xt7w9g5gc11h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w9g5gc11h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19230302  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  2, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  2, 1923 1923 2012 true xt7w9g5gc11h section xt7w9g5gc11h The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
VOL. XIII

LEXINGTON, KY MARCH

FIRST YEAR MEN SWAMP

WILDCAT

TENNESSEE

SEASON

IN 2ND

FRESHMEN

TIUJF

SEASON

INDIVIDUAL

KITTENS CLOSE SEASON

DECISIVE

WITH VANDERBILT TEAM

VICTORY OVER SEWANEE

HERE

Blue and White Team Has Easy
Time Disposing of Tigers,

Fast Passing Game of Kittens
Too Much for Southern
Quintet.
NO

No. 20

ENDS

QUINTET
WITH

2, 1923

Green and White Squad Can Add
Southern Basketball Title to
Triumphs by Winning

30

FEST,

STARS.

to

14.

BURNHAM

TOMORROW NIGHT

SHINE.

QUINTET IN FINE SHAPE

Rats Make Only One Field Goal
During Entire
Fray

Game Ends Basketball Careers
of Three Kentucky Players
Wreckin' Crew Goes in.

Largest Crowd of Season Expected to See Final Contest

Fur flew in all directions last Saturday night in the University of Kentucky gymnasium when the Kentucky
Kittens met and defeat the Tennessee
Rats, 42-- 7 in a game featured by the
passing of the Kentucky team. The
Tennessee yearlings had been defeated earlier in the season by the Kittens
and Saturday's contest only went to
prove still farther that the Rats are
not in the running with the Kentucky
basketmen.
Tennessee got off to a lead over the
Kittens when Goodman converted
two fouls into counters, aitid the Kittens failed to score for several minutes after the first whistle sounded.
Captain McFarland broke the spell,
however, with a sensational basket.
Kentucky again scored and from that
time on the Kittens steadily drew
away from the Tennessee yearlings.
Tennessee scored but one field goal
during the entire game, 'that coming
about the middle of the first half when
Goodman, who scored all of the points
made by the Rats, dropped in a 'long
range shot from midfloor. The rest
of the Tennessee points were made
by the free thr,ow route.
Kentucky
played a fast passing
game throughout the whole of the 40
minutes and never attempted to shoot
until the 'ball had been worked under
the basket They could have had
many more shots had they not presented most wonderful passing
on Page five)

The Wildcats closed their 1923 net
season last Friday night with a 30 to
14 victory over the Sewanee quintet.
Jumping into the lead a few .minutes
after the opening whistle, the Cats
maintained their advantage throughout the entire game and held a
margin of victory at the close
of the contest.

The University of Kentucky freshman basketeers will play their last
game as Kittens Saturday night when
they
strong yearling
meet
the
squad from Vandenbilt.
"Daddy"
Boles, who has coached the Kittens
for the past month, has sent his team
at furious clip the last week so that
the Green and White Freshmen will
wind up the season with a perfect record. The Southern basketball title
for freshmen teams falls to the Kittens if they defeat the Commodore
yearlings.
The Freshman mentor will send in
his strongest lineup.
Captain McFarland will hold down his usual
berth at forward
with "Turkey"
Hughes filling the other forward position. Will Milward or Underwood
will star in the pivot position and
Carey and Helm will be back at their
regular guarding stations.
Carey's injury which has completely
mended now, slowed him down in
the Tennessee game, but the reliable
backguard will be at his best Saturday.
Carey's inability to start in the
Rat game told on the team and the
Kittens did not get to scoring until
he and "Turkey" Hughes were put in
at their regular stations.
The style of playing that has been
shown by the Green and White
squad has attracted larger crowds
than the varsity tilts, and it is expected that the largest crowd in history will be on hand Saturday night
to watch the team.
Those who watched the Blue Devils

PHI MU ALPHA PLEDGING
SERVICE HELD IN CHAPEL
Musical Program is Followed by
Tapping Eleven New
Members.

