xt7w9g5gc123 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w9g5gc123/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19190116  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 16, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 16, 1919 1919 2012 true xt7w9g5gc123 section xt7w9g5gc123 f

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY., JANUARY

VOL IX

MANY CANDIDATES
FOR THE KITTEN TEAM SENIORS ELECT OFFICERS ARMENIAN RELIEF CAINS

WILDCAT BASRETEERS
WIN FROM WESLEYAH

ARE DUPSAYS SENATE

Football Captain Dishman
Chosen Chief of Goal
Tossers.

Seniors Given Every Chance
To Satisfy Requirements
and Receive Degrees
On June Eighteenth

TIGERS SATURDAY

BOYS TREATED WELL

Introducing the 1919 basketball seasand Lexington fans
last Monday night in Buell Armory,
Kentucky's 'Cats defeated goal tossers
from Wesleyan College by a score of
46 to 5. The visitors were outclassed
In all departments of the game.
When Coach Gill's performers trotted across the floor for practice before the game, three old "K" men
were seen. Thomas, who was particular satellite for Kentucky last year,
center from NorthMarsh, the long-boern Kentucky, and Dishman. Just before the squad was brought on the
floor an election for captain was held
In the dressing room. Anthony Dishman, of Henderson, was chosen to hold
down the job made vacant by Arthur
Dastin, who recently 'decided that he'd
rather work than go to school.
Wildcats Find Basket.
When Lieutenant Hansen, C. O. ot
the S. A. T. C. at Transylvania College, started the game, five Wildcats
and five Wesleyanltes sprang into action. It was pretty close until the last
few minutes of the 'first half when the
University artists awoke from their
lethargy and began to find the .net.
The only thing that stopped them was
the timekeeper's whistle. The score
was Kentucky 10 Wesleyan 3, at the
end of the first half.
When the local basketeers appeared
on the oor for scrimmage In the last
half they were looking better than
ever. Doctor Gill had been at work
Wesleyan's
representaapparently.
tives were undoubtedly in good condition, but their caliber is more like
that of the good High School.
Basketeers Better.
The half started in a hurry. Marsh
began to loop 'em in ever chance he
got. Everett, freshman timber, who
worked opposite the veteran Thomas,
got three baskets, and in almost every
play. Thomas got two from the floor,
both of which were good to look at.
The new captain, who was playing running guard counted twice, but was responsible for more. Burnham, another
now man, who started, played a good
game, he was especially adept in keeping the visiting forwards up among
the rafters of the gym.
WoBloyan's mode of playing was
necessarily defensivo. Five foul goals
were registered in favor of the visitors,
this being their total score. The forwards rarely ever got within striking
distunce of the basket with the ball.
When they did, they were pounced
upon either by Dlshmun or Burnham.
Substitutes Sent In.
With the game on ice, Coach Gill

The Senate of the University which
was in session last Friday, announces
that the graduation exercises for the
class of 1919, will be held on Wednesday, June 18, two weeks later than is
The
the custom 'of the University.
change is due to the disturbed condition of the University. The first term
will end February 21, and the new
term will begin on February 24.

on to University

y

V

(Continued on Page Six.)

(

No. 7

16, 1919

The Registrar announces that seniors are at present eligible for graduation, and have been passed upon by
the Senate in council. These seniors
have completed the necessary work
previous to their fourth year. Because
of the unsettled conditions of the University due to the "flu" epidemic, and
the disorganization of the S. A. T. C.
and due to the fact that many men are
returning from service to resume their
work In the University, the Senate has
agreed to permit students who have
not fully completed the necessary
work previous to this term to make up
the necessary hours and enter the second term as straight seniors. Of
course students of this type are not
eligible to participate in class meetings or elections, as they are not
straight seniors. Students eligible for
senior classification must have satisfied all requirements. The students in
the College of Arts and Science must
have completed 96 credits, at the beginning of their senior year; those in
the College of Agriculture must have
completed 103 semester credits; College of Law 52, and Engineers all prescribed work below the senior year.
,

At present there is a large number of
list and it behooves them to make up
students who are yet in the delinquent
this work, since the Senate has kindly
broken the precedent of not allowing
students

to enter with extra work.

