xt7w0v89kn3s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w0v89kn3s/data/mets.xml South Carolina Federal Writers' Project. South Carolina 1938 Other contributors include: South Carolina State Department of Education; 5 pages: leaf, 81 pages of illustrations, 20 cm; Includes Bibliography; UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program libraries; Call number F272 .F45 books English Not published This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed in accordance with U. S. copyright laws. South Carolina Works Progress Administration Publications Palmetto Pioneers, Six Stories of Early South Carolinians text Palmetto Pioneers, Six Stories of Early South Carolinians 1938 1938 2015 true xt7w0v89kn3s section xt7w0v89kn3s . VV
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I SIX STORIES OF
I EARLY SOUTH CAROLINIANS
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  Camp//rz/, Lirfj//C/I {1m/ 1//I/J'//'/I/{YZ,
By
FEDERAL WR1TERS’ PROIECT
4 WORKS PROGRESS Am11N1STRAT10N
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TI-IE DIVISION OF ADULT EDUCATION
STATE DEPARTMENT OI·` EDUCATION
SOUTH CAROLINA
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FOREVVORD
j  ‘ PALMETTo PIONEERS is one of the publications A
i j written by members of the Federal ¥Vriters’ Proj- ·
ect of the Works Progress Administration. De-
signed primarily to give useful employment to
*‘ . needy unemployed writers and research workers, i
`A this project has utilized their experience and abil-
i ities in the preparation for the American people
of a portrait of America—its history, folklore, A
, scenery, cultural backgrounds, social and economic ,
trends, and racial factors. j
*-  Maiiy books and brochures are being written for ;
` the American Guide Series. As they appear in in- A
creasing numbers we hope the public will come to i
appreciate more fully not only the unusual scope  
‘ of this undertaking, but also the devotion shown  
by the workers—from the humblest field worker
to the most accomplished editor engaged in the  
Hnal critical revision of the manuscript. The Ped- i
eral VVriters’ Project, directed nationally by
Henry G. Alsberg, is a part of the Division of
VVomen’s and Professional Projects headed by
Ellen S. VVoodward, Assistant VVorks Progress
l Administrator. _
_i HARRY L. HOI‘KINS
/lzlzxz/¢zi_v!1·zz/or
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8

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PREFACE F
. South Carolina is a comfortable State in which
to live. It is a State full of cities and towns, i
churches and schools, farms and mills, paved high—
ways, electric lights and other conveniences.
Life in South Carolina, however, was not always
this way. The Hrst settlers found forests covering
the land. Rivers were the only highways. Indians
and wild animals roamed everywhere. The settlers
had to cut down the trees for logs to build their j
homes. Fields had to be cleared and crops planted. ?
Food and tools had to be brought from England. i
The settlers had to be brave in those days. .
VVomen as well as men were in constant danger.  
l They had to have courage even to start on the long  
and uncertain trip across the Atlantic Ocean. Of
the trip which brought the first permanent Eng- .
lish settlers to South Carolina, Williain Gilmore l
T Simms, in his "History of South Carolina," says,
T “the voyage of these three ships . . . was
,  one of the most terrible in history.” He spoke
truly, for the journey occupied nine long months
filled with unceasing peril.
_ Unless we are reminded, we are apt to forget i
the price paid for the colony (state) by its early
settlers, those men and women who first built
homes and churches in the wild, dangerous forests.

 In order to understand their staunch spirit in be—
ginning at new life in at new world, this little book
tells the stories of at few of the pioneers who laid
the foundations for the present South Carolina.
Mz\BEL MoNTooMERY,
State Director
Federal T/Vrilers’ Project.  

 TABLE OF CONTENTS
_ PAGE
Foreword
Preface
jean Ribaut, champion of freedom and truth I
Joseph VVest, an early leader .............· 14
How Tuscarora ]ack got his name .......... 26
Colonel Rhett and the Pirates ............. 35
i Jean Louis Gibert, a pastor of the desert .... 47
Attakullakulla, an Indian who was a friend. . 60
Appendix .............................. 72
Bibliography ......................... 77
r

 
 P
I LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS ‘
L PAGE i
Cover Design. Six Historical Events.
jean Ribaut and his men, watched by the
L Indians, thanking God for a safe trip- · 2
" Charlesfort l\/Ionument .................. 13
A storm-tossed ship ...................... 15
Settlers from England building their homes
near the present Charleston in 1670 .... 17
Year after year the ships sail away to America 27
L john Barnwell making peace with the Tus-
    ............. . . . . .....  
The pirates spoke back with a blast of shot 42
1 The pirate captain drew his pistol and turned
On his {heh ......................... 45
I Pastor Gibert holding service at night in a
forest in France ..................... 50
Silkworms which the Huguenots at New
Bordeaux raised for the making of silk 57
i “VVe are all the children of one father, who
is the great King,” said the Indian chief
{O King Gegrge ..................... 65
, Indian emblems-—the peace pipe and the
tghqghglwk ......................... 71

