xt7wh707xg04 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wh707xg04/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1916 yearbooks ukyrbk1916 English Benson Printing Company, Nashville, Tennessee Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection The Kentuckian Volume XII text The Kentuckian Volume XII 1916 2012 true xt7wh707xg04 section xt7wh707xg04 /
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B ENSON
PR I NTI N G COM PA NY
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KNOWLEDGE
Ex Lib
ns
 THE
KENTUCKIAN
VOLUME XII
PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS OF NINETEEN SIXTEEN
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
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Cla.


DEDICATION
TO
PRESIDENT
EMERITUS
JAMES KENNEDY
PATTERSON
IN APPRECIATION
OF HIS FORTY-FIVE YEARS
OF EARNEST SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY,
WE DEDICATE THIS BOOK
THE
KENTUCKIAN




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FOREWORD
THE "KENTUCKIAN" RECALLS AT ONCE MEMORIES OF THOSE HARDY PIONEERS WHO FIRST JOURNEYED TO OUR STATE AND ASSUMED THE ENORMOUS TASK OF BUILDING A COMMONWEALTHOF DANIEL BOONE AND THE REST. AS A RECORD OF ONE YEAR IT SEEKS TO INSPIRE CONFIDENCE IN THE HEARTS OF ALL KENTUCKIANS, TO FILL THEM WITH THE SAME SPIRIT OF ADVENTURE AS WAS IN OUR FOREFATHERSTO DARE AND DO EVERYTHING FOR OUR STATE. REVEALING ALSO WHAT HAS BEEN DONE IN THE PAST, ITS AIM IS TO POINT OUT THE BRIGHT HOPES OF THE FUTURE. TAKE IT AND KEEP IT AND LET IT BE FOR YOU   MEMORY'S   STOREHOUSE
 SWEET   MEMORIES   LINGER   ALWAYS
(9) Ace Cla:
LET US WALK ALONG THE DRIVE
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(10) 			Wi
			
			
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WHERE   BODIES   BIG  AND  STRONG   ARE   BUILDED
(II) ----- "   '
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BENEATH   THE   DROOPING   WILLOW   TREES

"

(12)
 OUR  PRESIDENT
(13) 21*
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COME AND TRIP IT AS WE GO,  ON THE  LIGHT FANTASTIC TOE
(14) 
ALONG THE SHADED PATHS WE WALKED
(15) THE OLD MAIN
(16)
 WHERE OFT WE STROLLED WHEN LOVE WAS YOUNG
(17) .11
A
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RETORT AND CRUCIBLE AND SUNDRY THINGS
(18) -,
THE SEAR BROWN LEAVES ARE FALLING FAST
(19) ALL THE WORLD SEEMED COVER'D WITH WHITE
(20) (21) 
(22)
  (24)
 3
c3Txe "Tdeniuckian r
(25)
1916 M

