xt7vt43j1304 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vt43j1304/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610926  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 26, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 26, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7vt43j1304 section xt7vt43j1304 Today's Weather:
Cloudy, Cooler;
High 68, Low 50

Proposed Budget
I Progressive;
See Page Four
V4. LI 1 1, No.

University of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY, TUESDAY, SEPT.

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STREET

Alumni Building

The architect's dram Inn of the new Alumni Building to lie constructed on the rorncr of Hose and
r.urlid across from Stoll Firld. The building is to
tost approximately 5250,900 and the money is

by contribution! from l"K alumni.
Construction is expected to begin by January.
The Alumni Building will be given to the University at the centennial celebration In 19G5.

brinr upplied

Sigma Nu Put On Probation
For Rush, Liquor Violations
fiema Nu frnttrr.ity has been at least one active member" cony probation sumed liquor during rush recepp'.; ml on

tion hours earlier this semester."
''Sigma Nu'k actions are a direct
liolation of existing rush rules,"
Wallace said. "It's unfortunate that
this incident had to come up, and
it was in fairness to the fraternities who observed rush rules that
the penalties were meted."
"I hope there will be no other
violations of this sort." Wallace
continued. "They bring discredence
to the UK fraternity system as a
whole.
"We have made great strides in
the last two years with our deferred pledging system, and we can't
afford to let the actions of a few
individuals undermine the rest of
the fraternity system on campus,"
he said.
Assistant Dean of Men Kenneth

Rules Announced
For SC Election

Sororities Set
Pledge Record

dents are invited to run In the
assembly election.
Applicants must have completed
one semester at UK or one of the
extension centers and have a 2.3
overall standing on a 4.0 system.
Applications for election to the
assembly may be obtained from
the college deans or the office of
the dean of men. They must be
returned to the dean of men's office by 5 p.m. Thursday.

Checks Heady
Checks are now ready for
Welcome Week guides and workers.
The checks ran be picked up
in the dean of men's office in
the Administration Buildin.

f rushees
bids from the 12 campus
sororities yesterday alttrnoon. The
Full-tim- e
students can pick
39J women who lecitvtd bids were
chosen from appiim.nately 500 of the Coliseum Saturday, Sept.
lichees.
Each student must present his
Miss Pattern. n, as itant to the schedule card approved and valistudean of women, said, ' I think this dated by his dean. Full-tim- e
group is very Miperit r cue as their dents who have lost their K'hedule
record indicates toth scholastically cards must obtain verification of
activities. their schedules from the office of
and in
"I feel we have a lot to offer the recorder in the basement of
these new pledges in cur Panhel-leni- c the Administration Building.
student who regisAny full-lim- e
system. It is a very strong
tered late must present his valione."
Detailed infernatien and pic- dated schedule card to have his
tures will appear in toiuoruw's picture taken at the same time.
Students who have lost their ID
paper.
A record nu.nber

Plans Completed
For Alumni Center
The Alumni Association which
build the center on Univer- owned property, will be dedi- cated to the University in 1965
at UK's centennial celebration.
Construction of the two story
structure, estimated to cost between $200,000 and $300,000, Is expected to begin this winter. Alumni
officials said they hope to have it
completed by November, 1962.
The center will be of colonial
and will contain 17.000
square feet of floor space. Offices
of the Alumni Association now
located in the Student Union
will have offices on the
first floor. The building also will
conference rooms, a service
kitchen, dining space for 300,
lounge, full basement with kitchen
facilities, and a large reception
hall.
The Alumni Center has been In
the planning stage for approximately 12 years. In 1959, the Cen- -

will

f PCM

Rules concerning the Student
Congress assembly flection were
announced yesterday ty the chairman of the confrtss election committee.
id an "all new StuJo Hern
dent Congress assembly will be
fleeted."
The election is set for Oct. 4
with the polls tpen from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
Miss Hern said the flection will
be run by the rules established in
the congress censtituticn.
Congress officers will be chosen
from the assembly.
Miss Hern Mid all ,ualified stu- -

