xt7vq814r09f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vq814r09f/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky. University of Kentucky 1954 1955 The University of Kentucky Gradute Schools course catalogs contain bound volumes dating from 1926 through 2005. After 2005, the course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Graduate School course catalogs Bulletin of the University of Kentucky Graduate School, 1954-1955 text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky Graduate School, 1954-1955 1954 2016 true xt7vq814r09f section xt7vq814r09f BULLETIN} OF THE * .. . ' , , y , ~ i ‘ l ’
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EXINGTON, 1954 l

 i i
‘57 l
i
l
' i1 ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION ‘ "
i _
i 1 U
1: GENERAL ‘
i} Herman Lee Donovan, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., President,
‘1 Leo Martin Chamberlain, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Vice President '
3 Frank Dewey Peterson, A.B., LL.D., University Comptroller
i L John Sharpe Chambers, M.S., M.D., Director of University Health Service
1 Lysle VVarrick Croft, M.A., Ph.D., Director of University Personnel Office
‘ Bruce Frederick Denbo, M.A., Director of University of Kentucky Press
Ii Sarah Bennett Holmes, M.A., Dean of Women
;. Leslie Leon Martin, M.S., Ph.D., Acting Dean of Men
1 Robert Lee Mills, M.A., Ed.D., University Registrar ‘
i Hambleton Tapp, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant to the President, Director of Place-
” ment Service, Co—ordinator of Summer Session
|i Lawrence Sidney Thompson, M.A., Ph.D., Director of Libraries
1 Raymond Wesley Wild, Ph.M., Director of Public Relations
‘
i THE COLLEGES
i Martin Marshall White, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences:
i1 Frank James VVelch, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture and Home ‘
J Economics; Director of the Experiment Station; Director of Agricultural,
1 Extension
[ Levi Jackson Horlacher, M.S., Associate Dean, College of Agriculture and}
l Home Economics
I Daniel Voiers Terrell, C.E., Dean of the College of Engineering V
3 Elvis Jacob Stahr, Jr., M.A., A.B. in Jur., B.C.L., Dean of the College of Law;
Provost of the University '
li Frank Graves Dickey, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of the College of Education
E: Cecil Clayton Carpenter, M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Commerce
E1 Earl Platt Slone, Ph.C., M.A., Dean of the College of Pharmacy
I Lyman Vernon Ginger, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of the College of Adult and Exten- ‘-
i sion Education Published by
H Herman Everette Spivey, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School , at the Post
: Acceptance f!
i
‘ , Volume 46
. i i

 BULLETIN 1
. or 1
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J.7'Alllo-rn‘1‘9"
lace-
snces ul 1 9 5 4
lome J y,
ltural
and h I
, Graduate Sc 00
Law:
1954,55 ~
Exten- M 1
Published by the University of Kentucky. Entered as Second-Class Matter ‘
at the Post Office, Lexington, Kentucky, under the Act of July 16, 1924. 1
Acceptance for mailing at Special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103,
Act of October 3, 1917, authorized June 80, 1920. .
Volume 46 Number 7 i
1

 )
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‘ l ieg‘istra
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 CONTENTS
Page
lniversity Calendar for 1954-55 4
teg‘istration Schedules for 1954-55 6
'he Graduate Council and Graduate Faculty 7
lraduate School, General Regulations 11
ubjects and Directors of Graduate Study 27
iraduate Courses of Study 29
1. Agriculture and Home Economics 29
II. Arts and Sciences 41
III. Commerce and Economics 84
IV. Education 91
V. Engineering 102
VI. Law 113
VII. Pharmacy 115
allows and Scholars for 1954-55, List of 116
.dex 117

 at;
l
M
if‘ UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR THE YEAR 1954-55
1‘: ll 11
l First Semester are
1 1954 Lpl’il 8:
l
l Sept. 16—18 Thursday, 1:30 pm. through Saturday, 11:00 a.m.—Clas
l cation of all advanced standing students and registratday 12
of all students according to an alphabetical schedule.
. ; My 25
‘ : Sept. 20 Monday—Class work begins.
l Sept. 25 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized classday 29
the first semester.
: My 31
.3 Oct. 15, 16 Friday and Saturday—Period for filing applications for
‘ grees. une 3
1| Oct. 22, 23 Graduate Record Examination. une 4
l Oct. 25 Monday—Last date one may drop a course without a gr.
Dec. 18 Saturday noon—Christmas holidays begin.
une 14
.l 1955
l Jan. 3 Monday, 8:00 a.m.—Christmas holidays end. U116 15
ll Jan. 24—28 Monday through Friday—Final examinations. une 2]
l Jan. 28 Friday, 6:00 p.m.—End of first semester.
l une 2i
.i
‘ Second Semester une 22
Feb. 7, 8 Monday, 8:00 a.m. through Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.—Registra
I and classification of all students according to an alply 4
betical schedule.
uly 23
‘ Feb. 9 Wednesday—Class work begins.
ll rugust
1 Feb. 15 Tuesday—Last date one may enter an organized clas
l the second semester. lugust
'3
1 March 4, 5 Friday and Saturday—Period for filing applications forept 1
‘ grees.
l March 11, 12 Graduate Record Examination.
i:

