xt7w0v89hr7r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w0v89hr7r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19560413  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 13, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 13, 1956 1956 2013 true xt7w0v89hr7r section xt7w0v89hr7r i

SGA Offers Jam Session Today
By ELIZABETH

BELL

Combo Starts At 3;
To Be Held Al Wildcat

Jam f.cr.Mon free to all University of Kentucky students will be held today at 3 pin. at the Wildcat. The
Student Government Association is sponsoring this event.
Jack Gcdhelf and his Rhythm Jacks will play from 3 to
5 p.m. and the fountain will be open.
At its regular meeting Monday night' SGA also discussed lowering the price of the yearbooks, keeping the
Margaret I. K.ng Library open on Sunday evenings, and
the price cf the new Cooperstown apartments.
The possibility of lowering; the price of the Kenturkian
to between $2 and Si was presented by Lucy Lee Moore.
She said that the had confirmed thin possibility with Dr.
A

mi

It

.

V

ow,...

Oops

Nlel riutnnuT, head of Hie Journalism School. By raising
the tuition a small amount and letting every student
automatically have a Kenturkian, the price rould be lowered.
SGA also discussed keeping the library open on Sunday
evenings. Barbaranelle Paxton was appointed to consult

xi
.

Forgot, My Shoes

...

Tau Sigma, a group with modern dance on the mind, will present

its annual concert tonight and tomorrow night in the Euclid Avenue

Building. We understand the group has some real lively dances on

the agenda, such as "Flirtation," "Shades of Black," and "Premeditation in Pink." Sounds like the gals are really on their toes.

Tau Sigma Concert
Scheduled Tonight
modern dance group, will present
Tan Sigma
its 17th. annual concert at S p.m. tonight and touiorrqw night
in the Euclid Avenue UuiJdingr- is,

--

viser to Tau Sigma, is a graduate
of the University of Wisconsin.
Orchesis is a nationwide college
modern dance group. Tau Sigma,
a local group, is becoming a part
of the national group.
In the fall Tau Sigma holds
seven preliminary workouts. The
eighth meeting is the final tryout.
From these people members of the
junior group are selected by the
old members. The pledges are initiated at the end of the year after
the concert performance.
Costumes are being made by
Mrs. C. W. Stille. Members of
WAA are in charge of .sets. Lighting is by Suzanne Shively.
by Sarah Comp-torison; "The Jest"
Officers of Tau Sigma are Jean
and "Glances at Dances Ad- Morrison, president; Nancy Mcvance" by Joanna Gewertz.
Kinley, vice- - president- - Margaret
Sarah Ccmpton Is a guest artist Fowler, secretary; Tom Ruh, treaswho is a former Tau Sigma mem- urer, and Margaret Hyden, business
ber. Joanna Gewertz, the new ad manager.
Admission is $1 for adults, $.75
for students and $.50 for children.
Tickets are cn sale from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Li the SUB and from
p.m. at the Euclid Avenue Building. Reservations can be made by
calling ex. 2147X. Tickets will also
be on sale at the Euclid Avenue
Building both nights of the concert.
The dance numbers and their
choreographers are "Flirtation" by
Nancy McKinley; "Creation" by
Margaret Fowler; "Shades of
Black" by Joanna Gewertz;; "Premeditation in Pink" by Margaret
Ilyden; "Mopfters" by Jean Morby Tom
rison; "We Pasers-By- "
Kuh; "Battleground" by Jean Mor1-

with tjnwrence R. Thompson, director of libraries, concerning the possibility of n trial period to see how many
students this would affect.
John Woeste. Agriculture Collcce representative. suggested that the library be kept open for. study the full
time during the week. The closing hour at the main
library on week days is 9.:0 pm.
I'pnn the request of several married students concern-I- n
the rental price of the new Cooperstown apartment,
the Assembly voted lo try to fet an estimate from !'nlvef-sit- y
officials. Howard Dohrman. Joe Woesle, and John
Darsie are to investigate this matter.
The success of this afternoon's jam session will determine whether or not SGA will continue to sponsor them.