Eight Pages

Plans have just been completed for the University of Kentucky Alumni Center which will be built on the corner of Rose
and Euclid across from Stoll Field.

my?
V

to a rushee and
for mtvii.k luiut-premaiurt ly Mtn.ng a new member.
The Intrrfratrrnlty Council judiciary committer, which brought
the judgement againtt Sigma Nu
Saturday, also levied a $125 fine
agjinst the organization and prohibited it from obtaining a fall
semester pledge class.
The fraternity will te on probation the fntire ninester. but will
revert to normal peti tion during
the .sprint: scmtMer if no other violations occur.
Dick
Wallace. 1TC Judiciary
committee iha.imnn, .'aid Sigma
Nu pledged "at iejrt cne rushee"
before Monday,
jt. 25. the day
authorized pledging tuan. He also
said that "at least cne ru.shee and

26, 1961

L. Harper, speaking for the Office
of the Dean of Men, said:

"Fraternity men at I'K have

made their own rules, and when
one fraternity violates the rules it
helped make there is no
course open.to the judiciary committee other than the one it took."
"I believe the Judiciary board has
acted fairly in this matter to all
concerned. I condone the Judgment they have made, under the
circumstances," he said.
The officers of Sigma Nu had
no comment.

Faculty Members

Exhibit Works
In Art Gallery

The Art Gallery opened its fall
season Sunday with works by faculty members of the Art Department. The exhibition will continue
through Oct. 15 in the Art Gallery of the Fine Arts Building.
The showing includes examples
of the work of Richard Lethem, assistant professor of art. Prof.
Lethem received the Fulbright
Award in 1959. He also studied in
France and worked in the publications department of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The works of Phillip Harris and
Miss Frances Perry, a graduate
assistant from Chapel Hill, N. C.
are also on display.
Clifford Amyx, Raymond Barn-har- t,
Anne Green, Janis Stern-berg- s,
and Frederic Thursz have
Just recently completed works
which are also shown.
The gallery Is open to the public from 12 noon to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 3
5
p.m. on
p.m. on Saturday;
Sunday; and 7 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

ID Cards Ready Sept. 30

up their ID cards in the lohhy
30 from U:(H) a.m. to 8:(K) p.m.

cards must pay a $5 penalty to the
Bursar's Office. The receipt of
payment must be presented along
with the schedule card Sept. 30,
from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the
lobby of the Coliseum to have a
second picture made.
Students who cannot be present
Satuiday must get in touch with
the office located behind the ticket
office in the basement of the Coliseum on the Lexington Street side.

Library Gives

Students Books
One thousand books will be given
away this morning at 9 o'clock
by the Margaret I. King Library to
student book collectors.
The books are duplicates of
works already in the collections,
end they were donated by a friend
of the library for the purpose of
giving them away to encourage
young collectors.
Dr. Thompson said that the
books to be given away are of a
various assortment.
Each student will be allowed to
take ten books. The only stipula- tion Is that the student will enter
his private collection in the Sam- uel M. Wilson Student Book Col- lecting Contest before he leaves
college.
All students wishing to sslect the
should report to Room 208
of the library.

tury Club was organized to give
the aiumni an opportunity to par-si- ty
program
ticipate in an eight-poisupported by the University. It
was designed to ask at least 500
alumni to contribute $100 a year
for five years to the Alumni Cen
tury Club fund.
It is the goal of the club to
rajse $250,000 for the alumni build
ing and otner aiumr,l functions
such as scholarships for outstand-desig- n
mg students, and provide research
facilities that are hard to obtain
through usual sponsoring agencies,
They also will make available
search grants to the faculty and
tiy to help maintain the Univer-hav- e
Sjty's educational standards,