 i
llarch 14 Monday—Last date one may drop a course Without a grade.
lpril 8-12 Friday, 8:00 am. to Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.—Easter holidays.
:gigtlfastlday 12 Thursday—Thesis deadline.
medule.
Ilay 25 Wednesday—Latest date for reports to Graduate Office on
results of final oral examinations.
l classday 29 Sunday—Baccalaureate services.
My 31-June 4 Tuesday through Saturday—Final examinations.
n5 for
une 3 Friday—Eighty—eighth Annual Commencement.
une 4 Saturday—End of second semester.
at 3 gm
Summer Session 1955
une 14 Tuesday, 8:00 am. to 4:30 p.m.—Registration and classifica-
tion of all students according to an alphabetical schedule.
une 15 Wednesday—Class work begins.
une 21 Tuesday—Last date one may enter an organized class for the
summer session.
line 25 Saturday—Last date one may drop a course without a grade.
une 28, 29 Tuesday and Wednesday—Period for filing applications for
degrees.
Registrl
) an alply 4 Monday—Independence Day holiday.
uly 23 Saturday—Thesis deadline.
rugust 5 Friday—Summer Session Commencement.
3d clas
iugust 6 Saturday Noon—End of Summer Session.
ions forept. 12 Monday—Opening of Fall Semester of 1955-56.

 11

1

:1

1.1 REGISTRATION SCHEDULES FOR 1954-55

‘ 1 TI

1 1 First Semester

’1 Thursday Afternoon Friday Forenoon

1 1 1:30 to 2:20 —— A through Broo 8:00 to 8:50 — Crao through Fli

3 E 2:30 to 3:20 — Bros through Cran 9:00 to 9:50 — Flo through Haw

3 1 3:30 to 4:00 — Miscellaneous 10:00 to 10:50 — Hax through Kei

g 1 A through Cran 11:00 to 11:50 — Kej through Max

‘ 1

1 Friday Afternoon Saturday Forenoon

1 1:30 to 2:20 — May through Pes 8:00 to 8:50 — Sc through Tol

« 2:30 to 3:20 — Pet through Say 9:00 to 9:50 — Torn through Z

aj 3:30 to 4:00 —- Miscellaneous 10:00 to 10:30 — Miscellaneous

11 A through Say A through Z

‘1 September 20 —— Monday, 8:00 am. — Class work begins. AUBREY
September 25—Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class FHOMA:
; the First Semester. LYLE R
1: CARSIE
11 HERBEF
Second Semester ngEAI;
1; Monday Forenoon Tuesday Forenoon 3.03111):
1‘ 8:00 to 8:50 — U through Z 8:00 to 8:50 — H HERMA}
' 9:00 to 9:50 — Sim through T 9:00 to 9:50 — Fli through G AMRY V
11 10:00 to 10:50 —R through Sil 10:00 to 10:50 —Cro through Fle

1 11:00 to 11:50 — N through Q 11:00 to 11:50 — Bru through Cri

111 Monday Afternoon Tuesday Afternoon

1,1, HAROLI
3 1:30 to 2:20 — M 1:30 to 2:20 — A through Bro “CHAR
191 2:30 to 3:20 — I through L 2:30 to 3:30 — Miscellaneous ‘IATHAI
3:30 to 4:00 — Miscellaneous A through Z lDONAL]
I through Z :LIFFO:
, SHARLI
«1 February 9 —Wednesday, 8:00 am. — Class work begins. [AMES ‘
February 15 —Tuesday— Last date one may enter an organized class for 1121:2113;
11 second semester. :IOW AR
ADOLP}
[ ROBERT
1 Summer Session 1955 RODNE‘
‘ [OHN H
Tuesday Forenoon Tuesday Afternoon LOUIS 1
11 8:00 to 8:50 —- Ke through Ni 1:30 to 2:20 —- Clo through Ge 3130301
1 9:00 to 9:50 -- No through Si 2:30 to 3:20 — Ch through Ka “FR”
1 10:00 to 10:50 — Sj through 2 3:30 to 4:00 — Miscellaneous 21%?
1 A through Z NILLIA
11 June 15 — Wednesday, 7:00 am. — Class work begins. fi?§§1
1:“ June 21 —— Tuesday — Last date one may enter an organized class for the SUBANA C
1 mer session. fECIL ‘
1 -0HN M
‘* 1 NILBEI

