xt7vmc8rfn96 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vmc8rfn96/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700916  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 16, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 16, 1970 1970 2015 true xt7vmc8rfn96 section xt7vmc8rfn96 Tie
Wednesday, Sept.

CMTUCKY KERNEL

16, 1970

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

UK Trustees Meet

Vol. LXII, No. 9

7

Without Incident
surance as a condition of emBy RON HAWKINS
ployment.
Assistant Managing Editor
fl O O O
The board also approved a
The confrontation that many
G
to hear petitioners of the
feared would develop when the set-u- p
Board of Trustees met for the board. If a petitioner desires to
first time this fall failed to ma- speak to the board he first must
consult with President Singterialize.
If Singletary feels there
The University prepared a letary.
is relevancy in the petitioner's
closed-circutelevision set-u- p to
request, he recommends the
supplement the limited facilities speaker to a committee which sets
Patterson Office
of the 18th-floa
and date to hear
Tower meeting room. University thetime, place
petitioner. The committee
officials were not sure the set-u- p
then decides whether to recomwould work until yesterday mend
action on the petitioner's
morning.
request, to allow the petitioner
hook-u- p
The television
was to speak to the board, or to
piped into rooms in Dickey Hall, refuse the speaker's request.
the Commerce Building, AnderNamed to the committee to
son Engineering Building and
Kernel Photo By Dick Ware
the Classroom Building. Seating hear petitioners' requests were:
Closed circuit television in four campus buildings
Board approved two appointments and a life
M. Alverson,
interested faculty and students to view surance plan for UK employes. The rumored
capacity was estimated by Uni- Tommy Bell, Jesse
Mrs. Rexford Blazer, Robert Rudd the Board of Trustees
student confrontation failed to materialize.
versity officials as about 380 permeeting yesterday. The
and Robert Hillenmeyer.
sons.
When the Board Room was
filled, students and others were
told that they could watch the
board meeting on closed-circu- it
television. Reportedly, there were
-no incidents.
In the meeting, the Board of
An appeal has been filed to the UK ApBright' s appeal explained his reasons why
Bright attacks Section 1.21 as being "vague
Trustees approved two appointand overboard," with a "potential for undue
peals Board by Sheryl C. Snyder, counsel he believes the conviction based upon Secments by President Otis A. for Student Government President Steve tion 1.2i cannot stand. "By the code itself infringement
upon political expression."
Singletary and also approved a Bright, seeking reversal of a conviction aris- the UK trustees have required that political
Drawing on this, the statement argues that
life insurance plan for University ing from the May demonstrations.
demonstrators be dealt with only under any convictions "based thereon are invalid,
employes.
The charge brought against Bright was Sections 3.4 and 1.2a."
without regard to the conduct in question."
Dr. John Stephenson was ap- one of violating section 1.21 of the student
The appeal also argues that the "presiAlluding to segments of the appeal, Bright
proved by the board to serve code, which makes a disciplinary offense dential ban on meetings after 5 p.m. was claims that "since there was only doubtful
dean of undergraduate studies. "any violation of University rules regarding
as
and remote danger, not actual and impendsuperceded by the 7 p.m. gubernatorial curthe use of University property. "
Stephenson presently is a socifew and the ban thus became nonexistent."
ing danger to justify the president's comconBright seeks to overturn a
ology professor.
plete suspension of the constitutional right of
viction that he refused an order by UK PresThe
appeal states that Bright assembly, a person cannot Depenalized solely
Dr. William Dennen was ap- ident Otis Singletary to leave the scene of was the
for peacefully assembling in contravention
only one of the 700 reported stupointed acting dean of the grada demonstration by 5 p.m. May 5, in vio- dents who were in violation of the ban to of that unconstitutional order."
uate school. Dennen is now serv- lation of Student Code section 1.2i.
be prosecuted under the code.
ing as professor of geology.
The appeal termed the prosecution "a
In the document are moral and legal
ruse to unconstitutionally punish an unThe life insurance plan proThat, the appeal charges, sliows an at- arguments that he was "trapped" into being
vides that the University will popular speech, an attempt to make an tempt to make him "a political example" charged, that the basis for the charges are
pay basic life insurance for all example of a student leader whose crime and therefore is "clearly in denial of the invalid and contradict the basis for the
equal protection of the laws to him," makemployes. Previously, potential is unpopular political tactics, and an unconviction, and that the decision of a lower
constitutional denial of the equal protection ing the conviction invalid and warranting judicial body should be reversed and Blight's
had to puruniversity employes
dismissal of the charge.
chase, at their expense,life in of the laws."
University records cleared.
it

?..

