xt7vx05x7j4f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7vx05x7j4f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19390725  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 25, 1939 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 25, 1939 1939 2013 true xt7vx05x7j4f section xt7vx05x7j4f best uopy Available
m

ECentucecy

The

'SUMMER NEWS
FOR SUMMER STUDENTS

UNIVERSITY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, JULY

2 248

VOLUME XXIX

OF KENTUCKY

A Plaque For Him

BOARD WILL

Around

LET

ECe RNEL

LITTLE SYMPHONY CONCERT
Directed by Dr. Alexander Capur-sthe University Little Symphony
orchestra presented the first concert
of its summer series Thursday night
in Memorial hall.
The program arranged for the
occasion included two groups of or'
'
chestral selections and one group of
familiar tunes sung by the audience
under the leadership of Miss Lela
'Mason of the music department.
. In the opening group, the orches- tra played the "Jolly Robbers Over- -,
ture," by Suppe; "Kamennoi-Os- trow." by Rubenstein; "Senta's Ballad," by Wagner, with Miss Mary
Louise McKenna, soprano, as vocal
soloist and "In a Persian Market,"
by Ketelbey.
1
The community singing included
"Love's Old Sweet Song;" "On", On.
U. of K" and a melody composed
of "Let Me Call You Sweetheart"
nd "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling."
The program was concluded by
Dr. H. H. Dawning (above) will be honored for his 18 years of service
the orchestra playing "Song of In- as coach of the Wildcat tennis team with a plaque which the team mem
Entre-Adia," by
No. 2 from "Rosamunde,"
by bers, past and present, plan to place on Downing courts.
Schubert, and "Valse Suite, Opus
QA If
os. dv i. cruiims.

Acting President

3 INTERIOR JOBS

NEW SERIES NO. 68

Soprano Concert Star To Sing
For Wednesday's Convocation

o,

y

K)

'

ct

1

GOLF WINNER
M. E. Ligon. head of the department of secondary education, teamed
with J. B. Mylor, turned in a net
score of 140 to take first place in
the low net twosome tournament
held Saturday at the Lexington
Country Club. Golf balls were given as prizes.
BANKERS HEAR CARPENTER
The second annual Kentucky
bankers' conference, held Tuesday.
Wednesday and Thursday at the
University with 200 bankers from
all sections of the state in attendance, was highlighted with an ad- C.

p. Carpenter,

associate professor
of economics at the University, and
for the institute on
me Field of Mergers in Kentucky."
In his talk, he said there were many
small banking units "which might

furnish better sen-icto their
tomers and preserve their stockholders' investment by a consolidae

tion."
He declared there were 34 towns
of 2500 of less population with two
or more bands and added studies
showed in many instances there was
"excessive competition which weakens the banks involved."
Such competing banks, he said,
are unable to develop enough business through lending or receiving
deposits to use their capital as efficiently as banks not under the
pressure of competition.
Comparing
30
institutions in
communities to 123
without local competition. Dr. Carpenter said the former group had
average operating earnings amount
ing to 1.08 per cent of total resources and the latter group earnings that were 12 per cent of total
resources. This indicated, he said,
that assets were not used so profitably in the
com
munities.
"over-banke-

d"

TO

Is Cancelled
The faculty meeting which
was scheduled for Friday, July
28, has been cancelled according to an announcement
from the Summer Session ofFaculty members will be
notified if a meeting is called
for a future date, Dr. Adams
announced.

SECOND CONCERT

PR0GRAMJ3IVEN
Philharmonic Players
To Appear Thursday
The second concert by the University Summer Session Philharmonic orchestra under the direction of Alexander Capurso will be
held at 7:00 p. m. Thursday in Memorial hall.
The program follows:
I
Alma Mater. Lamport.
Orpheus (overture), Offenbach.
Alone,
Ye Who Have Yearned
Tschaikowsky.

