xt7wdb7vqd1f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wdb7vqd1f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670323  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 23, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 23, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7wdb7vqd1f section xt7wdb7vqd1f mmt

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The Soutlis Outstanding College Daily

Thursday Evening, March 23, 1907

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol.

LVI1I, No. II!)

Instructor Listing
In Schedule Book
Cut Tor Accuracy'

Faculty names have been omitted from schedule books to
upgrade accuracy and make a trial move toward automated regis- t rat ion, according to Assistant Registrar Katherine Shelburne.
Mrs. Shelburne explained the
move as an attempt to eliminate through the college in each deinaccuracies in the listing of inpartment, she added.
Lists of instructors must now
structors which have heretofore
be submitted for scheduling at
been caused by the early assignthe beginning of the semester
ment of classes.
Elbert Ockerman prior to when courses will be
Registrar
taught. For example, departnoted that as many as 30 percent of the instructors listed a ments were to submit their
year ago for the fall term were courses and teachers for the fall
term in January.
changed.
Basically the omission is
Up until this preregistration
directed toward improving schedwhich begins Monday course
ule book accuracy, he said, with and faculty
changes in the form
"an attempt to assess students of "pink sheeting" have plagued
and departments in actually of- the Registrar's Office
according
fering courses in terms of what to Dr. Ockerman.
students need.
A pink sheet is the form used
The omission was effected
a general though not by departments to make changes
through
unanimous agreement with col- in faculty, teacher, classroom,
hour, and section assignments.
lege deans, Mrs. Shelburne said.
However, Dr. Ockerman says
Instructors' names will be listed
"there's been just a minimum of
pink sheeting and we're delighted!"
Dr. Ockerman sees no likelihood that departments will be
better able to forecast their scheduling needs. "This business of
faculty recruiting is not going
to get any better," he noted.
beginning
While part of the goal is a
Monday, should be taken seritrial movement toward partial
ously by all enrolling students,
Dr.
registration,
assistant automated
Ray Cumberledge,
says over and over Ockerman said a fully computerregistrar,
ized registration is not in sight
again.
in at least a year's time. "At
According to Mr. Cumber-ledgif "we complete 90 this point with the present comeven
percent of all the schedules for puters there simply isn't the capastudents, it will bility (of complete computer
have been useless if students registration.)"
don't take it seriously."
An IBM 360 is now being inStudents with last names bestalled, he explained, adding that
will preregis-te- r its capabilities are not fully
ginning with
March
will
known as regards registration.
the week of April
Under a completely computernoted
Failure to
ized registration, Mrs. Shelburne
Robert Larson, associate regisstudents would only
trar, will result in a $20 late explained,
ask for courses but would have
fee and the student will be reno choice of instructors, sections
quired to register during late or hours.
Faculty members would
registration in any classes which have no such choices either.
be open.
happen to
According to Mr. Larson a
"Personally, as far as I'm constudent must do four things to cerned, I'd like to reject that
he must first approach," Dr. Ockerman stated.
be
of all go to his Dean's office "The student ought to have some
for instructions where he will instructor choice at the upper
division level," he continued.
Continued On Page 7

4Il's

Important,'
Registrar Says
Of Registration

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Prof. Kenneth Boulding of the University of Michigan's Center for Conflict Resolution spoke
last night at the fifth in the series on
Non-Violenc- e.

Boulding's Lover Has Changed
An analysis of Prof. Boulding' s "contradictions" appears on
page five.
By FRANK BROWNING

Kernel Associate Editor
man who fell in love with
the America of 30 years ago,
who feels she has turned into
a bitch, sees her now on the
A

brink of:
Transformation, or
Destruction.
The potential is here for both,
Kenneth Boulding told the fifth
seminar last night,
"and it all depends on which
comes first."
Non-Violen-

Mr. Boulding, originally British, is an economist at the University of Michigan, has written extensively in the field of
theoretical communications, and
is with Michigan's Institute for
Conflict Resolution. He is also a
poet.
Nearly dancing with the excitement and conviction of his
Boulding
message the
spoke of what he termed the
"Sociosphere" or the total realm
of all the human and social
sciences, describing the peace
researcher as the man who must
introduce scientific method into
the study of international systems.