 "4
 rfdentuclcian
PRESIDENT   BARKER
(26)  Starker att&
N unquenchable good nature, a spirit of progress, generosity and firmness have made President Henry S. Barker beloved by the student body and friends of the University.
In the five years of his administration much good has been accomplished. Various departments have been given new life by his favor and encouragement, and new departments have been added, causing the institution to grow in numbers and influence. Under his guidance a certain unity has been brought about, which has made possible the advancement of recent years. Where there were 721 students in 1910, there are 1,445 enrolled for the 1915-1916 session. Likewise, the number of graduates has been almost doubled.
One of the remarkable features of the progress of the institution is the growth of the College of Agriculture. Five years ago there were twenty students enrolled in the four-year course of the college. Now there are 253. The work has been done with a thoroughness that has placed graduates of the college in demand. A new interest in agriculture has been aroused over the State, and farmers are depending on the college and the experiment station as never before. Able authorities say they expect the College of Agriculture to be vitally concerned with the advancement of Kentucky along all agricultural lines in the future.
The College of Arts and Science, under the capable leadership of Dean Arthur M. Miller, has become the leading college of the University in numbers, having sixty-six in the graduating class. This college has done much and will doubtless do more to place the University in the front of all Southern institutions. One of its most flourishing departments is the School of Journalism, directed by Professor Enoch Grehan. Although in only its second year, this department has about eighty students doing practical work in journalism. The course has been elaborated with its growing numbers, showing an increase of about one hundred per cent.
The College of Civil Engineering is rapidly gaining strength under Dean Walter E. Rowe. Especially good work is done by this college in its short courses, whereby county engineers are given technical training. It has done much to help along the movement for good roads in the State.
Dean C. J. Norwood is directing the College of Mines and Metallurgy very ably. The graduating class this year is small, but the underclasses are large, and much interest is taken in the work. Undergraduates of the college have handled responsible positions in mining engineering during summer months, being ranked favorably with graduates of other institutions.
The Graduate School has had an unusual growth since its establishment within the, last four years. Dean Mackenzie 'has handled its work with a vim and enthusiasm that has demanded recognition in nearly half the States of the Union.
(27) rfeniucltian
The College of Law has advanced until it is accredited as a leading law school of the South. The course in court practice, handled by Dean W. T. Lafferty, is rated as perhaps the best in the United States. Its growth in the past few years has been very gratifying to its head and the University officials.
The development of fundamental characteristics of successful engineers, such as strict obedience, application, personality, tenacity, and all the other fine traits of men like Steinmetz, Westinghouse, Carty, Edisonsuch is the one great purpose of the College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. It consists of five departments the departments of drawing, practical mechanics, mechanics of engineering, heat engineering, and electrical engineering. The fact that only one degree, Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, is given from this college is significant. The young men studying for mechanical, electrical, commercial, or any other branch of dynamic engineering, receive the same traininga broad general course in the fundamentals of both mechanical and electrical engineering, as well as industrial and commercial principles.
This policy has proven its soundness by the unqualified success of the Kentucky mechanical and electrical engineers in all branches of the profession and in all countries of the globe.
This is the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. When the Class of 1916 leave to take up work in the positions chosen from among the hundred opportunities available, more than four hundred, graduates will be demonstrating to the world that the Kentucky-trained mechanical and electrical engineer faces the great problems of engineering with courage, ability and stamina equal to that of any graduate from America's foremost technical universities.
(28)
1916*