It is understood that all students,
both old and new, who are entering the
University

this term will be allowed

to take only

three-fourth- s

of the pre-

scribed work in their respective colleges, but will bo given credit for a
full term's work, if the work is successfully completed.
This plan enables many students to get up with

The selection of the members of the
girls' basketball team for the first
game of the season will be made soon.
Practice games are being held every
afternoon in the armory with Miss
Nancy Innls, former K star, a graduate
of the class of '17, as coach.
Among the candidates for selection
are several K girls, who are striving
to secure their places of last year in
spite of the competition of former High
School stars, who are showing up well
In practice. Among them are Lilly
Cromwell, forward of last year's team;
Lillian Hayden, center, Dorothy Walker, guard; Lucy Dean, guard; Minnie
Jameson, Katie Henry and Mildred
Porter, substitutes.
The new girls are Margaret Harbison, Frances Heller, Anne and Emma
Williams, Elizabeth Robinson, Pearl
Morgan, Angle Hill, Lorena McMahon,
and Roberta Blackburn.
It has been reported that a game will
be played with Kentucky Wesleyan
College January 24. This is, however,
unofficial.

Headley Shouse Wins Pre- House Director of Patterson
Hall a Member of Comsidency and Rises to the
mission to
Occasion With a Speech
War-Strick-

en

Country

DOT WALKER IS
VICE PRESIDENT FAREWELL LUNCHEON

Miss Adelaide E. Crane, House Director of Patterson Hall since September, 1917, has been appointed a member of the commission which the
American Committee for Assyrian and
Armenian Relief is to send to Turkey
Unlike senior class meetings of for- to assist in carrying on relief work
mer years, there was little disorder among war sufferers In that country,
and wrangling, with the exception of and unless present plans fall, she will
a heated discussion between several leave soon for New York City.
The exact date on which this commembers concerning the interpretation of a movement voted upon by the mission will sail is not yet settled, but
class. Shouse capably took charge Miss Crane is under orders to be ready
of the meeting and the election pro- whenever the transport promised by
ceeded in good order. Answering to the government is granted. This transthe demands of his fellow classmen port, which will go directly from New
who were ordering a "Speech," York to Constantinople, will be fur"Speech," Mr. Shouse said he appre- nished by the Navy Department probciated the honor bestowed upon him ably early In February. The food adand would endeavor, to the best of his ministration will furnish food from a
B.
T. C.
ability, to live up to the position, but Mediterranean base, so that the cargo
he felt as if he was a "war product," capacity of the ship may be used In
AMONG
U. K. STUDENTS having just returned to the Univer- carrying motor trucks, clothing, agrisity from camp life, but with the help cultural machinery and other supplies
of the class, he believed that the class to increase food production in the
"Snap Out of
is Cry as of 1919 would be the greatest class in stricken countries.
Former S. A. T. C.
the history of the University in spite
About three hundred workers, inFalls in
of many disturbing events which have cluding nurses and teachers, will sail
occurred.
on the transport.
Miss Crane is
"BE VOS"
The following officers were elected classed as a social worker and will
The University R. O. T. C. was re- at the meeting: Headley Shouse, presi- probably find service in an Armenian
orphanage.
organized on the plan of the old S. A. dent; Dorothy Walker,
The College Club entertained for
T. C. on the first day of drill, last Mon- Edna Berkele, secretary; Russell Davday morning. Former United States id, treasurer; Lee McClain, orator; Miss Crane at a luncheon at the Phoearmy officers, who are now students, Mildred Graham, prophetess; L. Kelly, nix Hotel Saturday, January 1. Durhave been given temporary command historian; Paul Anderson, Jr., giftor-ian- ; ing the luncheon a corsage bouquet
Eliza Spurrier, grumbler; Austin was presented to Miss Crane, attached
of most of the companies.
Lilly, poet.
to which was a poem and a check,
The R. O. T. C. is to be organized
Mr. Shouse is a member of the Phi with the request that the latter be used
into companies according to height,
as it was last year, but at present the Delta Theta fraternity, Alpha Zeta and in serving Armenia. The poem, which
rolls of the former S. A. T. C. compan- Lamp and Cross honorary fraternities, was written by Mrs. E. S. Good, is as
ies will be used. Drill is from 7:45 and is cadet major of the University follows:
to 8:53 on Monday, Wednesday and battalion. He left in the summer to "This bit of paper, man disclosed to
Thursday, and companies fall in for
view
attend a training camp, where he reBrings, from the College Club, to you
chapel Tuesday.
In the artillery,
Two messages: We wish It first to
There is a possibility of a company ceived his commission
being formed for preliminary training returning immediately to the Univershow
Members for this sity.
in Field Artillery.
Our pride in you, that you elect to go
company will be drawn from all the
In answer to the poignant cry which
other companies. There are at pres- KERNEL STAFF MEETS
comes.
ent two former Field Artillery officers
SATURDAY MORNING From starving, homeless, persecuted
in school.
ones.
The present plan relating to stuTho Kernel news staff will have a And, In tho second place, that we may
dents who have not had the required
brief meeting Saturday morning at
be
two years of drill at this University,
11:45 In tho Journalism room. Every With you by proxy, and thru your eyes
but who have been In tho United States
see,
army, is that they may secure credit member is expected to be present.
Headley Shouse, senior In the College of Agriculture, and recently commissioned in the National Army, was
elected president of the senior class
at the class meeting held in chapel
Friday.