 THE GRADUATE COUNCIL AND GRADUATE FACULTY
HERMAN LEE DONOVAN, M.A., PH.D., LL.D.
l Fli President of the University
Haw HERMAN EVERETTE.SPIVEY, M.A., PH.D.
13%;: Dean of the Graduate School
MARGARET HOTCHKISS, PH.D.
'01 Secretary, Graduate Faculty
1 Z
5
THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
AUBREY J. BROWN, Agricultural Economics 1953—1956
class LTHOMAS D. CLARK, History 1952-1954
LYLE R. DAWSON, Chemistry 1952-1955
CARSIE HAMMONDS, Agricultural Education 1952-1954
HERBERT W. HARGREAVES (Secretary), Economics 1952—1955
[OI-IN KUIPER, Philosophy 1952-1955
LEONARD E. MEECE, Education 1952-1954
H. A. ROMANOWITZ, Electrical Engineering 1952-1955
.VIORRIS SCHERAGO, Bacteriology 1953—1956
HERMAN E. SPIVEY (Chairman), Dean
C AMRY VANDENBOSCH, Political Science 1953-1956
Fle
Cri
THE GRADUATE FACULTY
Lro HAROLD PLANK ADAMS, M.A., ED.D. Education
RICHARD SWEET ALLEN, M.S. Anatomy and Physiology
15 NATHAN BRECKENRIDGE ALLISON, M.A., PH.D. Electrical Engineering
‘ DONALD PAUL AMES, PH.D. Chemistry
CLIFFORD AMYX, M.A. Art
CHARLES ARNOLD ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D. Sociology
[AMES WILLIAM ARCHDEACON, M.S., PH.D. Anatomy and Physiology
:5 for MERL BAKER, M.S., M.E., PH.D. Mechanical Engineering
“HARLES BARKENBUS, PH.D. Chemistry
EIOWARD WAYLAND BEERS, M.S., PH.D. Sociology
ADOLPHE EDMUND BICGE, M.A., PH.D. Modern Foreign Languages
ROBERT EDGAR BILLS, M.A., ED.D. Psychology
RODNEY ELMER BLACK, M.S., PH.D. Chemistry
lOHN HARVEY BONDURANT, M.S., PH.D. Agricultural Economics
LOUIS L. BOYARSKY, M.S., PH.D. Anatomy and Physiology
Ge SEORGE KEYPORTS BRADY, M.A., PH.D. English
Ka ALFRED CHARLES BRAUER, M.A., PH.D. Zoology
JS AUBREY J. BROWN, M.S., PH.D. Agricultural Economics
7 iAMES STEPHEN BROWN, M.A., PH.D. Rural Sociology
" vVILLIAM RANDALL BROWN, M.A., PH.D. Geology
SEORGE BOYD BYERS, M.S., PH.D. Agricultural Economics
'AMES SUTHERLAND CALVIN, M.A., PH.D. Psychology
the suDANA GEORGE CARD, M.S., PH.D. Agricultural Economics
EECIL CLAYTON CARPENTER, M.S., PILD. Economics
30HN MELVIN CARPENTER, M.A., PH.D. Zoology
NILBERT LESTER CARR, M.A., LL.D. Ancient Languages

