xt7vmc8rcw5p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vmc8rcw5p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19511102  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  2, 1951 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  2, 1951 1951 2013 true xt7vmc8rcw5p section xt7vmc8rcw5p ournausm Dedication Edition,

The Kentucky ECEKTirs.

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THE DEDICATION today

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Nov. 2, 1951

By MARVIN POER

By LOIS BRADLEY

oi the Journalism
Builc'u:-.;t'Klay has been made possible because of the foresight and efforts of Prof. Enoch Grehan, first
head of the Department of Journal-

Dr. Niel Plummer, director of the
School of Journalism, led the way
for construction of the new Jour-

ism.

Prof. Grehan perhaps could not
have foreseen the erection of a Journalism Building, but it was through
his organization and financial aid
that the Kernel Press was begun in
192. profits from the Kernel Press
vhich he started with one linotype
machine made this new building a
realization without directly costing
the taxpayers of Kentucky a cent.
'Uncle Enoch" came to the University in 1914 to become the first
head of the department, and he remained until his death in 1937. Students and fellow instructors alike
will always remember the famed
proiessor for his guidance and
which left lifelong impres-bion- s
on those who knew him.
A graduate of Transylvania
in
1894. Prof. Grehan, often called the
"dean of Kentucky newspapermen,"
served as news editor of the Lexington Leader and managing editor of
the Lexington Herald for a combined
period of 20 years before he was
made head of the Journalism Department.
Was Herald

Paragraphrr

Throuch his 23 years with the
University, Prof. Grehan was closely
associated with activities in the profession of journalism. His "Paragraphs" on the editorial page of the
Lexington Herald, which he contributed for many years, were typical of
the spirit that possessed "Uncle
Enoch." Always full of human interest and wit, they were popular
with both young and old.
He was the author of over 50.000
editorials and editorial paragraphs
which were written for Lexington
papers, many of which were reprinted by metropolitan newspapers.
In addition, Prof. Grehan was the

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PROF. ENOCH GREHAN
First Journalism Head
drama critic of the Herald for 25
years, and wrote more than 2,000
theater, music, and opera reviews
during that time.
Careful financing and management of the Kernel Press by "Uncle
Enoch" during its early years was a
major factor in the development of
the present plant.
Until 1924, the Kernel was printed
at a local commercial printing plant.
In that year. Prof. Grehan advocated the purchase of a printing plant
for the Kernel.
Stood Good For Loan
The first piece of machinery for
the new plant was a linotype, which
was purchased on a loan guaranteed
by Grehan himself. Twenty-fiv- e
journalism students pledged their
efforts to helo him make the printing plant a reality.
press was purchased
A two-pathe next year, again with the financial aid of Prof. Grehan, and the
first Kernel was printed on the
University campus in the fall of
19''5. In the following years, the
plant grew and became
and eventually became a
g
proposition.
profit-makin-

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of the new Journalism Building is the realization of a dream of two generations of UK journalists.

Expands On Work
Of .Predecessor

Indication

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Building Is Inspired
By Grehan, Plummer
'Uncle Enoch' Gave
Notes For First
Kernel Machinery

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nalism Building upon foundations
laid by his predecessor. Prof. Enoch
Grehan.
The present director came to the directorship of the University's School
of Journalism by way of Kentucky's
own classrooms in journalism, the
University of Wisconsin and the
newsroom of the Lexington Herald.
Under his leadership the journalism curriculum has been revised, the
department has grown into a school
and a new Journalism Building
constructed.
Student I'nder Grehan
One of "Uncle" Enoch Grehan's
own boys and a former managing
editor of The Kernel, he was no
stranger to Kentucky's Journalistic
dream when suddenly the task of
carrying on the direction of training for journalism at the University
was handed to him as Prof. Grehan
lay down his burdens in late 1937.
Today's dedication of the new
$425,000 Journalism
building, the
throbbing activities of the $200,000
Kernel Press and the throng of active, thriving and loyal sons and
daughters of Kentucky journalism
working on publications and in radio over the nation are testimony
that the dream was entrusted to
competent hands.
Sharing Prof. Grehan's conviction
that journalism had a great future
at the University, Dr. Plummer has
guided the School of Journalism
since 1937 to a national ranking
among the largest and most respected schools in the nation. '
Has Inspired I'nity
Through his insistance
upon
sound grounding of all journalism
students in the liberal arts, and his
unwavering conviction of the high
purpose inherent in the rail to serv- -