 cd7iQ Tden/uckian

 Intensify, cr "Patter

ESS than three-score years ago, among the many colleges west of the Alleghenies, University of Kentucky had its beginning. Nature could not have provided a better location than the heart of the Bluegrass, famous for its pasture lands and horses, its hospitality and friendship. The heavens sent the rain, the sun shone upon the earth, the birds sang, the flowers grew, Jupiter nodded, and Athena smiled; and ere the morning sun had far advanced the Potter's Shop was started.
Its path of progress has not been strewn with flowers, nor cheeks been kissed by every breeze. Assailed by storm and blast alike, it has stood the test. "The rains came, the waters descended, and the wind beat upon that house, but it fell not." Its base was laid on firm ground. Jealous, rivals have sought to hinder, but their thorns have brought forth roses dripping with dew. Their hindrances have been of little significance and consequence. The growth has been slow and steady; day by day a board was nailed and a plank was laid, until the shop was completed.
The potter gave his life to the building of the shop and the forming of Kentucky's shapeless clay. The pots turned out have been carrier afar, for Kentucky's soil is conducive to the making of men. From her soil have come the Breckenridges, the Clays, and Calhouns. The University of Kentucky has become the leading Potter Shop of Kentucky in standards of merit. The field is boundless from which to draw, and "State"  always gets the best.
It does not excel in numbers nor in wealth, but it puts on its outturned products a stamp of worth which bears them far and well among the children of men. Merit is its motto; and its aim is an open road and a fair fight for all. It gives every mass of clay a chance to help shape and mold himself. He is essentially instrumental in his own making, it matters not where he may be, but here he is given an unusual chance to show his initiative and originality. If an individual has been here for four years and has been marred in the making, it is the fault of the pot, and not the potter. Over every classroom door might well be put the lines:
"Honor and shame from no condition rise; Act  well   your  part,   there   all   the  honor   lies."
Though yet still young, "State" has sent many able men into many lands. It always holds its own- among rivals, often outclassing them on every hand, and bids fair to become the leading University of the South. In a few years we hope to see it take a place of merit among the leading universities of the land, a "Potter Shop" of unusual rank, turning out vessels of purest clay, bearing nature's noblest stamp, women among women, and men among men.
(29)
1916  DEAN   MILLER
 of Arts atrft
COME with me and I will take you through the halls where men love art for art's sake,   and science  for  its  own  sake.    We   are  they who  ponder.    We love to sit in our high,  lonely towers, where we may "unsphere the spirit of Plato."     No   thought  of   gold   corrupts   our   eager  brains.    "Why   cram  your  heads with  something which you  cannot  sell?"  they  taunt;   "ransack your brain  and you cannot  find  one  thing that you  can commercialize."     Be  it so,   for we  submit;   our doom is fair.     But we would rather let you have the gold if you will leave us our arts   and   sciences;   if   you  will  promise  never   to  harass  us   more  with   taunts   and stones of the poor cricket who, hungry and cold, went to ihe house of an ant  for succor.
(31)
1916 (Holtege of Arts atto &ronre
FACULTY
Arthur McQuiston Miller, M.A. Dean  of the  College  of Arts and Science, Professor of Geology
Columbus R. Melcher, M.A. Dean  of Men, Professor of  German
M.  Hume  Bedford,  Ph.D. Instructor in Physical Chemistry
Ralph Emerson Bitner, B.S. Instructor  in  Physics
Paul Prentice Boyd, Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics, Head of  the Department
William E. Butt, M.A. Instructor   in   Economics
George Marshall Baker, M.A. Associate  Professor  of Education
Harry S. Cannon, M.A. Instructor in German
Sarah Marshall Chorn, M.A. Instructor in German
Lloyd C.-Daniels, Ph.D. Assistant  Professor   of   Chemistry
Lehre L. Dantzler, M.A. Professor of English Lileralure
Joseph Morton Davis, M.A.
Professor of Mathematics
Anna Jackson Hamilton, M.A.
Dean of  Women, Associate Professor of English
Edward F. Farquhar, M.A.
Professor of English Literature
Derrill W. Hart, B.A.
Fellow   in   English
Theodore T. Jones, M.A.
Professor of Latin, Head of the Department
Mervin Joe Kelley, B.S.
Instructor  in  Physics ClNCINNATUS  D.  KlLLEBREW, M.S.
Associate Professor of Physics Alexander St. Clair Mackenzie
M.A., Lit.D., LL.D.
Dean    of   the   Graduale   School,   Professor   of Philology
Ralph  Nelson  Maxon,  Ph.D. Professor  of Inorganic  Chemistry
J. R. Mitchel, B.A. Instructor   in   Chemistry
James Thomas Cotton Noe, M.A. Professor of Education, Head of the Department
Merry Lewis Pence, M.S. Professor  of  Physics,   Head  of  the  Department
Joseph W. Pryor, M.D.
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, Head of the   Department
Elijah  L.  Rees,  C.E.,  M.A. Associate Professor of Mathematics
McHenry Rhoads, M.A., Ph.M. Professor  of Secondary  Education
Francis Jewell,  B.A. Fellow   in   English
Reuben  T.  Taylor,  M.A. Instructor  in   English
Glanville Terrell,  Ph.D. Professor of Gree\, Head of the Department
John  J.  Ticert,  M.A.  (Oxon) Professor of Philosophy, Head of the Deparlmenl
James  E.  Tuthill,  Ph.D.
Professor   of   History   and   Political   Economy,
Head of  the Department
Franklin E. Tuttle, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry, Head of the Department
William S. Webb, M.S.
Professor of Physics
A. H. Waitt, B.S.
Instructor in Chemistry
W. H. Staebner, B.A.
Instructor in Chemistry
Alfred C. Zembrod, M.A.
Professor   of  Modern   Languages,   Head   of   the
Department
*
(32) 97ie Ittenfuckian
DEAN  GREHAN
 nf Slaurnaltam
THE  School of Journalism has had a wonderful  growth during the two years of its existence under the able guidance of its head,  Mr. Grehan, assisted by Miss   McLaughlin.     It  has   earned   the   reputation  of  being   the   "busiest"  department  on  the  campus.    Aiming  to  turn  out young men  and women  prepared  to enter the  active field of journalism,  it serves  also to exploit  the  University  through local   and state papers.    Filling the need  of  a shop wherein  to  train young people for   the  growing   industry   of   the   age,   this   department  seems   destined   to   assume  a high  position  as  a  unit in  a rapidly  progressing  University.
FACULTY
Enoch  Grehan,  B.A. Professor of Journalism, Dean of the Deparlmenl
Marguerite McLaughlin, B.A. Instructor   in   Journalism
Mary Christine Hopkins, B.A. Fellow  in Journalism
(33)

