xt7wh707xh0p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wh707xh0p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1983 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 53, no. 1, Summer 1983 text images Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 53, no. 1, Summer 1983 1983 2012 true xt7wh707xh0p section xt7wh707xh0p ik
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Cn the Road .... .» -  » ¢  2-1
Presenting The UK National Alumni Association’s   "  _  / . ,
'83 Football Bus Trips for Members .... ’ *2 I
  J ·
GEORGIA (Oct. 22) — Leave Commonwealth Stadium Oct. 21 at   / ‘ ~
8:30 a.m. via charter Greyhound bus to Atlanta, set-ups and ice on I. 1
bus, lunch in route included. Two nights at the Northwest Atlanta  \,   1
Hilton Inn, Friday evening dance, pre-game brunch, transfer to ,' {
and from Athens and game ticket. Return on Sunday, Oct. 23, with < , _  
lunch included in Knoxville. (no luggage handling) I X x l ' \ ,
MEMBER PRICE. .. $139*   I —\ l
. »— . \ .- ‘
I  ` A rf` " N T
VANDERBILT (Nov. 5) — Leave Commonwealth Stadium _ ln ty)   1
Nov. 4 at 1:30 p.m. via charter Greyhound bus to   (_ _   -—“   1
Nashville, set-ups on bus. Two nights at the  1* /1 L _(,n C 4-   · * /5
. . ,1  _ 7,   .
Hyatt Regency, Friday evening dance, pre-game J ,  1 1 , . , A __
brunch, transfer to and from Dudley Field and J ; I T A ‘   lil ui; id ~;j_ -
game ticket- all part of package. Return on _l{]l, _, ,   ».,_     ( _),->»»·-· ’ _, / :2 (
Sunday, Nov. 6 (no luggage handling) ~ w   j;’_1» `   T J if 1
MEMBER PRICE . . . $110*   _ [   9 1 
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*based on fares as of March 1, 1983; fuel surcharge   ° fe  ,1,,,,: , .»  A ik l
may be added. .  . ·l _ ·· l
A` ``````````````````'`````'`````````'`>'``'``'```````````'``'``` ` ``````````````'`````'``' ` ```'````'''``'''''``'`'`' ' ''''''''`''''''''`'`'`''''''''`'''''''''‘'‘''''‘ 'Z'." ''''`'''''`“''''''''''‘''''''`'`‘ ""  
Please make the following reservations for me. My check, payable to "UK Alumni Assn." is. attached. (I under- 1
stand that a full refund will be made if I cancel my reservation priorto August 15, 1983. After August 15, there is   I
no guarantee a refund can be made.) . I
Name   Reserve _ places for GA. trip @ $139 each
Address ($25 deposit now) $   I
Reserve i places for VANDY trip @$110 each I `
1 ` ‘ ‘ T `_` ‘__ ($20depositnow) $ _ ( <
Phone   RETURN TO: Athletic Trips, UK Alumni Assn., 1 i
King Alumni House, Lexington, KY 40506 ( ;
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y Summer 1983 Vol.53 No.1
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» Thoroughbred/3
About the Cover "Derb Deli hts" ainted b Cla ton Pond © 1981 celebrates the colorful nature of racin
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symbolized in the racing silks and caps of the jockey. The full-color reproduction of this painting is
made possible through a gift from the estate of alumnus Wayne T. Cottingham who worked
for the Associated Press for 40 years. A full frame reproduction of the painting appears on page 21.
I Born to Run/4 Kentucky’s thoroughbred horse industry is a major economic force in the
Commonwealth in which UK alumni bolster every segment. For the Love of ¤ Horse/5
Farm managers talk about their year-round, round-the-clock responsibilities for the operation of their farms.
E¤rly to Rise/7 Young thoroughbreds begin training early for their place at the race track.
Insurin Your Bet/9 Insurance for the thorou hbred is a ma'or satellite business in the industr .
9 9 I Y
I The sizable investment re resented b a horse needs rotection. It Had To Be Horses/10 Tom Hammond rew u
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y in Lexington and around the university knowing that some day horses would be an integral part of his life.
I A Colorful Occu ution/11 Charlotte Mor an adds to the beaut of racin as she sews the silks and
P 9 Y Q
  blankets by which each racing stable is identified. Meanwhile, Buck ut UK/12 The University of Kentucky
I has an outstanding equine research program with an international reputation for the development of vaccines
I and other applied research. Coll the Doctor/14 Veterinarians play a key role in the life of a thoroughbred
caring for them on the farm and around the country at the race tracks. A Special L¤dy/16
I Anita Madden is well-known as a Lexington socialite, but she’s also integrally involved in the thoroughbred
business as a decision-maker on the State Racing Commission. Horsemen Adopt ¤ Cause/18
The Lucille Parker Marke Cancer Center is under Construction toda because Kentuck ’s horse
Y Y Y
industry—thoroughbred and standardbred—ralIied behind this critical need.