X.

r

Phi Mu Alpha, national honorary
musical fraternity,
conducted
the
clnpel exercises Tuesday.
Assisted
by the University band they presented a musical program which was followed .by the pledging exercises. Those
pledged were: Douglas C. Vest, Horace G. Brown, Paul Bicknet, C. Scott,
Sam Adams, Prof. Pat O'Bannon, H.
S. Jackson, W. True,
E. J. Asher,
William Pointz, Wickliffe Moore.
The musical numbers
presented
were all written by American composers, in accordance with the National Music week. The University
quartette also sang several songs
which were received with much enthusiasm.
Phi Mu Alpha was established on
the University campus three months
ago and this is the first pledging service held under the new fraternity.
The men selected arc taken for
prominence in musical affairs of the
University. Before one is eligible to
be pledged to Phi Mu Alpha he must
be a member of one of the recognized
musical organizations on the campus.
Namely, the band, Glee Club, orchestra or take part in one of the annual
operas given by the Musical

McFarland
Captain and forward of the Blue and
White yearlings has no equal when it
comes to handling the ball and tossing
baskets. Mac has scored about half
of the Kittens total points this year.

HI

SCHOOL NET TOURNEY

HELD HERNMRCH

9-- 10

Cream of State's Teams to Com
pete for Championship of
Kentucky.
The annual State Incfscholnstic
Basketball Tournament will start in
the University gym Friday .morning,
March 9, continuing through the day
and through Saturday with the' semifinals Saturday afternoon and the finals Saturday might. The cream of the
High School quintets all over the
State are expected to be on hand when
the drawing takes place Friday morning and several fierce scraps are promised the spectators who view the tourney. Both boys and girls are entered
in the classic, the boys playing in the
men's gym and the lassies occupying
the Armory until the
Sectional tournaments are scheduled to be held Friday and Saturday of
this week and the winners of these
tourneys are eligible to compete in
Among the
the state tournament.
most formidable rivals for the state
event are: Owensboro, L'ouisville Male
and Manual, Flem'ingsburg, Hazard,
Lexington High and Frankfort. Lexington High, winners of last year's
title, does not appear to have the
speedy combination that the Blue
Devils displayed last year both in
the state tourney and in the national
Frankfort,
runner up last
event.
year, seems a certain starter in the
Owensboro and the
state tourney.
Louisville team which wins its sectional tournament seem the best of
the schools an,d should they not meet
before Saturday might would provide
a choice morsel for court fans.
The officials selected for the tournament are the best referees in the
state, assuring the contestants of fast
and clean affairs. Head of Louisville,
Boycr, of Transylvania, Peak of Kentucky, and Hansen of Kentucky, are
scheduled to handle the deciding positions with Peak and Hansen
the feminine clashes and Head
and Hoyer the boys games.
semi-final- s.

The chief feature of the tilt
was the work of "Dutch" Burn- ham at back guard and Captain Fred
die Fest at center. Both stars played
their last game for the Blue and
White in the Sewanee scrap and both
lasting impression on the
left a
throng of Cat rooters that gathered
to bid the Cats adieu. Burn'ham, who
can always be counted on to play a
good game outdid himself in the Tiger
clash. Captain Fest, inspired by the
multitude, or perhaps it was an individual, easily played his best game
of the season and can now retire with
the knowledge that he has .faithfully
obligations to Kentucky.
filled 'his
The remainder" of the squad, for all
saw service in the scrap, acquitted
themselves well in their final appearance . "Gibby" Smith, also making
his final bow in a Cat uniform, played
a stellar game the time fie was in.
The Cats started in with a rush and
soon went into a safe lead on field
goals by Riefken and Fest. When
the first half ended the Blue and
In the second perWhite led
iod the Cats continued their offensive
and when Coach Buchheit saw that
his proteges had the game safely
tucked under their belts, he let loose
the "wrecking crew" which furnished
amusing entertainment for the rest of
the game.
Bailey and Shook were the luminaries for the invaders, the latter especially gaining distinction by his ex- 16--

(Continued

on

Page Four).