 1 1
1
111 LUCIAN HUGH CARTER, M.A., PiiiD. Commu JOHN K1
1 LEO MARTIN CHAMBERLAIN, M.A., PHD, LL.D. Educaii KARL 0'
111 JOHN SHAEPE CHAMBERS, M.s., M.D. Hygiene and Public Heal CHARLE
11 THOMAS DIONYSUS CLARK, M.A., PH.D., LmD. Histu TADEUS
1‘: LEWIS WELLINGTON COCHRAN, PHD. Phyii SHELBY
1 A. LEE COLEMAN, M.A., Pn.D. Rural Sociolq ARTHUF
‘1 CARL BRUCE CONE, M.A., PH.D. Histn JAMES I
ARTHUR LOUIS COOKE, M.A., PHD. Engli JOHN TI
: FRANK GORDON COOLSEN, M.s. Commen BERTHL‘
1 VINCENT FREDERICK COWLING, M.A., PHD. Mathemafi JACOB I
1 LYSLE WARRICK CROFT, M.A., Pn.D. PsychoquEONAF
1 CHARLES STEPHENS CROUSE, E.M. Mining and Metallun PARL L.
LYLE RAMSAY DAWSON, M.s., PHD. Chemist ARTHUI
11 JESSE DEBOER, M.A., PHD. Philosopl HENRY
1. STEPHEN DIACHUN, M.s., Pn.D. Plant Patholu VERNOI
1 FRANK GRAVES DICKEY, M.A., ED.D. EducatilVINCEN
‘ CHARLES FRANKLIN DIEHL, M.A., PHD. PsycholuEDWAR:
GRAHAM BENNETT DIMMICK, M.A., PH.D. PsycholoJROBERT
, HAROLD HARDESTY DOWNING, M.S., PHD. MathematiETHEL :
11 JAMES w. DRENAN, PI-r.D. ChemileRANK.
;, RAY HORN DUTT, M.s., PH.D. Animal InduslSALLIE
:1 WILLIAM CLEMENT EATON, M.A., PH.D. HislaESTELL
JAMES MARION EDNEY, M.A. ZooloJCARROL
I OGDEN FRAZELLE EDWARDS, M.s., PH.D. BacterioloIRALPH 1
ij EMERY MYERS EMMERT, PH.D. HorticulIuWILLIAl
1‘ JAMES MERTON ENGLAND, M.A., PH.D. HistuHUCH B
:1 STATIE ESTELLE ERIKSON, PH.D. Home EeononiEDWAR:
‘3 ERNEST NEWTON FERGUS, M.s., PILD. AgronomJOHN C.
,1 THEODORE RUSSELL FREEMAN, M.S. in AGR., PH.D. Animal IndustIHERBEF
1, WESLEY PATTERSON GARRIGUS, M.s., PH.D. Animal HusbandIJOHN B1
1‘ WILL D. GILLIAM, JR., M.A., PILD. , HistuHARRY .
1 LYMAN VERNON GINGER, MA. in ED., PILD. EducatioROBERT
11 JAMES WALTER GLADDEN, M.ED., PH.D. SocioloILUCIAN
“1| ADOLPH WINKLER GOODMAN, M.A., PH.D. MathematiIRWIN '1
111 CHARLES WILLIAM HACKENSMITH, M.A., PH.D. Physical EducalluMORRIS
1:1 THOMAS MARSHALL HAHN, JR., PH.D. PhysiJOSEPH
11111 WILLIAM BROOKS HAMILTON, M.s., PH.D. Hygiene and Public HealDON CA
31 ELLWOOD MEACHAM HAMMAKER, PH.D. ChemisuDWIGH'.
11 JOSEPH PERSHING HAMMOND, M.S. in MET.E., DEW, MetallunWILLIAi
1 CARSIE HAMMONDS, MA. in ED., PH.D. EducatioALBERT
1 RICHARD HANAU, M.s., Pn.D. PhysIJASPER
‘1 HERBERT WALTER HARGREAVES, M.A., Pn.D. EconomROBERT
:1: FRED EARL HARRIS, M.s., ED.D. EducatioHILL SP
‘1 ELLIS FORD HARTFORD, M.A., ED.D. EducaliaJONAH‘
WILLIAM WARREN HAYNES, M.B.A., PH.D. EconomlWALTEl
DANIEL VANBRUNT HEGEMAN, PH.D. Modern Foreign LanguagCHARLE
1 WILBUR AUGUST HEINZ, M.S. Hygiene and Public HeaIHERBEE
1 JAMES FRANKLIN HOPKINS, M.A., PH.D. HistaELVIS J.
1 LEVI JACKSON HORLACHER, M.S. Animal HusbanerEWEY
1 MARGARET HOTCHKISS, Pn.D. BacterioloFDWIN
1 FLOYD EDGAR HULL, D.V.M. Animal PathOIOETHOM-Ai
,1 EDWARD JUDSON HUMESTON, M.A., Pn.D. Library ScienMERREI
,1 JAMES CHARLES HUMPHRIES, M.s., PH.D. BacterialotWILLIA3
WYATT MARION INSKO, JR., MS. in AGR. Poultry HusbanleOY ER‘
,, WILLIAM HUGH JANSEN, PH.D. EnglilDANIEL
=1 GLADYS MARIE KAMMERER, M.A., PH.D. Political ScIemCHARLE
11 PERRY ELMER KARRAKER, M.A. AgrononiJAWREI
:; EARL KAUFFMAN, JR, M.A., PH.D. Physical Educafii‘EE H11
" JAMES DILLON KEMP, MS. in AGR., PH.D. Animal HusbanIIERNEST
1i BERNARD DONALD KERN, M.s., PHD. PhysiWILLm
“1 ALBERT DENNIS KIRWAN, M.A., Pn.D. HistaAMRYY
:1 GRANT COCHRAN KNIGHT, M.A., LmD. EngliWILLIA'
' OTTO TOWNSEND KOPPIUS, PILD. PhYIirHOMAi
‘1
1 1

 l

immei JOHN KUIPER, M.A. Philosophy ‘ l
ducali KARL OTTO LANGE,>ENG.D. Mechanical Engineering
2 Heal CHARLES ALBERT LASSITER, M.S., PH.D. Dairying ’
Histi TADEUSZ LESER, M.E., PH.D. Mathematics