1916*
38? /
DEAN   KASTLE
 of Agriculture
COME  hither,   all  ye who  love  the  life of  quiet  simplicitythe  one  of   true happiness   and   independence.    It   allows   one   to   roam   among   the   meadow grasses with  the  cows,  and pick the meadow   flowers.    He can  listen  to  the sweet sounds of evening,  as darkness  lets down its sable shroud over the earth  and he returns to his well-earned restthe singing milkmaid,  the contented, lowing herd, the happy calls of playing children, and the softly tinkling bells of the distant flocks. No   discordant   note   from   the  world   outside   can   enter   the  quietness   of   his   own domain to disturb him.    This is the life of the gods who on Olympus dwelt.
(34)
 ^c?C ...  ^ rfr&   iron			
	(Mler;? at Agrtmltttre		
	FACULTY		
			
Joseph Hoeing Kastle, Ph.D.		Perry Elmer Karraker, M.A.	
Dean of the College of Agriculture and Director		Assistant  Professor   of   Soils	
of  the  Kentucky  Experiment  Station			
		Edmund J. Kinney,  B.S.Agr.	
	W. S. Anderson, M.A.	Professor   of  Agronomy	
	Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry		
		Rudolph  E. Knapp, B.S.	
	Charles D. Bohannon, B.A.	(University of  Michigan)	
	Professor  of Agricultural  Economics	Assistant  Professor   of   Bacteriology	
	Ruby  Mildred  Buckman,   B.A.,  B.S.	Clarence W. Mathews, B.S.  (Cornell)	
	Assistant Professor of Household Arts	Professor of Horticulture	
	John   Henry   Carmcdy,   B.S.Agr.	Frank  T.  McFarland,   B.S.	
	Assistant   Professor   of   Horticulture	(Ohio  State  University)	
		Instructor in Botany	
	Aubyn Chinn, B.A.		
	Assistant of Home  Economics	Dillion   S.   Meyer,   B.S.Agr.	
		Instructor in Farm Crops	
	Otto  S.  Crisler,  D.V.M.		
	Assistant  of   Veterinary  Science	William D. Nichols, B.S.	
		(University of Kentucky)	
	Harrison  Garman	Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry	
	Professor of Entomology end Zoology	Robert L.  Pontius,  V.S.	
	Albert  Halley Gilbert,  M.S.	Assistant Professor of  Veterinary Science	
	(University of Wisconsin)		
	Associate Professor of Botany	George Roberts, M.S. (University of Kentucky)	
	Fred W. Hofmann, M.S.	Professor  of  Agronomy	
	(Univesity  of   Nebraska)		
	Assistant   Professor   of   Horticulture	Wallace  V.  Smith,   B.S.	
		(University of Kentucky)	
	J. J. Hooper, M.S.A. (Iowa State College)	Assistant  in  Animal  Husbandry	
	Professor   of  Animal   Husbandry	Charles Francis Stiles, B.S.	
	Roger  W.  Jones	Assistant in Entomology and Zoology	
	Instructor  in Fertilizers and  Feeds		
		Mary E. Sweeny, M.S.,  M.A.	
	Joseph Hoeing Kastle, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins)	Head of Department of Home Economics	
1	Robert   Graham,   D.V.M.	Walter R. Pinnell, M.D.	:
Professor of Veterinary Science		Associate  Professor   of  Bacteriology	
	Clara Waland White	Edwin Stanton Good, M.S.	
	Instructor in the Department of Home Economics	Professor  of Animal  Husbandry	
1	(35; ft-                                                       1f\	If* r-------------r*-rr------==e^	J
			