Strain Eases
On Fral Rush
The Interfraternity Council Rush
Committee moved Monday to ease
the strain on the fraternity system
by moving the pledge sign-u- p
period from next week to this
Thursday and Friday.
Dick Lowe, IFC rush chairman
and Tom Scott, IFC president, said
that the rushees may now sign
pledge cards in the Student Union
Building, Room 128 from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. on both Thursday and Friday. Final sign up is from 8 a.m. to
noon in the dean of men's office
Monday.
Lowe also stated that a rushee
who signs a pledge card will be
ineligible to pledge any other
fraternity for a year. Rushees have
been allowed to take fraternity
pledge pins since Monday,
Informal rush will be reopened
for freshmen on Friday, Oct. 13.
Rush functions for freshmen will
be on weekends only,
Presently there Is a silence
period for freshmen and no fresh-boomen are allowed to visit fraternity
houses.

Dr. Clark Addresses
Centre College Students
Dr. Thomas
of
Clark, head of the

D.
Department
History
and recognized as one of the nation's distinguished historians,
will address the Centre College student-facultconvocation at
11:15 a.m. today.
of
American frontier
y

Dr. Clark, who will . be Introduced
.
,,
T.
f, M.
Spragens. joined the LK faculty
in 1931. He was made a full professor and head of the History Department in 1942. The Board of
Trustees named him distinguished
professor of the University in 1948.
Dr. Clark has earned a wide
reputation as an authority on the
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and variety
Southern historical subjects. He
has published over fifty articles to
professional Journals and Is the
author of more than ten books.
A Louisville, Miss, native, Dr.
Clark has lectured in India for the
State Department and in 1953 was
a Fulbright summer lecturer at
Oxford University.

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Westminster Felloivshii) Dedication

I'niversity President Frank G. Dickey speaks at the dedication
services of the new $160,000 Presbyterian center located on Itose
Street. The ceremonies were held Sunday evening in the studeut
chapel.

* 2 --

lOfil

THE KLNTUCKV KERNEL, Tuesday, Sept. 2f,

Lexington Is Possible Nuclear Target
Are you prepared for a nuclear
var?
This Is a question which eon-eerall. Civil Defen.se has design-Ue- d
area
the Frankfort-Lexingto- n
is a possible target area in case
)f nuclear attack.

Dr. Lewis W. Cochran of the
Physic Department stated during
a recent Interview that "a small
bomb would completely devastate
the I K campus." A bomb of thl
caliber I equivalent to an explosion set off by 20,000 ton of TNT.

CLASSIFIED ADS
S fnU prr
RATE
nvrRTISINO
rd; l.l trull mlnlmam: IS prrrrnt
IWraant If adirrrtlsniieM ran 4 dyi.l heart before publl- LOST Pair of men's brown glasses and
opy Dradlln
. tio
a leather case during
registration.
20S4t
PHONE NICK TOPE SWMl.
after 7 p.m.
Phone
r

at.

FOR SALI
WANTED

HELP

MALE

rond-..teSALE 19K0 Triumph TR-Rndio and wlra wlieeli. Good
WANTED Male part time clerk. Must
5080.
Must nell Spt. J5. Coll
be marrird and not a senior. Some
20Stt knowledge of sports. $1.00 per hour.
hours
Working
OR SALE 1958 MGA. good condition.
from 12 noon until 3:30. South22S4t
1.2().
Cooperstown.
land Sport Shop, Southland Shopping
22S4t
Center.
FOR HINT

OR

APARTMENT and bath, first
Rirls.
loor. Wants to share with 2 or 3 3.107.
bedrooms available. Call ext.
J

MISCELLANEOUS

ROOM

19S8t

'OR
'.'wire

RENT
beds. Phone

room.

minute from class, at
PARK One-ha320 Rose Lane. $3.00 per semester. Call
22S4t

cond floor,
after 6 p.m.