K

ALPHA DELTA SIGMA
ISSUES QUARTERLY
Journalistic Fraternity Publishes First
Issue of Magazine
The first issue of the Alpha Delta
Sigma Quarterly organ of the professional journalistic fraternity which
has headquarters in Lexington has
been received by members and friends.
The current issue contains greetings
from national officers, a message from
Dr. John J. Tigert, United States
Commissioner of Education and an
alumnus of the Henry Watterson
chapter, University of Kentucky, reports from the chapters in eight colleges and universities, and other interesting matter.
The grand president of the fraternity, founded in 1913 at the University of Missouri, is Dr. A. St. Clair
McKenzie, New York; Mr. Oliver N.
Gingrich, St. Louis, is past grand
president; Mr. Herbert Graham, Lexington, is grand secretary; and J.
Owen Reynolds. Lexington, is grand
treasurer.

of Year.

Carey
A back guard that concedes ground
to no one. Burgess was a whang last
year but is even better this season.

TUSITALIA
TAKE

IN

PLANS

TO

NjWJ EMBERS

University Literary Club Conducts Literary Column in
Local Newspapers.
Tusitalia,

the University

literary

club, held a meeting last Friday evening at the home of Katherine Elliott
on the Versailles pike. After the usual program and discussion a short social hour was enjoyed and refresh
.lien t s served. The next meeting w
be held Friday, March 9. at the home
of Mary Rogers in Bell Court. Plans
will be perfected at this time for the

selection of new members.
For several months a weekly column has been conducted in the Lexington Leader by members of the
club, under the heading "Tusitalia."
The organization seeks to develop talent among its own members and to
foster and encourage literary effort
among the underclassmen.
The selection of new members is made to fill
the places of those graduating this
year.
Tusitalia was founded at the University as a purely literary club by
the Scriblers, a similar organization
among faculty members.
It was
known for a time as Junior Scriblers,
but later decided on the name "Tusitalia," which means tellers of tales.
Its membership as limited by the constitution to twenty, and these are
of the
chosen by recommendafon
English department or among those
productions of
literary
submitting
merit. Both iboys and girls admitted.
K

EDITORIAL WRITER TO SPEAK
IN CHAPEL NEXT WEEK
Mr. E. A. Jonas, noted editorial
writer and author, of the Louisville
Herald staff, will lecture daily at 3:30
in the University chapel, on "Conditions in Europe." These lectures are
free and open to the public. The program is as follows:
Monday "Europe Before the War."
Drifting
"England
to
Tuesday
War and Victory."
Wednesday "France."
Thursday "Germany."
Friday "The Next Chapter and
America's Place"

(Continued on page 5.)
--

UNIVERSITY

K-

ORCHESTRA

TO GIVE FIRST

CONCERT

Series of Concerts Planned to be
Given in Chapel Sunday
Afternoons.
Those who love music will have the
opportunity of hearing the University orchestra
Sunday afternoon,
March 11. at 3:30 o'olock in the University chapel. This concert will be
the first of a series of Sunday afternoon entertainments given by the orchestra this year; many will remember the excelelnt concerts given last
year, which were well attended.
The standard of excellence has been
made better by the acquisition of new
talent. One of the features of the
program will be a solo by Mr.
tenor solosist of Christ Church
Cathedral. Mr. Uphani has only recently come to Lexington, and with
his arrival the musical talent within
the city has been greatly augmented.
It is hoped that all who can will attend these concerts. All are invited.
Following is the first program "to be
presented:
"From the Highlands"0. H. Langley
Beethoven
"Andantne Cantable"
"Merry Wives of W!nsor".0'N!colai
"Ihngarian Rhapsody"
Listz
Up-ha-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two

Alumni Notes
Editor

Alumni Secretary

STUDENTS HUNT LOST ONES
CALENDAR
Undergraduates Get Acquainted With
Work of Alumni Association
have
Students of the t'n'ivcrsity
been of great help in locating ''lost"
alumni and in the organzhtion of
alumni clubs, especially throughout
Kentucky.
They read the Alumni
Page almost as eagerly as the alumni.
Officers of the Association, commenting on this situation have expressed great confidence in the future
of the organization
with such new
blood coming into it.
The quizzing of candidates for state
office and for members of the General Assembly, particularly with reference to legislation and appropriations
for the University, has been undertaken 'by the students. Alumni committees and clubs also are (active in
this.
An alumnus of the University rewrote the education sections of the
platform of one of the candidates for
Governor, wholly on account of the
Alma Mater.
,

