xt7w9g5gcd1k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w9g5gcd1k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19411205  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  5, 1941 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  5, 1941 1941 2013 true xt7w9g5gcd1k section xt7w9g5gcd1k rm

Defeat Germany. Even If
It Means War, Students Sav

VOLUME XXXII

TT

1HE

ON PAGE TWO

JRJEN

1

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FK,ID.Y. DECEMBER

KENTUCKY.

I.EXINGTOV

GuigiiolV Ladies In Retiremen t'
To Open Week's Run Monday
e
English theaters
ceived in
before coming to Broadway for an
extended run. It was recent'v made
into a motion picture.
Kathryn Oonley Wheeler. Let;- inPton- - wU1 Play the ,ead role of
EUen Creed tn tne cast' whlch nas
becn noldinB daily rehearsels for
tne P851 two "eeks- OPAL PALMER
Only representative of tne Uni- versity tn the cast are Opal Y. Pal- mer. wife of Dr. E. Z. Palmer of
the commerce college faculty, who
"U1 P'ay the part of Eir.ily Creed.
ho is cast
and Clarence Geiger.
as Albert Feather.
Others in the cast are Lucille
Little as Louisa Creed. Christina
Johnson McBrayer as Lenora Fiske.
Eleanor Robins Crain as Lucy., and
Frances Vance Clay as Sister Ther- esa.
Frank Fowler, produciton director
of the Guignol. will direct "Ladies
In Retirement." He will be assisted
by Angela Prels. Journalism senior.
and Juanita Shely. education jun- .
ior.
INTERMISSION
Coffee will be served in the thea- ter lounge during the intermission at
each performance.
Student ushers for the season
include Ann Austin. Mary Ann

Farbach. Ruby Jo Gevedon,

war-tim-

Tickets aifc now on sale for
Ladies in Retirement - Guignols
production of the year which
wil open at 8:30 p. m. Mondiy at the
little theater off Euclid avenue.
Sludents wishing to reserve seats
for any of the regular week's per-formances of the play should pre- sent their Guignol season ticket at
the theater box office as soon as
possible, it was announced yesterday
by Miss Frances Bouton. business
Admission is 50 cents
the student book.
Reservations
received suice the
sale opened Wednsday. in- dicate that "Ladies tn Retirement"
will play to
houses
throughout iU regular week's run.
seats
Miss Bouton said, adding
are still available for all per- formances.
MELODRAMA
A psychological melodrama,
the
Guignol presentation was written by
Edward Percy and Reginald Den- ham. The Guignol is among the
first amateur theaters to present
the play.
Its opening in London.
"Ladies in Retirement" was well re- near-capaci- ty

tht

Harrison, Jinkins,
Roper Named
Award Winners
GEORGE T. WILSON
Mrs. Willie Snow Ethridge. Ken- Kciurer. prajsaiig
at the third and final convocation
moming in Memorial hall, advised
aspiring writers "to be not just
spectators but active participants in
the game of life" if they wished to
be successful.
Dr. W. " W. ' Jennings, profes.of economics and president of he
local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa
presented Helen Louise Harrisrn.
Francis Louise Jinkins. and Ellen
L. Roper as the winners of the
honorary' annual book award at
the assembly.
George O'Bryan. chap- lain of St. Joseph's hospital, tie- livered the Invocation, and Ledionl
Gregory played two violin solos, ar- companied on the piano by Martha
Allen. Dean Henry H. Hill
presided at the convocation and
the speaker.
Speaking with a Georgian accert.
Mrs. Ethridge stated that the more
concerned a writer was about his
subject, the better his writings
would be. "An author has to feel
his subject is exciting, pathetic, or
enjoyable really to portray a real- Istic story." she continued.
"I was born with a zest for life
and have been interested In every- tiling. My husband tells me that he's
going to have engraved on my
tombstone The Lord called her up
and she could go'," the speaker
laughed.
Mrs. Ethridge then described how
she studied firemen, schoolteachers,
By

.