II
Deux Arabesque, Debussy.
L'Alouette (The Lark), Balakirew.
(Lexie Faye Francisco, pianist, Senior graduating recital).

Cave-In-Ro-

janitor.
Scott pleaded 'guility and became
the state's principal witness in the
trial of Mrs. Alice Austin, widow
of the victim, and Theodore Simmons, a neighbor. They were found
guility by a circuit court jury and
their punishment was fixed at 14
years imprisonment.

No W. P. A. Teachers
To Swell Figure

Student Voters

SHORT COURSES

August

ARE ANNOUNCED

May Go Home

Three Classes Slated

For August

BEJRECTED

19

Arabs Free Ohio
Minister Report

Finish Engineering
Field Work

Phi Delta Kappa
Plans Luncheon

Former Law Prof.
Named President

Films On Safety

Will Be Offered

re

Ill

w

By YW Secretary

.

ENROLLTOBATE

.),

Resignation Given

pri-fo-

1027 STUDENTS

FROM BREATHITT

"Dorn-roschen-

EHzabethtown. 111., July 24 Ira
Scott,
farmhand, today
n
was sentenced 14 years in state
on a charge of murder in the
truck-blas- t
death March 20 of Earl
high school
Austin,

Mary McCabe, soprano, will give

the first convocation program of
the second semester of the Summer
Session at 9:50 a. m. (the begin
ning of the third hour) Wednesday

STUDENTS BACK

"over-banke-

SENTENCE

JUS

For Net Coach

Yankee Rhythm (A Medley), May-heLake. (Introducing: Turkey in
the Straw, Largo (Dvorak), Reuben,
Reuben .Little Brown Jug, Chicken
Reel, Oh! Dem Golden Slippers,
She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain, The Men on the Flying Trapeze, Oh, Susanna. V
IV
DINNEJt GUESTS
Community Singing led by Lela
Dr. and Mrs. McVey entertained
with a small dinner party last week Mason: My Bonnie Lies Over the
night at Maxwell Place in honor of Ocean; Row, Row, Row; Santa LuMiss Harriet Elliott, dean of women cia.
V
of the University of North Carolina,
Moment Musical, Schubert.
and for Mr. Gayce Morrison of Al
,"
Waltz from the ballet
bany, deputy commissioner of edu
Tschaikowsky.
cation for the state of New York;
and to welcome Miss Ruth Melcher
Cof Detroit who is spending the
mer with her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
C. R. Melcher.
The table had an attractive cenThe resignation of Miss Elizabeth
terpiece of garden flowers.
Cowan, secretary of the University
YWCA has been accepted by the
WHITE HOUSE CARDS $1
Board of Trustees.
Her succesor
Washington. July 24 The secret has not yet been chosen.
sen-icis trying to find out who has
Miss Cowan, who this summer has
been charging admission to the been a representative to an interWhite House.
national religious conference repreA tourist recently remarked that senting the youth organizations of
he'd paid $1 for a card to visit the th world at Amsterdam, Holland,
executive mansion. A checkup dis- will take up her new duties as
closed that others also had pur- VWCA secretary at the University
chased cards, which are distributed of Texas in the fall.
Miss Cowan, whose home is at
free of charge to friends of officials
nd of congressmen. They entitle Rocky Mount, N. C, received her
the bearer to a more extensive White degree as bachelor of religious eduHouse tour than is given the ordi- cation from the Hartford Theologinary visitor.
cal Seminary, Hartford, Conn.
GIVEN

whose picture appears at the
right is a soprano concert singer.
She will present a program Wednesday in Memorial hall at the second convocation of the current semester. She has sung with several
opera companies and had leading
roles in the Broadway productions
of "The Student Prince" and "Coun-

Tennis Courts Named

fice.

.

M

DOWNING PLAQUE

Faculty Meeting
Set For Friday

...