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And Press
Occupy New Building

J-School

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The Kentuckian,
Kernel And KPA

Kernel Press

Also Quartered

By DICK CHERRY
Georgian
structure of three stories now houses
the University's School of Journalism
and the Kernel Press. The new
building stands north of McVey Hall
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and west, across the walk, from
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Pence Hall.
In 1914. Enoch Grehan. late head
of the Journalism Department, first
a University printing
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plant. The present building is a
realization of that dream.
No state funds were used for
the building. Accumulated profits
M( . ..... from the Kernel paid half the construction costs. Revenue bonds for
the balance will be retired from
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future earnings of the Kernel Press.
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Two Lexington architects, Robert
w)
McMeekin and the late Whayne
Haffler. designed the $425,000 struc-tui- e.
WW
Hargett Construction Company, also of Lexington, began work
in early spring of 1930. The cornerstone was laid Sept. 19 and the
building was completed by
st
I'H .Mlint, director of the School of Journalism, is stand
of this year.
south entrance of the new building.

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President Donovan
Congratulates School
I am indeed happy to have the opportunity of congratulating the
faculty members, students and graduates of the School of Journalism
upon this realization of one of their fondest dreams
the
Building.
completion of their new Journalism-Publication- s
It is a magnificent structure, one of which all Kentui kians can be
proud. What should make it all the more a source of pride is the fact
that the building was made possible through the efforts of hundreds of
students, their teachers and advisors, and without any state aid. It can
truly be said that this building, the home of the nation's newest School
of Journalism, is a monument to hard work.
Through the years the Department of Journalism, under the
of Prof.' Enoch Grehan and Dr. Niel Hummer, has become
widely known for the quality of its instruction, a fact that long since
lias been clearly proved by the success and high professional reputation of its graduates. I am confident that our future generations of students, as well as those of you presently enrolled, will rarry on in that
same tradition.
Once again, my sincere congratulations to students, alumni, faculty
and all others who have had a hand in making this building a reality.
The I'niversily and the entire St;ilc of Kentucky are grateful.
II. L. DONOVAN, President

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Miss MARGUERITE McL.U'GHLIN
Has Own Office at Last

ranged. The screens are permanent.
Both screens and window frames
are the new aluminum single-un- it
type.
granite
In front, a
stairway, flanked by a balustrade of
molded concrete, curves gracefully
up to the main entrance. Three
Papers In Cornerstone
Corinthian columns are grouped on
Sealed in the cornerstone are each side of the aluminum-stee- l
copies of the Lexington Herald, the double doors. These columns supLexington Leader, the Louisville port a broken pediment which exCourier-Journa- l,
1950 Kentuckian tends over the recessed entrance.
and the Kentucky Kernel; a catalog
North and South Entrances
of the University of Kentucky, a
directory of the Kentucky Press
There are also entrances at eaih
Association,
and a copy of the end of the building. Granite steps
cornerstone ceremony program.
rise .straight to a landing surrounded
External lines of the newest by a black iron railing. These two
campus addition are clean and side entrances have double doors of
classically simple. Part of the first aluminum-stee- l
and glass.
floor is below ground, but a conInside the main entrance, a short
crete retaining wall, topped by a entryway opens onto the main hall
black iron railing, gives light and which runs the length of the buildventilation access to the full win- ing. At each end are stairways leaddows of the basement. This wall ex- ing down to the printing plant in
tends around the front and both the basement and up to the top
ends of the building. An extension floor classrooms.
Halls are pale green with cream-lolore- d
of the drive behind McVey provides
tile blocks extending halfparking and delivery space at the
way from the floor to the ceilincc.
rear of the new building.
Windows on all idc.; of the build- Floors throughout the two upper
ing are large and symmetrically ar- - stories are of asphalt tile. Ceilings
mid-Augu-

semi-circul-

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on all three floors are of soundproof cork. Hallway doors are painted a deep
Doors to the
rooms are a natural bloi.de lir.iOi
The general office and lounge is
a continuation of the entryw y. It
is shut off from the main hall by
large glass and metal doors. Mrs.
Shirley Leathers, School of Journ.

