xt7w9g5gcm2g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7w9g5gcm2g/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1920 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1920 text Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1920 1920 2013 true xt7w9g5gcm2g section xt7w9g5gcm2g |iUI.I,|·I'I`|N K
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Special Lectures ............,,r,.,.>......,.........,.,.................,.._..........._..........,........... Er
Admission .___......_...,_...,_..,_,,_....,..,......__.............,,._A._....,,,.,___..__..._____.,,,__.......... 6
Credit ..,_.......__._...,...___,_,.._.___,__,,,.A_.....,.__._____,____....__.i..__...._,._.__,,...,.____..,,_,_....._... 7
Sinith-llughes Courses ..........._.........,.,.........._..,_.........__,....._,...................... 7
Graduate \Vork .`................................>............................................................. 7
Patterson Hall and Boarding ,....tA..........,.........,.......................................... 1. v7'
Courses and Fees ..r.................,.....,........................,.........,.............................. 7 ‘
a Departnients of Instruction ..,.................r................,...................................... 8*
Agriculture ..t,...>........,......................»..........,..................................................... 8
# Art .........l.............._.......................................,.......l._O,..t......,..............tt.t...t........... 11
E Botany ....>_.................i.........,.........,...,.....tr { ,..................,............»........,.............. 1  
Q Chemistry ._....................,..,...,.......,,............._....,.i.....,..........,_....._...................... 11
EC()I101lllCS and Sociology ....,.............................................._.......r.................. 12
Z Education ...................................,.,...................................t.............................. .. 12
·€ English ,.__.............,............,,.......................,....................................`.......1........... 13 V
Engineering ...........,.......,,................................................................................. 14*
_ (Ierman .................................,.......,..........,...........,............................................. 16*
History of Political Science .......`...,.......................................,...................... 1G` .
_ Jignie Economics ........................................................................................ .. 16 -
P Latin and Greek .............................................................................................   17
E Mathematics ...,..........................,.....................,..................................... ,. ....., 17
1 Music .........................................................r......................................................... 18
" Physics ...............................................................,................................................ 18
E Physical Education and Athletics .....................................................,. ,.,.. 19
Psychology .,..............r... ` ................................._....r...,....................................... ,. 19
  K Zoology .............................................................................................................. 20‘
  University Orgauizatio11 ........,........................................................... Cover  
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I GENERAL STATEMENT  I
p THE PURPOSES OF THE SCHOOL
The Summer School of the University of Kentucky will be in
session June 21st to July 31st, a period of six weeks. The work of ~
the summer session is designed for teachers, students and persons Y
` seeking information and training. VVith the instruction are to be·
) given a number of special features during the six weeks of the ses-
sion. From the program of studies it will be possible to make up plans
of work suitable for teachers and workers in many fields. The entire
plant of the University is available for use, including laboratories,
, libraries and buildings. 'The faculty of the University of Kentucky
{or the summer session of 1920 has been greatly enlarged. \Vork will
be oiered to satisfy the demands of teachers in every iield of school ’
activity. It is no longer necessary for the high school teachers of the
_ State, the city superintendents and members of college faculies to
leave the State for university work during the summer. The Uni-
versity of Kentucky is meeting the needs cf the Sate in Agriculture, R
. Engineering and all the Arts and Sciences. The multiplication and ·
zstandardization of the high schools, the enlarged curricula of second-
, ary schools and the new aims in education demand teachers qualified ,
_ in many subjects and trained in the theories and practices of modern _
education, and the summer school of the University is organized `
‘ {largely to satisfy this demand. _
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LOCATION  
e Lexington, called the capital of the Blue Grass, is a beautiful Q
iittle city, and a delightful place to spend the summer. It is ac- E
— cessible from all parts of the State, and may be reached over the `
I following roads: Queen and Crescent, Southern, L, & N., C. & O,.