0.

It"

COMMAND

t;

for the army drill, by reporting tho
fact ut once to the temporary cadet
ing who will be able to graduate in major, Hoadley
Shouso. Their name
June. A list of seniors who have been will bo carried. on tho roll of one of tho
Yote'd on by the Senate us eligible for present companies, and, tho they will
graduation is being propared in the of- not be required to drill, they will reuniversity credit.
fice of the Registrar and will be uvuil-abl- ceive tho usual
Arms will bo issued to the men next
for publication soon.
week, and a competition in tho manual
the class and many seniors are return-

e

"In UNION there Is strength."

AT "HARMONY MEETING"

(Continued on Pago Six.)

Eliza Spurrlor, Managing Editor.

ATTENTION STROLLERS
Tho Strollers

will

meet Thursday

afternoon at 3:20 in the Journalism
room in tho basement of Main building.

drover Creech, President.

"In UNION there Is strength."

And thru your heart feel, some pressing need
Which governments and boards have
not tlmo to heed.
Wo want this bit of paper then to do
Its "bit"

Serving Armenia, serving
serving us thru it."

you,

"In UNION there is strength."

and

* PAGE 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

STRAND

Heme of Paramount, Artcraft, Goldwyn
and Select Pictures
Rjemember, We Show Only The Best
In cWoving1 Pictures

G00D-8Y- E

OPEN

ADMISSION

vlting nil the people of tho city to

BARRACKS

10c.

II

S. R. Griffith's

Orchestra
Strand Hawaiian Concert Company
Hear Them! They Will Please Youl

P. M.

2?

and 20c, War Tax Included

at-

EXjTCAMP BUELL

motion was made by W. P. Averett

and seconded by James

II. Combs,

that Professor Lampert be given all

Former Homes of S. A. T. C.
Men Ordered Salvaged
By The Government at
Great Financial Loss

UNCLE SAM PAYS BILL
The Board of Trustees of the Unl
vorslty of Kentucky met In regular
session at the President's office at 11
o'clock Tuesday morning, December
McVey

the work of the University in opera'
tion with the War Department in train
lng the Student Army Training Corps

BARBER SHOP
....25e

HAIR CUT

SHAVE

15c

SHAMPOO

25c

TONIC

A Good Warm Over-

153

15c

8. Limestone 8t.

Lex., Ky.

coat at
PRESCRIPTIONS

$15, $18
or $20

The University Y. M. C. A., which
on account of the numerous interrup
tions in college activities, has not
been able to get in good working or
der before, is now organized and will
hold its 'first regular meeting of this
semester, Sunday evening in the Y.
M. C A. assembly room on the second
floor of the gymnasium building at 6:45

NEEDIEST!

Professor L. Lamport announces a
meeting of the committee for the organization of an Oratorio Society in
Lexington, Monday, January 13, at the
Commercial Club. Means of organization were discust, and it. was decided
to have another meeting at an early
date for the purpose of forming the
society.
The committee was appointed last
Tuesday, January 7, at a luncheon held
in the grill room of the Phoenix Hotel
by the Board of Commerce Following the luncheon, Professor Lamport
explained the formation of an Oratorio Society iu a ten minute speech.
Ills idea is to have community singing,
a plan which hus been adopted In many
of the larger cities. Ho suggests that
one afternoon a week bo named by the
board to be used in this manner, in