19SU ALTERATIONS Dresses and coats', hatsd
restvled and custom made. 348 Avles-for19S8t
Place. Phone
t.
furnished
RENT
decorated. $40 per month.
Newly
22Sxt WIFE of activated reservist desires
Apply 260 S. Limestone.
Phone
woman to share apartment.
to
FEMALI HELP WANTED
Welgo's Southland, for Mrs. Cooper
21S4t
call back.
j'EMALE HELP WANTED Waitress and
counter work available. Day and night
hilt. Full or part time. (Students NOW AVAILABLE on the UK Campus
Pontious and the Piolcts will wail for
wives will find this an Ideal working
2HS4t
Apply In person at Lucas', you. Contact Richard Bott.
' The Coffee ShoD of the Campus." 5D0
21S4t
Street.

otr

WANTED
e
secretary for Uni
WANTED
versity Computing Center. Apply Room
22Sxt
Hall.
()0, McVey

sales person. Must
ye able to work Monday nights and
Saturdays. Experience helpful, but lint
necessary.
Apply In person W. H.
2RS4t
Roland Shoe Salon.
VANTED

bomb multiplied
equal
to the Soviet Union's aliened
hydrogen bomb. This "super" bomb would sear anything
radius of its dewithin a
tonation site.
During radioactive fallout the
best protection is a bomb shelter.
The public shelter Is the best because medical aid is available. Second best Is the family fallout
shelter.
In any shelter thick wall are
required to deflect deadly radiation. Civil Defense information
shows about eight inche of concrete, 12 Inche of earth or 30 Inches of wood 1 sufficient shielding.
The fallout shelter should contain a battery-powere- d
radio,
flashlights, blankets, a two-wetwo-wesupply of canned food, and a
supply of water minimum seven gallons per person.
Dr. Cochran stated that In case
of attack and no preparation has
been made the best thing to do
is to try to get underground.
This ("small")

5,000 times is approximately

Don

Memo to All New Students:

The Phoenix, Lofoyette ond Compbell House Hotels would like to toke
to invite your family ond
opportunity to welcome you to Lexington, and
Whento stay with us when they visit here in your new home.
friends
accommodations for your family and
ever you need help in obtaining
friends, please call on us.

Murray

Richard

Egan

75e
Starts 7:30
TONIGHT

Admission

For Reservations Call

Karl Maiden

Donahua

Troy

Claudette Co'Jert

Shine's STRAND
"THE YOUNG DOCTORS"

Mrs. Bullock
THE CAMPBELL HOUSE
Mr. Schleicher
THE PHOENIX
Mr. Moriarty
THE LAFAYETTE

"PARRISH"
Jackpot $27500 (At Pran Time)
In Color and Scooe
AND
"SECRET OF THE PURPLE
REEF"

(Color)
PLAY BANKO

With Frederic March, Ben Gaiarh
and Dick Clark

ENDS TONIGHT
Dale Robertson, Lili St. Clair
"SON OF SINBAD"
Mijanou Bardot
"PIRATE Of THE BLACK HAWK"

-

ANF

Air Conditioned

PifSENTS

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WHETS

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LAFAYETTE HOTEL

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Free Parking

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Ms!
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XAMPBELL HOUSE

Television

STARTS TOMORROW!

i

KENTUCKY'S FINEST
HOTELS

PHOENIX HOTEL

SHOW
STARTS

vJ

2:00

LA DOLCE VITA.

"SCREAM OF FEAR"
And

Block from University
820 S. Limestone St.

NOW

Shine's DEN ALI
"THE TRUNK"

1

(MOST

STOVER"

"MAMIE

J a no Russell

Flavor

30
5:15
SHOCKED ABOUT
PICTURE OF OUR YEARSl

AT

"BUS STOP"
Monroe

Very Big On

p.m.

daily

Marilyn

Bord en s

944 Winchester Road

ucl.d Avonuo Chavy Chu
LAST TIMES TONIGHT

e

FOR THE FINEST IN
REFRESHMENT TRY

TRASH"

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Kfcl

still available for your classes

m.