Somerset, March 2. (First
day Regular) evening meeting.
Firankfort, March 2. (Postpon- cd from Feb. 26) evening meet- ing.
Buffalo, March 10. (Second
Saturday Regular) luncheon at
the ElKcott Clufb.
Lcxiington, March 10. (Second
Saturday Regular) luncheon at
the Lafayette Hotel, 12:15.
dinner dance.
Philadelphia, March 10. Sec- ond Saturday Regular) evening
meeting.
March 24. (Fourth
Detroit,
Saturday Regular) dinner, Dix- icland Inn.
New York, April 6. Annual
Louisville, April 20. Annual
K. E. A. banquet, Watterson
Hotel.
Fri- -

PLAN FOR COMMENCEMENT

.

WOULD TOUR STATE
Suggestions From Alumni Are Sought
Features.
for
Entertainment of the visiting alumni
for commencement is the problem
now of the executive commiittee and
the secretary. Class Day, the Senior
Ball, Gridiron Dinner and the annual
business meeting of the Alumni Association are on the schedule. Suggestions are requested from individuals and clubs for entertainment features.
Alumni Day was opened last June
with a joint conference iby colleges
for alumni, faculty and seniors the
programs for the several colleges varied but all were popular. The business
imeeting, which followed, was adjourned for luncheon in Dicker Hall. A
motor trip through the Blue Grass
was then followed by formal teas and
receptions by various organizations.
The annual banquet was held in the
evening at the Lafayette hotel.
New features are added every year.
Those who will be Commencement
visitors can get what they want by
speaking now. Put your order in
early.

WINN FUND GROWS
A check from J. I. Lyle, '96, for
the New York Club's
quota for the Winn Coaching Fund.
When the Lexington club completes
its quota in the next few days, according to plans of President W. D. Hamilton, the fund will be complete except for a very small amount to be
taken care of by miscellaneous sub
scriptions.
$200 represents

R. O. T. C. ADVANCES
Alumni Should Know About the Organized Reserves.
Growth of the Reserve Officers'
Training Corps in the University, for
merly known as the Cadet Battalion,
has been the most remarkable of any
department.
The advanced course
graduated one officer in the first class,
six in the second and should have fif
teen in June. A proportionate increase
has been reported from the 200 col
leges and universities with similar
units. There are 10,000 young Americans enrolled in thsee advanced
courses with 3,000 to graduate this
year.
Many alumni who served as officers
in the World War are taking an active
part in the work of the Organized Re
serves. An onslaught by the pacifists
last week in Congress was staved off
partly through the efforts of Univer
sity of Kentucky alumni reserve of
legislation would
ficers. Proposed
have practically eliminated the 'third
component of the army as outlined in
the National Defense Act of 1920, the
Organized Reserves, the two others
being the Regular Army and the National Guard.
Every College man
should become familiar with the scope
of this Act and the development of
the national defense under its

Dates During Easter Holiday Are
Sought by Student Speakers.
A state-wid- e
tour March 29 to
April 3 is contemplated by members
of the Student Speakers Bureau in
the interest of the "Greater Kentucky"
campaign. These young men have
already before numerous
appeared
chambers of commerce, civic clubs
and conventions
They are working
for the University, a better understanding of its work and problems on
the part of the average citizen. They
have attempted to show how the University is linked up with the success
of the entire public school system.
by suggestAlumni can
ing towns to be visited and organizations through which dates may be
arranged.
The object is .to bring
about a thorough understanding and
s'ympathy for the University in every
county of Kentucky.

