xt7vq814nq1s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vq814nq1s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19180404  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  4, 1918 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  4, 1918 1918 2012 true xt7vq814nq1s section xt7vq814nq1s THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON,

VOL, X

400

STROLLERS IN FORM FOR
STELLAR PERFORMANCE

S
"PUT IN" BIG
"DEMOCRACY"
GARDEN AT THE HALL

CO-ED-

DRAFTED MEN MAY

SALE

IS

GOOD ROYDEN TO COMMAND

Friday is "Stroller Day."
The Strollers of the University will
present "Mice and Men" at the
Opera House Friday night,
April 5. For two weeks the rehearsals
have been held nightly, and the cast is
in top form for a record performance.
Tickets were on sale in the Stroller
room in the Main Building Tuesday
and in town Wednesday morning. Before 10 o'clock Tuesday morning eight
rows had been sold and the room was
full of students asking for the best
seats. If this may be taken as an indication, there will be a S. R. 0.
crowd when the curtain rises.
At the last hour, as it were, an added attraction was put into the performance in the form ojj a dance by Peggy
the Orphan, who is slipping away from
her guardian to attend the ball . The
dance is a difficult one and for a while
the stage manager despaired of producing it. Miss Molloy, however, had
different notions and prepared the
dance and presented it at the rehearsal Monday night. She took the cast
by storm and they all declare it will
be one of the most successful scenes
of the play.
n

The Strollers have always presented
plays that were difficult for amateurs,
and this year their ambition was to
equal any of their former productions.
In the selection of "Mice and Men"
they were guided by this ambition, as
the play is worthy of the best professional effort. Forbes Robertson first
presented the play with an
r
cast. It was an immediate success.
It has lost none of its charm in the
Strollers' hands and will fully repay
any playgoer.
all-sta-

Local people in the cast will make
the play especially interesting to Lexington people. Five of the cast are
from Lexington, the three leading act-

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The University of Kentucky has
again enlisted itself as a ready ally
to Its government, in doing its "bit"
and best to help win the war, by offering its grounds, laboratories, shops
and buildings as an auxiliary training
camp for drafted men, whom the government will select for a short course
of special technical training, preparatory for Immediate service in France.
Captain Royden, commandant of the
University, has spent several days accompanying K. V. Carman, a special
representative of the War Department's Commission of Education and
Special Training, inspecting the University grounds and holding conferences with several prominent business
men of Lexington to ascertain the
suitability of the University for quartering the 400 drafted men by May 1.
Captain Royden, after his conference with Mr. Carman, was able to say
that Lexington would stand as one of
the four cities of the Central South,
where the training camps were almost sure of being located.
University Responsible
The facilities offered by the University combined with the fact that
the school has a regular army officer
at the head of its military establishment in the person of Captain Royden,
has been largely responsible for Lexington's selection. Altho the latter
will probably be in general command,
and members of the faculty at the University will be used for the training,
a number of additional military men
will in all probability be brought here
to assist in the training.
The student officers will be educated to fill the parts for which is the
most crying need among the expeditionary force in France at the present
time, and it is understood that they
will be rushed overseas as soon as

(Continued on Pae FIvp
ors and two others. Gus Gay, Anne
Molloy and Milton Revill have leadTO RESPOND
ing parts, while Charles Planck and MELCHER
Pred Augsburg have minor parts. The TO WELCOME ADDRESS
ability of Gay needs no repltion after
Wednesday session of the
the success of his performance last At the
Association,
Educational
year.
Anne Molloy, tho in her Kentucky
which will be held at Camp Zachary
first performance, shows talent either
24, Dean C. R, Melcher,
as an orphan in training, or as the Taylor, April
on behalf of the teachers of the State,
belle of the ball.
will respond to the address of wel
Friday morning in chapel the Stroll
come given by General H. C. Hale,
era will present a small entertainment
The principle address at this meeting
to give students a glimpse of their
will be given by Hon. Herbert Quick,
ability. Some members of. the cast
of the Federal Farm and Loan Board,
will appear.
Washington, D. C.
Numerous requests for reserved
seats in the University box have been MASONIC CLUB THURSDAY NIGHT
received, and the business manager
The Masonic Club will meet Thurshas asked peanut merchants to have day night at 8 o'clock in the Law Dei

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a good surplus on hand to provide partment.
food for the animals.

invited.