HIE WM

Vol. XLVH University of Kentucky,

taxington. Ky., Friday, April

TT

H
A

lb!
No. 22

1.1, 1!)."G

May Bay Parade
Slated Fof
May Day, an annual affair sponsored by Suky,
UK pep club, will be held Saturday. May 12. The
theme of this year's parade is perfumes.
All campus organizations are eligible to enter a
float in the parade competition. Sororities and
women's dorms may submit one candidate for May
Day Qneen.
The name of the candidate, title of the float, and
name and location of the warehouse must be turned
in to Mary Janet Bond, phone
no later than
April 17.
The sketches of the float, which are due April
27, are to be put in a sealed envelope and placed
on the desk at Jewell Hall and addressed to Sondra
Cowgill.
In case of duplicate float ideas, the first entry
will be accepted. Each organization is responsible
for obtaining a warehouse.
- An 8" x.10" pieture of the queen candidate, preferably black and white, must be taken to Boom 127
of the SUB sometime from
p.m. Friday, April 27.
Voting will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday, May 9 and 10. Votinj will be by
1- -5

JD cards. Each person has seven votes.
Final selection of a queen will be done by impartial judges on Friday, May 11.
No literature, pictures,
are to be used
during the campaign. There will be no campaign-in- ?
on the voting floor of the Si lt.
The purpose of the election is to pick a queen on
the basis of beauty and popularity.
Float decorations will be judgedon neatness,

originality, beauty; appropriateness to the title, and
to the May dance and durability.
Professional help will disqualify the float.
A meeting will be held at 5 pm. Tuesday. May3
in the SUB to clarify all rules and answer any
questions concerning May Day.
Suky will not be responsible for dissatisfaction on
the part of any organisation which dors not send
a representative to this meeting.
The coronation of the queen and the presentation
of her court will be at the May Day dance on Saturday night. May 12. The float trophies will be presented at the dance.

-5

.

n;

onstitntionalists
To Rnn Independents
,

Party, a sociation sprint election will be operation of our University through
party since its held early in May.)
SGA."
foundation, has opened its doors
Dan Woodward, Constitutionalist
He added. "We feel that this
to independents. In the past, in- Party president, said. "We of the move will not only strengthen BOA
dependent students on campus Constitutionalist Party feels that but will also offer a large number
have been represented solely by the present change will enable of Independent students the oppor
more students to expres.4 their tunity to gain valuable political
the United Students Party.
(The Student Government As- - views and to participate in the experience which they would other
wise not have the chance to ob
The Constitutionalist

sorority-fraternit-

y

I.

tain."

Faculty Aids
In Naming

President

I

The University faculty has
the procedure to be used in
selecting 10 UK representatives as
prospectie members of a committee to screen candidates for the
presidency of the University.
The ten names chosen will be
submitted to Gov. A. B. Chandler,
who will pick three from the list
to serve on the screening: commits
memtee. Three already-chose- n
bers from the Board of Trustees
are Dr. Ralph AnRelucci. Harper
Gatton, and Kobert P. Ilobson.
The plan calls for the 10 representatives to be named from the
teaching, research, extension, and
administrative .'tafl of the University. Two will be selected from
the College of Arts and Sciences,
two from the College of Agriculture and Heme Economics, including the Experiment Station and
the Extension Division.
Each cf the five other colleges
of the University will select one
prospective committee member.
This includes the colleges of education, law, pharmacy, commerce,
nd engineering.
The 10th member will be picked
(Continued on Pace C)
put-lin-

Don Ball. United Students Part7
president, said. "I'm very happy to
leurn that the Constitutionalists
have admitted independents. J I
think both parties Phould represent independents, as I'm one. ' I
think elections will be much better now. They won't be so one

sided."
Woodward said the Constitu
tionahsts will hold interviews for

ed

'party candid ites on Monday and
Tuesday, from 4;00 to 5:30 p.m. in
room L'OG of the SUB. Further interviews will be held on April 23
and 24.
t
Unofficial SGA vacancies to be
filled at the May election Include,
six in Arts and Sciences, two lit
Acriculture. two in Graduate
School, four in Engineering, thre
in Commerce, two in Education
and one in Law. (These figures
are unofficial, as apportionment
based on enrollment. An SCJA
election committee will meet next
week to determine Official repre
sentations from each college.)
-

j

,

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i

,A.

l
UK's Miss Universe

The Cosmopolitan Club is sponsorinr an International Dance in the SUB on April 21. The highlight of the event will be the crowning of "Miss
Universe of UK" who will be chosen by Jeff Chandler. Candidates are, first row (1. to r.) Betty Carol
Whallen, Gay Evans and Bum Joon Lee. Second

North Fast of the licit Line on Bypass 25

row, Edith It nssell. Nyla Harper, Bee Kelly and
Pat Grant. Third row, Pat Gray. Yvonne Eaton,
Lynn Graham, Fran Mehl, and Jody Short. The
Khythm Jacks will play for the event. Tickets are
5 J. 00 per couple, advance kale.

you thit column

tttry urek.

