xt7w6m334z7m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w6m334z7m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610210  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 10, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 10, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7w6m334z7m section xt7w6m334z7m Today's Weather:
Partly Cloudy And Cold;
Low 27
High

Editor Discusses
Voluntary KOTC;
Sec Page 4

TOJIRNIE-IUniversity of Kentucky

Vol. LI I, No. M)

LEXINGTON,

i

Official figures on the number of freshmen on probation have
not been released. Dr. Kenneth Harper. Interfraternlty Council
estimated that approximately 50 percent of the freshmen did
not make a 2.0 standing.
A (secretary in the Registrar's office said probation statistics may
be rendy by the first of next week.
Bill Sprague, IFC rush chairman, said the freshman grade situation wan a "big disappointment." He added that IFC would evaluate
the rushing system when rush ends next Tuesday.
Sprague raid about 150 men were initiated by the fraternities last
fall under the old rush system. He stated he was anxious to see how
many men are pledged under this new system since all pledges
can be initiated this spring.
If the number pledged exceeds the number initiated last fall
Sprague said he would consider the system successful.
An example of the hardship that many fraternities have been
placed under with the freshmen on probation is Alpha Gamma Rho.
Leroy McMullan, chapter president, reported that 65 percent of the
men they rushed last semester did not make their grades.
McMullan said the chapter was "rather disappointed," but will
just have to work harder. He said he favored a true deferred system
where there would be no rushing the first semester.
Under his plan rush would open the first of the spring semester
and continue for 30 days. After one month freshmen may then be
pledged. One advantage of this, McMullan pointed out, is that it
would be cheaper on the fraternities.
Phi SiRma Kappa rush chairman, Tom Berry, estimated that 50
percent of the men they were rushing failed to make the grade
requirement.
He said they were doing better than anticipated when they first
got the trades of the rushees. Berry said deferred rush was harder
financially and labor wise on the fraternities, but they did not have
to worry bout pledges' grades counting against the fraternity average.
Bailey Hale, a member of Sigma Nu, said that more than 50 percent of the men thry rushed did not make a 2.0 standing. He added
that his fraternity was "doing all right," but was having to work harder.
Philip Claudy, president of Triangle, said about 50 percent of
the freshmen in the College of Engineering did not make their grades.
He added, however, that his fraternity Is not having too much trouble
and generally were having good luck in rushing.
Bill Fortune, Phi Gamma Delta president, said about 30 to 40
percent of the men they were rushing failed to make a 2.0 standing.
he was not satisfied with the number of men his fraFortune
ternity had pledged thus far.
Jim Thomas, a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon's rush committee.
Continued on Page 8

$

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Kennedy seeks Medical I rogram

WASHINGTON, Feb. 9 (AP President Kennedy
today pressed fir enactment of a "freedom of
rlinlr?" moLTflm under which 14.2 million older men
and women would receive hospital, nursing and other
medicai care paid for by bigger social security taxes.
Sending his medical care for the aged pro- gram to Congress, Kennedy sought to neutralize one
major opposing argument by declaring "This
is not a program of socialized medicine."
"It is a program of prepayment of health costs
with absolute freedom of choice gauranteed," the
President said in a special message. "Every person
will choc.se his own doctor and hospital."

...

iI

v

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i

'-

-

7'- -

Shopping Spree

Sherry Cuzslrk, this week's Kernel Sweetheart, attempts a brave
mile as she prices books for the spring semester. Sherry, a freshman majoring in French, is from Ft. Campbell.

Cheerleader
Tryouls Set

Tryouts for fall semester cheer
leaders will be held at 7 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 13, through Thursday, Feb. 16, in the Euclid Avenue
classroom building.
Elections will be Monday, Feb. 20.
Men are especially needed and
asked to try out, according to
SuKY president Tom Harrington.
Regular cheerleaders will be at
the tryouts to teach the cheers.
The new cheerleaders will be
Introduced Feb. 27 during half-tim- e
cf the Kentucky-Aubur- n
basketball game.

Orders Job Inspections
i,
.