Masons of any degree are

OF "BETWEEN

Maids from the Blue Grass, the
mountains, the "Pennyrlle," and the
Purchase, city girl and country lass,
have united forces to defeat old H.
C. of L. along with Kaiser Bill, and
have "put in" a ten acre garden in the
rear of Patterson Hall.
Ably directed by Miss Adelaide
Crane, and Miss Ruth Duckwall, the
hoed, raked, "dropped and
fair s
covered" potatoes, planted radlsheB
and lettuce and put in "onion sets,"
the whole of Saturday.
Since the recent showers, hourly visits are made to "our" garden to see
if anything has sprouted. Deadly
war has been declared against the first
weed which shows itself, and volunteers are plenty for the first hoeing.

BE TRAINED AT

Ann Molloy Springs Dance Lexington One of Southern
On Surprised
Cities For Auxiliary
Camps
Cast

SEAT

KENTUCKY, APRIL 4, 1918

No. 24
IS THEME WILDCATS HUNGRY EOR

US"

TALK T

President Urges Fitness in McClelland And Dempsey
The Selection For
Will Probably Start the
College Officers

Game

URGED FIGHT FOR POSITIONS
The third observance of "Between-U- s
Day," inaugurated by President
McVey on coming to the University,
marked the chapel exercises Tuesday.
After a reading from Isaiah, Doctor
McVey gave a short talk on the fellowship of Democracy, putting special
spirit which
stress on the
has developed in the Allied armies.

Gradually working the kinks out of

their arms, occasioned by the cold
days of last week, and fast training
their eyes never to lose sight of any
pellet that descends on them from the