L. & E., now under the management of the L. & N. Railroad. i
I SPECIAL LECTURES
( Special lectures of interest to teachers and other students will  
{ be given throughout the summer session by members of the faculty  
` and other educators and men of distinction. Late1· announcements lg
of nonresident lecturers will be made. W,
; ADMISSION
‘ No entrance examination is required for admission to any of the
» courses, but instructors must be consulted concerning prerequisite
preparation in some courses. L
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 l CREDIT IN THE SUMMER SESSION  
1 ’ Students who have full entrance credits to the University will - i
 ` be given c1·edit toward degrees for college work in the summer school. ;
, Four semester credits will be given for one double course con-  
 ` sisting of two hours a day for the session. Two semester credits will _
V be given for a single course of one hour a day for the session. I
No student wll be allowed to make more than eight semester ,
Y credits in the summer school. T
AGRICULTURAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION i
Exceptional advantages will be offered in the summer school to
students who are qualifying to teach Agricultural and Vocational .
Education under the provisions of the Smith—Hugl1es Bill. Professor
McNeal C. James will offer courses in Agricultural Education and ~
in Educational Psychology which will especially fit students for the
· organization and presentation of vocational work in the high schools
of the State. Courses are also offered in I-lorticulture, Soil Fertility,
Animal 1-lusbandry and Farm Crops.
GRADUATE WORK
Graduate work will be offered by special arrangement with the I
l heads of departments and the Chairman of the Graduate Committee.
., PATTERSON HALL AND BOARDING
§ Room and hoard may be ha.d at lfatterson Hall for $8 to $10 per
; week. according to the size and location of the room. Students must
‘ furnish their own linens. Application should be made for reservation `
  in Patterson Hall before arriving,
  The University Cafeteria will be open during the summer session;
g room and board may also be had in town at convenient distances from
  the campus.
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  COURSES AND FEES
  'l‘he work in the summer school is given in Double and Single
Ei Courses. A Double Course means that the subject is taken two hours
  a day throughout the session. A Single Course is taken one hour `
  .a day for the full session. The fees are as follows;
lg Single Course ........ . ............................................,.......,. 3 5 00
  Double Course .............................................................. 7.50
One Double and One Single Course ........................ 10.00
Three Single Courses .......................................,.......... 10.00
A INFORMATION
For information address the Registrar, University of Kentucky,
- Lexington, Ky.
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, DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION  
  AGRICULTURE N
E Professors Good, Forster, Assistant Professors Olney, Martin,  
. ` Horlacher  
  Farm Management.——This course will consist of 36 lectures and ·
  12 three—hour laboratory periods. The lectures will deal with the
  principles involved in the choice of a proper type of farming; the " 
- comparative merits of intensive and extensive farming; the relation t =
) _, of live stock to farm management; the best size of farm; the rela- V
tion of capital to farm prodts; farm rental systems; the management
of men and horse labor and machinery for greatest profits; tne layout
of fields and farm buildings; farm accounts, including the annual in- `
ventory; the choice of a region for farming and important considera-
r tions in buying a farm; and other fundamental principles of farm or-
  ganization.
} The laboratory work will have two phases. The first phase will
` consist of iield t1·ips to successful and practical farms for the pur-
pose of studying their organization in detail. These trips serve to
bring out the personal element so essential in good farming and serve
to reinforce and vitalize the truths of scientidc agriculture as learned
in the various other lectu1·e and laboratory classes. The second phase »
will consist of practice work in farm accounts, including accounts
_ of single crop or live stock enterprises and complete accounts on all
l of the farm enterprises. Professor G. \V. Forster. ,,,
I HORTICULTURE
Vegetable Gar·dening.—This course will consist of a series of
twenty-four lectures and twelve field laboratory exercises, four lec- y
tures and two laboratory periods per week. The lectures will in- _
clude a discussion of such fundamental subjects as location and ar·  
_ rangement of gardens, soil management, seed selection and i1nprove—  
· ment, seed testing, preparation of l1ot—beds and cold-frames, and man-  
· ures and fertilizers. The more important classes of vegetables and   -
‘ particularly those requiring special or unusual treatment will he  
studied in detail.  