.

the scene and are investigating
the theft. No one has been apprehended yet.
Employees believed the thieve
to be students.
The telephone had rented on a
desk in the dining room and the
sugar containers on tables near
the entrance of the cafeteria.
Entrance to the cafeteria was
believed to have been gained by
prying loose a door at the northwest end of the dining room.
Head dietitian Martha Reynolds
said that, because of the theft,
students "will not be allowed the
privilege of using the dining room
telephone as they have in the.
past."

Illegal Pledging

Ed Thomas, chairman of the
IFC Judicial Committee, announced yesterday that any fraternity which illegally pledges
a freshman who did not make
a 2.0 standing would be subject
to a fine from $100 to $500 plus
other disciplinary action.

Passion Play Open ing
ScheduledForFeb. 23

The American version of the Oberammergau Fassion Flay,
which originated in Bavaria, Germany, in 1634, will be presented Feb. 23, 24, 25, and 26 in McAllister Auditorium at
Transylvania College
hv t hfl nhprommproQii trillorrora n

The drama originally scheduled
for January, is sponsored by the
University's YMCA to raise money
for a loan fund for foreign students. The scholarship fund, under
the direction of Dr. Kenneth
Harper, is operating at the present
time on $150 a year and has been
unable to get money from the state.
Manv of the foreign students
at I'K are in the United States on
student visas and federal law forbids them to hold jobs.
Twenty-fiv- e
scenes depicting incidents in the last seven days in
the life of Christ will be performed by a New York troupe
Congo Returned to Politicians
Feb. 9 (AP The of 40 professional actors who have
LEOPOLDVILLE. the Congo,
Congo's government was handed back to the poli- - been on tour for six years.
The first Passion Play was given
ticians today in a move to head off American overtures for a new deal with Patricia Lumumba.
President Joseph Kasavubu formally dismantled
the College of Commissioners the group of uniP.E. Cluh
versity graduates Installed by Gen. Joseph Mobutu
The women's Physical Educato run the country lust September and proclaimed
a provisional government of parliamentarians. It tion Club will have a special
will serve until Parliament can be summoned, but
meeting at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Women's Gym.
this may not be for some time.
There will be a panel discussNation's Economy Is Bleaker
ion on the proper ways to get
WASHINGTON, Feb. 9 (AP) Experts painted for jobs in physical education.
Congress today ft picture of even tougher months
ahead for the nation's economy. They predicted
things will get better later this year, but complete
recovery may not come before 19.62.
And there was applause for President Kennedy's
approach in trying to provide government
cures for the country's economic aches and pains,

... JFK
.

Thieves broke into Donovan
Cafeteria sometime
Wednesday night and took a
telephone and four sugar containers, employees at the cafeteria reported yesterday.
Campus police were called to
I Iall

p'y "'

Reds Charge Plane Shot

MOSCOW, Feb. 9 (AP The Soviet Union
charged tonight a French Jet fighter twice fired
on a Russian passenger plune carrying Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev across the Mediterranean for
an African visit.
Brezhnev, 54, was not Injured. He arrived on
schedule in Rabat, capital of Morocco.
(Rabat dispatches quoted M. Popov, a Soviet
foreign ministry press officer, as saying there was
no apparent damage to the plane and no one in
the party mentioned the attack. French spokesmen
in Paris and Algiers said they had no knowledge of
the incident.)
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko said
Brezhnev's plane was about 80 miles north of Algiers
over international waters of the Mediterranean when
a twin-Jfighter flew "dangerously close" three
times.

Telephone,
Sugar Jars
Are Stolen

Fraternity presidents and rush chairmen yesterday expressed varied opinions on the success achieved under the
deferred rush program since many of the freshmen did not
make the required 2.0 standing to pledge.
A survey of nine fraternities revealed that pledging is
being limited due to the failure of many freshmen to make
the required standing needed to pledge.

Iens Briefs

Eight Pages

.

High Freshman
Probation Rate
Limits PI edging

World

KY., FRIDAY, FEB. 10, 1961

gratitude to God for deiiVerance
from the effect of the Black
Plague which had stricken Europe.
In accordance with a vow made
by these people 327 years ago, the
play has been presented in Oberammergau every 10 years. Last
70O'0c0 'rom
PrU ol the
ded the play.
wor,d
Tickets to the play may be
purchased in advance at Graves
Cox, at the YMCA office in the
Student Union Building, or from
members of the YMCA or YWCA.
Admission to performances at 8
p.m. Feb. 23, 24, and 25 and at 3
p.m. Feb. 26 is $2.
Special student
performances
will be presented at 2 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 24 and at 10 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 25. Admission to the student
performances is $1.
Fred Strache, executive secretary
of the YMCA, said that any student or organization interested in
working with the play should contact him or Bob Wainscott, chairman of the steering committee, or
Sharon Chenault, who is in charge
of contacting church and Sunday
school groups.