pitcher's box, the Wildcats are reaching for a stride that will overstep the
Georgetown Tigers in their first game
Saturday afternoon.
"The fundamental basis of religion,"
Practice games have been la mode
he said, "is being at your best. This during the past few days. Park usumeans your best physically, mentally ally picks a first team and lines it up
COMMENCEMENT WILL BE (which depends on the former), and against a bunch of scrubs. Of course
spiritually. That is the new religion things are not as interesting as they
developed in the great conflict. It is would be if two teams of equally balespecially essential that college men anced ability were contestants, but
and women be at their best to answer working out tbe best players on the
the constant calls of the government same team will produce teamwork.
Ceremonies Cut Short On and other agencies.
Wildcat stock for the game SaturAccount of War
"The remarkable thing about the day took wings and flew Monday when
Conditions
experiences of the men in the trenches , tne Herald came out with a story that
is that those we have always known y,jg jjm Moss had enlisted as a enemPROMINENT SPEAKER as light hearted and careless have st ln the army and Droke up tne Tlg.
Commencement week for the class turned to religion and a broader life. er battery. Moss has been catching
"We have learned many lessons in Doodle Sullivan, captain of the Tigwr
of 1918 will begin Sunday, June 2, and
graduating exer- the great war that there is an actual team, for quite a while and knew
terminate with the
cises, which will take place Wednes fellowship of men, and a man counts his delivery from A to Z.
day, June 5, instead of Thursday, June for what he Is; the great value of the wdeat sab Artists ArrivIng on Time
spirit that exists in the.
catalog.
6, as announced in the 1917-1ag jg
Mathe
The President and the Senate deem armies m Keeping up uie mureuo; mm manager of the Cincinnati Reds, a betonly merit and fitness should conit advisable that, due to the war con-thter trainer of boxmen than anything
The only successful
ditions, the exercises should be con- - trol standing.
else because he himself was once the
program instead basis for anything is democracy. Let star, so is James
densed to a four-daPark getting the best
us apply the new religion here and
of prolonging it for five days.
out of University aspirants to the
everywhere."
hurling positions. Else McClelland.
The committee in charge of obtainDoctor McVey spoke of the great captain of the crew and tne begt pitch-facting a speaker for the occasion is in
for good that groups, such as er tha(. hag performed on stoll Fle,d
communication with men of national
fraternities, sororities, societies could smce park
hag
a fagt
Secretary McAdoo was
reputation.
in a college community, but de- - baH
hopg Uke a fn)& & drQp tfaat
asked to give the commencement ad- be
dress, but on account of pressing war plored the clannish spirit that often breakg uke the flight of a kingfisher,
business was forced to decline the in- characterized these groups. He earn - and a dazzling change of pace, all in
vitation.
estly advocated the selection of the his good right arm.
Doc Lasley, southpaw, is being used
concerning the speak- best and most efficient men for posiDefinite plans
in the practice games against the first
ers have not yet been worked out, tions on athletic
teams, debating
team, because he starts his windup
but the President expresses the deteams, and other honors, with no re- from the port side as does the redoub- sire that the entire staff of the Univer
gard for anything save their merit and taMe Doodlo of Georgetown fame. Las- unu uie ouiitur uittua win yui uui-- .
sity
'
pate in all the commencement exer- - fitness. Any other policy, he said, iey js rapidly getting control of the
ball. Next on the list comes genial
cises, making the commencement as would fail of the desired result.
Dad Downing, whose fast one would
much of a ceremony as possible under .
the trying conditions.
OF make Walter Johnson's look like a
SIGMA NU WINNER
m jy AGlflTTll ATT. PTTP knuckle ball.
Some additional features of com- Dempsey will probably don the mask
mencement week are being planned
and protector Saturday. He holds up
arrangements will be an- and definite
Tho Sigma Nu's defeated the A. T.
h,B battery partner weU and ,s a
nounced later.
08 , tho last of the mterfraternity artist, always picking out a bat 8tlck
that
has votfiil to baskot ball game8 Friday night, with
The Senate committee
Thoma8- wh
hole ln
Bot
hold the commencement exercises of, score of 13 to 10. The game was as
.
la
ilia,
t8"?8 ne 18 a Detter man on thn
the class of 1919 on the second Wed-the rest' which is going some. mond than the hardwood, and Dewey
nesday of June, since school will
gin one week later in September, 1918. and 11 really looked more like a bas- Downing, former battery mate of his
a wrestling brother Dad, are also aspirants for
ketball contest than
guardianship of home plate.
WEII IN CIVIL SERVICE
match. There were a few individual
First Saseman Hard to Pick
encounters to lend spice to the occa
Bastin and Gregg are splitting hairs
E. B. Webb, A. B. 1910, has been '
sion, however, and pep was not lack- in nifty plays at the Initial sawdust
transferred from the Deputy Collector- 0,1 e,ther sIde'
Tne team8 were sack. Both the boys are classy
ship of Income Tax to the Deputy Col-'
of Internal Revenue and wel1 matched, and It was necessary to erS( and fa8t attaining form with the
play off a tie to decide the champions, stick. Bastin, however, seems a slight
placed under Civil Service Rule.

F5

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

(STRAND
bit more experienced and will

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P. M.

prob-

ably bo flret nmn out for the game Saturday.
At the keystone sack Joe Cambron,
last year "K" man and second sacker,
will Btart dust clouds. Cambron hit
weii last year and is expected to do
oven ueucr mis season, ucorgo zer- foss will probably cover the shortfleld,
in which territory ho was at home
with the Wildcats two years ago.
Propps, a new man, has been playing
on the hot corner of the diamond,
where two base sluggers are sometimes burnt when they try to stretch
a double into a triple.
Riddle or Hall, Muth and Pullcn or
Kohn, will most like garden for the
Wildcats in the Tiger game. Rlddlo
and Pullen are fast getting into the
pplendld physical shape they encased
in moleskins last fall. Muth is showing up to good advantage, in the cen
ter plot of the diamond.
Infielders' Reserve Corps.
uicK nuguu, Aiex nan ana wuimce
enlisted men in the infielders' re- serve corps. Guthrie and Knight have
been playing second fiddle ln the green

grass.
The game will start at 3:30 o'clock
and will be umpired by Pat Dever-eauThe nine men who will start the
game will be chosen from the follow-