Physi SHELBY THOMAS McCLOY, PH.D. History

ociolq ARTHUR CRANE McFARLAN, PH.D. Geology

Histn JAMES WALTER MARTIN, M.A. Economics

Engli JOHN TALBOT MASTEN, PH.D. Economics
)mmm BERTHUS BOSTON MGINTEER, PH.D. Botany
hemati JACOB ROBERT MEADOW, M.S., PH.D. Chemistry
ycholq LEONARD EPHRAIM MEECE, M.A., PH.D. Education
etallun PARL L. MELLENBRUCH, M.A., PHD. Psychology

hemisi ARTHUR KEISTER MOORE, M.A., PH.D. English '
iilosopl HENRY BARTLETT MORRISON, M.S., PHD. Dairying
‘atholoi VERNON ARMOR MUSSELMAN, M.ED., ED.D. Education
ducatii VINCENT EDWARD NELSON, PHD. Geology
ycholqEDWARD LEE H. NEWBURY, M.A. Psychology 1
ycholalROBERT DAVIDSON NORTH, M.A., PHD. Psychology

hemafiETHEL LEE PARKER, M.S., PHD. Home Econ. Education ‘
:hemisuFRANK ACKLEN PATTIE, M.A., PH.D. Psychology

IndusuSALLIE ELIZABETH PENCE, M.A., PH.D. Mathematics ‘
. HimESTELL BURDELL PENROD, M.S., M.M.E. Mechanical Engineering

200101 CARROLL DAVIDSON PHILLIPS, M.S. in AGR., PH.D. Agricultural Economics
,teriolqRALPH RUSSELL PICKETT, M.A., PHD. Economics
mmdeILLIAM KENNEDY PLUCKNETT, PHD. Chemistry
, HistaHUGH BRUCE PRICE, M.A., PHD. Agricultural Economics
canomiEDWARD WARDER RANNELLS, M.A. Art
_gmnomJOHN C. REDMAN, M.S. in AGa., PHD. Agricultural Economics
IndusuI-IERBERT PARKES RILEY, M.A., PHD. Botany
usbandflOHN BISSELL ROBERTS, M.S. in Asa. Agricultural Economics

. HimHARRY ALEX ROMANOWITZ, M.S., PH.D. Electrical Engineering
)ducafiuROBERT WILLIAM RUDD, M.S., PH.D. Agricultural Economics
sociolmLUCIAN HOBART RYLAND, M.A., Docteur de l’Universite Modern Foreign Languages
themafiIRWIN TAYLOR SANDERS, PH.D. Sociology
:ducafiuMORRlS SCHERAGO, D.V.M. Bacteriology

. physiJOSEPH RAYMOND SCHWENDEMAN, PH.D. Geography
:c HeanDON CASH SEATON, M.S., ED.D. Physical Education
jhemisnDWIGHT MOODY SEATH, M.S., PHD. Dairying
[etaumWILLIAM ALBERT SEAY, M.S. in AGR., PH.D. Agronomy
EducafioALBERTA WILSON SERVER, M.A., Docteur de l’Universite Modern Foreign Languages
_. phngASPER BERRY SHANNON, M.A., PHD. Political Science
;C0nomiROBERT EZEKIEL SHAVER, BS. in C.E., C.E. Civil Engineering
gdummlillLL SHINE, M.A., PH.D. English
EducafiJONAH W. D. SKILES, M.A., PHD. Ancient Languages
;conoijALTER THOMAS SMITH, JR., PH.D. Chemistry
languagCHARLES ERNEST SNOW, M.A., PH.D. Anthropology
ic HeflHERBERT SORENSON, M.A., PHD. Education

.. HisiaELVIS JACOB STAHR, JR., M.A., B.C.L. Law
[usbandzDEWEY GEORGE STEELE, M.S., PHD. Genetics
cteriolOF'DWIN EUGENE STEIN, M.M., PH.D. Music
pathoimTHOMAS BRADLEY STROUP, M.A., PHD. English .
y ScienMERRELL RODMAN SULLIVAN, M.A., PH.D. Economics
CtemmWILLIAM GREGORY SURVANT, M.S. in AGR., PH.D. Agronomy
[usbanleOY ERWIN SWIFT, M.S. in MET. and MIN. ENG., D.ENG. Mining and Metallurgy ‘
.. EnglipANIEL VOIERS TERRELL, C.E. Civil Engineering
‘1 SciemCHARLES MALCOLM THOMPSON, M.S. in AGR., PH.D. Animal Nutrition l
Agronorf—‘AWRENCE SIDNEY THOMPSON, M.A., PH.D. Director, Libraries l
Educafili‘EE HILL TOWNSEND, M.S., PH.D. Agricultural Entomology l
lusbanllERNEST GREENE TRIMBLE, PH.D. Political Science l
.. PhyskWILLIAM DORNEY VALLEAU, PH.D. Plant Pathology 1
.. HiSmAMRY VANDENBOSCH, PH.D. Political Science ‘
.. Eng“WILLIAM FREDERICK WAGNER, M.S., PH.D. Chemistry ‘
PhysirHOMAS CAPELL WALKER, M.A., PH.D. Modern Foreign Languages ‘