Boulding used a number of
metaphors to describe the United
States' social sensibilities on the
international level:

"The cowboy

dominates

this

ethic which
nation is

Ml Debaters Often Quiet Victors
By JO WARREN
Just about every weekend of
.
the school year the UK Debate
team is engaged in the rough
and tumble of collegiate debate.
And quite often they are quiet
victors. Quiet because normally
little attention or publicity comes
their way.
But intercollegiate debate
may provide for more competition than anything except interkm
I km
collegiate athletics.
IJ
The University's debate team
ED OCKERMAN
is a gooil example of the
Debating At UK Tourney
of intercollegiate debate. Last year the team de-- - tournament expenses. Tw o or four
bated about 330 different schools. team members are usually sent
So far this year the team has to a tournament.
As with most intercollegiate
brought home 28 trophies as well
,as several top speaker awards. competition, debating is divided
At present the UK debate team into two levels: novice or first
and operates on year (usually freshmen), and
has 28
a budget of $8,000 a ytir for

3

The team will be representing
seven-stat- e
Southeastern Rein the National Debate
gion
Finals to be held at Chicago
The berth came as
April
a result of a victory in the
regional tournament held
at the University of Alabama
last weekend.
Rodney Page and Bob Valentine will compete against 38
teams now remaining from the
original 900 collegiate debating
squads. The national tournament, conducted by the American Forensic Association, is set
up into regional and national
finals like the NCAA basketball
tournament.
the

17-1- 9.

nine-roun-

The

Page-Valenti- ne

d

combina-

tion competed against nine other
Southern colleges selected to debate in the regional based on
Continued On

l'aje

8

?ffectn
the
laughably
spaceship."
"On the whole the international system is handled with
folk knowledge, and there is very
little science one can use . We
are operated by literary knowledge which is folk knowledge
without any way of testing-bro- ad
general knowledge and very
poor samples."
"The peace researcher," he
said, "is concerned with the improvement of knowledge of the
international system."
"The end view of the peace
researcher is a reform of the
international system," he explained. "But first we have to
have a model, an approximation,
to start. We operate out of incredibly naive models the flat
earth type and it's not surprising we fall off sometimes."
No method of instrumentation
has been able to be developed,
..

he said, adding that information
about international affairs is eor-cufrom the start. "Leaders
live in an imaginary world. Anybody in that position would have
to live in an imaginary world,
charged the author of "The

Image."

He sees the hugcinstitution
be it General Motors or the United
States in a position parallel to
the schizophrenic, who sees what
he imagines he sees. "Both are
prisoners of their informational
system." And he illustrated with
the lack of information available
to President John Kennedy in
the Bay of Pigs crisis.
"Anybody in hierarchy is entrapped by information because
hierarchy is based on corrupting

information." The subordinate
tells his superior what he perceives he would like to hear,
thereby corrupting information.
Continued on Pare 3

Marshall Favors Eiidinir
All Student Deferments
By

NEIL SHEEIIAN

New York Timet Newa Service

Burke Marshall, chairman of the presidential
WASHINGTON
commission on the draft, said Wednesday that he believed virtuallv
all student deferments were basically unfair and should be abolished.
Mr. Marshall, an executive
But a student right now is given
of the International Business Mathe choice of avoiding that."
chines Corporation who formerly
"That is the greatest probheaded the Civil Rights Division
lem," he said. "Giv ing some peoin the Justice Department, also
said in congressional testimony ple that choice and not giving
all people that choice is an elethat anyone with sufficient intelment of unfairness."
ligence and means could presentMr. Marshall said he also
ly "beat the draft."
He spoke before the Senate believed that student deferments
Subcommittee on Employment, were creating resentment among
lower economic groups.
Manpower, and Poverty, which
"It seems to me," he said,
is holding hearings on the draft
"that you can't explain to
under the temporary chairmanOn Page 7
ship of Sen. Edward M. Ken-nedsome-Continy-

y,

Mr. Marshall said that

eli-

minating deferments for graduate
school students would only remove part of the inequity and
would still not eliminate the
inherent unfairness in allowing
college students the choice of
postponing service for four years
through a deferment, while
youths who lack the economic
or educational means to go to
college are not given this choice.
This inecuiit) becomes particularly unfair in a time of war,
he said.
"Right now," Mr. Marshall
said, "being drafted involves the
possibility of fighting in a war.

sn:n

Hears

:ok;

I )cl a ys En do rse men
The Student Party for Equal
Representation heard Steve Cook,
a candidate for Student Government
president,
Wednesday
night.