SPECIAL

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goidwyn Picturea.
Hig
that's why they cost more.

Prices 5 Centt and'10 Centt.
Afternoon and Evenlnf.

FEATURE FOR

UNIV. SUMMER SESSION

Entire Plant of University
Available Fnr Siv
Weeks Session
COMMUNITY

SINGING

ration in some courses.
Credit In the Summer Session
"Students who have full entrance
credits to tho University will bo given
credit toward degrees for college work,
in the summer school.
"Four semester credits will bo glv- en for one double course consisting of
hours a day for the session. Two
scmeuter credits will be given for a
single course (one hour a day for the
session.)

I

The University in its annual summer school bulletin announces the
of the summer term June 17,
to close July 2S. The bulletin Just
Issued, contains the courses of study,
schedule and information necessary
for the matriculates and calender for
the year

"No student will bo allowed to make
more than six semester credits in the
summer school.
Agricultural and Vocational Education
xcepuonai aavantages will DO OIfered in the summer school to students who are qualifying to teach
Agricultural and Vocational Education under the provisions of the Smith- Hughes Bill. Professor McNeal C.
James will offer courses in Agricultur
al Education and In Educational Psycholoev which will nsnfiHniiv flf ntn.
,
oents ior tne organization and presen-ar- e
tation of vocational work in the high

-,

1918-191-

Six Weeks' Session.

rue summer school of the

h-cl-

Unlver-- (

slty will be in session June 17 to July
28, a period of six weeks. The work
of the summer session is designed for
,
,
,
.i
i
leuuuma, bluuuius ana persons seen- Ing Informatlon and traInIng Besides
'
the usua, courseg number
features will be given during the six
Graduate Work
weeks of the session. From the pro"Graduate work will be offered by
gram of studies it will be possible to
(special arrangements with the heads
make up plans of work suitable for
of departments and the Chairman of
teachers and workers ln many fields.
the Graduate Committee.
The entire plant of the University
Dormitories and Boardlnn.
will be available for use, including
"Patterson Hall will open for womlaboratories, libraries and buildings.
The bulletin, which has been sent en. The rates are $3.00 a week. Rooms
may be had in the men's dormitories
to all schools of the State says:
TlM5re are several
"The University of Kentucky has at a sma11 fee
entered upon a new era under the good boarding houses convenient to
leadershIp of president Frank L. Mc-- the University where board may be
Vey K ,s Wg ambltlon to pIace thls had at from $4:00 to $5.00 a week.'
Tne work In the summer school is
instItutIon ln the front rank of state
given in double and single courses. A
universities.
"His record of achievements as Pres- - double course means that the subject
ident of the University of North Dako-- j ,s taken two hours a day thruout the
ta and the work which he has already sesslon- A single course is taken one
accomplished here warrant the belief hour a day foT the ful1 session. The
that Kentucky will not long lag behind ,es ,or a sInSle course are $5.00, for
her sister states in the work of her' a do"ble course $7.00, for three single
courses $10.00, and for one double and
State University.
ne 8lngle course
"The University cannot accomplish
i

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...

spector and Supervisor of Secondary
Education, will bo with tho faculty
for the entiro week and will conduct
tho round table. Other members of
tho faculty will bo present and tako
part in the discussion.