BUFFALO ENTHUSIASTIC
Senior Engineers Will Be Guests on
Annual Inspection Trip
"A lot of enthusiasm was shown
when we got the good news that we
were to have the senior engineers with
us this year. In less than fifteen minutes nearly $300 was raised by the
fourteen alumni present for the banquet to be given to the boys.
"Prof. Daniels attended his first
Alumni meeting and entertained us
with a lot of tales and woes of a
Prof, at a University. N. E. Perkins
He
also attended his first meeting.
told us a lot of stories about the troubles of the '09 class while he was at
the University.
"Our meeting started at 1 p. m. and
lasted until after 4 o'clock. The last
two hours being taken up by the members telling stories of olden days.
"Dr. Blumenthal, our president, had
many good things to tell us about his
visit to the University and especially
with regard to athletics.
"Committees
were appointed to
make arrangements for the senior engineers, whom we are expecting here
the first week in April." Gilbert
Frankel, Secretary.

planning missionary work in Stearns,
a neighboring town.
"My conscience has been telling me
for some time that I should send in
some alumni notes but things have
been buzzing so fast in my line that I
have not been able to get to it any
sooner.
"There arc quite a few old U. K.
people here now. Virginia Helm Hil-n'20, is dividing her time so
between boys and hooks that
each supposes a monopoly. She is
working hard at her third yoiir (the
hardest of the four) at 1720 East Madison street.
"William (alias Woodrow) Wilson
'21, is keeping his U. K. record in the
second year, .though he does come to
Address
the Nurses Home dances
606 North Broadway.
"Reuben Pearlman '17, is a brilliant,
sagacious fourth year medical student.
"Polly Prewitt and Nancy Anderare seasoned nurses
son, both
Polly's sister, en
,and Martha
tered this past Valentine's day.
"Win. Curry Martin '16, M. D..
'20 at Johns Hopkins, is still interne
at Sydenham Hospital and is taking
several courses in the school of hygiene.
"A. W. Armentrout '22 entered
Johns Hopkins Medical School this
fall. Address 708 North Broadway.
"My brother, George '16, M. D.,
Johns Hopkins, is at the Pschiatric
Hospital, University of Iowa, Iowa
d
City. His wife was Susanne Beitz
they have one son, four and
years old George Sydney Spra-gu- e
ex-2-

ex-2-

cx-an-

one-ha-

lf

is with the
C. B Robinson,
Keystone Lime Corporation of
W. Va. His postoffice address
is Charles Town, West Virginia, Jefferson county.
4
is educational
W. L. Campbell
director at the Kentucky House of
Reform, Grccndalc, Ky. He is enthusiastic about the work.
is store manaVail Baldwin
ger, Baldwin Cocoa Coal Company,
RoderficW, W. Va.
cx-2- 4,

MiH-vill- c,

ex-2-

cx-2-

e,

The program for the next meeting

the Institution and Duty to the Student Body.
The Club is planning also to have
some member of the faculty meet
with them before the end of the school
year, to speak on University matters
generally. They are asking information also about prospective candidates
for state offices, relative to their at
titude toward the University, and i

12

E. J. Kohn entered the employ of
the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railway
Co., Steam Engineering Department,
in October, 1913. He is now Steam
Engineer with the Company at Ens-leAlabama, P. O. Box 35. Mr. Kohn
is the secretary of the Birmingham
Alumni Club, which can boast a 100
per cent membership of those they
have been able to locate in their vicinity.
'13

No better record as an active member of the Alumni Association can be
found than that of C. C. Curtis. Our
records show that regularly each year,
in May or June, his dues for the coming year reach this office. Just as
steady is his record with the A. A.
Housman Co., brokers, 20 Broad St.,
New York City. He is now cashier
His residence ad
of the company.
dress is 262 North Grove street, East
Orange, N. J.
'97