Dt'balp Mrets Entl
Debuting against such teams a?
Harvard. Princeton and Fordham,
the University Debate Team will
wind up its season in an invitational tournament with 24 other
teams at Xavler University today
and tomorrow.
James Dundon and Charles English are the only entrants in the
contest and will debate both sidcj
of the question

'

* Till: KENTUCKY KKKNEL, Friday, April

L

11.

19:r

Of the foreign languages. Ger
man is the mo.st like hngn.sn.
Transylvania is. the oldest coN
lege vest of the Alleghenies.
Miletus was the first Greek astronomer to predict a total eclipse
of the sun. in 585 B.C.
In South Africa, drunken driving can bring a $2,803 fine, 10 years
1 'lie selection
ol the 'T.ext Dtessecl Woman" unci the "Hest in the Jug, or both.
l
The starfish preys on oysters,
of the 10th
Dtrwil Man" on campus will le the li
pulling them open with Us tenSima Chi Stlc Show and licst Diesscd Contest to he held tacles and then turning Its own
stomach inside out to digest them.
at 7:.HO tonight in Memoii.t! Nail.
Glare has been called light out
In connection with the event KKO; Frances Mehl, ZTA; and
downtown merchants will sponsor Dolores Cohen, PSS.
of place.
a style show and will feature UK
jn the fraternity groups arc
students as models. The theme of ' Doyle Oliver. AOR; Robert Kel-thi."
year's show is "Americans In ium, ASP; Bill Oilliam. ATO;
nam Hughes. DTD; Glenn Adams,
Candidate for the Mrority dl-- ! Farm House; Henry Saufley, KA;
vision f the Best Dressed Contest David Craig. KS; O. C. Gartin Jr.,
are Eleanor Hun von. ADPi: JoycelLXA; Robert Lee. PDT; John Ball,
Ann Kane. AC.D: Carolvn East. PKT; Virgil Florence, PSK; Ed
CHURCH
AXiU; Jan White, Chi O; Shirley ward Eversole. P1KA; John Kirk- S. I. Goltrmonn,
Harris, DDD; Yvonne Eaton, DZ; ham, SAE; Ronald Hackett. SN;
Caroyn McClaln, KAT; Jane William Webb. SPE; Gus Collis,
potior
Rrandcnburg, KD; Nancy Saufley, TKE; Donald Cress, Triangle; and
Eo$t High at Park
George Specter, ZBT.
Divine Service 10:30 AM.
The "Read the Ads Contest," Bible
Clots & Sunday School ?;5 AAA.
calling for the correction of mis;
spelled words, w ill offer program
holders an opportunity to win one
of seven prizes.
,

1

Best Dressed Contest
Scheduled Tonight

V

4

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an-nua-

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.s

Wil-Parts-

SAINT JOHN'S
LUTHERAN y3

j

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I

At Ease, Cadets
Ilrautiful Susan Avril was chorn quern of the annual Military Ball
last Saturday night. Standing behind the pert miss are John Chen-aul- t.
Norma Jean Brandenburg (first attendant), Del Cannon, Betty-su- e
Gibson (second attendant), and Walter Currie.

Two Cadets
Are Awarded
Commissions

Two Year Budget
Set At $12,909,400
By MARNEV BEARD

FEIEE

Wilbur A. Steinhauser and Kenbudget of SI.'.HWJOO lor the University of Kentucky for neth R. Callahan, Army ROTC
next two fis(;il cais was ;iroetl by the (iener.il Assembly cadets, have been offered regular

A
1

1

io

List Friday.

amount, wliidi is ;i pail of ;i S."i 70.000,000
Ntatc budget apj)roed In the legislators, includes N(i,"0
and S(i, 101, 7(M for
located for the school year l!)."i(i-")I

ln

two-yea-

.