out this country for his fine interpretations of Shakespearean characters.
The teachers and Btudents of the summer Bchool, as well as tho citizens of
Lexington and the surrounding Dlue
Grass country, will have tho rare opThe Elsie Herndon Kearns Players portunity of seeing this fine company
of Shakespearean actors. Admittance
ln a Berle8 of Shakespeare and
)ero plays wlI1 feature the last week. will be reasonable."
Mo-tw-

Aionaay evening, JUiy no, at
nuiueu hhu tiuiiei win ue given, rues-day matinee at 3 p. m. the Learned
LadIea wm bo presented and the Tern- pe8t will be given that evening at 8:15
o'clock.
..Tnj8 great dramatic company is
headed bv Elsie Herndon Knams. who
played several years with the Ben
Greet Players and has an international
reputation as a Shakespearean
actress. George Somnes, who takes the
leadlng male roles, is well known thru

Pitcher, McClelland, Lasley and C.
Downing; catcher, Dempsey, Thomas,
D. Downing; first base, Bastin, Mis- rack, Gregg; second base, Cambron,
Hall; short stop, Zerfoss, Wallace;
third base, Propps, Miller; left field,
Riddle, Kahn; center field, Muth, Pul-- f
len; right field, Guthrie, Hall
The next game will be played with
Hanover College on Stoll Field Friday
afternoon, April 12.

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A map of tho University buildings
and grounds, with a "key" to each of
tho places on the campus represented,
has Just been completed and a copy of
It will bo put in tho University catalog which will soon go to press. The
original map has been hung in the ofTho map shows
fice of the President.
the improvements about the campus
that are being contemplated.

MRS. J. TANDY HUGHES
Member of A. N. A, M. of D.
Will give

at the Phoenix Hotel, for school girls and
boys an informal

EASTER DANCE

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ing:

UNIV. MAP IS MADE

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FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 5TH
She cordially invites the students of the University

MISS SPURR'S SPECIAL

BENIFIT

DANCE

FOR

DR. BARROWS UNIT
Wednesday Night, April 10th, 1918

-

REUBEN HUTCHORAFT
PROBABLY IN BATTLE

K. C HALL
Smith & William Music
Special University Classes. Regular Dances Wednesday and
Saturday Night. Private Lessons by Appointment.

I

That a former professor in the

Uni-

versity, Reuben Hutchcraft, Jr., is now
on the Western front helping to stem
the advance of the Germans, is the inference in a letter received Tuesday
from him by Judge W .T. Lafferty,
dean of the College of Law.

Features of the Session
The summer school of 1918 Is espe- of an efficient public school system.
The public schools cannot do their clally noteworthy in that it offers to
most efficient work without profes- - the students many features
"attempted by the University,
e
trained teachers. The
tiplication and standardization of the There wlu be special features each
Lieutenant Hutchcraft states he is high schools, together with the condi-- j week features that are as good as
working hard. "Of course," he says, tions resulting from the war, has pro- - found In tne lare Eastern universl-ducean unprecedented demand for tIe8, The lflrst week WM be music
"I can't tell you exactly what we are
weekThe seven days will be
a
doing, but you must have a general professionally trained teachers.
of the business of a line officer
additjon to the regular work for Voted to community singing and lee-IIn
an infantry regiment. Perhaps the "teachers in the courses outlined in tures on muslc' condted by
M. L.
give you some news as to thls bulletin, a number of popular and fe8sor Peter W Dykema
cnigan, proressors of music, Univer- what this Rainbow division is now en- - aMpntiflp
win ho rivsn fr
sIty
Wisconsin.
gaged in."
of charge during the summes session.
President McVey will deliver four
The Rainbow division mentioned in President Frank L. McVey will deliver
- lectures on the World War, beginning
the letter was one of the first branches lectures of special interest to teachof the American army to engage in ers. Members of the faculty will give Monday afternoon, June 24, at 4 p. m.
popular lectures in their special fields.1 These alone will be of great value,
actual fighting.
Dean Lafferty also received a card Professor Peter C. Dykema of the Uni-- J as Presideat McVey is an eminent
Tuesday from William Perry Drake, of, versity of Wisconsin will conduct Com- - authority on the war, having been in
Bowling Green, who was graduated munlty Singing and lecture on Music, touch wlth national figures in Wash- from the law college three years ago and the Dramatic Instinct. Judce E.!,nBin Ior several jnonths.
The feature of the third week will
and is now with the American expedi- M. Rucker of tho University of South
tionary forces in France.
Carolina will lecture on Domestic Re- be a series of lectures given by E.
"I am writing you," Drake says, "to lations. The Red path Chautauqua will Marion Rucker, United States assistlet you know that your old boys are be held during the summer session ant attorney, Washington, D. C, on
doing their bit. Am making good, but and the entertainments so arranged the "Law of Domestic Relations."
It's nothing like going to school." He that the teachers can take advantage
Round table discussions on educastates there are many former students of the lectures at reduced rates. Tho tional subjects will be held during
of the University who are now in city library as well as the University the fourth week, beginning Monday
'
France.
library will be open and free to stu afternoon, July 8, for the purpose of a
better understanding of the Kentucky
dents.
problems in secondary education, with
PROHIBITION CLU1 TODAY
Admission
"No entrance examination is re- the hope that a solution may be found
The Prohibition Club will meet ln quired for admission to any of the tliru the experience and counsel of
the Y. M. C. A. rooms this afternoon courses, but instructors must be con- workers in the field. Professor
at 3:30 o'clock.
Rhoads, Stato High School In- sulted concerning prerequisite prepa- -