nalism secretary, has her cVsk at
the west end of the room The e:ht.r
portion of the room coniains stuffed
leather chairs for the conver.u-neof visitors, faculty, and students.
Faculty Offices Grouped
Leading off the south ;:dv of ihw
office are fhe faculty offices. rv
large storage rooms, and a reference
room for
and facvl'y
Adjacent to the other side of the
main office is a readu.g room. He'-metal shelves contain curren' issues
of 26 major newspapers. Numerous
trade publications are kept n a larye
magazine rack. The Svhnol of Journalism also has subscriptions to
Time. Life. US Nes. Newsvut.;.
Editor and Publisher. Pubiistier's
Auxiliary. American Press, and National Publisher.
Beyond the reading loom is u
typing room with 17 machines and
typing desks. This room is ued by
journalism students for typing class
work and by members of the Kernel
reporting staff.
The Kernel, currently euited by
Bill Mansfield, journalism senior
from Mt. Sterling, occupies half tho
extreme north-weend of the n.aiii
tloor. The newsroom of the ix ;er is
equipped with a copy desk, a society
desk, typewriters, filing cabinets, and
a telephone. The editor and the
sports editor each have separate ofA
fices adjoining the newsroom.
dumb waiter, from the newsroom u
the printing plant in the busemenr.
simplifies the sending of copy ti
the printers.
Radio News Studio
On the east side of the main hall
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Press Influences
Reader's Oyv'nvn
Of What He Sees
By M. M. VJI1TE
an of College of Art and Sciences

D:

The Coiicee of Arts and Pcicrces
woJroT.rs uv-- Schoil of
Its presence on our rai;v"us is another step forward toward th" poal
of our Coliecp. The CoIV.'.e strives
to attain its go.U bv jmiiartinp
knowledge and by trrini-'the student in the proper nvt'irwls of acquiring mid using know h d:'e . to the
end th;st he may be brn if' v irlo'm-e- d
a:d skillful in tl:r siii;i:;;i of
problems, and that he may develop
c

inr.iauve.
hnl'its of
judgment, and those inner resources
and hapthat lead to
piness.
The Srhoo! of Jourr.alism will,
throurh its graduates, be a sf'int;
fo!cf in showing the ppo;.e f Kentucky ways of understand ins the
live, and ns a
world in which
consequence tne foa! of a'l liberal
education v ill be nearer. We forpet
sotnetimes that man perceives piveh
of rvcryday life as he is. not as
cveiyriay li!e is.
PreRS Infinetiees t nclerstanding
Goethe once remarked a.ter viewprtint-ining for several days
ihat all nature changed for him.
He saw the pointer's colors, shades,
and objects everywhere he looked.
Nature did not change but Goethe's
perception or understandinc cf it did
There is an element of truth in the
statement that life does not make
newspapers but new s inners make
life. The element cf truth is in the
fact thai man perceives much of
what is going on around him because
of the r.ews accounts that he has
read and perceives them according
to the newspaper stories.
This point may be illustrated. Ask
most any individual on the campus
how the numerals on the Memorial
Hall dock appear. Nearly all know
the hours are indicated by Roman numerals; but practically everyone insists that '"four" is indicated by "IV"
rather than Jin." Thev perceive
' irn" as TV because they know
Roman numerals are used and Roman four is 'TV" not Till." Man
sees the vorld in part as he is, not
as it is. One of the desirable values
cf our culture is the belief in the
dignity of man, the belief in man as
an end not as a means to an end.
A true liberal arts college insists
that tkis belief in the cignity of