The subject of spraying as related to vegetable gardening. will be  
` given attention in the lectures, and practice in the making and appli· lj
f cation of sprays will occupy a portion of the laboratory periods.  
This midsummer session will provide an unusual opportunity to  
study many phases of vegetable gardening that cannot be observed
so favorably during the usual college terms, and particular emphasis
will therefore be placed upon the laboratory and field exercises. As- `
sistant Professor Olney.
Fruit Growing.·—Four lectures and two laboratory periods per  
week. The summer course in this subject is arranged to supplement Y
the cou1·se offered by this department in the summer of 1919, and  
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{ the topics studied at that time will not be repeated in the present
. course, attention being directed mainly to apple orcharding and straw-
 , V, berry growing. The course will close, however, with a brief discus-
. sion of landscape horticulture with special reference to the improve-
. ment of home and school grounds.
The lectures on apple growing will include a consideration of
soils and sites, propagation, selection of stock and choice of varie-
I ties both for home and commercial uses, care of the young and ma-
ture o1·cha1·d, pruning, etc., with special emphasis laid upon the em-
ployment of an effective spray program. To this end several lectures
and laboratory periods will be devoted to the preparation and appli-
” cation of the various kinds of spray materials, together with a study
of numerous types of spraying a11d dusting apparatus used for the
control of insect and fungus enemies.
Strawberries will be studied from the standpoint of propagation,
variety, characters of both the standard and everbearing sort.s, plant
setting, culture, and harvesting and marketing. Assistant Professor
Olney.
Farm Poultry Production.-—This course treats of the production
of poultry on the general farm. It includes the following subjects:
s Breeds, and varieties, feeding, housing, breeding, culling, incubation, _
brooding and the marketing of poultry products. In the study of
3 breeds and varieties the student learns to identify all of the more _
common varieties of chickens and becomes familiar with the standard _ ,
* points for which they are judged in the show room. He also learns
the purpose for which each breed is kept and the value of each breed  
to the poultry industry. ln the study of feeding, rations are balanced,
using the feeds that are available ill the community from which the }
student comes. In the housing work the student not only becomes  
familiar with the essentials of a good poultry house but learns how {
to remodel without a great expenditure, the out—buildings which are  
Q found on many farms. In the breeding and culling work a definite  
’ . program to follow in breeding up the farm flock to a high state of egg  
` production, is mapped out. The laboratory work in culling thoroughly Y
i A familiarizes the student with such points as the relation of tl1e time E
of moulting and intensity of the shank and beak color to the hen’s  
egg production. The student also secures a working familiarity with i
the more common incubators and brooders. In the marketing work  
he learns how to dry, pick poultry and candle eggs. Lectures six  
’ hours a week, laboratory three periods a week. Three credits. Double  
course. Assistant Professor MARTIN.  
Animal Husbandry.-Two subjects are odered in Animal Hus-  
, bandry, namely: (1) Breeds of Live Stock and Judging; and, (2) Live °
t Stock Feeding. Each of these subjects is divided into two courses. Q
i  This makes it possible for the students who pursued these courses  
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3 during the summer of 1919 to complete them in 1920 and also oifers i
  an opportunity for the students entering in 1920 to partially or en- l ;
  tirely complete the wo1·k during one summer. ’
i Breeds of Live Stock, Judging.—ln this course a thorough study  
  is niade of the origin, history, development, introduction into Amer-  
é ica, and adaptibility to Kenturky conditions, of the leading breeds of  
§ Beef Cattle and Hogs. A great deal of attention is given to the ele· l
l ments of judging, including the use of the score card and practice ;.
  in comparative judging according to the standards of the breeder and A,
  of the show ring. The student is ll1€l(l€ acquainted with the leading  
V   strains and blood lines through a study of the winnings of the various  
I breeds at the principal shows and fairs and through the tracing of " ,
l pedigrees of these prize-winning animals. Four lectures and two T
laboratory periods of two hours each per week. Two credits. Assistant  
y Y Professor Horlacher. C
5 Breeds of Live Stock Judging. This course is a continuation of
Q the preceding one. It is designed for students who pursued the study ,
_` of breeds in the 1919 summer school. The breeds of sheep, horses,
jacks, and dairy cattle are considered. Eight lectures and four labor-
atory periods of two hours each per week. Four credits. Double
course. Assistant Professor Horlacher. ·,
` Live Stock Feeding. Course No. 1.---ln this course a study of the
, Q classes of nutrients of feed stuffs and the uses of each to the animal.