::

ed

Used as "Political Example"

Bright Seeks Reversal of J Board Conviction

45-pa-

Host Urges UK Silent Majority To Speak Out
By DAVID BLANTON

Kernel Staff Writer
The UK College Republicans,
holding their first meeting of the
year Tuesday night, began by
making W. James (Jim) Host,

campus atmosphere. "The wildest thing we ever thought about
was a panty raid, and I don't
think we ever pulled one off,"
said Host.

Commenting on UK's student
commissioner of
body president Steve Bright, Host
parks, an honorary member of the
stated, "If you have a president
club.
that you don't like it is your own
Host, a 1959 graduate of UK, damned fault." The commisreflected, with revival-typ- e
fury, sioner said that it was time for
on differences at UK when he the "silent majority" at UK to
was a student and the current speak out.

Kentucky's

He warned the students that
people outside the University tie
them in with the 50 or 60 "hardcore" on campus.
He urged the College Republicans "to take action the right
way the proper way the political way." Host said he feels that
youth can control elections in the
state, and he called for another
Republican victory in the gubernatorial election next year.

sible candidate in the Republican
primary for the governorship, attempted to play down any
concerning his plans.
"I wish that my name be removed from speculation at this
time. The. question is what do I
mean by 'this time?' " said Host.
He stated that he had to finish
his job with the parks and that
currently he was workingon some
new ideas and plans for the park
system.
He declined to elaborate fur-mur-murin-

Host, often rumored as a pos

"1

-

4

i.v

f

v
James Host, Kentucky commissioner of parks,
told College Republicans last night that it
was time for the "silent majority" at UK to
speak out He also said if students did not

like their student government president, it
was their fault for allowing him to be elected,
The commissioner looked at changing atti- tudes on the nation's college campuses and

said, "The wildest thing we ever thought of
was a panty raid, and I don't think we ever
pulled one off."
Kernel photo by Bob Brewer

ther on these plans, stating they

were contingent on several federal
grants.
A question and answer period
followed his speech. Concerning
strip mining. Host said he felt
that conservationists do not object to the way Kentucky's laws
have been enforced by the Nunn
administration, but added that
conservationists were let down by
the last legislature, in that
tougher strip mining controls
were not passed.
Host said he believes that all
strip miners should not be classed
together because some, he felt,
had done an excellent job in their
reclamation efforts.
In other business, the club
voted to. contribute $100 to Jerry
Cregory's sixth district congressional campaign and $20 to William Cowger's reelection campaign in Louisville. Jeff Cumer, a
club member and chairman of
the Student Center Board speakers forum for this year, stated
that a greater variety of lecturers
would be coming to campus this
year, including Republican Senator John Tower of Texas. Ihe
club is also sponsoring a reception
for UK's President Otis A. Singletary at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30 in the
President's Room of the Student
Center.

* 2--

TIIE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wntnculay, Sept. lfi, 1970.

Pratt Fights .Requirement
Oj Early Filing Deadline

1

By The Associated Press
federal court
A three-judg- e
will hear a suit filed by UK

the early deadline for filing may
be somewhat outdated.
"With the development of the
graduate Don Pratt seeking to modern news media the people
void Kentucky's law that reshould not be denied the right
quires all candidates for political to elect their leaders by being
office to file 55 days before pricompelled to accept those who
have been named seven months
mary elections.
Until the suit can be heard, before," he said.
county clerks in the Sixth ConJudge Swinford said the three-judgressional District's 21 counties
panel might be assembled
were barred Tuesday from printwithin 10 days and added the
ing ballots for the November hearing probably would be held
election.
in Covington.
Defendants in the case are
The suit was filed after Pratt
attempted to file as an inKentucky Secretary of State Eldependent congressional candi- mer Begley and Fayette County
date and was rejected on Aug. Clerk Charles Baesler Jr.
12. The deadline under existing
Pratt's lawyer, Robert Sedler,
law is April 1.
argued the law is unreasonable
U.S. District Court Judge Mac in requiring independent candidates to file so early. Asst. Atty.
Swinford, is restraining the printing of ballots and ordering the Cen. Walter Herdman argued the
three-judg- e
suit was frivolous.
hearing, agreed that