1,700

al-

accepted for regular commissions
to six, representing a 100 per cent
cal Science Building and related acceptance by the Department of
science structures, is to be dis- the Army of the University's
tributed over a four-yeperiod.
with $2,000,000 earmarked for the
year 1956-5- 7 and $3,000,000 annualTEXT BOOKS
ly for each of. the three succeeding
years.
SCHOOL SUPPLIES

7

President Herman L. Donovan
said that this was the first time
in 91 years of existence of UK that
the legislature had approved what
the University thought was an
adequate budget.
A - breakdown- - of the budget
hows that the Division of Colleges
w ill receive $4,868,700 for each of
the two years. Other allotments in- elude $708,000 yearly to the Agrl- cultural Experiment Station, with
a:i additional $100,000 in 1956-5- 7
for the purchase of dairy equip- n.ent, and $828,000 a year to the
Agricultural Extension Division.
This budget does not Include an
additional SI 1.000,000 to he appro- priated for construction of UK's
new Medical School. This money,
to be used for erection of a Medi- -

r

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Five Years Ago

II"

,

2-13-

ACROSS FROM SUB

By BILL IIAMMONS

(April 13. 1951)
The section of Euclid Avenue
between Rose and Lime Streets
was named Avenue of Champions
to honor UK's Sugar Bowl champion football teams and the NCAA
basketball champs.
At the alumni basketball banquet. Walt Ilirsch was presented
the Jerome Lederer rtophy award- ed to the player voted most val- uable by his teammates. Frank
Ramsey was given the A. B.
Chandler trophy for athletic abil- uy. leaaersnip, cnaracter, ana
scholarship.
Ten Years Ago
(April 12, 1948)
The Student Government Association was considering a point system to limit the number of extracurricular activities in which any
one student could participate.
Dr. M. M. White, then head of
the Department of Psychology,
gave these general reasons why
most students had difficulty at the
University : (1) Too many outside
interests; (2) Insufficient knowledge of English and Mathematics;
3) Too frequent trips home.

921 South Lime
6th and North Lime

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Army commissions. Col. Henry H.
Rogers, professor of Military Science and Tactics, said this week.
This brings the total of cadets

Watch for the Azure Blue formal
jacket shown in the Sigma Chi
stylo show tonight.

studs and cuil
Formal jewelry
links in smart new styles
3.50 to 5.00

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TMKKKNTITKY

KKKNKI.. Friday. April

1.1,

5

lor.r,

.1

Tribute Paid Three Deceased Professors

Tributes were paid to three former University professors who died
recently by members of the UK
faculty. The tributes were set
forth in death resolutions adopted
by the faculty last Monday.
The deceased professors who
ere honored were Dr. Grant
Cochran Knight. Distinguished
Trofessor of English; Dr. Joseph
W. Pryor, emeritus professor in
the Department of Anatomy and
Physiology; and Dr. Moses Edward Ligon, emeritus professor of
Education.
Dr. Grant C. Knight was born at
Willlamsport, Pa., on April 15,
1893. He died on March 15, 1956.
Dr. Knight began teaching at
the University almost 35 years ago.
lie rose in those years from instructor to professor, and in 1945,
became the first College of Arts
and Sciences "Distinguished Professor.
In 1948 he was one of seven faculty members to be designated officially by the Board of Trustees
as "Distinguished Professor of the
University."
Professor Knight was the author
of eight books: "Superlatives,

(1925); "Reading from the 'American Mercury'," (ed. 1926); "The
Novel In English," (1931); "American
Literature
and Culture,"
(1932); "James Lane Allen and the
(ienteel Tradition," (1935); "The
Se,aled Wall," (1943); "The Critical
Period in American Literature,"
(1951) ; and "The Strenuous Age in
American Literature," (1954).
The last two volumes were criti0
cal studies of the years
respectively, and
and
were the first volumes of a trilogy
to cover the years
Dr.
finKnight was about
ished with the last volume of the
three at the time of his death.
In addition. Professor Knight
also wrote a large number of articles in "The Dictionary of American Biography," and in encyclopedias and magazines.
Dr. Joseph W. Pryor was born in
Palmyra, Mo.. April 3. 1856. He
died on March 17, 1956. less than
three weeks from his 100th birthday.
Dr. Pryor received his M.D. degree from the University of Missouri in 1876, and in 1882 moved to
Lexington to engage in the prac- 1890-190-

1900-191-

0,

1890-192- 0.

two-thir-

ds

A

I

Heidi-ho- !

1

x

$14.95

J

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w

VI

I

tire of general medicine and surgery.