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DEAN WHITE

man is a vital one in our way of life.
The School of Journalism will make
:t possible for the Btudent to understand the significance of such values.
The student will learn, if he hasn't
learned before admission, to respect
the human personality. Too often
in the present day emphasis on material 'alues. we have overlooked
ideational values. The artist, the
writer, the lecturer or the playwright who emphasizes material
values strives to entertain, to amuse,
or to give pleasure, or to promote
the author's or reader's "success."
The School of Journalism will be
able to hold and to promote the humane values.
Must Distinguish Truth
The Lynds in their book "Middle-tow- n
in Transition," quote a minister as saying, Tn the old days people
went to preachers for consolation,
information and inspiration. They
still come to us for consolation, but
go to newspapers for information
and inspiration." This means not
only that the student of journalism
must acquire such humane values
as, respect for the human personality, social responsibility, rigorous
and a belief in the
greatest good for the greatest number, but he must also learn to distinguish between information and
misinformation, between the significant and the insignificant. This is
the second reason that the College
--

welcomes

the

School.

mane value. If the School of Journalism is successful in maintaining
a proper balance between these two
value svstenis. the material and the
ideal, its graduates in their profes- sional lhes will be of inestimable
value to the people of Kentucky and
the United States. Future students
when they enter the University will
be able to po further in their education than present day students because they will enter as freshmen on
a higher level.
There is still a third reason for
our cordial welcome to the new
school. Through its work the student will be able to earn a living:
but the work is not "vocationalized."
The liberal arts tradition distinguishes sharply between training an
individual to follow a set of formu- laes, a series of movements on' one
hand, and permitting an individual
to learn the principles upon which
the formulaes and movements are
based. Let the methods of printing
newspapers, gathering news, and
communicating news be changed.
graduates from this School of Jour- nalism will still be journalists able
to practice their profession. This is
education in the best liberal arts
tradition.
libera! Arts Heritage Of Journalism
Germany began emphasizing before the First World War technical
training separated from all the humanities. Hitler's Germany became
possible. Vocationalism leads inevitably to the inability to communicate with laymen. It leads to vocational isolation and a breakdown of
community life. Schools of Journalism will be frequently urged by
specialized groups to become vocationalized. A pressure group will
want a specialized course in feature
writing for their particular group;
another group will want reporters
trained with their "slant." Each
course will decrease by one course
the number of fundamental courses
in the various fields of knowledge.
A school of journalism such as this
one, only once removed from the
liberal arts tradition, needs have no
fear for the welfare of its graduates
or this nation if it holds to the principle of teaching students and not
training technicians. May the School
of Journalism reflect its heritage.

Charles Harbaugh,'48
Is Gettysburg Adman

Charles W. Harbaugh, 1948
Much emphasis is being placed upwho is advertising staff
on economic power and economic
success on one hand, and on the member of the Gettysburg (Penn.)
other a diminishing amount of hu Times and continuity writer for
Radio Station WGET, writes:
"My accomplishments since graduation are few when I compare
them with those of the School of
Journalism at the University of
Kentucky.
THE CASINO
"I regret that I cannot attend the
dedication of our new building, but
I rejoice that I can add my felicitations to the many congratulatory
letters you are certain to receive."

DANCE SATURDAY

NIGHT IN
7:30 Till Midnight

S.

Jack Eversole Busy
Down At Glasgow

His Piano and His Orchestra

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Jack Eversole, '48, manager and
news director of Radio Station
WKAY, Glasgow, reports he does
"light cleaning" on his job, which
also includes sports casting, public
relations and programming.
He says he will not be able to attend tonight's dedication, because he
will be broadcasting a football game.

of the Blu Crass

YOU'LL BE THE TOAST
OF THE
HOMECOMING EVENTS
IN THESE

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a supplement, a
of the ordinary
cpevial edition or an extra
Dave
handled his end of the job with aj
quiet efficiency that made all editors
1"ok belter than they were. He kept
them out of trouble, he protected
By W. B. ARDLRV
and nurtured their egos, he taught
3?
Kernel Editor.
them by example the decencies of
In thinking back over the people the newsnaper business. Imperfecand in my day
who staffed The Kernel daring my tions in the Kernel
were those of
editorship my memory somehow there were many
veers away from the editorial sid the editors beyond Dave's province
and focuses sharply on the late Dave to correct. Shoddy work was not in
Griffith, the composing and press him.