"GET IN" on it

Y. M. C. A. RESUMES WORK

mately $96,000. The military finances
of the University with the War Department for the training of the men KEEP YOUR KNITTING
in vocational work and those in the
college section have been peculiarly
MOVE
interesting. It is understood that the
War Department will pay the University the cost in the housing, subsist- Red Cross Work in Univerence and instruction of the men ensity Unit Will Continue
rolled and whatever shortage the UniSays Miss Turner.
versity suffers will be reimbursed In
full by the government.
VISIT HEADQUARTERS

PROF. LAMPERT
PLANS ORATORIO CLUB

THE BIG VALUE

the support possible by the Board of
Commerce. Tho motion was unanimously adopted, and President Downing was empowered to appoint a committee to assist in working out details
of the plan.

Governor Stanley arrived during
the course of the meeting. The Exe p. m.
The meeting promises to be an in'
cutive Board of the University met
teresting one, as Dr. Benjamin Bush
yesterday to consider the disposition
is to speak and Professor Lampert has
of the barracks erected on the cam arranged for special music. Mr. R,
pus by the University for the housing L. Duncan, president of the Y. M. C.
of the 700 men enrolled in the S. A. A. will preside.
Under the guidance of Mr. Ralph W.
T. C.
Government has ordered that Owens, the new general secretary, the
The
the buildings be salvaged and disposed Y. M. C. A. expects to have a very
of in the most satisfactory manner. successful year. The Y. M. C. A
The automobile shop constructed for reading room on the second floor of
the Department of Engineering was the armory building is open to the
used extensively in the training of the s'udents and faculty of the University
men, especially those formerly in the at all times. Anyone wishing to read,
Camp Buell unit and the $21,000 spent study, write or play should come in
in its construction was necessary to this room and make himself at home.
He will find Mr. Owens in. his office
obtain the permanent building. It is
only brick building that has been on the same floor. See him and he will
the
erected for government work and in be glad to help you in any way that
a settlement with the University, the is possible.
A Joint meeting of the Y. M. C. A.
War Department will properly raise
question of salvage. The total and Y. W. C. A. will be held at Patthe
cost of the four barracks and other terson Hall Sunday afternoon at 4:30
accompanying buildings to house the to discuss the work of the coming
unit has cost the University approxi- semester.
unit.

MARTIN'S

W . B.

tend.
A

10, to discuss with President

10 A. M. to

2

They're Good Styles
too, they're worth
much more than this,
but it is a collection of
broken lot Overcoats
that are Big Values.

Everything a

complete

Drug

Store

Should Have.

John's Drug store
The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT

Becker
Dry Cleaning

Co.
C. R. McGoughey,

Come
A

Down Today.

CMTrigM 1218
Boom of Kupp.nh.tnn

Proprietor
WE CLEAN, PRESS and REPAIR
ABSOLUTELY.

Phone

Graves, Cox & Co.
INCORPORATED.

Cor. Lime and High

621--

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO
INCORPORATED.

McVey the Red Cross has been able to CAPTAIN
fit a room on the third floor of the

ROYDEN

TO BE

R. O. T. C. COMMANDANT

1854-368- 0

DAY AND NIGHT

SERVICE

CITY RATES 50 CENTS

Agriculture building for their own use.
This room is open all of the time and

PHONES

All of the former S. A. T. C. officers

have either been transferred or musever she has an off hour. Since the tered out except Captain Royden, who
girls' room in the Administration build is to act as the R. O. T. C. commanding has been converted Into offices, ant; Captain George Mills, camp sur-

