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lf

,

co-ed-

Andrew GyoUer, Engineering jun-ni- or
"No. I'm already commissioned as a reserve officer. Because of
the technical nature of my profession. I will be of greater value to
the service after having received' an
engineering degree."
Julius Gctdbert; A & S senior
"I have a high number, so I probably won't be affected for at least
another year."
James Taylor. A & S senior I'll
graduate in August so the draft
won't affect me. I intend to take
graduate work as my number won't
be called for some time."
Allrnby E. Winer, A & S senior
"Yes, The indefinite situation has
caused me to turn (.'own several fair
offers in my field, for I am subject
to call July 1. and will be unable
to finish school this summer.
Harold Winn, A & S junior ' I'm
getting into advanced military.
Then, I probably won't be called
until I graduate."
P. Frady. A & S junior
. Claude
"I don't have to register until July,
and there are so many volunteers
from my county that I probably
won't be affected until after

Los Angeles Collegian

Ihe approximate leiial of ivih tvriiicu sheets
submitted by ihe ionic slants was :ViO. The- loial
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c A.MPU SCENE

Since th