.nt

--

WILL BE GIVEN

and the
Americas Role in the World
Crisis." will be the subject of his
lecture to the International Rela- tions committee, to be held at 7:30
p. m. Monday in the assembly room
the Law building, it was an- by
nounced
Sarah B. Holmes.
mailman oi tne group.
At an "All-meeting at 7 p in.
Tuesday in the Music room of the
Cnion building. Dr. OnderdonK will
discuss "Isolation or Federation of
Democracies" and will show moving
of war scenes in Chmt,
Spain, and Finland.
SIGNIFICANCE
is expected
Dr. Onderdonk
to
present his opinions concerning the
significance of the present ivjrld
crisis and outline the foreign pol- icy which he believes the United
States should adopt.
A witness of "the two must dra- malic days in the last seven centu.-Ut, of Austria's history: the collapse
of the Hapsburg reign and th"
erection of a republic." when lie
spent K hours by force of circum- -

Vienna-boun-

FOR SING

trains

d

BY YW, UNION
Women Will Break
Tomorrow Night
In Bluegrass Room

PARTICIPANTS

W

stances on

d

Ther-Followi-

jammed with revolutionary troops.
Dr. Onderdonk
has first-ha- nd
knowledge of central European
ditions.
Il 1922- after three years in Amer- lca- he went back to Ausnu and
witnessed the rise of the Nazi
movement. Since 1925 he has lived
in America, but he has none to
Europe every third year since tner
He attended the International con-o- f
ference at Pontigny. France. In
August. 1938. and was at Genev.1
during the Munich disaster.
ARCHITECTl'RE
Dr. Onderdonk. whose home Is In
Ann Arbor, Mich.. Is on a lecture
u,u, one of manv he las tak,.
slnce ne resigned his position as
an instructor of the College of
oecture at the University of Micl
jKan m i933
Though born in New York, Dr.
Onderdonk went to live in Aus- tria when he was 10 years old. He
received his degree of doctor of
technical sciences in Vienna in
1919. as a result of his architectural
studies.
A member
of the Society of
the Detroit
Friends i Quakers),
society, trie Inter Philosophical
national Lyceum association, and
the Sons of the American Revolu- tion. he comes of old Holland stock.

MUST BE LISTED
Contest Postponed
To Sixteenth
To Avoid Conflict

Groups planning to enter the
campus
eighth annual Cwens-ODsing must turn in lists of individuals
participating and names of director
and accompanist to either Frances
Jinkins, president or Cvns. or
Johnny Clark, presioeni, of ODK,
by 4 p. m. Monday.
The date for the sing has '.'een
changed from Thursday, December
11. to Tuesday, December 16, because of a conflict with the meeting
of the committee of 240 scheduld
for Thursday, Frances Jinkins announced yesterday.
The names of the individuals will
be checked for eligibility. There is
a minimum of 12 and a maximum
of 24 for each group, and not more
than five of the number may be
members of the glee club, either
this year or the school year ending
K

last June.
All organized campus groups are
eligible to enter. The fee charged is
$1
for each organization.
Each
group may sing three songs, one
of which must be a Christmas
song. There will be a ten n:ini;te
limit for each organization's performance. Dress must be formal
unless the selection calls for certain costume.
Cups will be awarded to the women's and men's groups having the
best performance, and the most
clever and original performance.

While members of Alpha Gamma
Delta sorority were having dinner
Wednesday night, thieves entered
the house and took $64 In cash
from members' purses.
The burglary took place within
about 30 minutes, the thieves covering six of the seven bedrooms in
house at 238 East
the
Maxwell in that time.
As the sorority
members were
singing after the meal which began
at 6:15 p.m., Mary Lee Burnett of
Mayfield left the dining room to
arrange chairs for the chapter
meeting in the first floor living
room.
"I heard the door rattle while I
was in the living room but paid
no attention at the time," Miss
Burnett said.
The burglary was not discovered
until . Louise Jones, Hopkinsville.
want to her room and found her
driver's license and certificates from
her purse lying on the floor.
Other members then Investigated
their rooms and reported the following losses:
Miss Jones said $34 and a small
amount of change had been taken
from her purse; Joyce Thomas,
Cincinnati. $16; Miss Burnett, $10
and a driver's license; Mary Lewis
Bcaz, Franklin. $2.75 and a driver's
license: and Carolyn Petrie, Hop
kinsville. $2.
The f?ont door of the house,
through which the. thieves probably
entered, is usually locked while the
chapter has dinner, members said
yesterday. Noise from the singing
may have prevented notice of the
intruders' activity, they added.
Nineteen members of the sorority
live in the house. It was reported
that the chapter's house has been
entered twice last year and once
in 1939.
One of the six bedrooms entered
Is on the first floor.
two-sto-