INFORMATION CALL

742-- y

its purpose without the

hereto-sionall-

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mul-jfor-

High Clan Tailoring

Moderate Prices
White Carnation

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Devotion

Rose

Love

Pansy

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ad

Disdain.

Heliotrope

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Thoughts

White Lily

Justright Tailor
ing Co.
145 W. Main St.

Sweetness

Yellow Lily

Gayety

Hyacinth

Friendship

Get them From
MICHLER BROS.
UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVE
H. L. MILWARD

MRS. J.TANDY HUGHES
Member of A. N. A, M. of D.
106 N. UPPER ST.
Classes Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday evenings.
It is the aim of this school to teach dancing as it
should be, advocating at all times proper
positions and decorous actions
Music

Piano, Saxophone, Violin, Trap Drum

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
FIFTY COUNTY

AGENTS

HERE ON SPECIAL

WORK

Experts Talk on All Lines
Of Home

Demonstra-tio-

n

Work
McVEY SPEAKS TODAY
Fifty homo demonstration agents
of tlio State mot Monday for a week's
convention under tho auspices of the
Extension Division of tho College of
Agriculture, to receive special technl
cal instruction to bo carried back to
the counties wherein they are em
ployed. These women are all trained
In this work and are well qualified to
disseminate this knowledge among the
different clubs thruout tho State.
Among tho speakers for the week
are members of the staff at the Ex
periment Station and experts sent
here from the Department of Agricultural at Washington. All parts of the
program afford an opportunity for
open discussion and the expression of
personal experience and individual
views. This is a closed meeting to
the public, but) the demonstration
agents will, in the end, give to the pub
lic the valuable points of instruction
which they receive.
From Washington comes Miss Mary
E. Oresswell, assistant In charge of
the girls club work; Miss Madge
Reese, specialist in cottage cheese
and the making of butter; Miss Ola
Powell, specialist in fancy preserves;
O. B. Martin, assistant in charge of
the home demonstration work and Dr
Franz Lund, specialist in canning of
poultry meats, iflsh and in drying. Dr.
Mutchler, head of the Extension Division of the Experiment Station; Mrs.
Helen B. Wolcott, State Agent Home
Demonstration Work; Dean Thomas
Coper, Director of the Experiment Station; and Pres. Frank L. McVey will
also be on the program.
Each day of the meeting is devoted
to a special subject or phase of the
work that can be accomplished during the ensuing year. Monday was devoted to organization, both state and
county and reports brought in by the
different agents from the state. The
many processes of gardening, canning and drying were discussed. Wed
nesday's program was a continuation
of the program begun on Tuesday,
and in addition some very valuable
instruction in regard to poultry, its
breeding, care and the prevention of
poultry diseases was given.
Today the discussions will bo devoted to the care of the dairy, and
the making of butter and cheese. This
afternoon President McVey will de
liver an address. The discussion of
honey, sorghum and other sugar substitutes will make up the instruction
and program oil Friday. Saturday
morning will be devoted to the formulating of plans for county and
and the meeting will
close In the afternoon, after a Round
Table discussion.
school fairs,