 I13
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I JAMES AUDLEY WARD, M.S., PH.D. at Email
III WILLIAM SMITH WARD, M.A., PH.D. B {ugh
I I RALPH HOLDER WEAVER, M.S., PILD. actegfilo;
1'5 WILLIAM SNYDER WEBB, M.S., Sc.D. ysx
I DONALD LEROY WEISMANN, PH.M., PH.D. A
I FRANK JAMES WELCH, M.A., PHD. Aglncultu
. HAROLD E. WETZEL, M.A. 500131 We
I PAUL KNOWLTON WHITAKER, M.A., PILD. Modern Forexgn Languag
I MARTIN MARSHALL WHITE, M.A., PILD. Psycholo;
PATCH GREGORY WOOLFOLK, M.S. in A611,, PHD. Ammal Husband: Grad
I KENNETH RICHARD WRIGHT, M.A., PH.D. Mmthousand
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Engli I
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Physi THE GRADUATE SCHOOL I
ICU“: HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, M.A., PH.D., Dean I _
11 We
nguag 2‘
clinic; INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT I
fix Graduate work is offered in all colleges in the University. Approximately a
thousand courses acceptable for graduate credit are listed in the catalogue, I
under the various departments. Directors of graduate study in the various sub- I
jects are listed in this bulletin just before the list of courses. I
The following advanced degrees are conferred by the University: ‘
Master of Arts
Master of Science
Master of Science in Agriculture
Master of Science in Home Economics ;
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering ‘
Master of Science in Library Science
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Master of Science in Metallurgical Engineering
Master of Science in Mining Engineering
Master of Science in Public Health
Civil Engineer (C.E.)
Electrical Engineer (E.E.)
Mechanical Engineer (M.E.)
Metallurgical Engineer (Met.E.) .
Mining Engineer (E.M.)
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Science in Education
Master of Business Administration
Master of Music
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)
Doctor of Engineering (Engr.D.)
Doctor of Philosophy
The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered with major work in the fol— .
owing fields: Agricultural Economics, Bacteriology, Chemistry, Economics, 3
Education, English, History, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, Political Science, :
ind in the combined fields of Sociology and Rural Sociology. Minor work may I
)6 carried in any department offering graduate courses. The degree Doctor I
If Engineering is offered in Metallurgical Engineering. I
I
ADMISSION I
A student who is a graduate of a fully accredited institution of higher leam- .I
ng may apply for admission to the Graduate School by submitting to the I
Kegistrar of the University two official transcripts of undergraduate courses and
, written application. Blanks for the latter may be obtained from the Registrar I
r from the office of the Graduate School. I
It should be clearly understood that a graduate student may not be able
3 begin immediately a full graduate program leading to the degree he desires. I