TURNABOUT HOP

ne

i

Friday and Saturday at the information desk, residence halls, and
by members of the planning committee for five cents each. "Mine
for Tonight" as well as the dance
program will be written on the tags.
"It's the women's night." according to Jeannette Graves, chairman
of the Turnabout dance sponsored
by the Union dance committee and
the YWCA social group. "There will
be absolutely no stags just does."
As a special feature, the
will be such songs as "My Man,"
"The Man I Love." and "Jim." .
Jamie Thompson's orchestra will
furnish the music. Tickets have
gone on sale at the Union information desk at 50 cents, couple of
doe. Women who wish to sell tickets and vie for a prize to be given
for the largest sales, may do so by
contacting her. Miss Graves said
yesterday.
"Some women intend to make
their night a gala affair by taking
their dates to the University-Miam- i
game and then follow that with the
dance," Miss Graves remarked. She
emphasized that it was possible to
do both.
Members of the committee who
are planning the dance are Frances
Jinkins. Jean, Waley, Mary Saun
ders, Martha Anne Coleman, and
Kitty Collins.

To Give Benefit
A benefit party will be given by
the combined French. German and
Spanish clubs at 7:30 tonight on
the third floor of Miller hall. Pro
ceeds from the affair will be given
to the American Society of Friends
to aid In feeding European children,

ART EXHIBITION
TO OPEN SUNDAY
IN UNION
Kentucky Colleges
Are All Invited
To Send Entries
Colleges art
The
exhibition will be open Sunday in
the music room of the Union
building, and will continue through

January 11.
The exhibition will be open for
the benefit of all students from 2
to 5 every afternoon, with the Student Union Art committee in charge.
All Kentucky colleges have been
asked to send pictures to the exhi- bition and most of them have ao
cepted. Some of the colleges repre- sented so far include Union, Berea,
Eastern State Teachers college.
Western
State Teachers college.
Centre, Lee's Junior college. George- town, and Morehead.

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NINE LETTERMEN
RETURN TO SQUAD
Kittens Will Play
Fort Knox Team

Funds Requests Made
To Legislative Couneil

At 6:30

$115,000 Asked

HOME EC DINNER

For Completion
Of Buildings
The request for $900,000 for a field
house was submitted to the legislative council this week along with
requests for Increases In other appropriations.

SCHEDULED FOR
MONDAY NIGHT
Ellen H. Richards
Will Be Honored,
Andrews To Speak

There is no place on the campus
or in Lexington to hold the student body and faculty, hence the
huge auditorium contemplated in
The annua! heme economics banthe proposed new structure would
fill a desperate need. President Herquet in honor of Ellen H. Richards,
man L. Donovan told the council. founder of the study of home ecoAuditorium space now available nomics, will be held at 6:30 p.m.
is so limited It would require four Monday in the Bluegrass room of
meetings for all faculty and stu- the Union building
dents to attend a given function,
Miss Virginia Andrews, graduate of
he said.
the home economics department and
$115,000 ASKED
A sum of $115,000 was also asked