MORE INFORMATION
SENIOR ENGINEERS ON
CONCERNING PIPER
Captain Royden has Just received a
letter from Frnnk E. Harrigs, Adjutant
General, concerning the stalUH of Wal
tor C. Piper, n student of tho Unlver
slty enrolled in the Signal Service
Corps of tho Military Department of
tho University, and who was drafted
by tho local board of Fayotto county.
Piper was granted tho privilege to con
tinuo his training at tho University
until tho prescribed courso was fin
ished, and tho following concerns his
commutation:
"Pursuant to the authority from tho
War Department dated March 16, ver
bal authority directing Privato Walter
C. Plpor, Signal Corps, to report for
duty to Captain H. N. Royden, U. S. A.
retired, at the University of Kentucky,
Lexington, Kentucky, is confirmed.
Commutation of quarters at the rate of
$15 per month wil lbe paid this soldier
and as it being impracticable to assign
him to any organization for rations,
the Quartermaster Corps will com
mute hi srations at the prescribed rate
of ?1 per day from date of reporting."

JUNIORS
ON INSPECTING TRIP

TWENTY-FIV-

E

Juniors of the College
of Engineering spent Ave days of last
week inspecting shops and machine
tool works in and around Cincinnati.
The juniors are of the opinion that
they benefitted greatly in practical experience by the trip.
The party consisted of F. Paul Anderson, R. S. Arnold, J. H. Bailey, C.
N. Batsel, W. S. Baugh, T. M. Bell,
W. R. David, C. F. DeMey, D. R. Dudley, J. M. Eyl, G. Frankel, A. D. Hall,
A. L. Kohn, J. J. Leman, E. A. Lillard,
J. H. Marking, H. M. Milton, J. E.
R. S. Park, H. G. Proctor, N.
T. Puckett, J. F. Shouse, C. L. Temp- lin, C. A. Timmer, J. S. Walllngford.
Twenty-fiv- e

STUDENT IN FRANCE
LIKES U. K. LETTER

ANNUAL

MUSIC FEATURES TWO
"Y" EASTER SERVICES

McVey Will Be Honor Guest
At Alumni Banquet
24

MAKING THE TRIP

Tho Benlors in tho three engineering
colleges of tho University left Sunday night on their annual inspection
trip to Chicago and vicinity. Twenty-fou- r
are making tho trip, returning to
Lexington next Sunday.
Tho party is in charge of Dean F.
Paul Anderson, Dean D. V. Terrell and
Prof. W. E. Freeman. Manufacturing
and power plants in Chicago are being inspected by the embryo engineers
and other places of Interest visited.
The itinerary includes visits to the
following places: Indiana Steel Company, Fourteenth Street Pumping Station, Lake View Pumping Station,
Northwest Station of the Common
wealth Edison Company, Division
Street Works of the People's Gas,
Light and Coke Company, Union Stock
Yards, Armour & Company, Pullman
Palace Car Works, Sears, Roebuck &
Company, Municipal Pier and other
places of Interest.
Saturday night the Alumni Club of
the University of Kentucky, will
the students at the Great
Northern hotel with a banquet, at
which President McVey will be the
guest of honor.

ir.

Early Sunday morning following its
usual Easter custom the Y. W. C. A.
held a song service. Miss Eliza
led this service.