27 Kentuckian Candidates
To Compete For Crown

.

rnounti
unenipioyment in big cities today prompt- ed p,.esident Kemiedy to order a series of
spot inspections of conditions in the hard hit areas.
The jobless picture was described as worse than
it has been in almost 20 years.
The Labor Department added 48 areas to its
list of communities having substantial labor surplus
or an idle rate exceeding 6 percent. More than
half the major industrial areas in the country, or
76 out of 159, are now so classified.

The 27 Kentuckian queen candidates are to meet at 6:30

in Memorial ilM for
instructions, according
P m' XckX
0 Hob Orndorf f, editor of the yearbook.
Orndorff said contestants may practice anytime today in Memorial;
Hall. The contest will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Four judges will narrow the list to five women from which the"
queen and her four attendants will be selected on the basis of ease
in conversation, grooming, grace, and manners,
Ann Martin is Chi Omega's candidate Instead of Jane Conell and
LaDonna Leavealle Is representing Kappa Delta Instead of Sue Ross
as was reported in yesterday's Kernel.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Friday, IYb. 10,

11

Brotherhood Dinner Set
For Feb. 23 In SUB

Placement Service Announces
Schedule For Job Interviews

The Placement Service has announced the following schedule of
Interviews for next week.
rb. 13 Republic Aviation: B.8.,
M.S., Ph.D. graduates in sciences
and engineering for aircraft or
missile fields.
Texaco. Domestic Producing Department: B.S. In commerce and
Jaw for scouting, leasing, and titles
work and related phases of land
end lease acquisitions.
Texaco, Research and Technical
chemical, electrical
Department:
engineering at all degree levels;
applied mathematics, geophysics,
chemistry, physics, mechanical and
physical engineering at M.S. and
it'll.!), levels; advanced degrees in
chemistry and mathematics.
VS. Naval Research Laboratory:
men and women in electrical, civil,
engimechanical,
metallurgical
neering; mathematics, physics, and
chemistry.
Feb. 14 Shell Chemical Company: chemists for analytical, experimental, pilot scale, research
find development laboratory work;
B.S. and M.S. levels In mechanical
and electrical engineering for de-- i
maintenance,
ign, construction,
and instrument
engineering at
t nemical manufacturing plants.
Shell Oil Company, Refining:
33. S. and M.S. levels in mechanical
and electrical engineering for
construction and maintenance, power plants and engine
chemistry at all degree
levels for research, development
and plant laboratories.
frhell Oil Company, Production
IDrpartment: B.S. and M.S. levels
in .mechanical, electrical, civil, and
chemical engineering for crude oil
and gas production and gas processing work.
Bailey Meter: engineering for
application, development, product,
project, research, sales and services.
Caterpillar Tractor: civil, electrical, mechanical engineering.
Commercial Solvents, chemistry,
chemical engineering at B.S. levels;
M.S., Ph.D. levels in chemistry for
production and research.
Southern Railway System
(Washington, D.C.) : electrical, mechanical engineering; (some summer opportunities for undergraduates in these fields).
VS. Naval Avionics Facility:

liFCtlll VjlVCIl

Tickets for the annual Brotherhood Dinner of the Lexington Chapter of the National Conference of Cliristians and Jews
are now on sale, according to Dr. Frank D. Peterson, University
vice president for business administration and chairman of
Brotherhood Week.
nominate persons for this award.
The dinner will be at 6 p.m. using official ballots which have

Feb. 23 in the Student Union appeared in the Lexington Herald
and Leader.
Building Ballroom.
Oeorge H. T. Kimble, head of
the Department of Geography at
Indiana University, will be the
principal speaker at the dinner.
1 1 a iwoion
A distinguished citizen of the
I mi)( v
1
community will be honored for his
NOW
or her contribution "to the cause
Gable's Lost and Best!
and
of human
understanding
brotherhood."
The public may

SUB Movie

For Courses

The movie, "Island in the
Sun," will be shown at 6 p.m.
Monday in the SL'B ballroom.
Sponsored by the recreation
committee, the film stars Harry
Betafonte, Joan Collins, James
Mason, and Joan Fontaine.