for completion of the
d
home economics building, a
daily barn, and animal pathology
building, and $50,000 a year more
was asked for agricultural extension.
The maintenance fund increase
asked was from $12,000 a year to
$87,000. The University
is facing
a depreciation crisis because it has
been trying to repair and maintain
a $6,500,000 plant for $12,000 a year.
Dr. Donovan said. It is universally
agreed that the obsolescence costs
two percent a year, .he added, and
by spending only $12,000 where
$130,000 ought to be spent the State
Is merely storing up future trouble.
An Increase of $150,000 per year
was asked for general operating expenses. The money is needed. Dr.
Donovan said, to restore financial
balance to an institution which has
one third more . students than 10
years ago. but which Is trying to
operate on $350,000 less money.
SALARIES
Because the average salary of
teachers at the University is only
$1,800 a year, as compared to $2,300
ten years ago. the best teachers
are leaving in alarming numbers
to accept higher paid positions in
other states, he added.
The operating budget is now
$818,000 a year, but would be raised
to $968,000 if the requests are
granted. It was $1,190,492 ten years
ago.
The combined appropriation increases asked by the six state colleges was $1,500,000 a year. The
present expenditure for the colleges
is $5,000,000 for the biennium. If
the requests for the colleges are
granted, the expenditure for the
j
time between July 1. 1942. and June
30. 1944. would be $8,000,000.
partly-finishe-

city supervisor of home economics
in city schools, will speak on "Home
Economists and the Defense program in Kentucky". "Home Economics and National Defense" will be
be discussed by Dean Thomas Cooper, and President Herman L. Donovan will talk on "Home Economics
and the University."
Fifty freshmen in the home economics college will be recognized.
Dorothy Angle will impersonate
Ellen H. Richards, and SlVrtle Bink-le- y
will give a reading.
Guests of honor will be Miss Andrews. President and Mrs. Donovan.
Dean and Mrs. Cooper. Dean and
Mrs. L. J. Horlacher. Dean and Mrs.
Henry H. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Peterson. Dean S:irah B. Holmes,
and Dean'Jaiie Haselden.
Those in cliaike of arrangements
and Frances Collis. The banquet wi;i
be formal and admission will be 73
cents.

By JOHNNY CARRKO
Kernel Sprts Editor
Adolph Rupp's Wildcats will b
seeing the scalps of the Miami Red- skins when they make their 1941 de- but at 8:15 p.m. Saturday In Alumni gym.
The Kittens will meet a Fort
Kncx team In a preliminary game
scheduled to start at 6:30.
Rupp's cagers have been in training for seven weeks, and the outfit
has developed Into a good passin?
and shooting team that looks a.s
if it will make a big impression
in the conference race.
NINE RETl'RN
Nine lettermen returned to tlie
squad that lest only three men Iy- Huber. Fuzzy Farnsley. and Hoot.
Combs. Of the men returning. Jim
King, center, was
as was Marvin Akers. guard. Akers
was chosen
ani
was given
honorable
mention.
Akers. however, injurea his ankl
In practice last week, and Rupp will
not use him unless it is absolutely
necessary. Rupp himself was a casualty when he fell from a chair and
injured his back Wednesday. However, he attended the practice session Thursday.
Miami has a clever basketball
team and Rupp dues not consider
them a breather. In a practice gam"
earlier the Redskins held the powerful Xavier team to a
score.
2
The Redskins defeated Transylvania
last night at Oxford.
FORWARDS
Waller White and Milt Ticco win
start at forward. White, a senior,
has been a consistent performer
Is the often- . while Ticco. a junior.
.54-3-

f

UNION TO OPEN

HOBBY SHOW
DECEMBER 15
Students, Faculty
Are Eligible
For Cash Prize

J

i

good.

j

see action are Ermal Allen, football

Other Wildcat players expected tn
i

WAA Will Meet

Balogh
To Plav At Musicale Sunday
J
er

Erno Balogh,
from New York, will appear at the
third afternoon musicale at 4 o'clock Sunday in Memorial hall. The
program will include two original
compositions, and selections from
Gluck, Haydn. Brahms. Chopin.
Liszt, Schubert, and J. Strauss-Ko-vaspianist-compose-

star. Lloyd Ramsey, starting
ward last year, and Jim King.
FIRST-TIMER-

Born in Budapest. Balogh studied

under his father until he was seven,
then entered the Royal Conserva-

for- -

S

Men donning Wildcat cage uni- Iorms Ior tne Ilrst tlme are Brute
Boenler- - Bud Robertson.
Adrian
BacBill Smith. Ed Lander, and
Vince Splane.
lhe irVlces of
-

I.J,dc"Uh,C8t

center was taken to Good Samaritan hospital Monday for an appendectomy. He was reported resting
weU.