Party officials predicted they
would endorse a candidate for
office but not until they had
heard the other candidates in
the race.
Spokesmen indicated the
party had decided on endorsing
a candidate already in the running rather than putting up a
candidate of its own.

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Marh

V

By W. II. McNEW

The Fabulous
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UNITED

7:30 'til 10;

ARTISTS

"THE VISIT"

1

I

'til Midnight

SDS Bringing

Seeger Troupe
II ere in i pril

A troupe of five nationally
acclaimed southern folk artists
including Pete Seeger, one of the
legendary names in folk music,
will present the second annual
Southern Folk Festival here April
10 under the sponsorship of the
local chapter of Student's for a
Democratic Society.
The festival consist of workshops in the afternoon and a concert in the evening.
The performance will be at
8 p.m. in Alumni Gym. The cost

ROLL-AREN- A

NOW SHOWING!

NORTHERN

folk songs (she records for Folkways Records) Eleanor Walden,
with a repertory of ballads and
union songs, also president of the
Atlanta Folk Music Society.
The Festival, coordinated by

the Southern Student Organizing
Committee, will be touring the
South during the month of April,
appearing at 20 colleges and uni-

SCOTT'S

li

M

Sat. nights
10

Sunday night
7:30 'til 10

i

"C"'Q BERGMAN

PETE SEEGER

the juke box stopped. Two folksingers began singing
"Long Ago, Far Away."
Future programs planned by
Nearly 70 students listened the SCB include Funny Flickto Robert Walker and Jack ers, which will be shown this
Mathews Tuesday in the first Thursday and Tuesday, and the
of a new series of programs at
Pymonia Blues Band, a jug band
the Student Center Grille.
comprised of UK students, which
The programs, sponsored by will perform March 30.
the Student Center Board, will
Tuesday's performers are Unibe held twice a week in an efversity of Louisville students who
fort to draw students into the have played at the Miss UK
is $1.50.
Grille.
Others in the troupe are Mable
Pageant and the Phi Tau house.
John Southard, program diGwen Peek, a UK sophomore
Hillery of St. Simons Island,
rector, said "There's been talk came from the audience and ,Ca., a blues artist recording for
of closing the Grille at night joined them
Vanguard Records; the Rev.
because of financial difficulty."
The duo's presentation inPearly Brown, a blind street
If the activities bring more pacluded such songs as "Try to singer from Macon, Ga., accomtrons, the programs will be con"Green Back Dol- panying himself on the twelve
tinued into next year and the Remember," Had a
lar," "If I
Hammer," string guitar and bottleneck style
grille might survive. If not, the
on the six string guitar and reand Robert Walker's own comGrille will "probably" close.
position, "Gonna Take a River cording for Folk Lyrick Records;
Boat."
Esther Lefever of Atlanta, singThe cashier at the Grille said ing Appalachian mountain balbusiness was a "little betterthan lads and playing the autoharp;
usual, not much, just a little." Bernice Reagon, of Albany, Ga.,
She added that "no one knew wearing the colorful clothes remC
about the new program."
iniscent of her African heritage,
ind singing traditional Negro

with JAMES COBURN

BBS

Show-time-

At 8 p.m.

Mm

COLOR

for mature audiences

Recommended

Foi
prrtenlt

Century

of the fashion models who arc
so slim as to inspire Tri Quang
to go back on his diet.
In sum, "Blow-Up-"
is well
worth the seeing. It is colorful,
philosophical, and entertaining.
If you don't care for one aspect,
you can ignore it and enjoy the
s
others.
are 7:10 and
9:15. It is advisable to begin
"Blow-Up- "
at the beginning.

Grille Programs Begin
REITER

NOW!

Production

Pooti

caught the contrast between the

There is a plot (not always
sure thing in an Antonioni

a

National Society
of Film Critics

A

frame is mini-

teeny-boppe- rs

nHow
OF

It is refreshing to find a movie
hero who not only works at his
job but is also competent at it.
Vanessa Redgrave is not on the
screen often, but when she is,
she is all there. When she is not,
she is missed. The supporting
characters seem authentic to mod
London or at least to those imitations of mod London which entertain us daily.
The star of "Blow-Up- "
is
Antonioni, the director. He started in movies as a cinemato-graphe- r,
and all of his pictures
have been distinguished for their
technical excellence. He has

semi-rap-

Govt.

d

vincing.

mal, one day from the life of a
swinging London photographer.
A number of episodes
cluster
within that frame, and among
them are things for everyone.
A most elegant pot party, a
rock 'n roll riot, and the
e
of the hero by a pair of
lithe and eager
all
help pace the action. Whether
they contribute anything to the
plot is debatable. Whether they
should or not is what "Blow-Up- "
is about.