,

Taught, Nurtured
Student Editors
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foreman.
I have seen many printers since
my time at Kentucky fast and slow,
careful and careless, sober and
drunken, boors and gentlemen
but I have yet to see one who could
do so much with so little as could

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THE JOURNALISM reading room, between the typing room and the Journalism School office, provides a
studying na relaxation between classes. Students have access to the larce metroplare for
politan dailies, and the latest trade journals and news magazines. The reading room in equipped with
four tables, and can accommodate 32 students.
last-minu- te

By C. M. BALL

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'An'
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The Margaret I. King Library of
the University of Kentucky offers
unlimited resources for School of
Journalism students. All types of
books, periodicals, newspapers and
other pertinent data are available
lor study and research.
One of the outstanding journalism facilities of the University Library is the complete file of all
major newspapers of Kentucky as
well as files of newspapers throughout the country. Newspapers of
practically every large city in the
country are kept current in the
periodical reading room. Also, the
largest collection of Kentucky newspapers anywhere is kept in the
library for reference by students or
others who are interested.
Publications Micro-Filme- d
In addition to the many publications on hand at the Margaret I.
King Library, are the micro-filof

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BOOKS PUBLISHED recently by the University of Kentucky Press
are in the background of this picture of staff members of the Press.
Bruce F. Denbo, center, is director of the Press; Kenneth W. Elliott,
left, is assistant editor and Miss Jackqueline, at right, is secretary.

Betty Tevis Writes
Feature For Radio

UK Press Publishes
21 Books Since 1943
By JAXE WEBB
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The Kernel Press, in addition to
printing student publications and
also
doing University
prints books published by the University of Kentucky Press.
The UK Press began operations
on the campus in 1943 in the midst
of war-tim- e
restrictions on paper
and other essential materials, which
made progress difficult; Since that
time, however, the. press has published 21 books, seven of which were
published in the last year under the
directorship of Bruce P. Denbo. At
least five more books are scheduled
for the coming year.
Mr. Denbo came to UK in 1950
from the Louisiana State University
Press, where he got his start in
publishing. He also acquired much
valuable experience while he was in
charge of recruiting publicity in the
Command HeadSeventh Sen-icquarters during World War II. With
Mr. Denbo in the University Press,
arc lr. l. meiiuu cugiajiu, cuituiint
associate, and Kenneth W. Eliott,
assistant editor. Miss Jacqueline
Dominick is. the secretary.
Cited For Excellent Designs
In addition to his administrative
duties, Mr. Denbo also selects the
type and plans the format of all the
books published by the Press. Three
of the books he designed while at
L.S.U. have been cited for typographical excellence by the Institute
of Graphic Arts.
Mr. Denbo, who also supervises the
Kernel mechanical plant, found one
of his biggest problems adapting the
facilities of the Kernel pressroom to
the complicated business of printing
books. In order to do this, two new

Ken-tuckia-

Takes Year To Make

A Book

It takes about a year to produce
a book after the manuscript has first
been submitted to the press. It must
first be approved by an outside authority in the field it concerns, and
also by a University Press committee headed by Dr. Prank L. McVey.
The manuscripts are judged on the
Significance of their scholarship,
and about one out of every 15 is accepted. After a manuscript has been
approved, it must undergo several
rounds of editing until it is ready for

fled Letters

Betty Tevis. '46, New York, writes
a weekly "Hollywood Roundup," a
type feature
for about 600 radio stations and is
doing editorial work for Movie Life
and Movies magazine. Ideal Publications.
Betty, who lives in Greenwich Village with her husband, writer Henry
Balke, recommends the movie magazine field.
"Movie magazines seem to offer a
wonderful opportunity for people
who want magazine experience and
don't want to get lost in the shuffle
of a big general book," she says.