Mary McCabe To Give
Assembly Program
In Memorial Hall

Mary McCabe . . .

in Memorial hall. She will be intess Maritza."
troduced by Dr. Jesse E. Adams,
As is the University custom, all
director of the Summer Session.
chdes will be dismissed during
According to the University cus
so that Summer Session
tom, all third hour classes will be
Courtesy Lexington Leader students may attend the assembly.
dismissed Wednesday to enable stuTwo other convocations will be
Dr. W. S. Taylor (above), dean of
dents to attend the program.
Contract No. 3030 Furnishing of the College of Education, is acting held during the second semester of
Miss McCabe has been soloist
materials and performance of work as (resident of the University dur the Summer Session. On Tuesday.
with the Chicago Civic Opera
Aug. 1, Harry Collins SpiUman will
plumbing, heating, ing Dr. McVey'i vacation.
required for the
Company, the Philadelphia Opera
speak on "Fortifyirir Democracy at
and ventilating for the home eco
and the St. Louis Municipal Opera.
the Base." The program for the last
nomics building.
She has had leading roles with
convocation has not been announced.
Contract No. 3040 Furnishing of
various Broadway productions, inmaterials and performance of work
cluding the "Student Prince" and
required for the electric work for
"Countess Maritza." She is been
building.
the home economics
guest artist with the Philadelphia
Contract No. 2151 Furnishing of
Symphony Orchetra, the Minneamaterials and performance of work
polis Orcheetra, the Chicago Sym5
required for elevator equipment for
phony and other orchestral organizations.
the biological sciences building.
All classes will be dismissed
Approximately $50,000 is available
She has broadcast from many
for Saturday, August 5, it was
for the three constructon Jobs to
stations and had regular programs
Monday by Dr.
announced
be divided as follows:
The figure to date for the enroll3-from New York over nation-wid- e
Adams, director of the SumApproximately $25,000 for plumb- ment in the second semester of the
networks. She has given two Town
mer Session.
ing, heating and ventilating of home
enSummer Session is given as 1027 by
Two short courses in agricultural Hall (New York recitals with
Dr. Adams stated that the
economics building; approximately
viable press acclaim.
education and one in home econoUniversity wishes to facilitate
$18,000 for electrc work on home the office of the registrar. This is
Miss McCabe is originally from
the highest record for second semesmics education will open August 3 Montgomery, Ala., and is looking
economics building, and approxi
students in going to their
mately $6,800 for elevator equipment ter Summer Session enrollment in
homes to vote in the state prito continue for two and a half forward to her return to the South
mary, and expressed the wish
for the biological sciences building. the history of the University with
for summer concert engagements.
weeks, closing August 19.
Plans, specifications and contract
that as many students as posPresident McVey and the Board
Harry Collins Spillman of the
Prof. Carsie Hammonds and Mr.
the exception of 1938 when the figsible avail themselves of this
documents may be examined at the
of Trustees have approved plans
W. R. Tabb will teach agricultural National Association of Manufacure reached 1250.
office of the Dean, College of Enopportunity.
education 179. "Determining Content turers will address a convocation
made by members of the tennis gineering, at the Builders Exchange,
The 1938 total included, however,
in Vocational Agriculture' and Pro at 11 a. m. (the beginning of the
team to erect a plaque to Prof. H. 620 South Fifth Street, Louisville, 275 students who were sent to the
fessor Hammond will teach 287c. fourth hour) Tuesday, August 1. in
H. Downing of the mathematics at the Building Witness Publishing University by the WPA to matricuEvening Schools.' Both courses of Memorial hall. His subject will be
department who for 18 years has Company, Building Industries Ex late in classes in adult education
fer three credits and will meet by "Fighting Democracy at the Base."
hibit Building, Cincinnati, Ohio, or and nursery teaching offered last
been coach of the team without
appointment.
any material compensation,
and may be obtained from James H. summer only.