In 1885 Dr. Pryor became the
medical examiner of State College,
now the. University of Kentucky.
In 1890 he was oppointed to the
headship and became the founder
of the Department of Anatomy
and Physiology. In 1894 Dr. Pryor
organized in the College of Arts
and Sciences one of the first
curricula in the country.
The present Pryor
Society of the University was organized by Dr. Pryor in 1915. It
was known then as the
Society. The Society was named
in his honor after Dr. Pryor was
placed on special assignment by
the University.
Dr. Pryor was recognized as an
international authority on anatomy. In 1927, he spoke before the
Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland in London, England. In the same year he read a
paper at the Ecole de Medicine in
Paris, France. His work in anatomy became a classical reference
in Gray's "Anatomy" and in all
major textbooks. In his 91st year,
Dr. Pryor was the author of a publication dealing with the true zygotic relationships in the Badgett
quadruplets.
Dr. Pryor was listed in "Who's
Who in America," "Who's Who in
American Medicine." "Who's Who
of American Authors," "Who's Who
Among Physicians and Surgeons,"
"The International Directory of
Anthropologists," and "American
Men of Science." He was the first
vice president of the Kentucky
State Medical Society and the
Honorary Grand President of
Omega Beta Pi.
He was a member of many associations, among them the American Association of Anatomists, the
American Association of Anthropologists, the American Association
of Roentgenologists and the American Medical Association.
Dr. Moses Edward Ligon was
born at Owenton. Ky., April 15.
1877. He died March 27, 1956.
Professor Ligon received his A.B.
degree from Georgetown College in
1905, and his M.A. from the Uni
pre-medi-

Pre-medic-

cal

al

Pre-medic-

al

versity of Chicago in 1927. lie wa
awarded an honorary I.L.I), from
Georgetown in 1933.
Dr. Ligon began his career as
supervising principal in the Philippine Islands in 1905. In 1908 he
became elementary school princl- pal in Paducah. From there he
went to Owensboro in 1910 w here
he was a hiah school teacher and
in 1913 he became a high school
principal in Lexington. In 1919 he
was named Superintendent of
Schools In Henderson and in 1921
he became high school principal
at Ashland.
In 1924. Dr. Ligon became a
member of the University faculty
as a professor of education, a position he maintained until his
death.

n

i

i

Dr. Ligon
member , of the
Kentucky Educational
,
the National Educational A
the Southern AtMMiatlon of
Colleges and Secondary Schools,'
the National Council of Social
Studies, the Department of Secondary School Principals, the National Society for the Study of
Education, the National Society of
College Teachers of Education, the
National Institutional Teacher
Placement Association, the Kentucky High School Athletic Association, and the I.etlngton Hoard
of Education.
He was a member of Phi Delta
Kappa and Kappa Delta Pi honorary fraternities and was listed in
"Who's Who in Kentucky" and
"Leaders in Education." U932.
AwM-Ution-

ix-lotion-

MxSfafciani
(Author of ' Dartfoet Doy With Chttk," tie.)

MONEY ISN'T EVERYTHING
I have asked the makers of Philip Morris an enterprising
and aggressive group of men; yet at the same time warm and
lovable; though not without acumen, perspicacity, and drive;
which docs not, however, mask their essential greathcartcdncss;
a quality evident to all who have ever enjoyed the beneficence and
gentleness of their wares; I refer, of course, to Philip Morris
Cigarettes, a smoke fashioned with such loving care and tendered with such kind regard that these old eyes grow misty when .
I think upon it I have asked, I say, the makers of Philip Morris
that aggregate of shrewd but kindly tobacconists, that covey
of enlightened Merry Andrews, that cluster of good souls bound
together by the profit motive and an unflagging determination
to provide all America with a cigarette forever gentle and
eternally pleasing I have asked, I say, the makers of Philip
Morris whether I might use today's column to akc up the
controversial question: Should a coed share expenses on a date?
"Yes," said the makers simply. We all embraced then and
squeezed each other and exchanged brave smiles, and if our
eyes were a trifle moist, who can blame us?

-

To the topic then: Should a

coed share expenses on a. date? I

think I can best answer the question by citing the following

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T'X-- -'

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Navy,

c
Our gay little
makes sumdress that
mer so much fun.
ric-ra-

1
1

Red or Yellow

Cotton Print.
Sizes

5.