Miami won ten games last year
and dropped seven. Five lettermen
returned to this year's Redslin edition. Outstanding performers on the
squad are Jim Uram. center. Wayne
Clappand Ra'ph Palaia. guards, and
AnHv Vnnnvirh

fnr

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three are juniors, and Uram

e

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BALOGH

Will be .".'.
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fr.i- -

To Beauty Queen

V

.

48-4-

Barbara Rehm Is
Second Attendant
:

.

is

senior.
t WW
The Redskin squad is coached by
Walter "Rip" Van Winkle. Advaiwe
notices say that there are no phenomenal scorers on the Miami cl'ih
but that it is a well balanced team.
LAST SEASON
Last season the Wildcats won 14
games and lost six. They were defeated 5 by Indiana in the Sugar Bowl and were runners up to
Tennessee
in the Southeastern
tournament at Louisville.
Kentucky will meet Ohio Staf
Columbus on December 6.
The probable .starting lineups:
Kentucky
Tlcro
whit
Brewer
Stukrr .
England

s.

tory of Music. When he was 12 he
became the pupil of the composer
Bela Bartok. and five years later
was graduated from the conservatory. Upon graduation he received
the Franz Liszt prize and the Prize
of the City of Budapest.
After the World War he studied
with Lenid Kreutzer in Berlin, and
FROM THE LITTLE ACORN
in 1924 he was engaged by Fritz
o .lljilm Delia I'i, national sot ial sorily irhiili was uiilitiletl on the ttuajius this lull, Kreisler to accompany the violinist
on his American tour. Balogh then
are shown abort-- lint I; row. standing, (left to right) Betty Dawson, ( '.eorgntniie Marnier,
Mt Dearutan . liantes iiiliiiis, Betty ('alltiher. Mary Olive Davis, I irguiia Hieetluig. Setoml row. became a citizen of the United
States. He has appeared as soloist
seated. 11
MtCnllry. Htiberta I'yles. Carolyn S finer ; Betty Mt Chin, il,, in . I! n I h an Earnest , with leading symphony orchestras
Betty Inn I awler, fineilnne Clawt tn k. The lour girls in the fureijronntl me llt ll to riht) Mar- in this
and ha-- eivpn recit(' my. Xotinn Hose.
gate! Htihbei. Maignerile Williams,
als from coast to coast.

,,

guaros wm oe tan staKer.
leader of the Cats, and Ken England,
who replaces the a!ng Akers. England has improved rapidly this season, and. when Akers returns to the
wars, will be a threat to Staker's
starting berth.
Mel Brewer, junior center. wHl be
at the pivot spot. A
Hoosier. Brewer has looked particu-- I
larlv potent in practice sessions and
may hold down the starting Job for

ine

Monday has been set as the deadline for entries in the Union build-ma- 's
hobbv show wnich
will be held December 15. 16. and 17
in the Union music room, it was an- nounced yesterday.
Entry blanks for exhibits are:
available at the Union information
desk. Both students and faculty are
invited to participate in the exhibit,
the winner of which will be awarded
a cash prize.
A meeting of all members of the
The public will be invited to the
Women's Athletic association will
be held at 4 p. m. Monday In the show of hobbies and collections
women's gym. Doris Relchenbach, which will be open during scheduled
hours each day of the exhibit.
president, announced vesterday.
An attendant will be in the music
Folk dancing games' will be directed by Miss Lovaine Lewis, graduate room during the exhibition hours
'
assistant in the physical education to protect the collections.
Van Coke. University student who
department.
Rita Sue Laslie. vice president has wen several national photogis in charge of the program, assustei raphy contest prizes, was the first
by Jean Ewers and Jennie Sullivan, person to enter a collection.