Thomas C. Kelley received his B.
M. E. in '97 and his M. E. degree in
1906.
From August 1897 until November, 1889, he was with Lane & Bod-le- y
Co., Cincinnati, O. Firom December, 1899, until February, 1901, with
the I. & E. Greenwald Co., whom he
left to enter the employ of the Mesta
Machine Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., returning shortly to the former company
in Cincinnati, where he remained until
October, 1913. For one year he was
with the Triumph Ice Machine Co.,
of Cincinnati.
He then opened an
designing and
office as consulting,
constructing
engineer which he has
successfully maintained to the present, at 605 Second National Bank
Bldk. December 26, 1899, he married
Cora Davenport; they live at No 35
Gilbert Apartments, Gilbert Avenue,
Cincinnati, O.

dis A. B. degree in '13 and LL.B. in
'14. He 'has been practicing law in
Ashland, Ky., Gaylord building, ever
since and is making good in his profession. He is
of the
Alumni Club of
Ashland Alumni Club. Mrs. Bryson
was formerly Juliette S. Gaines, '13.
They reside at 507 E. Hilton Avenue.
13

"I have received the last two copies of the Kernel, both of which were
very interesting
Also find enclosed
said two dollars. I am now plantation superintendent on an 8,000 acre
pineapple plantation. This is a wonderful place to live, everything being
ideal except the distance from home.
Wm. P. "Bill" Tuttle,
California
Packing Corporation, Wahiawa, Oahu,
Hawaii.

ALUMNIDICTORY
NOTE Alumni in business and in
the professions are encouraged to insert cards here for the convenience of
fellow alumni.
Write the Business
Manager for rates:
WM. S. HAMILTON '07
LAWYER
707 Marion E. Taylor Bldg.
Louisville, Ky.

'04

Frederick L. Schneiter, who receiv-d- e
a B. C. E. degree, used his training in "oonstruct;ion" for furniture
making. For several years he was
manager of the E Q. Smith Company, at Evansville, Indiana. He is
BARGAINS IN MAGA-ZINE- S
now secretary-treasurof the Wertz-KlamFurniture Company of that
BLANDVILLE, KY.
city. His residence address is 523
Adams avenue. He is president of
the Evansville Alumni Club.
DUES AND THE KERNEL
Marcus A. Dodson went into the
ONE YEAR $2.00.
banking business and for several years
Herbert Graham,
has been cashier of the Peoples Bank.
Secretary.
"
"I have just returned from a trip Science Hill, Ky. He is
djcnvn
to Raima Sola treal wildcat
country, not far from Mexico City
th ree days by horse. My Kernel came
regularly and was the 'best company
I had.
"Edgar B. Gaither '03. who served
as Captain of Engineers in the A. E.
F., is manager of a big sugar refinery
and plantation
E.
hereHacienda
On A WORLD QUESTION OP TODAY
Potrero, El Potreo, Vera Cruz, Mex.
THIRTY-FOU- R
CASH PRIZES
"I always enjoy the Kernel but the
$300
First
Betwixt Us column contains every
Second
$300
thing of personal interest these days."
Third
100
Apartado ISO,
John L. Sallee
Fourth
$50
Tampico, Tamps,
Mexico (Potrero
Five Prises at $25 Each
Lamp.)
Twenty-fiv- e
at $10 Each
Theme:
is president of the
J .S. Shaw,
"THE WORLD MOVEMENT AGAINST ALCOHOLISM"
J. S. Shaw Co., incorporated, Con
struction Engineer, Georgia Savings
Any Present-Da- y
Aspect.
Bank Bldg., Atlanta.
His residence
Open to all students ; closes June 1; length of essay, 2,000 to 3,000
address is 62 Fairview Road.
words. Those desiring to enter should apply at once for regulations,
"Since leaving school I have been
reference lists and literature to
here and there working at my trade,
and have spent two winters in CaliINTERCOLLEGIATE PROHIBITION ASSOCIATION
fornia I am settled down here now
14 West Washington St, Chicago, 111
as my father has given me a half interest in the store, so I am completely
ADDITIONAL PRIZES AVAILABLE
satisfied for the first time in my life.
Students who choose at topic, "Best Methods of Meeting the Wine
Am going to try to get to Lexington
and Beer Propaganda," may enter the contests of the National W. C.
for Home Coming next fall and want
T. U. with the same work, provided
shorter copy, mot to exceed
to bring Harry Abell, who is practic1,500 words in. length, is also prepared. When writing, ask for W. C.
ing medicine in Paducah, with me."
T. U. Contest Regulations, also.
George R. Orme,
druggist,
Marion, Ky.