 \ ‘
it.
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‘
“ 12 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
I
“‘ It may be necessary for him to satisfy certain prerequisites which he omitl
“ in his undergraduate curriculum. These will be determined by the dcp'.1rtmihc”‘l,fS for
‘ in which the major work is to be done. In brief, it may be Stated that a gnregister n
‘ ‘. uate student may begin a full program in the fields in which he has the equirDearl 9f 1
lent of a balanced undergraduate major; in some cases the equivalent of Stlldy 15 r
‘ undergraduate minor is adequate. of web 5
‘ Admission to the Graduate School by the Registrar entitles a student to “figned S}
such courses as he or she desires, provided the necessary preparatory coimwork boy
1‘ have been taken. However, admission does not automatically make a studfififii‘ “'11
. _ ‘
.‘ . an applicant for a graduate degree. divided 1
The Graduate Record Examination ments for
“ All students working for graduate degrees should take three parts oftWhicil th‘
Graduate Record Examination (the Area Tests, the Aptitude Test, and ‘ies’inngh
_; Advanced Test in the major subject). This should be done during the first taIStmg ts
1‘ of graduate work. (See the calendar at the front of this catalogue.) ments.
‘ Application for Full Graduate Standing and the Graduate Record Examination
‘3 Graduate students desiring to earn a graduate degree must be approved
‘5 degree-applicants by the departments in which they intend to major and byl
“ Graduate School. This application should be made as soon as scores on Courses (
Graduate Record Examinations are available and in any case prior to the beg A11,
ning of the semester or term in which the degree is sought. The appropiiil00 t 01‘
., forms are available at the Graduate Office. _ 3
To be admitted as an applicant for a graduate degree a student must Inga/tar ‘:
" met the following requirements: (1) an average of at least 2.5 (midway flourie S
“ tween B and C) on a scale of 4.0 on all previous college work; (2) a satisl'u “if:
“‘ tory grade (in the opinion of the department concerned) on three parts of i0 re an“;
‘ Graduate Record Examination (the Area Tests, the Aptitude Test, and ‘rerted v;
.1 Advanced Test, if there is one, suitable to the student’s major); and (3) aissi ned
‘ average or better on all the graduate work completed at the University of III g '
5. tucky. A student not having a 2.5 average on all previous college work mayrégisfmfi
admitted as an applicant for a degree provided: (1) his performance ont Bef
‘_‘ Graduate Record Examination, in the opinion of the major area and the D‘lirectoi‘n
‘ of the Graduate School, is sufficiently high; or (2) in the judgment of the mi1 re listed
. area and the Dean of the Graduate School, he has demonstrated his combis f
i tence in graduate work. (The Graduate Record Examination may be talc“???
f either before admission or during the first semester after admission. See [:6 inui‘
calendar at the front of this bulletin for the dates.) '6 guirnemj
5 Graduate work taken before students are admitted as “applicants for ‘ndicatin
‘ ‘ grees” will be evaluated by the major area and the Graduate School at theft
; the degree-application is considered, and the remaining requirements forltudentL
7‘ degree will be indicated, insofar as is feasible. Th
i‘ Members of the faculty of the University of Kentucky having a rank higl t eh
‘ than that of instructor may not be considered as candidates for advanced 333;?
‘ grees from this institution. ifteelrili
;‘ Attendance in the Graduate School at the University of Kentucky is 110‘. e m (.
i‘ right. It is a privilege which the student concedes may be withdrawn by“; 33x:
“ University or any area of graduate study if it is deemed necessary by the Dem? ii
‘1 of the Graduate School in order to safeguard the University’s ideals of schfl‘ssi 1:8
‘ Ship and character. gr 331:2:
‘ Graduating Seniors as Part-Time Graduate Students 2:20:11;
Seniors of the University of Kentucky lacking no more than six semefveeks it
. ‘
‘1

 GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 13 l
omiti . . .
armhours for graduation and havmg an undergraduate average of at least 2.5 may 1
a g“register in the Graduate School w1th the consent of their college deans and the l
equi‘Dean of the Graduate School. Approval of the appropriate director of graduate l
t of study is required if the students are to be applicants for degrees. The total load ‘ »
of such a student shall not exceed twelve credits. The graduate residence as- J
to tasigned shall be one and one-half weeks for each semester hour of graduate
c011Pwork beyond the six or less credits needed to complete undergraduate requrre-
studinents. The incidental fee shall be that of a full-time student in the school in
which more than half of the work is taken. In cases where the load is evenly :
divided between the schools, the larger fee, if any, shall be assessed. Require- ‘
ments for the undergraduate degree must be completed during the semester in l
‘ ftwhich the student is allowed to register for part-time graduate work. Students 1
' 0d ilesiring to do this should fill out in duplicate a petition requesting such and l
an isting the course or courses to be taken to complete undergraduate require- ‘
.rst telments. Such a petition must be approved by both deans concerned.
n l
roved GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL ADVANCED DEGREES
cl byl
‘ on lCourses, Grades, and the Mark "I” (Incomplete)
.e be; All courses listed in the Graduate School Bulletin (both those numbered 1
aropmloo to 199 and those numbered 200 and above) may be counted as credit
ust ha:oward a graduate degree provided they are approved as an appropriate part
lway fit the students graduate program by his graduate adviser or committee. A
satisl'ourse completed with a grade of D will not be given graduate credit. An over-
ts ofEll average of B on all work taken as a graduate student must be attained be-
and {ore an advanced degree may be awarded. An “incomplete” (I) must be con-
3) Ierted within one calendar year after the close of the term in which the I is 3
'(of Ka‘rssigned.
I maytégistration and Classification
$60111): . Before registering each semester a graduate student should confer with the
he mallrecltor of graduate study in hls major subject. (Directors of graduate study
5 co mire listed ]ust ahead of the catalogue of courses in this Bulletin.) If convenient,
be t alhls conference should come In advance of the day of registration and classifica-
See Ron} in any case it must come prior to the completion of classification and the
)egmning of classes. For all regular graduate students the Graduate Office will i
s for {equire for each registration the signature of the director of graduate study :
the tindrcatmg approval of the proposed program. l
‘ .
5 forltudent Loads and Short Courses
nk hi g1 The normal load of a graduate student during any semester is twelve se—
mce d lnester hours if he is working for a masters degree under Plan A, or if he is ‘
ivorkmg for a doctor’s degree. In no case may this load for a semester exceed i
I is ndrfteen semester hours. In the summer session the normal load is six hours and
m byihe maxrmum. nine. Graduate students serving in the University as assistants
the De" part-time mstructors should reglster for less than the normal load, as de- ‘
If schol'errmned by their advrsers. Persons holding full-time working or professional
lssrgnments, whether employed by the University or not, may not take for 1
graduate credit toward a degree in any single semester or term more than
i or 4 credits. Two short courses of 4 weeks or less may not be taken simul- .
. :aneously. A short course may not carry credit greater than the number of l
- semas/eeks it is offered. l