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CAMPUS BOOK STORE

F"
'-

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McVEY HALL

i'Oim COLLEGE SUPPLY CENTER
AJ

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Construction Hinders LeamittP Social Activites
Anyone who has been on cam- pus within the past week could
not help but notice the strange
variety of sights and sounds com
ing from all directions.
The construction work is the first
fiRht that most people see and
they quickly realize that they must
lUuy J,Xfan "le 7Le 6rU,nJ1 iT
as they walk,
at the same time, they must keep
a wary eye cast upward or they
might be hit with a piece of re- volving machinery.
The noise of the machinery also
presents a problem to the student
who would like to hear what his
professor Is saying. If a student
happens to have a class ln the
Social Science building, he will no
doubt find himself in a very small
room on the side of the building
farthest away from the new Grand
anyfc1,nB d!'8.nrXt t0 ?Ta,""ty
T,3iw- i
other means than sign language
In the larger rooms in the front
of the building.
For those members of the student body who find it necessary to
enter the campus from Rose Street,
there Is the small problem of find- Ing a way to get there. All the
previous used walk are blocked
off except two, and one of these,
the drive in front of the Funk- Lou.ser building, is usually very
filled with hordes of workmen
and their equipment. The other

t

Engagements
Tinker Fox. Junior radio arts
major from Harlan and a mem
ber of Delta Delta Delta to Bobby
Slack senior commerce major
Paiis and a member of
Kappa Alpha.

CWENS
Cwens, sophomore women's honwill meet at 4 p.m. tomororary,
row ln the Ping Pong Room of
Keeneland Hall. The purpose of
the meeting is to collect the calendar money.

Pdly

Sl'KY
Suky, the pep culb, will hold
from 5 to 6 p.m. today
ln the Social Room of the Student
Union Building.
try-ou-

ODK
Omicron Delta Kappa, senior
men's honorary, will meet from 4
to 6 p.m. today In Room 206 of
the Student Union Building,

C OSMOPOLITAN CU B
The Cosmopolitan Club will meet
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Margaret Ann Brown, Junior Room 128 of the Student Union
arts and sciences major from Lex
Building.
lngton and a member of Alpha
Gamma Delta to Roger Huston,
junior commerce major from Lexington and a member of Phi
Sigma Kappa.
Seniors and graduate students
Joyce Tallman, sophomore edu- expecting to complete their studies
cation major from Louisville and in
January, June or August are
a member of Kappa Delta to Bill
urged to register immediately with
crouch. Junior commerce major the Placement Service, Room 207
from Louisville and a member of Administration
Building, by its diphi Sigma Kappa,
rector, Mrs. Katherine Kemper.
Joan Kruse, sophomore educa-we- ll
Many industries, governmental
tion major from Rocky River, Ohio agencies and educational instituto Dan McLain, sophomore en- tions will be on campus only durgineering major from West Lib- ing the first semester and several
dates
erty and a member of Phi Sigma have announced early cut-o- ff
for applications.
Kappa.
Pin-Mate-

s

Placement Service

Caroline Taylor, sophomore arts
and sciences major from Louisville
and a member of Delta Delta Delta
to Clay McDowell Brock, Fopho-Jc- e
more commerce major from Lex-Iroington and a member of Kappa
Alpha.

Recently Wed
Kay Moore, senior education
major from Ashland to Lee Har;,
senior commerce major from Ashland.
Joan Easter from Whittenburp
and a member of Kappa Delta to
Bob Rapp, junior pharmacy majO).1
from Louisville and a member c2
Phi Sigma Kappa.
Ann Morgan, former studen.
from Princeton and a member o
Delta Zeta to Merle Myers, senlcv
engineering major from Calhoun.
Linda Frey, a former student
from Madisonville and a member
of Delta Zeta to William Hall, Junior engineering major from Louisville.