  i
$ cd7ie "Tdeniuckian


DEAN ROWE
(Etml iEngtttemng
HERE is the college for you who would live the picturesque life of the open. It has been proved quite often that there is no better way to win the heart of  a sweet,  unsophisticated maiden  than to work as a civil engineer in her neighborhood.    This profession has grown in popularity, despite  that  fact,  and it is recognized  now   as  being  one   of   the  most   important  of   all.    Kentucky   and  many other slates have  realized   the  importance  of  civil  engineers  and  have  looked with much favor on Dean Rowe's graduates and undergraduates.
(36)
1916

 ^feentuckian        jggg

FACULTY
Walter Ellsworth Rowe, B.S., C.E. Dean of the College and Professor of Civil Engineering
Robert Graig Terrel,  C.E. Professor of Rural and Highway Engineering, Head of the Department
William  Joseph  Carrel,  B.S.,  C.E.
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, Head of the Department of Bridge
Engineering
Daniel V. Terrell, B.C.E. Acling Professor of Rural and Highway Engineering
(37)

1916
        i
7?enfuc/cian

DEAN LAFFERTY
 of IGaur
I COUNT   myself   happy   that   I   have   the   opportunity   of   speaking   in   my   own behalf,"  says   the   amiable  young   lawyer.      It  will  surprise  you   to  learn   how long he  can  talk,  even   to the extent of  "out-senatoring"  some of  our national Senators.    He is shrewd in his argument even  to the point  of sophistry.    His eyes are  keen   and   darting.    He  learns   the  tricks  of   mankind   from  his  many  dealings with all types of humanity.    How is it possible for him to keep his moral balance, when he is continually dealing with the infinite crimes and misdeeds of man?     Herein lies the secret.    He loves his work, for he vindicates the innocent.    He would lose his  own   life   rather   than   allow   one   innocent  man   to  be   punished.    Justice   is   his theme,  and his plea for justice makes him right and keeps him optimistic.
(38)
1916
 
 nf
FACULTY
William   Thornton   Lafferty,   M.A. Dean  of College,  Professor  of Law
Charles Kerr Professor   of   Law
Lyman Chalkley, LL.B. Professor   of  Law
James Richard Bush, B.A. Associate Professor of Law
George William  Vaughn, LL.B. Associate  Professor   of  Law
J. Embry Allen, B.A. Associate  Professor   of  Law
Reuben Brent Hutchcraft, B.A., LL.B. Professor   of  Law
(39) r
 rfdeniucltian
DEAN ANDERSON
tral attb l-lwtriral lEttgutming
"Hence,   home,   you   idle   creatures,   get   you   home. Is  this  a holiday?     What,  know you not, Being mechanical, you  ought not walk Upon a laboring day without the sign Of your profession?     Speak, what trade art thou?
'Why,   sir,   a  carpenter.' Where  is  thy  leather apron and thy rule?"
Here's to the lad who works with handsand brainand with earth-made implements conquers the earth and makes her his. He has learned here in the University of Kentucky what a ten-year mechanic will tell him, that if he expects to hold a good job he must resolve to work sixteen hours a day, and seven days a week. But they are the men we must honor and revere, for the man who acts is the man to whom the world will look eventually for support.
(40)
31916
58? 
(ttolfcge of itofjatttral nnh Hwirtral Ettgtomttg