1944 Kernel

publications which are not only of
historical significance but also of
importance and interest to those
engaged in the study and progress
of journalism as a profession. A
micro-filof the Kentucky Gazette,
published in Lexington in 1737. is
one of the many examples of the
completeness of the Library. Other
eighteenth century newspapers, in
facsimile, also are abailable for
study and comparison.
Every phase in the study of journalism is covered in detail in the
many publications in the library.
Such subjects as typography, graphic arts, the mechanical functions of
the newspaper are only a few of
the many subjects covered.
For those interested in journalism, and how it is practiced in other parts of the world, the card catalogue has the subject of journalism
broken down by hemisphere, country, state, county, and even towns
of large population.
Advertising, publicity, public relations, and promotion also are all
a part of journalism and materials
covering these topics are available

for study and reference. These

GIORDANO'S SHOE REBUILDING
387 SOUTH LIME AT EUCLID
Nest To Becker's Main Plant
! Workmanship
And Materials

Best

All Work
Guarantees'
a. 3

Celia Bederman Schwartz, Kernel editor '44. is now a housewife
living in New Haven, Conn.
Mrs. Schwartz says that she is
pushing buttons on her electric
stove rather than typewriter keys.
K
She married Russel Schwartz,
'44, and they have a son, Stanley, three, and daughter, Deborah,
four months.
ex-U-

Letters to
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G -A - B - M- O - N -T
by

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the built-i- n comfort that every smart college man demands.
The Gabmont is made of washable gabardine that
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of
colors. And it will serve as an extra
dress shirt because it has long sleeves and can be worn
with a tie. The Manhattan Gabmont Sportshirt

When filter turns
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style . . . and it has all the built-i- n comfort that every smart
college man demands. The Gabmont is made of washable gabardine
that lets you save on cleaning bills. Comes in a variety of
colors. And it will serve as an extra dress shirt because it
has long sleeves and can be worn with a tie. $5.95
good-looki- ng

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lugun)i

finjik.

V.F.Q.
17.00
MEDICO KEOALIST
il.JB
Wid varitr of ttylM and tit m.
Write S. M. ffaak S C., N. T.. f
ImM
III I
MEDICO

FASHION

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Many Periodicals Available
Perhaps one of the most popular
rooms in the University Library is
the periodical and newspaper
ing room. This room contains current unbound periodicals and newspapers which are displayed on open
shelves. Current metropolitan newspapers, current magazines and Kentucky newspapers are shelved alphabetically by title. This material
is all restricted to the periodical
room, but is available to anyone
desiring to use it.
The University of Kentucky Library is one of the most rapidly
growing libraries in the South and
the materials, sources, references,
and other data are growing with the
library.
The director of libraries is Dr.
Lawrence S. Thompson and the library has a complete staff whose
personnel is trained to serve students and all others interested in
advancing their knowledge of

m

Editor

the press. Then begins the actual production.
When the book is completed from
cover to cover, Mr. Denbo begins
what he considers the most important step in producing a book the
promotion and sale of the book to
the public. He is particularly interested in publicizing the books to
sychan extent that they 'will ,be
Bprif'ficial t all those interested in
tJTteir subject matter, or all those who
might become interested after reading the book.
Mr. Denbo desires that the press
be considered an advisory organization as well as a publishing concern.
Even when a manuscript is not designed for publication by a university press, he and Mr. Elliott are
ready to help the author with information and advice about other publishers.

like-

wise pre catalogued to be easily
cessible to journalism students.