E. R.Ransom '05

vice-pre-

$1000 Prize Contest
r- -

of the Pulaski County Alumni Club,
Friday, March 2, in Somerset, is an
interesting one. There will be talks
on Duty of Alumni and Alumnae to

n,

Arthur T. "Dact" Bryson received

'94

ex--- 8,

Betwixt Us

11

Grovcr C. Routt received his B. S
degree in Agriculurc in '11 and M. M.
S. in 1913. From 1914 until 1917, he
was tobacco expert Tobacco Division,
Department of Agriculture, Ottawa,
Canada.
Since 1920 he has been
county agent of Carroll county,
Ky. He is president of the
Carroll County Alumni Club.

'82

J. Will Stoll is president of the First
& City National Bank, Lexington, Ky.
In 1919 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate and served in the General
Assembly of 1920 and 1922. He was
leader of the delegation fighting for
an increase for the University in the
Senate in 1922. It was due largely to
his untiring efforts that the bill allowing increased appropriations passed the Senate. He is known in many
ways as a loyal and dependable champion of his Alma Mater.

III.
"Fitzhuigh Maclean, '16, is shooting
up the ladder in railroad engineering
with the Southern Railway, at Knox-villTenn. His home address is 1619
Magnolia Ave.
"I am having the most exciting part
of my nurses training my specialized
work, such as operating irooms, dispensary, social service, etc. I expect
to finish the middle of November next.
Now I can read the alumni notes
with an untroubled mind. I enjoy
every word of the Kernel though I
must admit the only familiar names
are in the alumni notes.
"The editorials are especially good
and quite a credit.. However, I do
think the Kernel could have spoken
more strongly on the tragedy of last
week. It was written up on the
front page of a Baltimore paper and
is generally talked about as what you
might expect from backwoods Kentucky. It is a new and most uncomfortable situation for me to be ashamed of any University affair, but it
surely seems like old mjountain fued
time to carry a loaded pistol to a
dance. Times are pretty bad if it is
felt to be necessary, or even excusable to carry firearms on the campus.
I guess I am pretty far off to criticise but I feel as though I have received personal injury.
"On to a stronger, 'better University." Marion B. Sprague '20. Nurses
Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland.

dent of the Pulaski County Alumni
Club.

ex-o-

ex-1- 8,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
GIRL BASKETEERS

DOWN

CHATTANOOGA

-

CO

EDS

Kittenettes

Lose
First Two
Games of Southern Trip; Come
Back Strong in Last.

After dropping the first two games
of their Southern trip, the University
of Kentucky Kittenettes
came back
in the final game Monday night and
conquered the Chattanooga
baskctccrs on the Tennessee floor.
The game was oloscly contested
from start to finish and the scoring
was neck and neck until the final whistle was sounded. The shooting of
Miss Blanding and the floor work of
Miss Potter 'featured the game while
Miss Ingram, Chattanooga running
guard, contributed with some of the
flashiest work o fthc evening.
Chattanooga got off to a lead but
Kentucky ran close behind and the
g
score kept almost even in a
fashion. The Tennessee girls
lead at the end of the first half, 10-Kentucky staged a rally in the second
period and with but 30 seconds ito
play the Kittenettes lead their
by one point, the tally standing
Miss Blanding then put the
game on ice when she rang a field
goal just before the final whistle.
Summary:
Kentucky 21
Chattanooga 18
Blanding 17
F
Bunnett
Stagmair 10
Carroll
F
C
Harrell
Potter 2
G
Ingarm 2
Harrison
Ligon
G
Chapman
Kentucky, Wilson 2;
Substitutes:
Chattanooga: Sussdorf.
K
Patronize Kernel advertisers and
remember to tell 'em you saw it in
The Kernel.
co-e- d

nerve-rackin-

0.