On Television

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UK is fulfilling its function ns
a protector of valuable hi.tlorical
items through its Kentucky Life
Museum at Waveland near Lex-- :
ington. The museum is open to
the public.

r"'

-- Dinners

GileluiroeiClift
SESWalbcfi

Luncheon

The

Th

aeronautical, architectural, chem- cy: aeronautical, civil, electrical,
ical, civil, electrical, industrial, me- mechanical engineering.
Hazcltine Corporation: men and
chanical, metallurgical engineerwomen In electrical, mechanical
ing.
5
Mead Corporation: engineering, physics.
Feb.
electrical
International Business Machines:
chemical, mechanical,
M.B.A.
candidates; men and women in applied sciengineering;
accounting majors who are In up- ences; M.B.A. candidates.
U.S. Bureau of Ships: architectper half of class.
Feb. 15 Baltimore City (Mary ural, civil, electrical, electronic.
land) Schools: teachers In all mechanical engineering; physical
sciences. Summer employment opfields.
for third year mechanCrosley Division, AVCO: electri- portunities
ical, electrical, electronic engineercal, mechanical engineering.
students and graduate stuing
Internal Revenue Service: ac- dents in these fields In headquarcounting; men In all fields inter- ters office In Washington, D.C.
ested in positions as revenue
agents.
1
Kentucky. Department of High- ways: civil engineering.
International Business Machines:
men In all fields Interested in
marketing; men and women with
background in sciences, mathematics, for systems service.
The University Extension Class
Well Surveying
Schlumberger
Program and the Department of
Corporation: electrical, mechaniMathematics and Astronomy will
cal engineering ; engineering
extension credit for two
give
physics.
classes currently being presented
Ashland Oil and Re on Continental
Feb. 6
Classroom, an
fining Company: chemical, civil, NDC television production
mecnanicai engineering;
electrical,
Tne course for undergraduates,
chemistry; men in all fields for -- probability and Statistics." will
sales and marketing. (No military offer tnree nours of extension
obligation).
credit and may be viewed at 6:30
I'nion Carbide Nuclear Com- - a.m. on Mondays. Wednesdays,
pany: chemical, civil, electrical, and Fridays over WLEX-TThe other course, "Teaching
mechanical,
engimetallurgical
neering; chemistry, mathematics, Probability and Statistics," will
oiler three hours of graduate exphysics, statistics.
Feb. 16 Bethlehem Steel: cer- tension credit and may be viewed
amic, civil, electrical, industrial. at 6:30 a.m. on. Tuesdays and
mechanical, metallurgical, mining Thursdays on WLEX-TStudents also may be admitted
engineering;
chemistry, nuclear
"to these courses for no credit upon
physics.
Martin Company: aeronautical, payment of a $2 registration fee.
civil, electrical, mechanical, nuclear A register is kept of all who
men and women in roll as non-crestudents,
Further information may be ob- physics at all degree levels.
Phillips Petroleum: mechanical tained by calling the Extension
electrical, chemical, civil engineer- - Class Office in Fiazee Hall.
ing; chemistry, physics at M.S. or ,
,
'
,f
"'
f
Ph.D. levels.
Rural Electrification Adminis- For the personal gift
(ration: business administration,'
accounting, economics.
.
Your
McDowell
Automation Center:
men interested in administrative
systems, marketing, and sales.
7
Feb.
Procter and Gamble
N. E. Corner of Main & Lime
(Sales): men in all fields InterPHONE
ested in sales.
Feb. 17 Federal Aviation Agen- -

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Slord. $3.00

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SaeratGofdan
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THIS FRIDAY
Music By

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Also Available For Parties

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smart graduates choose
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day!
Come in and select your
from our
pattern
collection of the finest

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Triday, Feb.