Miss Ronella Spickard will teach
The 1027 students now registered
have recognized that the tennis Graham, Dean, College of Engineer
home economics education 263.
dol include those matriculating for the
courts be officially called the Down- ing upon deposit of twenty-fiv- e
'Current Problems in Home Econo
lars.
entire semester and for the first
ing courts.
mics Education."
This course will
group of short courses which will 16
The plaque will be placed on the
Jerusalem. July 24 A donkey
offer three credits and will meet by
close August 2. It does not include
Downing courts to commemorate
trader declared tonight that the Rev.
appointment.
those who will come for the second
Professor Downing's services to the
G. R. Goldner of Ohio had been
group of short courses to be held
Sixteen University students have
team and to the University. Plans
released by his Arab abductors
August 3 to 19 or those who will concluded seven weeks of field work
for its design are not yet definite.
while efforts were being made to
It is hoped that the dedication will Phi Delta Kappa, national hon attend the coaching school for at Camp Robinson, Noble, Breathitt
pay a partial ransom through a
orary fraternity in education for football and basketball coaches
take place in the fall.
Bedouin tribesman.
county, and have returned to their
Funds for the plaque are being men graduates, will hold a luncheon which will be held August 7 to 12
While the Bedouin messenger
meeting at 12:30 Wednesday in the inclusive.
St. Paul, Minn.. July 24 Dr.
homes. - The camp is maintained by
raised by contributions from memslipped out of the old city of BethFaculty room of the Union building.
Charles J. Turck. president of Cen
the University for seven weeks each
bers of Wildcat net teams who have
lehem with the money for the wanFollowing luncheon, a brief pro
tre College at Danville. Ky., from
WANTS BILL APPROVED
served under Professor Downing's
summer to give students practical
dering tribe which kidnapped the
gram will be presented at which
1927 to 1936, has been named presi
Washington, July 24 The Bank
coaching.
clergyman last Tuesday, this story
time Dr. C. A, Rubado, assistant ing Committee urged swift Senate experience in field work, and is a dent of MacAlester College of St.
from any other
unconfirmed
superintendent of schools in charge approval of the administration's $2, prerequisite for graduation in both Paul.
source was received here:
of elementary education in Louis 490.000.000 lending bill today with a civil and mining engineering
Dr. Turck, now a resident of
Ishak Attia. the donkey trader,
ville, will speak.
claim it would create 500,000 new i This year the sophomore engi-- I Philadelphia and director of the
said he rented to Goldner and his
-.
National Board of Education of the
neering students, under the guidDr. Jacob Goldner, also a
WASHINGTON ALUMNI
The committee's report to the a nee of Professors Daniel V. Ter- Presbyterian church, follows the rather.
Several sound films dealing with
preacher, two donkeys for their
Senate on the controversial meas- rell. Phillip C. Emrath and Robert late Dr. John C. Acheson, who died trip to Marasaba Green monastery
highway safety will be shown at
One hundred and twenty-fiv- e
ure was prepared by Majority Lead- E. Shaver of the College of Engi- in November, 1937.
8:30 a. m. Friday in the Training
I Tuesday.
members constitute the Washington, er Barkley
who said he neering staff, continued the work
School auditorium,
The new MacAlester president
it was an- D. C, University
When young Goldner was held
of Kentucky alummight call night sessions in an ef- of former years in surveying and practiced law in New York from
nounced by Major W. H. Hansen, ni club, according to
information fort to obtain action by midweek. mapping the University's 15.000-ac- 1913 to 1916. He then became pro for ransom and his father was redirector of safety education in Ken- recently received. Meetings
leased to arrange payment of the
are held It still was considered doubtful that
tract in Breathitt, Perry and fessor of law at Tulane University. money, the donkeys were kept by
tucky.
the second Wednesday of each Congress could adjourn by this
highway New Orleans, and was professor of j the kidnappers.
Knott counties, making
The films will be shown in conmonth at the Army-Nav- y