19-1- 8.

able that the Crimson will be found on
the Cat schedule this year.
The Southern trip, which begins
May 7, will be the acid test for the
Forwards: Rcifkcn, Kentucky,
Blue and White horschidc pounders,
Long, Georgetown, R. Powell,
for the Cats will engage in six conTransylvania.
tests in as many days with three of
Transylvania, Creech, Centre.
the most formidable
nines in the
Centers: Jacoby, Georgetown,
South. Ogelthorpe also has two conGlenn, Wcslcyan.
tests with the Cats at Lexington, making a total of four scraps between the
Guards: Burnham, Kentucky,
two schools on the diamond this year.
T. Snowday, Centre, Kemper,
Notre Dame, Michigan and Cin
Georgetown, Rice, Kentucky.
c'niiPti always have good teams atu'
their appearances on Stoll Field
should attract a great many spectaBASEBALL SCHEDULE FOR tors. Centre and Georgetown always
fight hardest against the Cats, so the
Blue
squad
have very
1923 HAS BEEN POSTED stiff and White ahead will them a when
schedule
of
they start warming up their "old soup
Southern Trip Begins May 7; bones" early next month under the
supervision of Coach Cy Barger and
Cats to Meet Six Strong
Captain "Dutch" Burnham.
Teams

KERNEL'S HONOR ROLL

Page Three

The Lafayette Drug Store
Lafayette

Hotel

Building

OPERATED BY STUDENTS
We handle a complete line of domestic and imported Perfumes and Toilet Articles.
OUR SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE IS THE BEST IN
TOWN.
"We Deliver."

Stationery

Phone 3309

Candies

University Lunch Room
r"HOME OF STUDENTS"
Good Things to Eat at All Hours

K

Daddy Boles, athletic director of
the University has announced the following schedule for the Blue and
White baseball squad for the season
of 1923:
March 29 Georgetown at Georgetown.
April 6 Notre Dame here.
April 7 Michigan here.
April 12 and 13 Ogelthorpe here.
April 21 Cincinnati at Cincinnati.
April 28 Cincinnati here.
May 7 and 8 Tennessee at Knox-vill-

Oh Gee
Smith "I was out last night with
a girl who said she had never been
kissed."
Lil Collins "I'd hate to foe a girl
who looks like that."

MM H

H

o

Foster "You've awakened me from
sound sleep."
Milward "That sound's just what
made me wake you."
a

RENT-A-FOR- D

o

Where?
"Ann is that

e.

May 9 and 10 Ogelthorpe at Atlanta.
May 11 and 12 Georgia Tech at
Atlanta.
May 18 Georgetown here.
The two contests with Centre are
still pending but it is a surety that the
Colonels will play two contests with
the Cats. "Daddy" Boles is negotiating with the University of Alabama for
two scraps but it does not seem prob

MR. and MRS. W. M. POULIS, Props.

Father

AND
young

man

there yet?"
Ann "No, father but he is getting
there."
LOST!

Drive It Yourself
f For Dances, Parties and Pleasure Trips

Fountain Pen on a block grossgrain
ribbon, between University campus
and Rhodes addition. Finder return
to Kernel office.

RATES:
Open Cars

12c

Closed Cars

15c

per mile
per mile

Plus 20c an Hour.
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS

CALL US
IL.O

JB

B

R--T

I

BOYLBS

.R

'

'

JP

IT JVC JP

RENT-A-FOR-

CO.

D

PHONE 3656

134

E. SHORT STREET

I

MM

The "PRACTICAL" Alchemist and
"THEORETICAL" Robert Boyle

m

HE alchemists wrote

vaguely of "fluids" and
Copper
"principles
was potentially silver.
Rid it of its red color and the
"principle" of silver would assert
itself, so that silver would remain.
With a certain amount of philosopher's stone (itself a mysterious
"principle") a base metal could be
converted into a quantity of gold
a million times as great. .
This all sounded so "practical'
that Kings listened credulously,
but the only tangible result was
that they were enriched with much
bogus gold.
Scientific theorists like Robert
Boyle (1627-169proved more
"practical by testing; matter, discovering i