Tropical Pursuits Heading
Weekend Party Activities

Social Activities
Elections

Recently Wed

1

By KERNEL SOCIETY EDITORS

It's a new semester, and February, '61 comes only flnco
in the history of time, but there's still a weekend at the end
7.ETA TAU ALPHA
Carlene Lechner, Louisville, to
Polly Colgan, a Kappa Delta of every week.
John Keeton, a member of Farm
Theta and Kappa Sigma are pro
was recently from Louisville, to Don Berg, a
Karen Kramer
Everybody seems to be in the
House from Carrolton.
their dates with a quick
elected president of Zeta Tail Kappa Alpha from Louisville.
mood to "swing out'' again after viding tlme
,
niUmg through th(J
Alpha sorority.
a quiet vacation at home with trlp
Jane Hartenstein, an Alpha XI
calendar to April and Florida. At
elected were
Other
officers

Meetings
nsu

A progressive dinner will be held
Saturday, Feb. 11 for all Baptist
students on campus.
Those who wish to attend should
turn In their names at the Baptist
Student Union. The group will
leave from the BSU at 5:30 p.m.
Grace, Calvary, Porter Memorial,
and Immanucl churches are participating.
nil MU ALPHA
Phi Mu Alpha men's professional
music fraternity will meet at 5
pm., Monday, Feb. 13 In Room
6 of the SUB. All members must

Linda Lawrence, vice president
and rush chairman; Phillis Lilly,
recording secretary; Dottie Luns-for- d,
treasurer; Betty Lou Thome,
house president; Martha SchneidJanice Peterson,
er, secretary;
scholarship chairman.
Marilyn Swift, social chairman;
Gay-Elle- n
Eaton, activities chairman; Marjorie Farrant, ritual
chairman; Betty Stein, standards
chairman; Jeanette Caswell, music chairman;
Marilyn Staryzk,
magazine chairman, and Carolyn
r.
historian-reporteBooth,

DEMOCRATS
Jones was recently elected
president of the Young Democrats
SU PERSONNEL COMMITTEE
Club.
The Student Union personnel
Other officers elected were Bert
committee will meet at 4 pm.
Sharon
King, vice president;
Monday, Feb. 13. In Room 206 In Perkins, secretary; Marjorie Far-ran- t,
the Student Union.
treasurer, and Fred Gardner,
and Allan Todd, publicity chairSIB DANCING LESSONS
The free dancing lessons spon- men.
sored by the SUB social commitTAU KAPPA EPSII.ON
tee will be held at 6:30 beginning
Feb. 13. In the Social Room of the
Oordon Edward Bloom, electricStudent Union.
al engineering major from Columbus, Ohio, was recently elected
president of Tau Kappa Epsilon.
Other officers elected were Joe
Feeno, Erlanger, treasurer; Benny
A group Interested In the promotion of religious drama will Estes, Bagdad, secretary, and John
meet at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12. Norfleet, Lexington, rush chairIn the Game Room of the Central man.

attend.

YOUNG

Bill

Religious Drama
YWCA.
A plan of organization

will

be

presented. Miss Sondra Search,
director of YW activities on campus, with Rev. John King. Presbyterian minister to students at UK,
and Dr. Edwin Hansen, head of
the drama department at Transylvania, will lead a discussion on the
application of this type of drama
and specific plays.
Anyone Interested may attend.
The group Is Interracial and

ZETA BETA TAU
Myron Pass, a pharmacy major
from
Louisville, was recently
elected president of Zeta Beta
Tau.
Other officers elected were Steve
Hyman, Louisville, vice president;
Kenny Rosenberg, Louisville, treasurer; Tony Mann, Louisville, secretary, and Ira Kipnis, Valley
Stream, N. Y., historian.

Pin-Mat- es

,.