· 1 A study is also made of the process of digestion, absorption, and assin1— Ri
ilation. An exhaustive study is made of feed stuffs, nutritive ratios,
  ` feeding standards and of the principles underlying the balancing of
_ ` rations for maintenance, growth, fattening, milk and work. During
the last two weeks of this course a comprehensive study is made of
the feeding of hogs, including the use of forage crops. Occasional
visits are made to the college farm to inspect experiments in progress
, in the feeding of hogs. Six Zcet-ares per week. Two crctlils. Professor
` Coon.
‘ Live Stock Feeding. Course No. 2.—This course is a continuation
of course No. 1 and will deal with the feeding of Beef Cattle, Dairy
Cattle, Horses and Sheep. An inspection and study of the feeding of
V breeding and experimental animals on the college farm will be a part
, of the work. Five lectures, one laboratory period of one hour per week.
ll - Two credits. Professor Goon.
l Farm Dairying.—Instruction is given in the production of clean
‘ milk; the care and feeding of dairy cows and the management of the V
l ~_ dairy herd; the construction of dairy barns and the marketing of milk.
` Students are taught to test milk for butter fat, acidity and use of the
, lactometor. The separation and care of cream; the ripening of cream  ·
;§ and churning of butter. Practice is also given ill the manufacture of
~ soft cheese. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week.
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 ART
A Assistant Professor Beck ‘
` ia. Drawing and Painting.—Drawing from objects, cast, still}
life. Figure action drawing. Perspective. Outdoor sketching. Me··'
diums, charcoal, watercolor, crayon. Two hours daily.
2a. Art Structure.—A careful study ot the three elements of art:
$ line, tone, color. Simple exercises in space iilling, bringing out th8
` principles ot balance, rhythm, repetition, subordination, etc. Planning
of borders and surface patterns. Two hours daily.
BOTANY
Professor Shull
General Botany.—A general survey of the plant kingdom, inclm?
ing classincation, structure, function, distribution and uses of plants.
Methods of collection and preservation of materials for class use. A `
course adapted to the needs of teachers of Botany in the high schools
of the State. Double course.
Field Botany.—A study of the flowers and trees in the vicinity of
Lexington, with field trips and laboratory studies. Principles of classi-
,_ lication, distribution, and the general physiology of plants. Designed
I especially for teachers who wish to become familiar with plants i11~ ‘ A
I nature. Double course. , A `
  ci-aarvnsrav l
Professor Tullle, Assistant Professor Mitchell - C;
1b. General Inorganic Chemistry.—Continuation of la. Chemistry"' T
of the metals. ‘ Lectures, class-room exercises and laboratory works  
Prerequisite, Chemistry la. Assistant Professor l\i1rc111aLL.  
3. inorganic Prepaa·ations.——A practical laboratory course de·· ;
voted to the preparation ot inorganic compounds from the crude ma-  
terial. Pre-requisite. onehalf year’s work in General Chemistry. As· i
sistant Professor Mitchell.  
4. Qualitative Ana!ysis.—Laboratory work accompanied by recita· ]
tion periods. Prerequisite, Chemistry lb. Assistant Professor N[I’1`CHEL'L·  
7. Organic Chemistry.—An elementary course for non—profes- `
sional students. Prerequisite, Chemistry lb. Assistant Professor Mm g
einem,.  
8. Quantitative Analysis.—A laboratory course accompanied by T
' lectures and `class-room exercises. Gravimetric and volumetric methods E
of analysis are studied in detail. Prerequisite, Chemistry 4. Professor  
Turrign.  
*  ’ 9. Quantitative Analysis.—A lecture and laboratory course de•· `
voted to the analysis of ores, alloys, etc. Prerequisite, Chemistry S.