9

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A

.

ge

Faculty Research Funds
Total Over $13 Million
By JIM WIGHT
Kernel Staff Writer
Over 13 and one-ha- lf
million
dollars in research funds have
been awarded to members of the
University faculty for the current
fiscal year, according to President
Otis Singletary's report to the
Board of Trustees.
The funds made available
range from a $500 grant to the
Department of Agronomy for tobacco research, to a $368,979 allocation to Dr. W.H. McBeatH of
the Ohio Valley Regional Medical
Program.
Dr. S.C Bohanan, College of
Agriculture, has been awarded an
additional $185,000, on a contract
of $645,000, to finance an agricultural experiment station in
Thailand.
Money from this
DeAgency for International
velopment grant is used to pay
the salaries and lab equipment
of the 10 UK staff members who
are working in Thailand. In addition, a monthly stipend is given
each of the 26 Thailand students
who are attending the University
to prepare them to take over
operation of the Thailand station
by July, 1975, when the contract
expires.

The Department of Electrical
Engineering has received from the
Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, a grant of
$49,440 for the development of a
e
vehicle. Built on a
modified Jeepster chasis, this
according to Dr.
prototype,
Robert L. Cosgriff, chairman of
the department, will be able to
operate in an atmosphere devoid
of oxygen or in almost any kind
of environment hostile to man.
In a study more relevant to
many students, Dr. W.G. Drew
of the Neurophysiology Department has received $50,777 as part
of a three year project to determine the action of marijuana
. on recent memory mechanisms.
Dr. Drew, who has spent a large
portion of his career experimenting with the effects of drugs,
stated that there is significant
evidence to indicate that marijuana produces a physiological
change which prevents the memory area of the brain from retaining a record of recent occurences. He added that marijuana is also believed to disrupt sleep and dreaming patterns,
thereby producing unwanted tensions and anxiety in the chronic
user.
mine-rescu-

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Getting It Together

partially due to more students having to live off
campus each year because of lack of dorm space.
Concern was expressed by Dean of Students Jack
Ilall over what he called the tendency of students
to break laws laid down by the University and the
apparent regression of students standards of morals
and ethics. Dean Rosemary Pond of Residence I falls
Programs, shown above, feels that the students
do not use their residence hall governments to their
Kernel Photo by Dick Ware
advantage.

on TV
Agnew vs. Students; Showdown way he expresses
the
rhetoric
of

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M.(AP)
Vice President SpiroT. Agnew,
i ejecting complaints about his
rhetoric as a fake issue, said
Tuesday he plans a television
appearance with .militant studentsand hopes it will show
that there are areas of agreement between them.
"Every accusation I've seen
that my rhetoric is polarizing
the country is usually accompanied by some of the most violent, inflammatory statements
that I've seen printed or stated
by the very individuals that make
these accusations," Agnew told
a news conference. "The accusa- -

tions
inflammatory
are poorly concealed smokescreens to shield the fact that
these people don't have any real
answers to what I'm saying."
Agnew, in Albuquerque to
campaign for Anderson Carter,
Republican nominee against Sen.
Joseph M. Montoya,
said he has no intention of al

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himtering
self on the political platform.
His appearance with the students is to be on the David
Frost Show, an interview program, which he will record in
New York next Monday. Frost's
public relations representative
said the show would be aired
Sept. 25 in most major cities.

Pollution Control Standards
Slow Kentucky Funding
the

ther
FRANKFORT
confrontation of sorts is developing with the federal government
over state requirements for water quality standards in interstate
rivers.
The Ohio River Valley Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) is
The UK Civil Liberties Union
holding a hearing in Cincinnati
will sponsor an open forum Montoday as a first step toward adoptday, Sept. 21, concerning the new ing standards which are not in
student code.
accordance with federal guideParticipating and answering lines. ORSANCO, an eight-stat- e
questions from the audience will compact, actually has generally
be Tommy Bell, member of the adhered to these standards for
Board of Trustees and chairman some time but never has adopted
of the committee that drafted them formally following a hearthe new code; Steve Bright, Stu- ing.
dent Government President; John
diRalph
Darsie, University Counsel; Jack rector of Pickard, executive
the Kentucky Water
Hall, Dean of Students; and Dr.
Robert Zumwinkle, new vice Pollution Control Commission,
told the state commission Tuespresident for student affairs.
day that Kentucky would have
The program will begin at to follow the standards if OR7:30 p.m. in the Crand Ballroom SANCO
adopted them. That
ofthe Student Center.
would bring Kentucky in con- (AP)-Ano-