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  1

 r
JEAN RIBAUT A
1. Champion of Freaazfom and Tru!/1
Four hundred years ago a brave but unhappy
man lived in France. His name was Jean Ribaut
` (Reebo). Jean Ribaut loved three things above
all others. He loved his country, France, he loved
his church, the Protestant (called Huguenot, in
France), he loved his work, the Navy. '
The Catholics did not like the Huguenots. The .
y Catholics persecuted the Huguenots and would not E
L let them worship God as they wished. A
“Let’s go to America," said the Huguenots. I
"There we can worship God as we wish."  
i King Charles IX of France gave them permis—  
sion to leave France and Captain Jean Ribaut was g
placed in command of the group.  
Two Sums SET SAIL
l On February 15, 1562, Jean Ribaut and one
hundred and fifty Huguenots set sail in two ships.
When Columbus came to America seventy years
_ before, he crossed the ocean in a roundabout way ’
and stopped at certain islands. But Jean Ribaut J
sailed straight across the Atlantic Ocean. Two
l I l

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PALMETTO PIONIEERS 3
I months and three days after leaving France, he _
sighted the coast of Florida. _
5 jean Ribaut and his men went ashore. The first
thing they did was to kneel down and thank God
for bringing them safely across the ocean. The In-
  dians, who had never seen white men before, came
down to the beach and watched them. VVhen
Ribaut arose from his knees, he pointed upward to
show the Indians that he and his men had wor-
shipped God. The Indian chief nodded and pointed
two fingers upward. By this the chief meant that
he and his tribe worshipped two gods—the sun and
l the moon. Ribaut made friends with the Indians
by giving them presents. The presents were knives,
hatchets, beads and bright colored cloth. In return,
A the Indians brought the white men such gifts as
baskets, pearls, furs (skins) and silver.
A HARBoR is Discovnnnp
, Then jean Ribaut and his men returned to their
l ships.
l “We shall sail northward," said Ribaut. “Per-
haps we may hnd an even fairer land on which to
settle."
Sailing up the coast for several hundred miles,
they came to a large and beautiful harbor, which I
I Ribaut named Port Royal. He wrote of this harbor

 4 PALIVIETTO PIONIQERS  
in his report to France, "It is one of the greatest
and fairest havens of the world, where without j
danger all the ships of the world might be  
harbored."  
Ribaut visited several nearby islands. On one of  
them he set up a stone pillar, claiming the land  
for France. This island he found covered with  
forests which were as full of game as the waters l
were of Hsh, the Indians were friendly and help-  
ful. Ribaut decided to locate his colony there. The j
island he chose is now Parris Island, in Beaufort  
County, South Carolina. i ?
A Foivr is BUILT
jean Ribaut and his men built a small fort, .
which they named Charlesfort in honor of Charles,
their king. The little fort had a cannon for pro-
tection. Powder and food were stored within the .
fort. l
“Now," said Ribaut to his men, “I shall return y 4
to France where many of our Huguenot people I I
still suffer because of their religious faith. This ‘
new land has plenty of room for all of them. I
shall tell our people of this new country, the fine ,
harbor and our colony." I
“How long will you be gone?” asked the men.
I
\

 l) A L M lil T T O P I O N lil li R S S
"Only six months," Ribaut said. "You can get P
along without me for that long." _
_ pz "V\7ho will be in charge while you are away?”
r the men asked.
“I shall select a new captain," Ribaut said.
A   "VVho will stay while I return to France?”
  “l will stay while you are gone," answered one
Frenchman.
"And I," said another.
“And I," said the men, until twenty—eight had
agreed they would stay at Charlesfort.
° A RIl3ALT'1` T{ETURNS TO FRANCE
One June day, in 1562, the wind blew and filled
the white sails of Ribaut’s two ships. The blue
1 water of Port Royal danced in the sun. Palmettoes
Huttered their green fronds along the island. The
men lined the shore to see their leader off.
Ribaut leaned over the rail of his ship.
“Remember," he said in a loud voice so all
could hear, "I’ll be back in six months."
l Anchors were hauled and the two ships moved
away.
“Goodbye! ” Ribaut called to the group on
shore.
“Goodbye, Captain!" the men shouted. "God—
speed.”
E
l eeoeee s ,_, heir,