Professor Tu·rrLn. .
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V 11. Agricultural Analysis.—An introductory course in quantita-
I tive analysis arranged for the students in the course in agriculture.
  The elements of quantitative analysis are studied with special refer-
  ence to the constituents of soil, fertilizers and agricultural products.
it Prerequisite, one year’s work in General Chemistry. Professor Turrmc.
12. Advanced Agricultural Analysis.—A laboratory course hav-
, Ing for its object the complete analysis of fertilizers, feeds, soils and
i agricultural products. Prerequisite, Chemistry 8 or 11. Professor
’ Turrts.
  14. Advanced Quantitative Analysis.—'l`he analysis of iron and
l ‘ steel, slags and rocks. Prerequisite, Chemistry 9. Professor 'l`u·rrr.1c.
ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY
  _ Assisielzl Professor J. S. Glclcmzl
. Principles of Economics.—A study of production, distribution and
consumption of wealth; the application of principles to sonic social
g and economic problems. Single course.
g. Principles of Sociology.—A study of social origins, social evolution,
and social institutions and their relation to biology, psychology and
economies. The study will be illustrated by 1·eferences to concrete so- . i
` cial problems. Double course. Al,
` » Economic History of the United Si;ates.—An account of the na- U
` tional development in agriculture, manufacture, transportation, com- ` {Jl
I merce and finance. Single cou1·se.
1 E¤ucATloN ·
Professors Bowers and Jtw/rcs, Assoeic/o Profcssor Jiokw
3s. Problems in City School Administration.---;\ general course
including a consideration of recent city surveys, city superintendents
. annual reports, nuances, age-grade distribution, standard units of
. measurement, and principles of constructive supervision. Lectures,
class discussions, and reports on assigned readings. Double course.
Associate Professor B.u;1ai·:.
4s. History of Eclucation.——A general course with particular ref-
K · erence to the 17th, 18th and 19th century theorists, emphasizing
  Milton, Locke, Rousseau and Montessori. Lectures, class discus-
sions and reports on assigned readings. Lectures will be illustrated
with lantern slides. Double course.  
5s. Technique cf Teaching.—A discussion of General and Special ‘
method, giving the background of psychology, and illustrated with  
lesson plans and the teaching of several subjects. Double course. “
· I -7s. Agricultural Educatlon.—This course will deal with the
organization and teaching of agricultural courses in the Kentucky
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 high schools. It is designed for those who have had courses in the
fundamentals of agriculture in some Agricultural College. Double
course.
8s. Educational Psychology.—The laws of mental development,
structure and function. Special attention to the laws of memory,
habit, attention and their application to education. Designed primar-
ily for Smith—Hughes students. Double course.
14s. Principles of Social Education.—A study of the development
l of tl1e social mind with special 1·eference to education. Text-book,
reading and reports. Double course.
ENGLISH
Professor Farqzthur, .·tssistunt Professor Hobie
las. English Composition.—'l`l1e principles of composition will be
studied to facilitate a clear and accurate expression of thought. Themes
will be required in the practice of writing of English and some study
will be made of the art of composition as illustrated in collateral read—
ing. Double course.
18s. The teaching of English Composition.—Diseussion in this
  course will include problems of grainniar, composition, speech and
M literature. Methods of teaching as they bear on the speeilic problems
U3; of teachers enrolled in the class will be considered. Single course.
pi 114s. American Literature.—\Vorld events have put a new em-
phasis on the importance of American literature. The course is de- ·
signed to show what Americanism is and to give some acquaintance V
with the American ideal as it has been expressed in literature. Double
course.
16as. Literature of the Bible.—A literary study of the Bible by
books. lt is designed to show how the Bible depends on a literary
interpretation for much of its beauty and truth. It will prepare the
way for appreciation of literature generally because of the demand that
literature identify itself with the highest thought and feeling. Single
course.
110s. Shakespeare.—Intensive study of Shakespeare in tragedy.
The course is both historical and literary. The Oxford edition is
7 recommended in interests of a uniform text. Double course.