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

every girl is invited to visit It when-

P. B.

Robards

geon, who expects to be discharged COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR
this Is an ideal place for the
AND
SUITS
coed to spend her off hours. immediately; Lieut. O. F. Flanders,
PRESSED
$1.25
Suit
Here she will find comfortable wicker acting personnel adjutant, who is Cleaning,
"The armistice has been signed;
$1.50
Cleaning,
Suit
awaiting a call to another college as Suits Pressed
$0.50
peace, we hope, is on its way, but the chairs, window boxes and curtains to
Soon a con- commandant, and Lieut. Scurry, who ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY
duty of the Red Cross girl is by no rest her eyes on.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
means ended," said Miss Louise Tur- signment of material will arrive that is still on duty as quartermaster and
PHONE 1550-- Y
ner, president of the University Red the girls may work on while in the who will probably stay here until about
Lex., Ky.
152 S. Lime.
Cross, in an interview today.
room. At present there is none avail May 1.
To be sure our boys for whom we
The trucks that were here have been
able, but every girl is askt to watch
have been working so ardently are
the bulletin board, prepare to work sent to Camp Holibard, Baltimore,
coming home and therefore are less
Maryland.
in need of our help, but we have oth- when it comes.
"In tho meantime there is knitting
ers to think of. The Germans have
receded from the occupied countries to do for baby sweaters and socks are 'FRIZZY' FRAZIER RUNS
MILITARY POLICE
leaving their victims destitute, hun- to be made. Having knit the larger
IN TEXAS
gry, clothless, looking to us for aid. garments for the soldiers last year,
Now for the .first time the girls of this work is quite simple.
Emery L. Frazier, bettor known as
"Do not wait to be askt to knit. See
America are given tho chance to really
"Frizzy," who for three years took an
help their Belgian, Armenian and mo and ask for the yarn yourself. I
Corner Limestone and High
outstanding place in the University's
would like to see the knitting fad reSyrian sisters.
athletic, dramatic and military ac"Last year much was accomplished, turn again; every girl should carry
tivities is now in charge of the Mili "Get Acquainted With Us While In
Town."
but this year much more will be ex- her knitting bag with her. Begin again.
tary Police at Waco, Texas, holding Pay Kentucky's Noted Candy Shop
pected, and with funds in the treasury, Spend youd odd moments knitting.
a Visit
tho commission of first lieutenant. Ho HOME MADE CANDY
EXCLUSIVELY
we must not lose the good that this Knit in chapel, on the campus, and if
a captaincy by only seven days,
Mado and Sold Only Dy
missed
the patriotism of the faculty will per
money can do thru lack of workers.
Schamre's Candy Kitchen
as ho had been recommended before
"Thru the generosity of President mlt, knit in your class rooms."
115 S. Upper St.,
the armistice was signed.
Just around corner from Main Street.
class-wear-

y

Everything Good
to Eat
Call On Us

Warren Bros.
GROCERS

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Mrs. J. Tandy Hughes
Member of A. N. A. M. of D.
Weekly School Dances

"TIGE" WINS LAURELS
WITH THE RED TRIANGLE

Outlines of His
Saturday Evenings In Phoenix Sixship IncorporatedAuthorInto
Model Geography for
Hotel Ball Room
Soldiers

Hours 8 to 12
P E A C E CELEBRATION
Smith's Saxophone Orchestra
Mrs. Hughes is teaching privately at her home and Dean P. P. Boyd of the Arts and
offers reduced rates to students.
Science College, has received a most
interesting letter from Dr. John J.
PHONE 547

THE PHOENIX HOTEL
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

A Metropolitan Hotel
Rsspsctfully

the patronage of University People

s elicits

JOHN SKAIN, Manager

Ik

I

W.

LEXINGTON

COLLEGE OF MUSIC
(13th Year of the Organization)

rm H E oerfec
I tlon of pencil'
nualitv

FACULTY:
PIANOFORTE
Lewis 6. Thomas
Anna Chandler Goff
Myrtle V. Kesheimer
Sylvia M. Vigneti.
VOICE
Albert d'Scheu Haberstro
Birger Maxlmus Beausahg
VIOLIN
Georges Vigneti
Mamie Morgan Miller.
VIOLA. OTLLO
Georges Vigneti.
DRAMATIC ART
Sallie Bullock Cave

un

equalled for
uniamoothneM,

formity of gradlag
and durability.
17 black degreat
from 6B aoftMt to
to 9H hardctt. and
hard aad aMdlaat
(inddibte) copying.
Lok far If dMfm- Um VENUS finiM

FREE!
box

Tfcta total

wkhflra VENUS
Dfiwiai Faadk.
Halilir a d
VENU1

IW

I

Fifth Ava..N.Y.
Dept.
VENUS Ermttr. Hm. JIM
2
2.00
slut.

ErgMr

forK.

AsMricam Laad Pencil Co

Try ih
m In

HARP
Georges Vigneti.
INSTRUMENTS-WO- OD
BRASS
WIND INSTRUMENTS

II
II
II

fur tar.