Club. All week-enhowever.
and railroad locations, and estab- law and secretary of the law school
nection with the short course en- former University students who are
In contending the program would lishing triangulation stations perti at Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
SHAW TO ENTER RACE
titled "Safety Education"
which in Washington on these dates are give jobs to 500.000 men, the comTenn., from 1920 to 1924. He was
nent to the area mapped.
Major Hansen is teaching during invited to meet with the group.
mittee report listed among those
camp roll for the last seven professor of the law school of the
The
Akron, Ohio, July 24
Wilbur
the first two and a half weeks of
who would benefit directly "carpen- weeks included, besides the three University of Kentucky from 1924
le
autoShaw, winner of the
WOODSON RESIGNS
the second semester of the Summer
ters, bricklayers, stonemasons, ditch professors and their wives, and to 1927.
a
mobile classic at Indianapolis May
Session.
The showing will take
diggers, cement workers, a host of Gordon Thurman, who was In
30, announced today he would enter
Washington, July 24 Urey Woodabout an hour and a half and is
other skilled,
and un- charge of the mechanical equipthe transcontinental event of the
open to anyone who is interested. son of Kentucky, director of the skilled men who work
with them."
Fors-to- n
ment of the camp, William C.
Alien Property Bureau since 1933,
national air races September 2.
There is no charge.
Jr., Marow Cox, W. L. Robards,
is quitting his Job, which he reShaw has rejected a rubber comCOLUMNIST RECOVERS
Sam Johnson and J. E. Delaney, all
gards as "practically completed."
pany's offer for an auto tour of the
Approximately 35 persons gathof Lexington; Dewey Young, Verne;
Attorney General Murphy, in a
country.
Jim Caldwell, Kernel columnist
letter made public today, expressed and junior in the College of Arts Fred Fischer and Joseph Rapier, ered for the summer meeting of
"I don't feel sate on the roads,"
A picnic for the women of the
Asso"grateful appreciation of the servand Sciences, was to have been re- Louisville; Louis Rekoon, Kenmore, the Kentucky Nurserymen's
explained.
residence hails is being planned
ciation being held yesterday and he
ice you have rendered." The resig- leased today from the Good Samari- N. Y.; J. H. Baughman, Moreland
for Wednesday night it was anJohn K. Orndorff, Adairville; Carl today at the Agricultural Experination was dated June 26. Murphy tan hospital where he underwent
nounced Monday by Mrs. Sarah said it would be
ment Station.
Vice, Mean; Robert Pollock, Frank
accepted as cust- - an operation 10 days ago.
B. Holmes, assistant dean of
fort; Paul Johnson, Youngstown,
Prof. w. A. Price, head of the
5
women.
Ohio; Joseph Farcht, Burgin. and University entomology department,
Joseph Endris, Paris. Farcht' and extended greetings to the group,
The group will meet at 6 p. m.
The place for the outing has not
Endris are majoring in mining en- while Prof. George Roberts discussed
yet been decided.
gineering and the remainder of the aspects of soil conservation. Better
students are civil engineering ma- care of trees, the growing of small
Any women in the halls interIt took five hours to undo
jors.
ested in attending the affair are
fruits and similar sufcj'js were
the mischief which some stuasked to communicate with Mrs.
scheduled for discussion Monday
dent did in five minutes when
Eda Giles at Boyd hail or Mrs.
afternoon and Tuesday.: Alvin
ll
he (or she? gave vent to
By VINCENT CROWDUS
courses as practice in writing, word
Jennie B, Clay at Patterson hall
of Sparta, president of the
the vandal Instinct and paintbefore noon Wednesday. There
Established in 1914 as the first study, and critical examination of
ed red the ball on the drinkPresident and Mrs. McVey left association, presided over Monday's
will be a nominal charge.
in Kentucky, and among the first the press. At present approximate
ing fountain just north of the
Lexington last week to spend several sessions.
Mm Giles and Mrs. Holmes are in America, to offer training in ly 500 students are enrolled, of which weeks at Elk Lake, Williamsburg.
Administration building which
in charge of arrangements.
practical newspaper work, the de- only about 175 are majors.