FACULTY
Frederick  Paul Anderson, M.E. Dean  of  College,  Professor  of Mechanical Engineering
Leon   Kaufman   Frankel,   M.E. Professor  of Applied Mechanics,  Head  of Department of Mechanics of Engineering
William Edwin Freeman, E.E.
Professor   of   Electrical   Engineering,   Head   of
Department
Louis Edward Nollau, M.E. Professor of Drawing, Head of Department
Arza Lytle Wilhoite,  M.E. Assistant Professor  in  Steam  Engineering
John Sherman Horine, M.E. Assistant Professor of Drawing
John James Curtis,  M.E. Assistant  Professor  in   Testing of Materials
Perry  Rogan  Cassidy,  B.M.E. Assistant   Professor   in   Thermodynamics
Joseph  Dicker Superintendent  of Shops
John B. Dicker Instructor  m   JYoodshop
Gordon Thurman Instructor   in   Steam   and  Electrical  Laboratories
James  Ray  Duncan,  B.M.E. Instructor   in   Electrical   Engineering
Margaret McPherson Instructor  in  Freehand  Drawing
(41)

1916 MM


DEAN  NORWOOD
 nf
 anft

"Surely  (here is  a mine  for silver, And   a place  for  gold  which   they  refine. Iron is taken out of the earth, And   brass   is   molten   out   of   the   stone."
He breaks open a shaft far from the haunts of men. Into the path which the bird of prey knows, which the falcon's eye has seen, where the fierce lion walks, and the proud beasts pass, there is the place where our mining engineer goes. He leaves his footprints in the sands of gold. He puts forth his hand upon the flinty rock, and overturns the mountains by the roots. He cuts out passages among the rocks, and his eye sees every precious thing.
(42)
1916
 "Tdeniuckian
Faculty
Charles Joseph Norwood, M.S. Dean of College, Professor of Mining and Metallurgy
Thomas James Barr, B.M.E. Professor   of   Mining   Engineering
Ivan Poppers Tashof, .M. Instructor  in  Mining  and  Assaying
Joseph Walker Reed Instructor in Examination of Mine Air
(43)
1916
            ,
DEAN   MACKENZIE
THE question of organizing a Graduate School was brought to the attention of the former Committee on Degrees  and  Diplomas by  Dr.   Mackenzie,  Head of the Department of English.     This was done in view of the increase in applications coming before this committee for such work as is generally conducted in a Graduate School. By resolution of the Board of Trustees, in Executive Committee April 12, 1912, the Graduate School was created and Dr. Mackenzie was made Dean.    Professors Lyman Chalkley, L. K. Frankel, F. E. Tuttle, and J. E. Tuthill were appointed on the Graduate School Committee.
The first regular meeting of the Graduate School Committee was held November 27, 1912, and since that time the School has grown steadily in numbers and in prestige. The enrollment for the current year is eighty-three, which compared with fifty-six of last year, shows a greater growth than that of any similar organization in America.
There  are  resident  students  enrolled  in  the Graduate  School   from  Pennsylvania,
(44)

1916 Tdentucltian

Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Indiana, and other States. There are also non-resident students in West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Texas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Florida, Michigan, and elsewhere, which gives some idea of the scope of the influence of the school.
The work done by students in the Graduate School is of a very high grade, and it is believed that under the capable leadership of Dr. Mackenzie it will grow even more in numbers and influence, so that it will receive recognition throughout the country.
GRADUATE SCHOOL COMMITTEE
(45)  cJientucIcian

CLASSES
.....................I
SENIORS
ALUMNI
JUNIORS
SOPHOMORES
FRESHMEN
(47)
H
i I I
H
IS
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I
IB
         ;       ,
l^enfucfcian

O.   M.   Edwards.........
Mary Howard........
W. P. Mayo......
Mary Louise Dougherty Rebecca  Smith Ina  Darnall H. Felix    . Julius  Wolf G. C. Wilson  .    . C. R. Barker  ....
R. E. Cullen......
Herbert   Graham......
(Elans
..............President
..........Vice-President
..........   Treasurer
.......Secretary
.....Prophet
.....Historian
.....Crumbier
.....Orator
.  Class Representative
..........Poet
.....Ctfiorian, Manager Keniuc\ian
.....Edilor-in-Chief Kenlucfyian
(48)