Lives In New Haven

aim for
c?
in svorts

mm
-

presses especially designed lor book
printing were purchased, and six
new type faces were added.
A trust fund set up by Margaret
Voorhies Haggin gave the Press its
start. She intended that the Press
serve the Commonwealth of Kentucky by publishing works of significant contribution to knowledge and
culture, with particular emphasis on
works about Kentucky and this region, and works undertaken by Kentucky faculty members and scholars.
Mr. Denbo points out, however, that
the press is not exclusively for
but must keep Kentucky in
mind as its primary subject.
Although commercial presses will
print works about Kentucky by Kentucky authors, there is a clear distinction between their aims. The
commercial presses will print a book
on Kentucky only when they are
able to foresee a sizable sales' profit
from the publication. On the other
hand, the University Press looks
first for significant scholarship and
worthy contributions, with no primary interest in large profits.

and tars it has trapped. Insert fresh
filter for cooler, cleaner, dryer,
sweeter smnkinj. Imported Briar.

'A t

1

Press Well Covered In Library

.

$14.95 to $39.95

'.") I

dedication

g

of the new Journalism Building, in
the continuing effort of editors to
improve and progress, a backward
glance down the road The Kernel
has traveled brings some of us a pic- ture of Dave, who left things better
.i
i
Dave.
tnan lie luuuui uu-in- .
When you wanted something out
God rest his soul.

good-looki-

1

1

--

1

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K

Says Kernel Foreman

The rustle of taffeta
the
swish of net - - - the soft flowing of
velvet
or crepe will add charm
to your evening - - - They can
all be had in the short glamour
dresses with deep decollete that are the
ri
t
t.
neignt ot elegance, tor dinner or tor
dancing - - - Your most becoming
color awaits your selection in
junior sizes 9 to 15 or misses sizes
0 to 20
and priced to fit
your allowance
i

N

Memory Of'Ardery
Focuses On Griffith

Arts Dean Says
Step Tow ard College's Goal
J-Sch-

Kb

Th

Monhottan Shirt Co.,

Mokrs of Monhottan Shirt,

SporHhtrfi, Nckwar, Ondrwo,
Fojdmos. 6 each wear, HandkorchtoH

subject to

ops

regulations

* Best Copy Available
FritTay. November 2. 1951

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'SI

KENTUCKY

THE

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V"

Separate Status
First Recommended
By Pres. Patterson
Journalism instruction at the
University of Kentucky has evolved
from a rudimentary beginning In
the English Department 46 years
ago to a
school in the
College of Arts and Sciences.
The first smatterings of journalism taught at the University were
in English composition classes,
where instructors began including
the principles of newswriting around
1905. A few rudimentary ideas of
newswriting and infrequent lectures
by local newspapermen were the extent of journalism teaching.
full-fledg- ed

-

-- ?

mmmm.

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v

NEWS AND EDITORIAL policies of the Kernel are determined in editorial conferences of student
editors. Shown onferrine here with Editor Bill Mansfield, seated at desk, are Chuck Tilley, sports editor;
Emily Campbell, society editor; Dortnan Cordetl, new editor; and Tom Wilborn, managing editor.

Kernel Has Grown From Tabloid
To Kentucky's Largest Weekly
is composed of the director of the columnist for the Cincinnati EnSchool of Journalism, the University quirer; Joe Palmer, syndicated turf

By BILL MANSFIELD

Kernel Editor

comptroller, the director of Student
Publications, the editor of the
Kernel, the editor of the Kentuckian.
and one member of the SGA Assembly.
These appointments are
subject to the ratification of SGA.
Other staff members are selected by
the four elected.
Many former staff members have
attained prominence in journalism
and related fields. A few of them
are:
WashJohn Day, Courier-Journ- al
John Ed
ington correspondent;
editorial
Fearce, Courier-Journwriter; Kenneth Gregory, Associated
Press; Fre'd Conn, Texas publisher;
Larrv Shropshire, sports editor of
the Lexington Leader; Ollie James,

This marks the 5Cth year since the
first newspaper was published on the
University campus and the 36th
year of continuous publication for
the Kentucky Kernel.
Started in 1915 as the successor to
the official student publication, the
Idea, the Kernel has grown from a
tabloid paper printed by
a commercial firm to a regulation
paper: "The largest weekly in the
state of Kentucky."
Starting publication a year after
the establishment of the Department of Jour