 li
X
6 PALMETTO PIONEERS  
The ships grew smaller and smaller. The sails  
became as small as kites against the sky. At last ii?
the ships were out of sight. Twenty—eight men  
were left on an island in a strange new country. e
HELPLESS IN PR1soN  
VVhen Jean Ribaut reached France, he found  
that many things had happened while he was away. V  
Wai· had broken out between the Catholics and the  
Huguenots. Ribaut at once began to fight for the l
Huguenots. Finally he had to Hee to England for  
his life. When he tried to leave England, he was i
arrested and put in prison. Day after day he sat in
jail, thinking of the men he had left across the ,
ocean. ri
"What are they eating?" he worried. “The food  
must have given out long ago. Indians may have  
killed them. Oh, that I were there instead of here 4
and helpless! ”
1
THE MEN Look Foiz A SAIL  
Jean Ribaut had every reason to worry about ¤
the men at Charlesfort. There was plenty of work €$
for them to do, but they did not work. First of all,  
they should have cleared the ground and planted ` l
a crop in order to have plenty of food. Instead, the  
men sat around and did nothing day after day.  
l
1
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i
  l’ALl\/[ETTO PIONEERS 7
  They l00ked t0ward the distant skyline 0ver which ·
7 the tw0 ships had disappeared and kept h0ping ·
Ribaut w0uld s00n return.
“D0 y0u see anything?" they w0uld ask each
g 0ther day after day.
,· "N0thing," they w0uld agree sadly.
Sometimes 0ne w0uld think he saw s0mething.
“A sail! A sail!” he w0uld yell.
“lt is 0nly a bird,” the 0thers w0uld sadly re-
I ply. “Only the white flash 0f a sea gull’s wing
= against the distant blue sky."
Y
TR0UBLE AT CHARLESFORT
-1 When pe0ple are idle, tr0uble starts. The men
  began t0 quarrel am0ng themselves. The captain
t wh0m Ribaut had left in charge was a hard mas—
, ter. He punished the men severely when they re-
  fused t0 0bey his 0rders. One 0f them, a drummer,
P he put t0 death. An0ther, named La Chere, wh0m
everyb0dy liked, he banished with0ut f00d t0 a
° distant island. The men became s0 angry when the
_°, captain sent La Chere away t0 starve, that they fel]
  up0n the captain and murdered him. Then they
  elected a new captain and br0ught the half—starved
ji La Chere back fr0m the distant island. ,
l l?`00d began t0 run low. At first the friendly
  Indians traded f00d in exchange f0r knives and

 8 PALIVIIEZTTO PIONICICRS  
hatchets and trinkets. But the Indians did not have  
much food, either. They, too, were lazy. They  
worked only when they had to work but they were  
not selfish with what they had. They gave the  
white men as much as they could spare. Once the  
men brought home food secured from the Indians f
but a fire burned to ashes both the food and the  
house in which it was kept. The Indians brought  
more food and helped the pioneers build another  
house. Still there was not enough to eat. The men  
were hungry and unhappy.  
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 , 18 PALIVIETTO PIONEERS , 
Proprietors. He held court and punished law—  
breakers. He kept men at work. He divided tools  
and supplies. He wrote reports to the Lords l 
Proprietors.  
_ Because West was fair and honest, because he  
was a hard worker, and because he was brave and y 
‘ wise, he became very popular with the men and l 
women who composed the colony. Governors  
changed from time to time, according to the wishes  
of the Lords Proprietors who appointed them, but i 
Joseph West remained in charge.  
V 
EVERY MAN AN EQUAL SHARE ` 
One of West’s Hrst jobs was the building of E
two houses in which to keep supplies. One house  
, held war supplies, the other held the general  
stores. Once a week VVest furnished the settlers  
with supplies and gave them an equal amount from  
the general store. To each three men West gave if
I nine pounds of dried beef and fourteen pounds of
either dried peas or oatmeal, or ten and three- _
. quarter pounds of bread. No man could have more °
than his share. i
i In all these things, joseph VVest tried to do  
what was best for the settlers. He also tried to ’,
please the Lords Proprietors in England, for the
land belonged to these eight men and their whole

 l
1
  I’.~\L1\/[ETTO PIONEERS 19
= idea in starting the colony was to make money for V
{ themselves. To the Lords Proprietors, the colony
'  was a business, or investment, into which each Pro—
prietor put a certain amount of money. Naturally, '
l the Proprietors wanted their money spent wisely
in order that profits would result.
The Lords Proprietors trusted VVest to spend
_ about $15,000.00 a year. He built forts, public
p buildings, roads and high fences around the settle-
l ment as protection. He bought new supplies for
l the Indian trade because this trade with the In- I
  dians was one of the main ways by which the new 1
  colony brought profits to the Proprietors. i
sj .
  Pizorrrs Exiiizccruo FROM FARMING  
i The Lords Proprietors hoped to make money  
through good farming. They wanted the settlers I
to raise ginger, indigo, grapes, olives and cotton.  
The Proprietors told VVest to try all sorts of crops
I on all sorts of land. In this way he could find out
  what crops would succeed in Carolina. The Pro—
  prietors were willing to pay, for the experiments
i would mean more money for them in the end.
, At first things did not turn out well for either
the settlers or the Proprietors. The supplies began {
to run low before the settlers could raise more.
The first crops failed for several reasons. Some of

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li
1 20 l’i—\Ll\/IETTO PIONEERS  
them needed a warmer climate than Carolina’s. A  
freeze the first October killed other crops. Part of I 
the seed was not good. A time came when all West  
had to give out was a pint of peas a day for each  
A man. Fish were in the streams and game in the l 
_ woods. The men, however, did not have time for i
hunting and fishing. They spent all their days  
clearing fields and building cabins. Cutting down  4:
tall trees and clearing large fields was not an easy  
job in a warm climate. No man could work hard P 
and keep happy on one pint of peas a day.  
West wrote the Lords Proprietors in England l
about his troubles. He told them his men were  
suffering from hunger and asked the Proprietors  
4 to send more food. He also told them that he ex-  
l pected the settlers to raise enough food crops for  
another year. _ 
 
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