31916

 The T^enfucltian

SENIOR CLASS
Russell Foster Albert, B.C.E. Elizabethtown
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Tau Beta Pi; Prize Drill Battalion 1,  Captain  :;,  Major i;  B.  C.  E.  S.
Russell has been recognized as the leading military man of our class. As acting commandant he showed initiative, executive ability, and foresight. In his enthusiasm over preparedness he seems to have concluded that all "Folks"  should  have  a soldier  around.
Lawrence M. Amburgy, B.S. Agr.
Hindman Agricultural   Society.
"Skinny" conceived a powerful liking for girls and dancing during the latter part of his term, and has devoted a considerable part of his time to it. His favorite haunt has been the Country Club.
Maryland D. Amburgy, B.S. Agr. Hindman
Class  Treasurer  4;  Agricultural   Society.
M. D. always attended strictly to business, and "set no houses afire" in a social way. He did get what he came here for, however, and we suppose he is satisfied. In  his  own  way he should  reap  a  rich harvest  in  life.
Virginia  Frances  Anderson,  B.S.  Agr. Lexington
Choral   Society.   Vice-President   2.
A charter member of the firm ABC, Virginia has stood by the flag, and greets us every day with the same cheery nod and smile. We often wonder what will  claim her attention   after June has come and gone.


(49)
1916 
SENIOR CLASS
Clyde Russell Barker, B.A. Brooksville
Union Literary Society; First lieutenant Band 3; class   Poet   4.
Of course, I don't non  Tvhat you  thinly about 1/,  but I can tell you rvhat I thinly
"Judge" for four years was hardly known on the campus, but in his Senior year he sprang into prominence as Class Poet. He is a hard worker and has his own opinions.
Pearl Allyne Bastin, B.A. Lexington
Alpha Gamma Delta; Varsity Basketball 3, 4; Mountain    Club,    Secretary    :';    Library    Club.    President    4.
It is often said that athletics and studies do not go together, but don't you believe it! Pearl is the original "A" student, and wears the "K" besides. Also, she spares time to make a psychological study of the "hart" occasionally.
Judith Ellen Beard, B.A. Hardinsburg
Secretary Y. W. C. A. :!, Delegate to Blue Ridge 3, Cabinet 3, 4; choral Club; Music Club; Vice-President Horace Mann Society 4; Library Club; Philosophian Literary  Society;  Pennyrnyal  Club.
She goes her quiet way and makes friends with all. Judith has selected the pedagogical career, and we predict for her a success in this and everything else she undertakes.
Carl Louis Bernhardt, B.S. Newport
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 4; Agricultural Society; Apple Judging Team; Democratic Club; Six-One Club; 4-K Club;   Glee   Club;   University   Orchestra;   Music   Club.
You may be right about it/ don't fynoxv
Newport, one of Cinci's anterooms, claims this tall Apollo. Soon after his first whiskers appeared, the "little blind deity" smote him a mighty stroke, and we don t believe   he   has   recovered   yet.
(50)

1916
  "Tdeniuckian
SENIOR CLASS
Carl Bettinger, B.S.
Covington
Bui,  the future  lies ahead
"Belts,"   the   modest   youth   from   Covington,   aspires   to be  a champion boxer  some day.
Glover Birk, B.S. Chem. Owensboro
Track   Team   !!;   Union   Literary   Society.
Here is a man who, by earnest endeavor and steady application, has done well as an undergraduate. He fought hard on the track and the gridiron to win a place where he might bring honor to the University. To him should  go much praise.
Edward A. Blackburn, B.S. Agr. Ludlow
.Sigma Chi; Alpha Zeta: Pan-Hellenic Council 4; Editorial Staff. "KBNTDCKIAN; Business Manager Varsity Hand Book 4; Battalion Lieutenant 3; Class Football   2;   Y.   M.   C.   A.   Cabinet   3.
In "Ole Big" we have a man second to none. His good fellowship has endeared him to many. His enthusiasm and a spirit of progress have satisfied demands of the most exacting. His work in college is evidence that he wili get what he goes after in life.
Alfred Dunbar Bosley, B.S. Agr.. Owensboro
Union   Literary   Society;   Agricultural   Society.
We have not yet become reconciled to Alfred's change lo a Chesterfield in his Senior year. In September he could carry a cane more gracefully and wear a mustache more unconsciously than any other in the class. At the same rate he should be Commissioner of Agriculture  in   two or  three  years.
(51)
1916
 