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The mood was informal and the discussion was
between deans and stuopen at the
dents of UK last night in the Office Tower. Representatives from the residence halls discussed with
the deans subjects such as campus disorders of
last spring to the open-hous- e
rules in the dorms.
Dean Elder indicated that a program may be
started for students living off campus in which a
hour service will be available for them
twenty-fou- r
in any emergency aid they may need. This is

September

pirn
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no admission!
mmttttwwml

flict with
federal government
again over the standards.
A spokesman for the federal
Water Quality Agency told the
state commission Tuesday that
federal matching funds for water pollution control were being
withheld pending final approval
of Kentucky's standards. The federal government approved the
standards last year with some
exceptions, which Washington
apparently now wants resolved.
Pickard responded that "We'll
be going out of business" unless
the federal money is released
soon. He said the commission
has been operating with all state
money since the start of the fiscal year.
The main differences which
Kentucky has with Washington
over its standards are water temperature, dissolved oxygen and
alkalinity-acidit- y
levels.
The commission also heard
two alternative proposals from
E. E. Dupont de Nemours Co.
for disposing of excess hydrochloric acid which will result
from a new manufacturing process in 1972. By the mid 1970's,
a company spokesman said, further changes in operation will
eliminate the need for the acid
at all.

The Kentucky Kernel

Th. Kentucky Kernel. University
Station. University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40304. Second cUw
poUg paid t Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five timet weekly during the
chool year except holiday and exam
period, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box
Begun as the Cadet In lm and
publuhed continuously as the Kernel
since IK 15.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported U The Editors.
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KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor Managing Editor .... J7S-1TEililorLl Pa
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Advertising, Business, CirculatM-44tion

* --THE

KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Vctlnclay, Sept.

16. 1970- -3

Costs Rise by $100

Financial Aid Loses Pace With College Expenses

"Financial aid for college stu
dents is not keeping pace with
increased college expenses and
enrollment," said Jim Ingle, director of Student Financial Aid

"Some of the 500 or more stu
at the University of Kentucky.
He suggests that parents should dents denied financial aid for the
start now building a savings ac- fall may have a second chance
to secure funds this spring," Ingle
count for their children's educasaid.
tion.
He expects to receive another
He said parents of preschool
or grade school children, whose $50,000475,000 in National DeIncome exceeds $10,000 a year, fense Student Loan funds in the
may expect difficulty in securing near future, when the Bureau of
Federal aid for their children's the Budget orders the
bill approved.
Enrollment in the University college expenses in the future.
"That would be enough to put
Last year Ingle's office proof Kentucky Community College
dent in the 500
System climbed past 10,000 again vided financial assistance to some a
with fall registration after brief- 1,600 UK students through Fed- who were turned down during
ly declining as a result of the eral aid programs. "To provide the summer," he said.
financial aid to the same students
Ingle listed four types of fideparture of Northern Communthis year," he said, "would re- nancial assistance funded by the
ity College from the system.
The former community college quire an additional $160,000, Federal government: the Nationbecame Northern Kentucky State since costs to attend UK have al Defense Student Loan, which
sets no family income limit; the
risen by $100 per student."
College, effective July 1.
The University received apCollege Work Study program,
Enrollment in the system for
the fall term is 10,109.
proximately 60 per cent of its which first emphasizes families
Jefferson Community College request for financial aid. "When with anincome of $7,500 or less;
Educational Opportunity Crants,
heads the list, with an enrollment we send in our requests for Fedof 2,531. Second isPaducah, with eral aid, the amount requested is which give preference to families
based on estimated needs. The 40 with incomes of $6,000 or less,
1,132. Ashland Community College has 1,073 students. Elizabepercent we didn't receive this and the Federally Insured Loan
th town has 630, Fort Knox 792, year means some students were program, in which participating
Hazard 210, Henderson 584, Hop-ki- n denied financial assistance and banks and lending institutions
therefore were unable to attend loan the money to students.
sville 478, Lexington Techni"Loans under this last procal Institute 583, Madisonville the University."
310, Maysville 360, P'estonsburg
Ingle believes the situation gram are guaranteed and insured
should improve this winter, since by the Federal government,
420, Somerset 668, and Southeast Community College has 338. Congress has provided an ad- which also pays interest fees
Northern's enrollment before ditional $110 million for higher while the student is in school
leaving the UK system was about education to what the President and for nine months following
his graduation, if the family ad- 1,350.
originally requested.