Pianist-Compos-

--

Arch-pictur- es

Passing, Shooting Cats
Will Meet Redskins
Tomorrow Night In Gym

ry

-

-

NUMBER

SORORITY HOUSE
64 Dollars Taken
'While Members
Are At Dinner

et

International Relations Club,
YM-YTo Hear Onderdonk
Dr. Francis S. Onderdonk, mter- national lecturer and world travel- er. will be on the campus Monday
and Tuesday with addresses to the
Relations committee

Gene- -

th

er

It's A Mighty Good Record
The Cats Have To Shoot At

IvUI

BURGLARIZE

Shad-secon-

telephone operators, gardeners, and
all classes of people to make her
characters more lifelike. She also
studies amusements and diversions,
such as horseback riding, shopping,
and gardening, for subject matter.
rMjservation should be the up- permost thought In an essayist's
Mrg Ethridge stated, "No- mind
u
smaU to ,Tlte about ,f
you nave the eyes to
lt
Mrs Ethridge said at the begin- nlng of ner lecture that she hai a
theme story, "like Kate Smith and
"
have
other radio entertainers
songs." She then told
their theme
of an experience of sitting in a box
reserved for Mrs. Herbert Hoover.
while watching a banquet of news- paper publishers, which included
her husband.
Describing her lecturing exper-Fathlences. Mrs. Ethridge told of beinj
invited to make a talk on safety at
a luncheon. "I didnt know a thing.
about the subject, though. If my
family went through a month with-Jaout a broken tooth, a fractured leg.
or a baby, we were lucky, she
turned.
Mrs. Ethridge. who was born in
Savannah. Ga.. received her A. B.
degree from Weslyan university. She
makes her home at Prospect and is
a member of the Public Nurses as- sociation. She is married to Mark
Ethridge, general manager of the
Louisville Courier-Journa- l,
and has
four children,
Besides her most recent book, "111
Sing One Song," Mrs. Ethridge is
author of "As I Live and Breathe."
and "Mingled Yarn". She was the
recipient of a fellowship of the
Oberland trust for study in Cen- tral Europe on the problems of
minority races.

5.

THIEVES ENTER,

va House. Louise Peak. Adalin Stern,
Joan Taylor, Joyce Thomas. Jerry
Williams. Marcia Willing. Sue Fan
Gooding.
Edwin
Jack Taylor.
d
Barnes. Terry Noland. Other
wisk' and John Ta lor
STAFF
On the production staff are Clar- ence Geiger. technical director, as- sisted by Billy Nave. Winston BIythe
and John Ambrose. Properties are
under Anne Glover Geiger. assisted
by Frances Roland and Marjorie
JEANNETTE GRAVES . . .
Freeman.
. . . is in tharge of the Y "turnMrs. Anna Freeman, costume
tress and designer, will be
about" tinner, wliieh is sthed-tilesisted by Jean Phipps and Alice
for tomorrow night in the
Wooten. Dorothy Love Elliott, grad-tickstudent, has charge of the Union balltooni.
uate
box office, and Jack Taylor, arts
and sciences sophomore, is house
manager. Clay Lancaster designed
the sets.
Story of the play is how Ellen
of
Creed, housekeeper-campanio- n
Leonora Fiske. retired actress, is
driven to murdering her employer
to provide a home for her (wo
sisters, Louisa and Emily,
Ellen tries to conceal her crimj
from her nephew, Albert Feather,
,
the servant Lucy, and Sister
esa. a nun from the neighboring
priory and friend of Leonora.
Effecting a complete turnabout in
dance customs, the informal dance
scheduled for tomorrow night in the
Union ballroom will have women
doing all the dating, paying, and
breaking.
Baggage
tickets
with
which to tag the men will be sold

Willie Snow Ethridge
Advises Writers-To-B- c

JJUS RNE1

UOLY

-

ON PAGE FOUR

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Z246

Palmer, Geiger
To Represent UK
In Cast

TTJm

JJ

.

Barbara Rehm. president of
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority,
was elected the second attendant to Kentuckian beauty
queen Sue Fan Gooding. Kappn
Kappa Gamma, at the Kentuckian dance Saturday night.
Her name was inadvertent lv
omitted from the report of the
queen and most popular man
elections tn TuedaVs Kernel

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Editor
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trie opinmm ol The Mrrnei.