 i E
E
E .
EEE 14 UNIVERSITY or KENTUCKY
:‘E
E Residence tion 0f t1?
E A load for full-time residence comprises a minimum of 9 semester hoursStu.dent 5‘
W graduate course work, or the equivalent in thesis research. In the summer s§CnPt Sho'
; E sion the corresponding load is 6 semester hours. Part-time residence duringa
l semester is compuscd on the basis of one and one-half weeks of residence Extension ‘
E each semester hour earned. Part-time students in the summer Session recei Under
E one and one—half weeks per semester hour except for short courses of less thresidence
E eight weeks, in which case residence shall not exceed the actual numberzension cc
ll weeks involved. dents wh(
E , quirement
.‘ Time Limit for Degrees
E No course or residence credit is given for graduate study completed “MA. or M
1 than eight years prior to the date of the commencement at which the studs Whetl
.; expects to take his degree unless such credit or residence is specifically validals left to
‘1’ by the Graduate Council on written recommendation of the director of grana be 5'
uate study. No course or residence credit may be validated in this mannerak: the l‘
E completed more than twelve years prior to the commencement date. (Thisri
ii is applicable to new students registering after February, 1952, and to all oil.
.‘ .ourses an
‘E students after June, 1955.) All co
E; Proficiency in English lents if a
N0 student shall be approved for a graduate degree until he has demo Gradu
EE strated his ability to write accurate and effective English. A decision on tlrganized
matter shall be based on the student’s rating on the Graduate Record or equiitudent c
E lent examination and such other evidence as the director of graduate studylne-half,
3 special committee and Graduate Council shall deem necessary. naster’s c
E.
‘l Graduation n eldnrca:
Advanced degrees may be conferred at any commencement convocativith Elhie:
l} but at no other time. Attendance at the commencement at which the candidt ‘
E is scheduled to receive a degree is required unless the candidate is excusedusmined
E writing by the Dean of the Graduate School. Appropriate academic costul .
must be worn. The graduation fee covers the cost of the diploma, the h0< Candi
'i and, in the case of the master’s degree (with thesis), the binding of the their one se
E Students intending to graduate at a given commencement must make fomases Wh‘
E application (at the Registrar’s Office) for the degree early in the semestetfladuate
E term of the commencement—in no case later than four weeks before graduatit , .
E xamlnutlc
E Fees _ . . A fine
; Registratlon fees per semester are $65.00 for resrdents of Kentucky; $125~1ter than
E ' for non-residents. Part—time graduate students who are legal residents oflate Sch(
E state pay $7.50 per semester hour; non-residents pay $14.00 per semester h°he purpc
.i Students carrying full loads in the summer session pay one-half the regu/hom th:
E semesfter fee. Those taking less than full loads pay the regular semester crelaing con
‘ hour ee. Iritten 2
E Graduate students holding University fellowships and scholarships, gradil‘ ,
E assistants, and instructors pay the fees assigned to Kentucky residents. Epp|icafi°
E Early
E GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MASTERS’ DEGREES .on in ti
E (See also pages 11-14.)
‘EE ees
EEE Transfer of Credits Befor:
‘E With the approval of his graduate adviser, the dean, and the registratmst be;
E; student may transfer up to six credits (but no residence) toward the satiSl
El
l

 1‘
GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 15 }
tion of the minimum requirements for masters’ degrees. In such cases the l
oursstudent submits with his request (endorsed by his graduate adviser) a tran- 1
1e: sscript showing the courses involved. ‘
nga 3 I
nce fixtension and Correspondence Work ;
recei Under certain conditions, up to six of the credits and nine weeks of the ‘
ss tlresidence required for any master’s degree in course may be satisfied by ex- 3
iberzension courses given in person by University of Kentucky instructors. (Stu- i
dents who registered before Feb., 1952, may count up to one-third of the re- ‘
quirements.) No graduate credit is given for courses taken