Patsy Dickey, senior education
major from Lexington and a member of Delta Zeta to Marvin Selke,
a former graduate student.
Pat Dolwick, a former studen
from Erlanger and a member oi
Delta Zeta to Robert Foxworthy.
i

387 S. Lime At Euclid
A

Zipper Repair
Jacket Cuffs, Bands

Shoe Supplies
Keys Made

Are you still wondering about your wardrobe?

'

Here to please everyone
.

.

cur terrific

collec- -

tion of fall sweaters. ...
There's a wide selection
a wonderful
cf styles
of colors.
array

JIM'S BARBER SHOP
"We Clip You"

...

FLAT TOPS A SPECIALTY

2 Doors up from Euclid

S. Lime

Texas boys offer black string tlei
while narrow ties with square end t
are seen on eastern campus gieenr.

SHOE REPAIR

GIURGEVICH

.

383

Sqt. 2i, lOlilVj

'Beau' Ties For New Hair Styles
From The Milwaukee Journal
Time was when a man could
lose his head or, economically
speaking, his shirt over a girl.
Now, thanks to a new fashion fad,
he can also lose his tie. So says
a report on "beau ties," new hair
styles that are fit to be tied.
A whole variety of tie-uand
tie-iare to be seen which coordinate the tie to the hair style.
Girls use a bow tie to encircle
a muffinlike pouf of curls on top.
They convert the four in hand Into
a headband, letting the long ends
dangle over the ears to cover part
of the band. They bring a bow
tie around their head to tie in
front, letting a few curly petals
of hair fall into bangs over the
forehead. They perch a clip-o- n
bow on top of a pony tail. Those
with short wave length wear the
clip-o- n
low over an ear or clip
it in front to bangs.
s,
Needed in many of these
cautions a hair fashion authority,
is a soft home permanent for body
and for line. For more curl, less
curl, set with rollers. The rule is
the longer the hair, the bigger
the roller.
The fad for tie-ualso seems
to be taking on regional character- to the report.
istics, according

Meetings

walk becomes slightly risky as one
approaches the small goat hill next
to the library. This area becomes
rather crowded between classes
as the students try to edge their
way up the incline 1,1 slngle file- But cheer up because this will
someday be over and everyone will
talking about the much
,,ceded addlUon t0 tne ,ibrary and
the beautiful new science building.
They will also speak proudly of
whatever It is that will arise from
tne jargc pit which ,s now ln the
f be,ng dug neXt t0 lhC
pr0CesS
,aw building.

Tucm1.iv,

ft

Don Meyer Shoe Store

TO

In

Southland Shopping Center
VELVET STEP SHOES
HAPPY HIKER
For Ladies and Girls

CITY CLUB
WESTBORO SHOES
For Men and Boys
FRIDAY

OPFN

NIGHTS

'TIL

9 P.M.

'.V tr
'

PlUf'il'f

?S

;1

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NO ADDED COST
and Country wishes to welcome you upperclassmen
back to school. And to you new freshman girls, drop in to
see us sometime. We would be glad to meet you and advise
you on any clothing problems you may have.
Make it a good habit to visit the friendly store.
The Smart Coeds Shop at . . .

Town

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Phone
265 Euclid Ave.

15

Next to Coliseum

Cash

966

H'jrrucLb-ir-

P.;cJ

630 East Hirjh Street

Discount
& Carry

Town and Country

214

E.

Main St.