Letters

Gossip

Features

Don't Know All I Said
Was That They Were From Jim
I

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an ait

Ai i In .tiniu;il I'atilu llcni- - baiiiiT hi si nielli,
nun viiitiiiit-metro or less prontllv,
'1'lifsp women walked a
.inn- I.Vi
Ii
l alt grontM,
"1 (.m-- L women
to
,
I'.iiilu
UhIv. announced
iln ii naiiK-s- , home towns, and aHiliaiions. and
In jnl ilu- - oltcn sincere applause of i lie actives.
,
I:
Ii ol these
either ai a hid dav
alu-die iM'iiin of school or ai another
mhiii
I. ill kccL. I'loinised herself 10 ihe Greek group
i!i:i uunied her for a memltfr. She promised to
ilu iiotip lu-- r undivided lovahy, certain fees,
ami
observance of ihe
aiul tides of
tin ilc;iiici and naiional organiai ion.
In ici in ii the chapter promised her. not in
tiling oi otlitiallv as I lie pledge was made, a
Nianding on the campus, a more
oii.iiii l
.is.int pl.ice to live than the dormitories, and
i lie piivilege
of serving the group during tlie
pl deOiip and as an officer or committer intni
Ixi liniiit at live memliersliip.
s

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MMoiiiv-goit-inin--

BETTY PUQH

led-res-

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s

so-ia-

when a sister is thosen third assistant to some
(piccn.
While some sorority women go through college life confident thai the only datable men
are those ihev have met at ocn houses, many
are more
have found out what
there are just as many men, even
apt lo realie:
just as many "datable" men, lo lie mel in Y
meetings, in classes, or in extra rurrirnlar activities, as ai ihe traditional
eu house.
indc-endcnt-

s

Ik-s-

lot

iii. iiiv ol these girls, sororiiv

life will Ik
Suggesiiiuis from actives will improve
ilu ii
apM'arance and their poise; oh ii
I. hums and Mind dales will help them nice:
"daialile" men: if they hold office, and llure
:ne minor ones treated aparently for this pur-x.swill Ixilsiei their
and devel
op any tpialiiies of leadership i hey niav have.
I'm for inanv ihe price will Ik urn great. Manv
like to luxe ":he Alpha Beta pledge" as a
:iiHsiiie to their names; others prefer
iiulix idualiiv lo external indeni ili at ion with
aiA loup.
I lie thief thing women give up when they
pledge a sorority is their individuality. As long
as ihev wear ihe enameled pledge pin or the
ji .t l i! hadge of ihe group, ihev vole the
su.ii-;li- i
Constitutionalist ticket in campus elecare praised or condemned according
tions, ili
to die group raiher than according to themselves.
Ii is i.ikt ii lot grained thai they will Ik- happiet
thai a sister of Alpha Beta made Mortar Hoard
than thai ; I it- Beta Alpha they grew up with
uas i hosen. I hey are expected lo gush for hours
j;mkI.

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we have made a specialty of wrap-

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o

ping, and employ a large staff for
this purpose. Kvery Perkins Christmas paekagc is a work of art, no
s.

pemm

0.

Giving A Party?

o

To the Editor of The Kernel:
There seems to have been some
criticlsm of the recent "most popu- lar man" election, and we as head
staff of the Kentucian feel that we
should make a public statement re- garding our views on the matter,
Two attitudes were put forth in
Tuesday's Kernel: first, that "one
of the most important elections at
the University" should be carried
on by a "more universal type of
balloting;" and that it should not
be necessary to have fifteen annuals
sold to put up a candidate for this
honor.
In discussion of the first criticism,
we'd like to agree with our critics
on the fact that a campus-wid- e
election would be better. We were,
however, following a tradition set
for us by previous staffs; and as
other traditions, such as that of
freshman caps have done this year,
it flopped with a mere 120 votes.
If any wise student could have
this, as they have been

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Why not use

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and
Service

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BLUE ROOM
CRYSTAL ROOM

Parlies

Hotel Lafayette

THIS

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WASHISO-PO-

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Bud

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For Your Trip Home

ai ChrUtmoi

HIRE'S HOW YOU, TOO, CAN TRAVEL ON

"COUG

SPECIAL"