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2

and

3L xxrm

Faculty Aids

i

5

(Continued from Page 1)
from an administrative group
which includes the registrar's office, library services, comptroller's
office, and the College of Adult
and Extension Education.
Each college will decide the
method of electing its own representative, and will do so independently of the other colleges.
As a prospective member is chosen,
his name will be submitted to
Governor Chandler by Dr. Robert
L. Mills, registrar, and the faculty
secretary.
Although no deadline was set
for submitting nominations, it was
estimated by
Frank
D. Peterson that all colleges will
have selected their representatives
by April 16.
Peterson, who will serve as secretary of the screening committee,
said this would be necessary as the
committee wants to start work as
soon as possible on the screening
5
of some
expected presidential
possibilities.
Vice-Preside-

icecLCe

On The Esplanade

typical case:
Poseidon Nebenzal, a student at Oklahoma A and M, majoring
in hides and tallow, fell wildly in love with Mary Ellen Flange,
a flax weevil major at the same school. His love, he had reason
to believe from Mary Ellen's sidelong glances and maidenly-blusheswas not entirely unrequited, and by and by he mustered
,

nt

50-7-

if love MStotcntiftiv Unrt&uitcd
question: "Will

up enough courage to ask her the
you wear my

-

pin?"

"Yes," she said simply. They embraced then and squeezed
each other and exchanged brave smiles, and if their eyes were
a trifle moist, who can blame them?
For a time things went swimmingly. Then a cloud appeared.
Mary Ellen, it seems, was a rich girl and accustomed to costly
pleasures. Poseidon was bone-poand he quickly ran out of
money; Unable to take Mary Ellen to the posh places she fancied
or

n

Drive To The ParUettc

For Goodness Sake
Nothing Tops Our

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and too proud to tell her the reason, he turned surly and full of
melancholy. Senseless, violent quarreli developed. Soon it appeared that the romance, so promising at the beginning, was
headed for a breakup, but at the last moment, Poseidon managed to blurt out the truth.

"Oh, beloved agrarian!" cried Mary Ellen, grappling him
close. "Oh, proud husbandman! Oh, foolish reaper! Why have
you not told me before? I have plenty of money, and 1 will contribute according to my ability."
Poseidon, of course, protested, but she finally persuaded him
of the wisdom of her course. From then on they split all expenses according to their incomes. Rather than embarrass
Poseidon by handing him money in public, a joint bank account
was set up to allow him to write checks. Jnto this account each
week they faithfully deposited their respective allowances ii3
cents from Poseidon; $2300 from Mary Ellen.
And it worked fine! Gone was all the arguing and bickering.

They were happy truly happy! And what's more, when they
graduated they had a nice little nest egg eight million dollars
with which to furnish a lovely apartment in Lubbock, Texas,
where today they operate the local laundromat.
So you see? You too can salvage your failing romance if you
will only adopt a healthy, sensible attitude toward money.

-

-

. Mil Sl.u!u.n.

1

'

1

Lucre i$ no obstacle uhen it tome$ to Philip Morris. Popular price
$ gentle (igarettet uhose maker $ bring

$lill prrtail for thitt America.'
you this column every ueek,

.

* THE KENTUCKY KRNET,. ErH.iv. Anril 13. lO.'fi

4

SGA Revisited
Student Government Association reached
an

all-tim-

e

low last week wlien, for no ap-

parent reason, it delved into the pros and
cons of UK's establishing a medical school.
Whether members of SGA approved
(which they finally ended up doing) or disapproved (which one member urged the
body to do) is completely irrelevant. The
Medical School has alrcnidy been authorized,
and surely no assembly member actually believed that SGA's whims would make the
Kentucky legislature reconsider.
Spending time debating on a topic like
the Medical School is as foolish for SGA
to do as it would be to hold sessions on how
it could solve the Communist problem. SGA
is loaded with its own uncompleted work-y- et
it still tries to solve problems out of its
own sphere of influence.
Instead of the Medical School issue, whv
didn't SGA tackle its own problems?
The Public delations Committee (which
is fast becoming a committee in name only)
surely has done nothing to increase student
interest in SGA. There was, at one time,

grandoise schemes to hold forums and suggestion boxes. This worthwhile project also
died an early death.
And then there was the promise of providing speakers and lectures for the nexy voters
at UK. SGA was fired with the idea last
semester. Hut again there remains nothing
but the empty talk.
The Planning Committee produced a number of workable projects and problems, but
has failed to see them carried through to
completion.
Section committee seems
The Suky-Car- d
to have washed its hands of the problem,
which is by no means solved. Many other
committees also exist only on the record

planjotheLcadership Cabinet for
financing an enlurgcclcholarship program
at the University.
Dave Noxes and Jim Iisher told the ( ji 1)1"
net about the "Little )00 Mile" bicycle race
at the University of Indiana. Last year Inch-annetted $12,000 admission receipts from
the race and- a dance following the race.
Since the race's inception five years ago it
a