For information phone or write

i

Miss Anna Chandler Goff,

Director

441 Second Street, West.

Lexington, Ky.
Phone 639--

you buy a pipe bearing the
trade-maryou have the
satisfaction of knowing that your money
could not have bought a better pipe. The

WHEN

C

k,

W D C is strictly American made. You can
choose among a multitude of styles, sizes and
grades at the best shops $6 down to 75 cents.
VM. DE.MUTH & CO . New York
World's Larutst I'tpv Manufartura

tliu Jet tiUcU lusiru ot tho vulcanite bit.

Tlgort, formerly head of the Philoso
phy Department of the University, now
actively engaged in war work in
Franco, that we take the liberty to
publish:
"London, Nov. 23rd, 1918.
"Dean P. P. Boyd,
"Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.,
"Dear Dr. Boyd:
"I thank you most sincerely for your
interesting letter of October 14th, con'
talning all the news of the University,
I am very glad that you are having
such a splendid year, as I didn't ex
pect such a large enrollment, when
the war situation developed.
"I have added a little to my educa
tional achievements over here. I first
organized a number of classes in the
Navy while I was in the North. Later
I had charge of the educational work
in a number of aviation camps. With
headquarters in London, I was so
pleased with my work that when all
the air forces "washed out" recently
and returned to the good old U. S., I
was offered the position at London as
head of the educational work in the
whole area. I was gratified, of course,
that they should feel this way about
my work, but I have decided to transfer my activities to France and will
go over this week.
"I had to struggle hard to get them
to let me go over, for they were anxious for me to stay here. Very much
to my surprise, the Y. M. C. A. has
had six outlines of lessons on the
Geography of Europe, which I worked
up especially to use among mobile
troops, incorporated in a model geography for soldiers, and this is being
used everywhere as a text and as a
basis for correspondence work. They
asked me to prepare similar outlines
for a Model Geography of the British
Isles. This I have done and it will
be printed right away.
"The soldiers have received my historical lectures most favorably. I have
lectured on many historical themes.
Among the most popular are "The
Background of the War," "Our Allies,"
"England and America," "The World's
Greatest Battles and Their Lessons,"
"The League of Nations," "The
etc. Looking over this letter,
it seems very much as if I had developed a case of "egoitis." I will give
you something different for a change.
"How splendid it is that we have
at last witnessed the complete and!
glorious triumph of right, freedom and
Justice. We have proved that right
is might, and that the power of the
mightiest sword cannot crush truth.
happened to be in old Oxford
tho armistice was signed and
heard tho bolls of victory ring from
thoso 'towers which whisper from their
battlements tho last enchantments of
tho mlddlo ages.' No ono could have
fulled to thrill thru and thru at that
glad harmony of scoua of beautiful
chimes. There were tho heavy tones
of Old Tom in Christ Church, ono of
tho biggest bolls In tho world, and
thoro woro tho sllvor strokes of countless smaller bolls all blending fn one
ovorllow of Joyous music.
"I

whon

PAGES

"On tho afternoon of that great day,
went to London to seo how tho
world's greatest metropolis would act
on tho day of tho world's greatest victory. London was simply besldo her
self with Joy and celebration. Liter
ally, millions thronged tho streets. For
the first tlmo in years tho streets were
bright with lights and no searchlights
were playing across tho skies. Plcca
dllly Circus, Leicester Square, Trafal
gar Square, Westminster, tho Strand
and all tho more popular places were
so thronged that it was almost impos
sible to find a place to put one's foot
without kicking with tho other. Peo
plo were killed in the great Jams and
wise shopkeepers had their windows
boxed up so that they could not bo
broken out by the surging mob.
"I attended a great Thanksgiving
servince at St. Paul's Cathedral, at
which I saw King George and Queen
Mary. The service was quite simple,
but very impressive. No one was fool
ish enough to try to speak, there was
no one who could rise to the occasion
There were appropriate songs and
prayers. The great 'Poem of Victory'
was read from Isaiah and they closed,
of course, by singing lustily 'God Save
the King.'
"I wish you and Mrs. Boyd a very
merry Xmas and a very happy New
Year. Am sorry that I cannot be at
home in Kentucky at this most de
llghtful time of the year.
"Very cordially yours,
"JNO. J. TIGERT,"
"My new address Is: American Y.
M. C. A., 12 Rue d' Aguessian, Paris,
France."
I