nu

mother and the TV. From Friday
Delta from Metuchen, N. J. to till
Monday UK students will be
Richard Krunkle, a Phi Sigma busy going places and doing things
-e- verything from ice skating for
Kappa from Louisville.
the cold at heart to swimming and
Florida parties for the daydream- ing spring watchers and waiters.
Tonight the Sigma Nus and the
Applications for Mortar Board
Slgs will return with their
should be made in the Office of dates to the old
haunt, Dance- the Dean of Women no later than
invading it en masse.
Feb. 18.
Saturday,
The FiJis will do a little toe- Those eligible for Mortar Board, testing of the water at the Camp- are bell House pool, and the Lambda
senior women's honorary,
second semester Junior and first Chis, equipped with pillows on the
semester senior girls, and those
head for the ice
with equal status on the acceler- skating ponds.
ated program, who have a cumuThe Phi Sigs are entertaining
lative standing of 3.0.
dates with a house party to- preparing them for the cold,
cruel world and tomorrow night's
skating party.
But, tomorrow night, ah yes,
The final match in the SUB eyes will twinkle and hearts will
chess tournament will be held at melt the Lambda Chis and Pi
3:30 p.m. Feb. 15 in . the "Y" Kaps are having Valentine parties
at home. Cecil Jones will provide
Lounge.
The match is between Gene the music for Cupid at the Lamb- Lewter, an Arts and Sciences da Chi house while Jim Dandy
freshman
from Louisville, and makes handy for the PiKA's.
The good brothers of Phi Delta
Steve Morgan, engineering Junior
from Alaska. John Runden, who
was eliminated earlier in the tournament, will help Judge the final
match.
The winner will receive an engraved gold trophy and the runner-up
a gold key chain.

hnilB- fhp Ph(
portcd a Jade beach and the EU
bow room just for the
ln fact ,t.s been rumored all ot
Ft Lauderdale may have been
transplanted. Proper dress is ber- muda shorU and beachcombers.
pa
The Kappa Slgs have gone
thenic too. Decorations for their
Florida dreamland have been sup-lan- d,
plied by Woody Woodbury, an
entertainer at the Bahama .Nite
Club ln Ft. Lauderdale,
Not given to frivolous dreaming-- ,
AGR and KA are sticking to the
business of the moment with rush
parties at their houses. Dates, of
course, are indispensable necessi-the- ir
ties, practical, and serve as pleas-nigant decorations,
The Fijis will be at home with
Dennis Campbell and the Empires
blowing magic sounds. The Phi
Taus will also be homey with the
Torques making the noise.
And, Holmes Hall is having a
dance party from 8 to 12 p.m. to- morrow sponsored by the Women's
Residence Council. Joe Mills and
Bob Miller will take care of the
entertainment for the occasion.

Mortar Board

Chess Tournament

5&jCapeCodder

Impress Your Date-T- ake
Her To . . .

Fresh Seafood

LA FLAME

301 SOUTHLAND

...

DRIVE
. AT THE UNDERPASS

.'.

RESTAURANT

For

Phone

941 Winchester Rd.

OPEN DAILY

"FINE FOODS, LOUNGE
AND DANCING

Carry-Ou-

t

Service

... 4 to 8 p.m.

Desserts Open Rush;
40 Women Participate
The nine sororities participating
In spring rush will issue written
invitations to rushees for the first
parties beginning Tuesday, Feb.
14. Previous plans had been to
notify rushees by telephone.
Approximately 40 women students have registered for the
spring rush. A 2.0 minimum standing for the last semester Is
required for eligibility in the program.
Two invitational contacts will
be permitted
under the spring
system. The first contact of all
sororities will be in the form of
desserts. Each sorority has designated one evening in which only
that group will be rushing. The
desserts will extend from Tuesday,
Feb. 14 to Sunday, Feb. 26.
The weekday parties w ill be held
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Those held

on Sunday will be from 2 to 3
p.m.
The second contact between
sororities and rushees will take
place between Feb. 27 and March
4 and may be in varied forms.
There will be no limit to the number of functions a sorority may
plan during this week but each
rushee may only be invited back
once.
Sororities will submit preference
lists by noon March 6. Rushees
will be contacted by the Office of
the Dean of Women and asked to
sign preference cards March 8.
Miss Patricia Patterson, assistant dean of women, explained that
the present system was chosen to
prevent rush from being too time
consuming. She expressed confidence in its success.
Chi Omega sorority, whose quota
had been filled in the fall, will not
participate in this spring rush.

'

4

f

v

Miss Carolyn Reed

R

Embry's advisory board
member from Chi Omega

calls the girls at the
house to tell them about
Glen of Michigan's
corduroy skirt, 12.98, the
Compass shirt, 10.98;
and the mohair cardigan,
25.00.

urn

it

rfifT'i

Are You Planning?

DANCE
DINNER
PARTY
JAM SESSION
BANQUET
Why Not Try the Smartest Place In Town?