Justed income does not exceed
$15,000," Ingle explained.
Last year Ingle's office handled Federal financial aid totaling approximately $1,175,000.
"We have committed $1,200,000
for the 1970-7- 1
academic year,"

Fall Enrollment

he said.
Ingle noted, however, that the
extra money primarily is a cany-ove- r
of an additional $88,000 the
government provided the University at the end of the spring
semester.

Is Over 10,000

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* Nixon's Biased Commission
Last summer President Nixon denied that heoranyone in his admin
istration was to blame for the spreading campus violence last spring.
However it appears that his Commission on Campus Unrest, chaired
by fellow Republican William Scranton, believes it was exactly the
Nlxon-Agnestyle of bombasting which was responsible for the naon campuses. An accusation of this nature from one's
tionwide flare-u- p
own commission is not particularly desirable in a hotly contested
election year.
The report of the commission is not yet published but according
to Republican sources who are familiar with the commission's staff
reports and tentatives drafts, at least three other points will be made:
1) much of the lawlessness of last spring resided with the "official violence" of state troopers and National Guardsmen.
2) Most of the students involved were idealists who view the
Vietnam war as immoral.
3) the spring incidents were not part of an organized strategy
radicals.
by
All these points could make for public sympathy for students and
political havoc for the Republicans.
This possibility is not lost on the administration, which is already
making efforts to discredit the commission's findings. One high administration source was reported as saying "When you put Rhodes, Cheek
and Ortique on the commission, you can expect what is now taking
place. All of them hate the President and they will vent that passion
in a report like this." Thus three men have influenced an eight-ma- n
commission which, of course, makes the report biased and invalid
before it is even printed!
In 1968 a distinguished scholar made the following remark to the
Kerner Commission on Civil Disorders: "I must again in candor say to
you, members of this Commission it is a kind of Alice in Wonderland with the same moving picture reshown over and over again,
the same analysis, the same recommendations and the same inactions." If the Nixon administration plays its political game correctly,
the Report of the Commission on Campus Unrest also will become a
paper fantasy.

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John Junot

The Skulled--

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rest

"If any of you have objections to the official policy of

this administration, let it be knoicn note, before you bias

the commission,"