Upper Lounge

London which grew up after the
Great Fire and the City of Tomorrow with its grim massive
buildings whose only virtue,
seemingly, is to appear less than
they are.
His use of color is neither
gaudy nor glorious, but natural.
Cinematographicdc vices abound,
but seldom obtrude. Antonioni's
manipulation of light on the
hero's three visits to the park
which is the center of the plot
is matched only by his treatment

mid-poin-

"Blow-Up,- "
now showing at the
Cinema, is at least ambiguous
in that it may or may not be
ambiguous. Antonioni flirts with
the unities, but his movie is made
in the light of "The Stranger"
and "The Trial;" so questions
of significance andmeaningmust
be matters for the individual who
cares to wonder.

Featuring

p.m.

movie), but it does not surface
t
of the show.
until the
David I lemmings, as the photographer who makes the pictures
which give "Hlow-Up- "
and blow-up- s
its title and plot, is con-

Antonioni's

Michelangelo

2

l7

Cinema: 'Blow Up' Worth Seeing

c essLon

Jam

2.1,

BELTLINE

versities.
Both the workshops and concert here are open to the public.
Tickets will be available at Ken-

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TBUKSVAT EVENING
Evening Cnrrt. rrank:
"PrWude. Aria, Finale"
March of
"Ttw Hard Way Back"
Live of Harry Lime:
"Oraen Welts"
Hews
Beethoven:
Maaterworlcs,
"Trio in E Flat"
"Doctor Patient
Viewpoint:
Relationship"
FEJBAY AFTEENOON
Sign on: News. Music
Afternoon Concer, Chopin:
"Piano Concerto No. 1"
It Happened Today: News
BBC World Report

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NICHOLS
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ernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lex.
Ington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
E"!1?"? Pald t Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 41MMJ.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
the Cadet In 1894 and
as the Kernel
published
since 1913. continuously

* wr,mt

mim

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thtirtav( Marh

2.1, l'M,7- -1

Boulding Explains 'Academic' Role Of Peace Researcher
Continued From Tare

1

"How many steps are there
between the private in Vietnam
who knows what's happening and
President Johnson?" he asked.
Moulding went on to describe
what he feels is a further corruption of America, the acquisition of power.
"Anybody in the position of
power is more mentally ill than
anyone not holding it. Anyone
who wants power is mentally
ill. A man has to be crazy to
want to be a college president."
He substantiated his argument, calling attention to great
economic and social achievements made by the
holders of the world, namely
Japan, Sweden, Iceland, and
others.
Yet, he sees the world as
essentially moving out of the
power worship situation, moving out of "the age of civilization, which was a deplorable
age," he said.
"For the last 300 years we
have entered into a new evolutionary year." (Social evolution, he said, is "the process
of increasing knowledge where
social progress produces more
knowledge than is consumed.")
This new evolutionary year,
as he calls it, has rendered violence obsolete and was brought
into being by the testing and
sampling scientific method.
"Exploitation of man has become obsolete. Imperialism is
obsolete. Violence is obsolete.
And being a great power is for
the birds."
A man interested in the effect of "disaster," Dr. Boulding
called the best thing in economic
development a "thorough military defeat." He points tojapan,
where he says that after defeat
an entire system has been
changed. "Children are twice as
rich as their parents. Just think
what you can do with science
and technology when you aren't
a great power."
Working from that basis,
Boulding outlines four phases:
1. Stable war;
non-pow-

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Unstable war;
Unstable peace;
Stable peace;
The degree of intensity toward
stable war, he said, is the level
of the threat system whore
"armed forces arc not intended
to be used except essentially as
a threat. Yet, he noted, a stable
threat system cannot exist since
threats must be reinforced or
will suffer depreciation. "There
must be a positive probability
that they will be carried out."
"It is a hopeless illusion that
the present international system
can exist. It's bound to meet
destruction."
The only alternative to destruction as the reinforcement to
threat, he claims, is the tendency
toward "warmth in the international system" achieved
through various cultural exchanges and "expressions of affections.
"We have a stable peace in
parts of the international system.
Anything that exists is possible,"
he quipped philosophically.
2.
3.
4.