Phone

I

* university aoaimox

The Kentucky Kernel

Sollllions To

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Kkmhy 1'ovvhl, MnK
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Wallace, Advertising MaiMger
TUESDAY NEWS STAFF

Ei.don I'm. lips,

As.s,k

Scottie Hklt, Sxirft

UK's Progressive Budget
The University's budget request
was
r
for the
period, 1962-6.called "large but realistic" last week
by President Dickey.
It is more than this; we think it
is progressive. The request shows that
this state stands on the threshold of
greater opportunity to better educate
its youth. Indeed, the youth of our
state are not the only ones who will
benefit from the more than 25 million dollar requested increase. The
entire state will benefit from it. This
University probably stands as the best
possible avenue for "heading in the
right direction."
We are sick unto death from hearof
ing our own citizens and those
other states continually spreading the
word that Kentucky ranks lowest
among her sister states in one field
after another. It is about time we did
something about it. It is time for us to
"tafk up" Kentucky instead of "talk
two-yea-

3

-

ing down" Kentucky.
This is not an appeal from University oificials for the support of
every student, although they do want
your support. Rather, it is an appeal
from we, the editors of the Kernel-o- ne
wholestudent to another-f- or
hearted support for the budget request.
You, as a student, have just as
much at stake in this matter as any
other Kentuckian. Certainly, we realize that this will not solve all of the
Commonwealth's problems in two
years. It would be bordering on
ignorance to believe this. But, again
we say, this is a step in the right
direction.
If you are a Kentuckian, and if you
and your parents really believe in your
state, then you should encourage-ev- en
demand the full support of
your parents for the increased budget
request.

Worship Of Success
"A statement from the dean of one;

of the nation's prominent law schools,
given at graduation time a tew weeks
ago, still is worth repeating. It was
d
the comment of Dean Erwin N.
of Harvard University and it
dealt with a subject familiar to all
of us; As we consider mounting college enrollments and expenses, we
alO should be giving thought to the
pmpose of it all.
You expect older persons to be
concerned with security. But Dean
Griswold, for one, cannot understand
why so many of college age also put
personal security above most other
considerations, even at that age. He
wonders what has happened to the
onetime zest of young people for
more adventure in vocations, those
involvnig more risk and service of the
kind that might pay off more in satisfaction and gratitude than in cash.
Taking an example from his own
profession, he asked, "How many students leave law school these days with
Gris-wol-

'

.

in the field of
criminal law conscientiously in the
public interest, or to represent people
whose civil liberties are impaired?
How many desire to engage in correctional work, or in youth guidance
activities?
The same challenges could be repeated in almost any field of educaa desire , to practice

tion. ' '
"Americans," he said, "long have
worshipped success and too often
have given it a purely monetary index.
More recently, the goal has shifted
safest way to assure
to security-t- he
a fairly good income over a reasonable span of years.
"But neither money nor security is
a sound scale to measure true worth.
The atmosphere of free inquiry is

fruitless unless we use it to enable
our students to shake off narrowness,
prejudice and blind orthodoxy and to
develop their minds and hearts.
Muskegon (Mich.) Chronicle.

THE READERS' FORUM
l

Incomplete Stories

To 'jfhe Editor:
Today's KcrneFs front page (Wednesday, Sept. 20) carried two stories
of extreme importance to UK
and Kentuckians in general;
"Proposed UK Budget Jumps $23
Million," and "Dickey Appeals To
Tress."
ijie stories are incomplete too
many vital questions are left unanswered. The biggest single question is: Why, specifically is so large
an increase needed? Some sort of
breakdown by departments and coljustifications for
leges is needed-wi- th'
each. We must remember that 50 million dollars for two years is an expenditure of approximately $3,600 per
student each year. That's enough to
support a family!
Would this level of expenditure

be expected to continue in years
ahead?
i Will tuition and other student
costs lie affected?
Will this budget allow the school
'to absorb research costs that might
be lorne by other agencies, particularly private industry?
Why is this increase needed so
suddenly? Enrollment has jumped and
will continue to rise, but not at the
rate of MX) percent in two years!
Where will the extra 2i million
dollars come from? Is Kentucky's revenue sufficient to cover the additional
expense?
Has there been any official response from the state government
concerning tin's increase?
If these additional expenditures
are really necessary, I for one will
support thein, but please, let's have
all the facts!
David F. Smith