CONGRESS INN
1700 N. BROADWAY
See

or call Dick Wallace at

for Information and Reservations

.

L

* The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

Bob Anderson, Editor

Newton Spencer, Sports Editor
Managing Editor
Hohhif. Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Lew King, Advertising Manager
Society Editors
Nicky 1'ope, Circulation
Skip Tavi.or and Jim Channon, Cartoonists

Beverly Cardwf.ll and Toni Lennos,
Perry Ashley, Business Manager

FRIDAY

Are We Really Behind?

Kentucky

Serond-clnpostage pnid it Lexington, Kentucky.
Published four timet a week during the regular trhnol year except during holiday! and Kami.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Mike Wenninger,

The Missile Race

NEWS STAFF

Rex Bailey, Sews Editor

Sue McCauley, Associate
John Fitzwater, Sports

Ry J. M. ROBERTS
Asmh iatctl Press News Analyst

The people of the United States
have been told so many times alnnit
the state of their military defense that
they don't know what to believe.
They have been told that this is
the world's greatest power, that it
is a second-ratnation, and a lot of
stuff in between.
"Missile gap" is a phrase which
had almost come to be accepted as
an established fact. President Eisenhower always said it wasn't exactly
true, despite the Soviet Union's lead
in rocket motors. Candidate Kennedy
and President Kennedy stuck to the
gloomier side.
But now the Pentagon is more
inclined to agree with Eisenhower.
Kennedy's own Pentagon team says
there's no gap now.
There has been a
indication, based primarily on tin;
number and variety of space shots,
that the United States has a fundamentally broader program, embracing a greater number of space capabilities, which lays a lxtter foundation for precision production.
The recent successful testing of a
solid fuel missile was an important
step forward for the United States
in the purely military uses of rockets.
The arrival of the Minuteman may
e

Voluntary ROTC Works

Foe several years the Kernel has
belabored the compulsory Reserve
Officers Training Corps program at
the University. Why do we do this,
many have asked us. What business
is it of ours, they want to know.
Our reply is a simple one forced
service in military units, except during emergencies, is contrary to the
principles of individual liberty which
are the cornerstones of the democratic
foundation of the United States.
Moreover, the University's responsibility is to educate Kentuckians, not
to turn out masses of soldiers for
the federal government.
In recent years, compulsory
ROTC has been abolished at several
colleges and universities, including
several land grant schools, and has
been replaced by voluntary programs.
The armed services, especially the
Army, oppose this move because they
say that compulsory basic ROTC is
necessary to assure an adequate supply of reserve officers. Many school
administrations are also giving this
reason for their unwillingness to make
basic ROTC voluntary. Such reasoning is due mainly to the propaganda
efforts of the Army, which says it
has a far greater need of ROTC
graduates than do the other services.
For example, former Army Secretary Brucker has said the Army
cannot get the 14,000 officers it needs
by 1965 unless compulsory ROTC is
kept an integral part of college
His statement is contradicted,
however, by one made not long ago
by Charles Finucane, then assistant
secretary of defense.
Finucane said that with the expected doubling of college enrollments during the next decade, continuation of compulsory basic ROTC
would lead to an Army enrollment
of approximately 300,000. He said this
"would result in 178,000 in excess of
requirements." The secretary continued, "We (the Defense Department) have found it advisable to
adopt a policy of 'freedom of choice,'
leaving the decision entirely up to
the institution."
As for the Air Force, although
some officers are opposing voluntary
ROTC, the service as a whole is planning to ak its advisory committee
to recommend that AFROTC be put
on a voluntary basis. Air Force Col.
William C. Lindley has said, "There
is no doubt that the AFROTC program is overextended. We have units
in 175 schools and subuuits in 15
others. Accordingly, we have a freshman enrollment in Air Science I of
more than 60,000 boys each September. Four years later we commission from 3,500 to 4,000 of them as
second lieutenants. The loss and the
cost are great to ljoth the institution and the Air Force."
Proof of the wisdom of the Defense Department's policy was shown
last semester when the University of
Wisconsin made its ROTC program
voluntary on a trial basis. Wisconsin
curric-ulum-

Army, Air Force, and Navy
ROTC. The Army unit acquired more
than enough freshman volunteers