-

has made over .S 10,000. All the money has
been given to scholarships.
Iisher and Noxes suggested that a similar
race be held at the University. The Cabinet
agreed to start preliminary work on the
project with the idea of staging the first race
a year from this spring.
The plan has considerable merit. More
undergraduate scholarships should be gixen,
particularly considering Kentucky's unstable
agricultural and mining economy. A sudden
slump in farm or coal prices can bar many
qualified students from attending college.
The University has another handicap as
far as scholarships are concerned. State law
prohibits UK granting scholarships directly
from its funds. All scholarships to the University come either. from private trust funds,
cor)orations, or campus organizations. Worthy as these scholarships may be, they are
entirely inadequate. The University needs

-

.

"P.
I

k'i

E'i

3,000.000

CAVDIF
POWER LIciHTCTIIRW

TAKE A

I

'SI.

I

VOQYXr'

nT Jn L!rKAYTI
Tw
J

planned agenda, and then see that action is
performed. Students are becoming tired of
orators and petty parliamenthe
tarians who are wasting SGA's time doing
nothing.
arm-cha-

ir

Idiot Profs
be drawn.

Besides financing scholarships, the bicycle
race idea is designed to promote better alumni relations and oiler a good time for the
students. Alumni will be encouraged to return to the Unixersity for the race. In ellect
it will be a spring homecoming, finally, students will be gixen one grand and glorious
weekend. Generous pries will be awarded
to the winners of the race, which, incideutal-lx- .
xvill be open to any campus organiation,
and a name band xvill he imported for the
dance.
If the rate is held it xvill fill a big gap in
the student's spring social lile. At present
there is no major. Unixersitx social exent in
the spring.
Admittedly, the plan is ambitious and as
such it has one main drawback student
apathy. II it is to succeed the students must
be vvholeheai tedlx behind it. A conceited
program must be initiated to secure student

backing.

operating campus organiation
should be resruited to work on the project
and a publicity campaign should be mapped
out and started at the first of next xear.
An idea as big as this should be carried
out in a big way. If it is, it xvill greatly beneEvery

4

fit the campus.

The Kentucky Kernel
Entered at the Post Office at Lexington, Kentucky, ai
second class matter under the Act of March 3, 1879
Published weekly during school except holidays
and ex ami
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$1.00 per leraeater

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Editor

Bill Billiter

Associate Editor

Kay Hornback
Yvonne Eaton
Tommy Preston
Ellis Easterly
Christie Vandergrilt
Ann Abernathy
Ted Simmons
Bill Hughes
Dave Nakdimen

Managing Editor
News Editor
Sports Editor
Feature Editor
Society Editor
Exchange Editor
Photographer
Cartoonist
Cartoonist

PpoiU Writers
Henry, Robert White. Bo Criffin, Mjmey Beard
Kernel Kcporters
PegRV Joyce Adams, Marvin D. Tteird, Elizabeth
Chang. Paul Clay Daniel. Frances CJ. Pdnev. Robert T.
IV Griffin. Ciravson
Enduott. Orpha CJosser,
Harriet HaUhell. Martha Kueblor, Dayton Matluk.
Ovorne M. Mayerthak, Philip Mclnloh. Jolin R. Mitchell.
Ann Monarch. Moira CJunm, VURuiia SnodKiuss. David
Stewart, John Strachan. Walter Setnum, Jerrv Vance.
Donald A. Wallace. Kobeit White, Thamas White, and
Nancy Wilder.
BU

IeU

tt-i't-

l

i

A

l

,

IV- -

ae-'s-

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is

happening to higher education

Back Talk

The best way to make and keep a friendship is by learning how to say and repeat
often, "You're right!"

Jim Crawford

Muting a habitual cough, the professor enters the classroom.
He is petrified; chiefly because he knows that over half of
the class has a higher 1 than he does. The prof is being paid
to make the students fear and respect him, yet he knows less
about the subject tlian does the village idiot down on t