sc8

Problems

mcmhtis to innumerable University
To The Editor:
and administrative commitEast j ear marked the reentry of Faculty
a tees and urates advisory committees
Student Congress as supposedly
administrative
vital and significant part of the Uni- to arious University
In short, Student Congress is
months later, in at- offices.
versity. Eight
segmented into so many committees
tempting to reorganize Student Con- that one
part does not know what the
we ask, "What accomplishgress,
and to the nonplused
to the stude nt other is doing
ments can we present
observer's dismay, nothing is being
1mh1?" A Spindletop conference? A
$1(X) debt on the Madame Tolstoy accomplished.
In committee government, coorlecture? A glittering September stuand direction are essential.
dent directory (recently cancelled)? dination
Its absence at UK can be corrected
The experiences of the last eight
with the naming of three vice presimonths dispel the notion that Students; one to direct and coordinate
dent Congress can be a meaningful
body on sheer will alone. The survival of student government on this
or any campus depends on its purpose, structure, and leadership.
What is Student Congress's purpose? Nobody really knows. The
Congress convenes, debates, creates
committees, and adjourns. Student
government at UK has no defined
purpose or goals. True, it serves as
a forum for the expression of student
opinion, but it goes no further! The
expression of student opinion should
serve as a means to some appreciable
and positive end, instead of being an
end in itself.
If Student Congress is to be a
meaningful and productive organ in
the conduct of student affairs, a definition of its purpose and a delineation
of its responsibilities are in order.
One might describe it as an organization functioning to enhance the
academic life of the student body, the woik of Student Congress, comanother to integrate congress
having the responsibility' of procuring mittees,
adrepresentatives into Faculty and
lecturers, establishing symposiums,
ministrative committees, and the third
etc. (as is done at Notre Dame).
Its purpose might be to coordin- to plan and direct special conferences
ate all student activities with the at Spindletop, and to establish the
responsibility of contacting and em- meeting agendas.
The third prerequisite for Stude nt
ploying all campus entertainment, as
fs responsible-anis done at Auburn University. '.Its Congress effectiveness
"non-orburdeneer" leadership".'
be to provide a student
purpose might
voice in the formulation of University Elected officials must remembvr.that.
in representing the students In ad-- :
policy. These are but' suggestions;
exis that Student ministrative relations, they must
the important concern
student will, not personal preCongress purpose Ik? defined and press
dilections. When Student Congress
its responsibilities delineated.
votes a caution light or a crosswalk
Secondly,' its structure.'- should lx?
in operative form. In an as- across Bose Street, it doesn't give its
placed
elected officers permission to consent
sembly with over 100 members, comof inmittee action is the only feasible way pusillanimously to the erection
to handle legislative affairs. Last effectual "CAUTION SCHOOL
ZONE" signs.
spring approximately 40 committees
There is always an abundance of
were created. If these committees
there zealous presidential aspirants. Pernever meet (and many didn't),
of Student Concan Ik? no legislative action and Stu- haps being president
dent Congress will disintegrate. But gress would be the epitoiny of a glorwhat if these committees do meet ious college career. Perhaps they are
and legislate? If only 10 of the 40 attracted by financial gain. Everyone
offer committee reports at one meet- is not aware that the president of
Student Congress and the Judiciary
ing, Student Congress will be in sesThe constit- Board chairman annually receive $270
sion until midnight.
utor does not provide for standing and $280, respectively. (I understand
that this financial enticement might be
committees, nor has the congress
deleted from this year's budget.)
them.
chosen to establish
While re sponsible leadership is
comIn addition to those
evssential, the president of
Student Congress appoints
mittees,
Student Congress cannot be burdened
with other
rcsponsi-- .
bilities. being president is a.
responsibilities and
Tis not the dying for a faith that's job with
hard . . . 'tis the living up to it obligations. Potential candidates
so
with other responsibilities
that's difficult. William Makepeace
and commitments have no business
Thackeray.
see king the presidency.
It would be satisfying if all who
A man seldom thinks of taking
man