R?r FARES

REDUCED

Students and teachers travel from and lo their homes ot great
savings on these College Special tickets. To make this saving,
all you have to do is purchase one from your hometown railroad ticket agent before returning from the Christmas holidays. The cost is amazingly low liberal return limits fit you
school program you con make
tool There ore
reduced round trip Pullman rates, also. When Spring holidays
come you can use the return coupon to travel home again or
use it at close of school.
stop-over- s,

HSY

is expecte-- i that on account of a heavy
ol
travel. Oft well OS civilian holiday traffic, paw ogee
Christmas-Neforthcoming
Year's Holiday period
heavy this year. If it can possibly bo
for
students to leave school December 17th or beforo and retvtro to
school January 7th or loter, it is urged they do so. It will also bo
found easier to make reservations and more comfortablo to travel
on or before December 17. 1941. ond on or after January 7, 1942.
It
IMPORTANT
Military furlough
travel during tho
wilt be extremely

Start right and easy! Send your
luggage round-tri- p
by crusty,
Railway Express, and take
your train with peace of mind. We
pick-u- p
and deliver, remember,
at no extra charge within our regular vehicle limits in all cities and
principal towns. You merely phone
low-co-

with Safety

Be Thrifty

ASSOCIATED

Travel by Train

EASTERN RAILROADS

tllVICI

percent;

percent; Less.

23

44

per- -

percent; No Opinion,

21

an increase
in religion in this community since
the war began?
b. Have you noticed

Yes, 45

percent;

No. 47

percent;

Don't Know, eight percent,
PARTICIPATION
cShould the question of Ameri- can Pticipation in the war. 17
can participation in the war be dis- cussed from the pulpits of American
churches
Yes, 53 percent; No, 45 percent;
No opinion, 2 percent,
3. Which do you think is more

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Central Kentucky's l ending Jewelers and
Ai'iljy Slt IViili

Silver ninths

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important:
a. That America stay out of the
war, 17 percent,
b. That German be defeated, 80
percent.

three percent,
The survey, a random poll based
on the student directory, was
visecl by
taeeitn university proc. No Opinion,

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PHOTOGRAPHsNI
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SELECTION

HOOH

phologropAi . .
1 for $3.10 to 1 for $10.10
No Appointment f)e)vlr4

Other

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Chrl.tr'

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WHITE TAVERNS
Delicious

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percent.

12

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ORAL ROOM

More.

cent; Same.

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C.REEN ROOM

Personal Supervision

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COLONIAL ROOM
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PITTslirwill
MT. OHK

11

2

ago'--

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m.'r &

r.oi.n room
ICxcellent

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44 Brk-.

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vrrsrvFAPOUi- n
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PHIkiI)l-XI-H-

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Even if you don'l have a return portion of a
College Special Reduced Fare ticket . . . yoti
can go home by train on a definite schedule,
safely and economically. Fares ore lowl

HEADING FOR HOME?

IAI1-AI- I

siarlrr
HluhT
Plaxs

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ifivKi-k- i
2'4 BovNt,

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lup and the same questions are
used by him in national surveys.

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RED ROOM

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IIKTROIT
K.1T OHANCK
illl.WM KKK

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NATION. Dl

your

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holi-it-

people
in this community are more interested, or less interested in religion
than young people were 10 years

ELOISE PALMORE
GEORGE NOLLAU

;'

QUESTIONS ASKED
Here are the questions asked,
with the results stated in percent- a8e:
1. Do you think it would be bet- ter for youn8 People if we had national prohibition again?
No, 55

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tilCll.

the puIpits of American churches.
although the majority favoring this
thought it would awaken more peo- Ple 10 tne fact tnat we are nearer
realized, while those
war than
who opposed it thought that mat- ters of state and religion should
"
kePt separate,

be-:-t

N?HoT percent.young
think

er many more votes would have
been cat in a general election. The
election may have been, "one of
the most important elections at the
University" but we sure didn't notice
a particle of interest until