PLANS FOR
WEEK

FARMER'S

FAST MATURING

January 28 to 31 Will be Big
Days in Agricultural
Circles of State.
ABLE

MEN

SPEAKERS
SPEAKERS

Dean Thomas P. Cooper, of the College of Agriculture, and Dr. Thomson
R. Bryant, attended the annual convention of the Deans of Agricultural
Colleges and Directors of Agricultural
Extension work from all the State Universities of the United States in Baltimore, Md.
They will while there complete arrangements with some of the ablest
speakers on agricultural topics in the
country to be in Lexington during
Farmers' Week, which occurs at tho
University of Kentucky Jan. 28 to 31.
They are sparing no efforts to make
the coming Farmers' Week the best
since the movement was started eight
years ago. They feel confident that
the attendance this year will exceed
tho two thousand mark.
Thoro will be no corn show or tobacco show this year In connection
with Farmers' Week, which occurs
Jan. 28 to 31 at tho University of Kentucky. Tho alfalfa show, however,
will bo hold iu tho usual manner and
a hundsomo premium list has been
provided. Tho crop of alfalfa was exceptionally good last year, but on account of scarcity of labor, many farmers noglocted to bnle their hay or to
suve bundles of plants for exhibit.
This will cut clown the uumbor of entries, but will, of course, increaso tho
chances of winning by those who do
show. There wll lbo u bale class with
live awards, also flvo awards for tho
(diameter) bundles of
best three-incalfalfa plants.

Tho dairy cattlo club will also hold
Its show and will offer tho usual category of prizes for samples of milk, butter and cream.
Farmers' Week will have tho ablest
men on its program this year that It
has ever enjoyed. This annual ovent
offers an opportunity for ono to meet
tho leading stockmen and farmers
from all over Kentucky.
Miami

Student

First to Enter Met.

(Tho Miami Student)
Being tho first American soldier to
enter Metz la tho distinction of
"Heinle" Beckett '11 of Hamilton, O.
Beckett, who has been reporter on
Hamilton and Cincinnati papers, and
who is at present one of the foreign
correspondents of the Cincinnati Post,
says that ho and a chum started out
for Metz one Sunday morning without
leave, and from the experiences he
cites the risk he took seems to have
been well worth the while.
Arriving at Metz, Beckett said they
were greeted by crowds of young
men and women who sang the Marsel-lalsThe streets he said were decorated with many American flags but
few British ones.

e.

One interesting incident told by
Beckett is that of a crowd of school
boys who came rushing out of school
wearing the
and crying "Bon
Jour," and then inquiring whether
President Wilson was coming with
white bread and chocolate. Beckett
says, "They see him as something between a meal ticket and Almighty
God."

Many of the German business men
expressed surprise to see these American boys in such good condition and
said that they had been told that they
were
that there were only
5,000 Americans in Europe; and that
Germany had taken New York.
Beckett assisted In the overturning of a statue of William I. under
which was the inscription, the irony
of which is now clear, "Erected by
his thankful people."
Concerning another deed similar to
this, Beckett writes, "A Frenchman
wanted us to help him tie with chains
the hands of a statue in the cathedral
William Hohenzollern had it made
in his own image as a saint. About
it now is a neat sign 'Sic. transit
passeth worldly
gloria mundiV-'- So
glory.' And the hands are chained.
It occurred to us how dignified and
cultured a way of doing it that is.
In America you'd find some such sign
as this, 'T'hell with this guy.'"
After seeing the entry of Generals .
Petain and Mangin, Beckett and his
companion started back to their regi- - '.
ment, only to find that it had left. But
they found it eighteen kilometers t
away and from the impression gotten, il
from his letter it seems that the un
official leave went unpunished.
In fact, Beckett and his chum are
tho envy of the whole regiment.
:

'

!

HORACE MANN NEWS,
The Horace Mann Literary Society
resumed work at a meeting held Thurs;
day, January 9, ut 7:30 p. m. In Pro- fossor Baker's room, In (he Education.
building, with Miss Ha See, presldont
of tho society, presiding.
"The Boys' Homo Coming," was tho
subject of the program which consist- od of the reading of threo magazine
articles by tho following members:
Miss Margaret Bird, "Canip3 of Disappointment;" Miss Amanda Forkner,
"On the 13 vo of the Great Surrondor,"
and Miss Lucy Cracraft, "Tho Khaki
Univoisry."
Tho program was concluded by u
short discussion of "Reconstruction, iu
Tonus of the University," by Professor
Baker.

,
,

,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

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