LONDON. JAPS AGREE
the class of 1918 gave to the
Mich. Mr. and Mrs. James Morris
partment of Journalism here has
The Department Is Born
University.
and small son, Barrett, will join
grown so rapidly in the 25 years of
Britain promised today to refrain
REDS BACK HOME
Monday mornng at 7 a. m.
The department was added to the them later.
from countenancing
acts which
Cincinnati, July 24 Those ram- its existence that it now ranks College of Arts and Sciences by an
Fountain Maupin, an employee
would hinder the Japanese army in
paging Reds returned in triumph among the 10 leading departments act of the Board of Trustees in
of the buildings and grounds
MINERS AT WORK
North China from
today from their most successful of the nation.
department, set to work with
June. 1914, and opened the follow
own security and maintaining
road trip of the season, but their
HARLAN, Ky., July 24
It is one of the 32 members of ing September. Its purpose, speciUnion their
varnish remover, alcohol,
fingers were crossed.
cleaning powder and finally
the American Association of Schools fically stated, was to "train young coal miners were called back to work public order."
The British and Japanese governLike their front office, they pre- and Departments of Journalism, men and women in the practical in Harlan county pits today under
a steel brush on an electric
ferred to leave "pennant enthus- from which it obtains its high work of journalism with ample fun- a working contract signed ,by the ments made public an agreement
motor to remove the paint.
iasm" to the
fans rating, and is recognized by all the damental collegiate instruction pre- Harlan County Operators' Associa reached in preliminary Tokyo talks
He finished at noon.
who have seen them in action since major editors and publishers' asso- paratory to the practical phases of tion and the United Mine Workers. for a conference to settle their Far
No one who was asked
April 17. It was "ladies day" at ciations in the country.
Eastern dispute which was brought
seemed to remember the octhe profession." Instruction was to (C. I. O.)
to a head by the Japanese blockade
the union terminal when the team
During this quarter of century of cover a period of four years, or its
casion for painting the globe.
Mine workers officials formally of
rolled in
the British and French conceswives, children and growth, 305 persons have received equivalent, and was to lead to a
Maupin said that along with
ratified the "peace of Knoxville sions at Tientsin.
friends of the players making up Bachelor of Arts degrees from the djgree of Bachelor of Arts, in Jourit were red arrows leading
Saturday.
The agreement
was
a crowd of several hundred.
department. Of these over 75 per nalism.
around the campus and finally
ratified the "peace of Knoxville"
OFFICER MANHANDLED
cent have graduated in the last 10
But more than one
Practically synonymous with the Tenn. A union
to the mens dormitories. These
committee notified
Hankow. China. July 24 Japagot only "we might years. Only 11 students had re- growth of the department is the George
were removed last spring when
Ward, secretary of the oper- nese naval authorities announced
have done better' by way of ceived degrees at the end of the name of its founder, the late Prof.
the engineers undertook to
ators' association that idle miners tonight an amicable settlement had
1921-2- 2
acknowledgement.
school year.
Enoch Grehan, who devoted the last would return to work today.
obliterate the "Billie Dunlap
been reached on an Incident inHowever, the graduates represent 23 years of his life to its developThis, after nine victories and
for May Queen" signs which
How long the several hundred volving R. A. Baker, warrant offifour losses before nearly 154,000 cash only a small number of those who ment. In placing the department
some few of their group had
customers that placed them nine have received training in the de on a sound functional basis, this national guardsmen patrolling the cer attached to the United States
scribbled about the campus.
Harlan soft coal field would re- gunboat Gaum, and a group of
partment. Students from all col- great builder guided it over numer-- (
games up on the second-plac- e
Japanese soldiers here Sunday.
was question.
main here
leges on the campus take Journalism
Continued on page Two)