The Campus Playhouse.—The Campus Playhouse, the intimate
  theatre of the Department of English, will present a program of plays
hi sometime duringthe Summer Session. Students of the Summer School
T in and out of English courses will be invited to make up the casts
  for the performances.
` 3as. History of English Literature.—This course is designed to -
make a general survey of English literature. Any period of literary
activity may be selected as the instructor sees fit. Extensive readings
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_¤ from selected masterpieces and reports will be required. Double  {
  course. §’ 
  Sub-Freshman Composition.—The course is for young stude11ts  
l. who want to prepare for college entrance or remove conditions in ,, 
Vi high school English. Themes and reading will be required to meet Q?
j their needs. Single course. 4 j· 
if ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING in 
  Profcssor F·rc<·11mn. atsstismnt Professor Ilorinc, Mr. Dickcr, l 
· i- Mr. T]l’lLi`}ll.(L7L `V 
  la. Mechanical Drawing.—Required of all freshmen in Engineer-  
5; ing. Comprising: la) Freehand lettering: (b) Exercises in the use ;
)j` of instruments; (c) Projections from Pictorial Views and descriptions; I 
¤   (d) Exercises in tinting and shading; (e) Tracing; (f) Blue printing. »
  Double course. Professor Homxi-1. It
L 1b. Mechanical Drawing.—Continuation of Drawing 121. Double  
i course. Professor TIOKIXIC.  
' Sa and Sb. Descriptive Geometry.——Required of all freshmen in g
_ Engineering. This work includes, iirst, the discussion of descriptive  
J geometry as a branch of pure mathematics. Later comes a consider·  
  ation of the application of descriptive geometry principles as an aid  
  to engineering drawing. The lectures and recitations are supplemented .
1 A by work in the drawing room. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. Double ,
course. Professor Hoiuxn. `
  4a. Advanced Drawing.—Required of all sophomores in Engineer-  
  ing. Comprising: (a) Working drawings of parts of machines and Y
` complete machines, both detail and assembly; (b) Teclmical sketching;  
(c) Plotting of surveys. Prerequisites, Drawing la and lb. Double l
` course. Professor Hoiuxn. l
, 4b. Advanced Drawing.—Continuation of Drawing fla. Double  
I course. Professor Honrxn. l
j Electrical Engineering  
. 2. Direct Current Dynamos.—Required of juniors in Mechanical  
, and Electrical Engineering. This course involves a more intensive  
i_ study of direct current generators and motors than is covered in Course  
’ · 1. Prerequisite, Electrical Engineering 1. Single course. Professor ?<
H‘1:EE11AN.  
.. 3. Alternating Currents.—Required of all juniors in Engineering.  
` g, Elective for juniors or seniors in Industrial Chemistry. This wo1·k in- l
{ volves a study of the fundamental laws of alternating current measur-  
l ing instruments, generators, motors, transformers and converters. Pre-  
  requisite, Electrical Engineering 1. Mathematics 7b (Calculus, second i
Q part), must have been completed or be taken co-ordinately. Single  
  course. Professor FREEMAN.  
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  7. Dynamo Design.—Required of juniors in Mechanical and Elec-
  trical Engineering. This work involves all the calculations necessary ·
gv in the design of a direct current generator or motor, together with a
  complete set of detailed drawings. Each student is assigned an in-
Q  dividual problem. Prerequisite, Electrical Engineering 1. Electrical
fn  Engineering 2 must have been completed or be taken co—ordinately.
 ‘ Double course. Professor Fi:l—:1·nr.xN.
  9b. Electrical Laboratory.—Required of all juniors in Engineer-
 C ing. Elective for juniors or seniors in Industrial Chemistry. This is
 E. a continuation of Course Da and is intended to parallel Course 3. Pre-
  requisite, Electrical Engineering 9a. Electrical Engineering 3 must
J  have been completed or be taken co-ordinately. Tito hours cc (lay, twice
  (L zrrck.
  Mechanics of Engineering
2 6. Analytical Niechanics.——Ztequire