SENIOR CLASS
Charles Leroy Bowers, B.A.
Newport
Y. M. C. A., Cabinet 4; Catholic Club; 4-K Club; Democratic Club; English Club; Patterson Literary Society.
"Roy" hails from Newport.    He prefers lo watch the battle from the hilltops. His  favorite poet is "Browning; his favorite spot the    library; favorite color, "Brown."
Elizabeth Carleton Brewer, B.A. Eminence
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. A., Secretary 1, 2, Cabinet 2; Strollers; Choral Society; Philosophian Society; Cast ot "College Widow" and "Call of the Blood."
Divinely tail and most divinely fair "Carl" started out to find fame in the realm of Mathematics, but after finishing Physics, Chemistry, Calculus, and Analytics, she decided the scientific course was too easy. So in her Junior year she enlisted as one of the humble followers of the Arts. She has never been idle in the study of History, and especially of the lives of great men. For more than a year she made a special study of the personal life and characteristics of "Arnold," and since that time has turned her attention to "Boone"  and "Clay."
Hazel Brown, B.S. Lexington
Library   Club,   Secretary   4.
Hazel entered school as the middle member of the "Bugology Firm A. B. C." But when the firm disbanded, she gave up counting the number of fingers on the hand of an ant, and devoted her energies to "Bowers." She has gone unscathed through Physics, Chemistry, and Geology, and is now prepared for anything that may confront her. But we predict for her in the future: A path through the Arcadian land of golden sunshine and breezes, with "bowers" at her right hand, where every word  and deed pleases her.
Iley Baker Browning, B.S. Paducah
Class Football 1, 2; President Pennyroyal Club; Jackson  Purchase  Club;   Observatory Assistant.
Iley can tell you the age of the hills as well as a jockey can tell the age of horses, and he knows all the slips and faults of this old earth.
(52)
1916
  rf4eniuckian

SENIOR CLASS
Armiel. Carman, B.S. Agr. Paris, Tenn.
Alpha Zeta; Agricultural Society; Basketball Manager  4.
Armiel has applied himself well during his four years in college, and is established in a high position in the eyes of faculty and student body. His is the nature that  makes  strong  men  successful.
Elizabeth Robinson Cary, B.A. Versailles
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Philosophian Literary Societv 1; Class Prophet, Class of '13; Y. W. C. A.; Staff and Crown.
We borrowed Elizabeth from the Class of '13, and feel the gainer thereby. In spite of the handicap of ill health, she has made an excellent scholastic record, and has  a wide circle of  friends.
Samuel Jefferson Caudill, B.M.E. Shelbyville
Tau Beta Pi; Manager Class Football 2, Captain '1; Kernel Staff 4; Transit Staff 4; Mountain Club; Patterson Literary Society; Lightweight Chainpion Boxer; Democratic Club; Pick and Shovel.
Caudill has the peculiar distinction of being the only Senior in his department this year. After some stay at West Point and Valparaiso he decided that the University of Kentucky needed him. He is true blue and of the 42-centimeter  caliber.
George L. Cherry, B.M.E. Bowling Green
Tau Beta Pi, Junior Honor Man; President 4; Delegate to Tau Beta Pi Convention 4; Secretary-Treasurer A.  S.  M.  B.  4; Vice-President Mechanicals '16.
How shall he become wise thai holJeth the plow Whose discourse is of the stock f bulls?
Therefore, George became a mechanical, but he is seldom seen with the sign of his profession, i. e., leather apron and a rule. He deals with the higher problems of mechanics. He 13 studious and businesslike, and has many friends among the students and faculty.
(53) .*-*,         %:V


SENIOR CLASS
Ernest Harold Clark, B.M.E.
Lexington
Kappa Sigma; Tau Beta Kake; A