1ft

Rimsky-Korako-

Is Available
Work On
For
3 Buildings

S50.000

Bids for interior work on the
and biological
home economics
sciences buildings will be opened at
3 p. m., Monday, July 31, in the
offices of President McVey, Judge
Richard C. Stoll, chairman of the
board of trustees, announced yes
terday.
The following three contracts will
be bid upon:

SUMMER KERNEL

25, 1939

CONTRACTS FOR

The Campus

TUESDAY ISSUE

TO STUDY INSURANCE
Washington, July 24 Growers of
tobacco, whose crop is subject to
hazards of nature perhaps as great
as anything else growing in the
ground, may follow cotton producers
under the protective shield of crop
insurance.
The Senate, in approving crop
insurance for cotton, adopted an
amendment authorizing the agriculture department to make a comprehensive study of the possibility
of extending such protection against
possible losses from natural causes
to tobacco farmers.

d,

500-mi-

semi-skill-

Nurserymen Hold
Summer Meeting

ed

Picnic Planned

Hours Work
Takes Red Top
From Fountain

UK's Journalism Department

Is Rated In Top Ten Of Nation

McVeys Vacation

Kid-we-

"safe-guardi-

million-and-mo-

re

.

back-slappi-

well-wish- er

* HE"

THE KENTUCKY

Page 1 wo

p.v VIRGINIA

"WJiat

Evt-i- y

Woman

Kn"

in-bc-

l

is

wecji-scav-

jn

undifinalile, undeniable sluni). I mIi metal and physical, but it's
the smal l woni.ui Ji knows live liasii taust and who after giving
lirr ti)su i bob a final p.n voiiuet om, tenixi atuie iiih as it
is. to find that ultimate remedy
crutches for a rippled summer
Kaubohe.
1 Ikic is absolutely mulling tlial will give you quite the lxxsl
that a new hat will. Not just a tomnionjilace, everyday hat, hut
a frivolous, imjxattitahle one. It tan do wonders for a
white dresn. Why iun try something gay like a white straw

Ik

i

;-

V

-'

I. I U,

skimmer, tied jauntily with red and
blue grosgratn bows, or go ultra
feminine in a victrola record of
burnt straw topped by two huge
pink cabbage roses? Then there is
loud as fireworks checked gingham
that is a perfect foil for the white
suit.
The second school of thought for
those more practical minded individuals recommends a new dress, a
black dress to wear deep into the
autumn. As Vogue says this is like
a husband "to be searched for diligently, chosen with discernment
Well,
and cherished henceforth."
in my ramblings I have discovered
some darling ones with details as
new as a bright copper penny. The
two that cought my eye boasted
back bulkiness bustles. One had
an apron front on
black
crepe, dropped folds gathered into
looped ends over the back.
The
other had pleated ruffles romping
around the hem, climbing up the
back and continuing to circle the
neck.
To overcome that physical letdown, have you tried an eau de
Coloogne rub down after your bath,
keeping your creams in the frigid-air- e,
keeping busy, never looking at
the thermometer, brushing your hair
an extra amount, sleeping without
a pillow, taking a tepid bath and
thinking how you nearly froze to
death last winter?

ivaTe

big-ci-

j

ty

University Jends
Educational Films
To Many Groups
Would you like to see a film pn
weather forecasting?
Or maybe
your taste would run more to a
movie on ants, digestion, Abraham
Lincoln, snakes, or the workings
of the human brain. If you would,
and there are not too many ahead
of you. the chances are that you
could borrow such a film from the
division of Audio-VisuAids of
the University of Kentucky department of University Extension
in Lexington.
According to W. Gayle 8 tames,
assistant director of the department and in charge of this work,
more than six hundred films covering every conceivable variety of
human knowledge are available by
the University department for loan
to clubs, churches, schools, ;and
other interested organizations. About
half of the collection consists of
sound films while the remainder
are silents
During the past four years, the
circulation of these films has increased 3200 percent. During the
1938-3- 9
school year. 29.116 showings
of these films were made before an
audience in excess of one and one-ha- lf
million.
While the primary circulation of
these films is in the state of Kentucky, requests for loans have been
received from approximately twenty-fiv- e
al

other states, and Canada.
In Kentucky, about two hundred
and fifty schools are now equipped
to show these films, and these
schools have been doing the bulk
of the borrowing.