AMERICAN ARTISTS

"'Somewhere in France,'
"March 8, 1S18.

Tigert,

McVey,

EASTER PARTY AT THE HALL
I
i

Fifty children of Lexington made
merry Saturday afternoon, at the annual Easter party given for them by

PROFESSOR REID IN CHAPEL

of Art.

139 EAST MAIN STKEET
Hanrment Opp. Phoenix Hotel
PLAIN. SHOWER AND

TURKISH BATHS
CHAIRS
Best of Service

FOUR

DENTIST
For any kind of dental service call on

DR. J. T. SLATON
127 CHEAP8IDE

this was converted into a peanut hunt.
The party was a decided success, de-

Oflc

spite the absence of the usual Easter

Patronize Our Advertisers

boon,

8

. m.

to 6 p. m. Phone

Kentucky Kernel
$1,00 Per Year
5c

Per Copy

Patronize Our Advertisers

CHIROPODIST

W. B. Martin's Barber

Office Phoenix Hotel Barber
Shop.
Hours by appointment. Phone 1988-- x

SHOP
The Closest Shop to University
HAIR CUT
.25
.15
Shave
Shampoo
.2i
.6V
Glover's Shampoo.
153 S. Limestone St., Lexington, Ky.

FRATERNITY

Vends
iO'PENCIIi

CLUB PINS
MEDALS
We Cater to

rr

the

University and College
Patrons.

HEINTZ
Jeweler
123 E. Main

Opp.

H E oerfec
tion of pencil'
quality un

equalled for
eiBootnneee, uni-

formity of grading
sad durability.

Dr. Tigert predicted

17 black degrees
from 6B softest to
to 9H hardest, aad
hard and aaediuaa
(indelible)
copy
leg.
Look for th tksttnf
(fee VENUS Jiniahl

Street,

FREE!

the Phoenix,

TMs trial box
wk& five VENUS

Lexington, Ky.

Dnwia

PcBcila.

Holder aad

VENUS

fraMT

fork.

Loomis went over Dec. 12, as First
Lloutenant, Coast Artillery Corps, and
now as captain, has charge of a bat

Asfterica

tery of heavy artillery on the
ern front.

Tru ih, VENUS
In
92.00

west-

864--

Dr. J.C.Day

the Louisville

Dean P. P. Boyd addressed the Y.
M. C. A. Sunday night on the subject,
of the University, has been elected "Food Will Win the War.'
Dean
to take Miss Smith's place In the high Cooper will speak next Sunday at tho
regular meeting at 6:45 p. m.
school.

Hair Cut
25c
6(0. T.Martin Barber Shop

er egg hunt, but for patriotic reasons

Pic-

a great future
for art In America and a right of way
for the coming painters of the land,
whether it be in landscape or portrait
work.

r

TO YOU

Com-

mittee of the Y. W. C. A.
The usual custom is to have an East-

Ital-

The American artists were of especial interest. The fact was emphasized
that foreign schools give these men
more credit than they are given even
in their native country. Most of the
Americans studied abroad, but something distinctly American in its freshness and color remains to make the
men of this country differ from their
masters.

BUY A THRIFT STAMP

the girls of Patterson Hall under the
auspices of the Social Service

ian, Scottish and American schools
were hung about the room and as Doctor Tigert spoke these were used in illustration.

Dear Sir:
"Please let me express my hearty
appreciation of the Christmas greetings which reached me only a few
days ago, from the University to 'her
sons in the service.'
"I was In Kentucky only in 1914-1and went back to the University of
Tennee where I finished in 1917.
"But your greetings were like 'a letter from home,' indeed. It shows that
the school is also doing its best to
help whip the Kaiser.
"Yours appreciatively,
"ED. L. LITTLETON."

on the subject

tures from the French, German,

Nitrate

Pig-go-

Those who are making the trip are: tokens.
P. M. Andres, W. K. Adkins, J. A.
Brittain, E. B. Cavallo, H. B. Clarke