"The idea that the U.S. is
peaceable country is nonsense," he commented, however.
"We're a highly military couna

try.

"A total transformation of our
society" has occurred in the last
30 years, lie said, noting the rise
of the war industry and decline
of agriculture.
"Our acceptance of the draft
is indication of our moving up
the visualization of peace as the
norm to the state of an unstable
war.

"If you want to avoid the
draft, I think you should," he
declared with a ring in his voice.
"We ought to have an underground railroad to Canada!
After all, it's just like slavery."
"It's all right to be inhuman.
he
It's not to be
described as the general outlook.
"It's a small planet. It's a
nice planet. How about being
human?" he asked in a quiet,
friendly tone.
This is Kenneth Boulding' s

of the fresh, naiv e, humane girl
America he married 30 years ago
and still holds optimistically as
wife.

"The development of a world
community creeps up on us. The
hope is that there is a creeping
warmth."
"There are islands of stable
peace because of the warmth in
the system. It is very unlikely
France and Germany will ever
go to war again. And Japan
enjoys being a protectorate of
the U.S., getting richer.

Kenneth Boulding is optimisabout the United States
making what he terms the neces-sartic

y

transformation

going to develop in the next 23
years as we've done economically in the last 23. This is the
role of the ieace researcher."

Art Film Series Presents

..

.

"ISIGIIT AND FOG"
Alain Reshais

7:00 p.m.

vXietus

Jbiing the gangV

Student Center Theater

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a

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"warmth." "I'm quite sure we're

complaint about the corruption

PARTY.

tasty

is
"Your
your
military
enemy," he charged. "It screws
the da lights out of you. It says,
'ask not boys' and it's about
time somebody asked!"

T?ne 2""94U

V

N

* The Kentucky Kernel
The Smith's Outstanding College Daily
Unimhsity ok Kknivcky
BSTAHLLSIIED

1894

TlltmSDAY,

Stkvk

11(m:co,

M.

Ghant,

.xcTx-wm- r
,

MAHCII

23, l!K7

Editorials represent the (yjnnions of the Editors, not of the University.

Waltkh

7

I

"

t

t

r

.

rx.y

Editor-in-Chi-

Editorial Vagc Editor

William Knatp,

Business Manager

The Guam Conference
in reaching the conference table,"
the decision at Guam seems to be
further escalation of the war in
Vietnam. President Johnson has
realized that the present military
strategy could involve the U.S. in
a war for another decade or two
before there could be any decisive

President Johnson, in a press
conference in Washington following his recent trip to Guam,
described the present time as a
"favorable turning point" in the
war in Vietnam. But little evidence has been forthcoming from
the conference, in which Johnson
spoke to South Vietnamese Premier Nguyen Cao Ky and Chief
of State Nguyen Van Thieu, to
support this statement.
With the disclosure Tuesday
that the President had written personally to Ho Chi Minh to propose peace talks and that he had
been flatly refused, it became more
and more apparent that the United
States must at least cease the bombing of North Vietnam before such
talks can come about.
One chance to bring matters to
the negotiation table was probably ruined by the U.S. when
President Johnson ordered a renewal of the bombing after temporarily extending the bombing
pause beyond the Tet cease fire. It
was at that time that U.N. SecretU Thant said, "If
ary-General
it (the extended pause) means cessation of bombing, then I believe
that meaningful talks will take
place within a few weeks." When
the bombing was resumed shortly
thereafter, it was reported by the
Washington Post that "UN sources
statesaid the Secretary-General- 's
ment was based on firm informa-

outcome.