Plan Broadcast
Of Fraternity's
Exercises

1.

-

I. 1

flajic K

past-ne-

x

Centenary Day exercises (of Betfc
Theta Pi. national collegiate rateri
nity, will be broadcast over WW
and the Mutual network on Tuesday, August 8, from the campus of
Miami University, Oxford. Ohip.
The list of nationally-know- n
speakers on the program, to be aired
from 11:45 a. m. to 12:15 p. 'In.,
EST. is headed by Owen D. Young.,
chairman of the board of General
Electric, and Charles P. T&ft, son
of former president William Howard
Taft and a member of Cincinnati's
City Council. Others scheduled to
speak are Walter Hubbard, Jr..
Franklin S. Edmonds and G. Herbert Smith. Dr. Smith, general
secretary of the fraternity, will tender the centenary records to an official custodian of Beta Theta Pi.
The ceremonial highlight of the
occasion will be the presentation of
the Beta Theta Pi Memorial Bells
by Clarence L. Newton, president of
the fraternity, and their acceptance
by Alfred D. Upham, president of
Miami University. The bells will be
heard for the first time during the
latter portion of the broadcast.
An additional feature of the pro
gram will be the first reading of
Beta Theta Pis Centenary Ode,
written by William Henry Cran-shaChoral selections forming
part of the ceremonies are "Ameri
ca.' "Gemma Nostra' and the "Beta
Doxology."

(Continued from Page One)
pus economic and academic depressions, giving it moral, financial, and
instructional support.
Professor Grehan had been connected with newspaper work for 20
years before his appointment as
head of the department. During
that time he had served on local
papers as city editor, managing
editor, pews editor, editor,
(of which he wrote approximately 50.00C) and dramatic critic.
Appointed to assist Professor Grehan was Miss Marguerite McLaughlin, who is still a member of the
department. Miss McLaughlin, an
alumna of the university, likewise
had received much experience on
local papers.

I

para-graph- er

Equipment Improvements

The University allotted two rooms
to the department in the basement
Building.
of the Administration
These served as lecture rooms, laboratory, and office.

p'5
i

The two rooms were equipped with
desks, tables, chairs,
telephone,
typewriters,
and reportorial and
editorial equipment used in modern
newspaper offices of that time. The
"big city editor's desk of the latest
approved pattern, a large exchange
table, and 12 individual editorial
tables" were constructed and given
to the department by the mechani
cal shop workers of the Engineering
College. All were of "oak, hand
polished and rubbed." In contrast to
the tables "ordinarily seen in such
environment, which are usually of
soft pine, carved, burnt by innum
era ble cigar stubs, and pasted over
with ancient editorial clippings.'

praa

y,

p,

J"

--

1

the girl who wants the sun on her legs, and who, when she wears
invariably rolls them up. Harper's Bazaar presents in the
February issue, these new long shorts of gray Hockanum flannel, cuffed
at the knee. With it this model wears a striped Everfast cotton shirt of
red, white and blue.

FOR

was appointed director of student
publications, specific duties being
business management.
In the spring of 1933, membership
on the board was changed, Pres.
Prank L. McVey appointing four
faculty members and three students.
The former consisted of Professor
Grehan, Mr. Shropshire, L. J.
assistant dean of the College of Agriculture, and D. H. Peak,
business agent; the students being
the president of the Men's Student
Council, president of the