The Kentucky

Iernel

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

U

I
I will." But as you can see, this is
EDITOR'S NOTE: John Junot is a senior a say,
severely limited kind of "power". It's
Arts and Sciences student. This is the more accurate to
say, "If you don't do
second of three installments of this week's what I
want, I'll blow us both up." This
column.
kind of destructive power is useful only
.In Lexington, the struggle for the to the degree that the opponent is aware
for the comcampus is over, the struggle
of it and respects it.
munity is about to begin. As always,
This analogy between nuclear politics
Lexington is a good two years behind and campus confrontations is not exactly
the larger cities and more sophisticated
accurate. Nevertheless, it is very instrucuniversities, In those places, New York, tive, and, in 1970, regretfully appropriate.
Chicago, Berkeley, Madison, the struggle For a protracted and bitter student strike,
has escalated to guerrilla warfare. If Lexa Berkeley, Columbia, or San Francisco
ington and UK are to avoid the same State, with all its bloody confrontations,
all people here must analyze the is the
fate,
campus equivalent of nuclear war,
history of those other places, make comespecially at a state school. Everybody
parisons, find others' mistakes, and make loses. Even if the buildings stay standing,
plans for many different situations. These the university is destroyed as a social
plans must be discussed, a consensus
system, dissolving in an atmosphere of
reached, a mood established.
hate, bitterness, mistrust, suspicion, and
I feel qualified to do this. I've made fear. The state loses its
young citizens,
a life style out of doing it. Qualified or a
university, and a hell of a lot of money.
I don't see anyone any more qualinot,
The administration loses its best men and
fied who's any more likely to try.
is reduced to being an incompetent poI said the struggle for the campus is liceman. The
faculty loses peace of mind,
Stuover. I mean the students have won.
its ability to teach, or even to do research,
dent Power is a reality. On the campus
due to punitive cuts in its funds, and
we are free. Though this power is as yet its freedom. The students lose in terms
rather unorganized, incoherent, fluid, and of broken careers,
jail sentences, paranoia,
intangible, it exists. It exists as an awareand death. Even the opposite
in the minds of at injuries,the
ness or consciousness
politicians and radical actileast a large minority of students. At poles, who seem to make immediate gains,
vists,
least a large minority, more likely a malose because the strike becomes addicjority, and quite possibly the vast majortive, a monkey on their backs, inescapity. Not to mention quite a few faculty
able, unstoppable, and costly in time
and administrators as well.
and energy needed for other projects.
from now on
The awareness is this:
students are to be treated as human beings, adults, and, with a few
exceptions, as equals. As a group
they deserve respect. Their counsel is to
be sought and seriously considered on all
decisions they directly affect them, and
on many that do not. "Seriously considered" meaning that several points are
yielded on.
Or else.
For students see the above as recognition of hard-wo- n
rights, not as a matter of
affection or a reward for being good little
boys and girls to be snatched away if they
start being nasty little brats. It's not a
matter of being tolerated; it's a matter of
power, of oppressive prerogatives faculty
and administrators traditionally held,
which students destroyed or had conceded to them.
Students can rule UK in the same way
that our last four Presidents could have
ruled the world, that is, "I have the power
to blow you up, and if you don't do what

1894

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 16, 1970

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Frank S. Coots III,

Editor-in-Chi-

Kernel Soapbox
The Case for Dr. Mason
By KARL MAY

EDITOR'S NOTE: Karl May is a sophomore Arts and Sciences student.
It would have been rather hard to have
gone through the first few days of this
semester without having been approached
by one group or another, to join this
or sign that. Many times these causes
or groups, are shrugged off simply because a person just hasn't got the time
or mood to comprehend the purpose of
these people.
Others just don't want to get involved.
Well, everyone has his own choice; but
may I suggest to those people who feel
that apathy is the best course, that
does absolutely nothing to
relieve any affliction that any segment
of this University feels, in any capacity.
Everytliing that happens on this
campus, whether the progression of one
cause or the death of another, somehow
shakes at lea'st a small strand on almost
every student's web.
A cause that I wish to speak of, in
particular, is that which supports the
renewal of Dr. Cene Mason's contract
for the fall semester of 1971 and spring
1972. Dr. Mason for the uninformed, is
a professor in the Political Science Department, who planned to run in the
6th district primary about four months
ago. His chances were gunned down by
the structure's claim that he allegedly
bought a hot IBM typewriter. Those in
the know generally led that Dr. Mason
was set up, but that's history now and
can't be changed.
The issue now centers on Dr. Mason's
having received his terminal notice for
employment here at the University. After
the political structure, fearful of his appeal
to the younger voters and those more concerned with change, has robbed him of
his political aspirations, they now seek to
rob him of his livelihood so iliac ne will
be forced to move from this state. That
would be very convenient for them, to
say the least

Those students who have been

tunate to have had Dr. Mason as an

forin-

structor generally conclude by a substantial margin, that his capabilities as a
professor rise above the mean of such men
on this or any other campus. His straightforward manner and honesty may be offensive to a few students who aren't
used to such an approach to instruction,
but his concern for both his student's
response to the material he uses and the
relevancy of that material to what is
going on, is refreshing. That can't be
said about too many professors anywhere.
We, the people circulating the petition
proposing the renewal of his contract, feci
that political powers both in Frankfort
and in downtown Lexington are at work
to railroad this man out of this state.
Such tactics sltould not be allowed to
work. Dr. Mason has a great interest in
the growth of this University and those
people who can make it what it should
be, the students.
This man should not have to stand
alone. For his case carries with it the
cold fact that if he is forced to leave,
then with him goes the respect many
students have for the University carrying
on its own affairs. It will stand as absolute
proof that the politicians in this state
dictate to this