'If

fcf

j

pi

He is at a crossroads,

where he can either lessen military activity, particularly through
the stopping of bombing, and show
a sincere interest in peace talks.
Or, he can push the war further,
including additional bloodshed and
suffering by American youth caught
on the battlefield and by a nation

that has suffered

for generations.
most unfortu-

Apparently, and
nately, he took the latter decision
at Guam.
Another shortcoming of the
Guam Conference was the fact that
it was hastily thrown together and
was quite threadbare. It was exhaustive for all concerned, and the
.

efforts are not reflected in achieve-- !
ments.
The pacification program is an
example of this. Last Sunday, the
Los Angeles Times reported: "There
is . . . evidence that the pacification program the effort to win
over the South Vietnamese people
in permanent, meaningful support
of the Saigon government is begin-

ning to bear fruit.
"It is the pacification program
that will get the major share of the
tion."
attention at Guam."
The reason President Johnson
Yet, the New York Times News
gave for ending the bombing pause Service reported Tuesday, "What
was that North Vietnam was in many American officials considered
creasing its supply movement. the most pressing business of the
What was not mentioned is that Guam conference was left undone
during the same period, according at the meeting.
to the Chicago Daily News Service,
"According to authoritative
"on . . . the first full day of the sources, the
participants never
cease-fira one-da- y
record of2,762
really came to grips with the probtons was set for American cargo lems of the crucial
pacification
delivered by air to units in the
program for South Vietnam. Nor
field."
did they work out the allocation
The Washington Post, during of responsibility for it within the
the same period, reported: "At the soon to be reorganized American
State Department, a spokesman Embassy in Saigon."
said the United States was conThe summation of the success
tinuing its resupply. In answer to of the Guam conference seemed to
how this differed from what the be captured by President Johnson
North Vietnamese were doing in at his news conference when he
their supply efforts, the State De- said, "I think we have a difficult,
partment spokesman said: 'The serious, long, drawn-ou- t,
agonizing
United States is in South Vietnam problem that we do not yet have
to assist in resisting aggression. The the answer for."
difference is a difference of intent.
We do not question the fact
The military resupply activity be- that President Johnson is making
ing carried on by the North Viet- sincere efforts to do something
namese is clear evidence of their about the war in Vietnam. We do
intent to continue their aggressive very seriously question his apaction against a soverign nation
proach. He seems to think the only
an aggression which the U.S. is answer is to draw us in deeper
and deeper, to incur more sufferhelping combat'."
Such information makes the ing under the flag of preventing
President's excuse to resume bomb- aggression when we, in fact, are
the aggressors, instead of showing
ing seem pretty flimsy.
Despite the fact that our bomb- a concerted effort to reach discusing is directly related to a delay sion at the conference table.
e,

--

--

--

"Personally, It Makes

Me Feel Very

Proml."

Letters To The Editor:

Sivarls Answers Rebuttals
To the Editor of the Kernel:
tering University student, but it
I should like to reply at least should follow its own advice and
in some measure to the rebuttals wake up to the reality of the sitappearing in the March 9 Kernel uation.
to my letter of March 3.
Referring to your editorial exFirst, to the incoherent babbl- pressing the view that underclassings of Robert Fleischman, I care men should not be required to live
only to reply that, contrary to his in campus housing, I question your
insinuation, I am a member of no analysis of the average freshman
organization, either governmental just entering the University.
or
and any or
Perhaps from the vantage point
of several years of college the eninion I may express is intended to
be representative of no organiza- tering freshman profits from the
tion or person other than myself. maturity generally present in the
Secondly, to Michael Urquhart, University population. However,
who called my letter a perfect ex- the major part of this maturity is
ample of something less than nice: gained not during the senior year
I thank you for the compliment,
in high school when all is gay and
but I assure you that I am my- prestige and norms are enforced by
self somewhat less than perfect, and family and friends, but instead it
am therefore incapable of producing is gained during the freshman year
at college when the student is" conanything perfect.
fronted with sharply contrasting
After wading through your
I find norms and the necessity for makIssueums, however,
your point to be well taken. But ing decisions.
Dorm living fits in here not as
if the manner in which many universities in this country are oper- a crutch or deficient substitute for
ated is any indication of how your home and mama, but as a forum
"intellectual community" would in human interaction in which the
approach politics, I think we should strength and contrast of numbers
keep our scholars in the classrooms aid adjustment and confirm conwhere they will not be taken servictions. The freshman gains maaciously. I maintain my original turity and the
stand.
it by experience, which
companying
Finally, I might add I found necessarily takes time.
it quite amusing that both you
So the University is acting on
gentlemen should so criticize my good reason in requiring freshmen
argumentative abilities, whilewrit-in- g to live in dorms while increasing
such imperfect letters your- in the maturity necessary for makselves. Let's keep up the good ing
g
decisions.
humor work, boys; it makes the
FAlen O'Daniel
Kernel almost fun to read fo