I Your UK Beat/21
I Class People/25
I
Robert Stephens ’51 . . , Diana Wall Freckman ’65, ’7O . . . R.D. Johnson ’42
{ .
unwmtrv N¤I·I*•• B Class N 0tcs/ 28
Mgygqret l. King LIl¤r¤*Y ‘ Nm` News updates from your classmates.
1 UHIVBYSILY ol KGHLUCIKY
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  to   by Liz Demorczn
ln this issue of the Kentucky $20,000. Kentucky is fortunate to be fF¤l¤€f`S ¤¤€l<€Y'5 ¤¤m¢‘§·  
Alumnur, we feature a few of the well represerrred in the upper riers The race track bustles with. early
alumni lIlV0lV€d lf) [l'l€ fl'l8l’ly ZISPECIS of of horse brggdjng and ggleg mornlng activity for to keep in shape
the thoroughbred industry — farm internationally as well as in the smaller l0f tl”l€ distance, milnlflg regimins
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, 0¤S h0¤F$» love Of the horse and  ~··q·   l ` V` if ’”[4[’V':"   Crestwood Farm on Spurr Road, said
V L great satisfaction characterize     · wx   V i "      he found it Convcnient to live on the
5 the life of a horse farm manager. ’ VQ  '     ,   farm in light of the job’s demands.
Many feel that the mares, stallions, — , §   Q Q?  J  l "Since I own the operation, I’ve kind
soils, grass, water, and expertise   · V   V,  . of accepted it. It’s more convenient
found in Central Kentucky have made . V     because I live on the farm."
it the heart of the thoroughbred V i Mclean said he often "gets an extra
industry.   } burst of energy" when one of his
For horses and their managers, the   M I mares is in foal and needs his
year is divided into five seasons. The A attention, no matter what time it is.
first is breeding season which begins       3   Throughout the year regardless of
February 15 and ends approximately I  V  i a the season, a farm manager oversees
july I. During this time, mares and    “  V   il  _V ,,;_  , the general upkeep of the farm,
stallions are prepared for breeding.   s   V      i` l     including pastures, soil, fertilizing,
"A farm’manager's main job is to I     ,    _     fencing and building.
coordinate the efforts of his staff to   V ""€  . ‘i  ; _ii' i   V_ . Henry W7hite ’52, managing owner
supervise the preparation of mares and ` _    R I ili  `li of Plum Lane Farm on Russell Cave
stallions for breeding," said Ted Bates ‘ * `  Pike, divided the responsibilities of a
`52, manager of Pine Grove Farm on I horse farm manager into five areas.
Combs Ferry Road.
Preparation includes high-protein   Tap, I. to r., Pope
diets, teasing and selling shares in the   ‘ "  M°l~€°"· Ted B°'°‘» l·°’°
. . ,, ·.  Eaton, Charles M.
stallion to insure a full book of _,  E BOOHBV Henry DV Wj,,,,,_ V
rnares" during the breeding season. .,   xg]  
"That's their station in life — to be     ·" dy
bred, to reproduce," Bates said.   *  . ` _, ,
Yearling sales, or the sale of one-   V  ‘ I `
year-old horses, are in july and August,  
followed by preparation of breeding   V _ _
stock for next year’s sales. This   l
involves weening the foals from their I I VV   V \  
l mothers when they are five to six * A ,  
months old by simply separating them. ` _‘{— s I V »   . V;  
In November and December, the fall   V "  V I I `
sales are held, followed by the foaling   ” fa   I
season from january I5 to    Q,. V ,3,  £VV_g `
I approximately May 1. An II-month ‘ * ’_ I  
l gestation period results in simultaneous     _ s   
l breeding and foaling seasons, an   , .,   Ti`?
]· especially busy time for horse farm   V   ` . ` VV Q '
; managers.         i f   l
"It‘s definitely seven days a week and    ig  `      
{ 24 hours a day, but you just enjoy it so   ‘;;}*'     ` · \`
- much, it’s not work," said Shannon V   _ __   , 5 {  ‘·
Wolfram ’73, manager of North Ridge   .·il * j_ Y   ‘   _.
a     V ’ .'iZ‘."$ 4%
Farm on Spurr Road. *»VVf¥*;,i’,..s ij~;;_ 6,   . ·>···*`
"We have a builtiin love affair with   V        
the 1ndustry," he said.   .   V__. »—   _·   Q
Pope McLean '60, who owns     CIV   ’  i»—  
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"A farm manager is first a White noted that "the part of the Kentucky," Bates added, he would like
businessman, second, a horseman, horse we can’t see is the most to see more horse industry
third, a labor relations man, fourth, a important part, and that’s his heart. management courses in UK’s
loan department for the help, and fifth, Heart is when you go to the races and curriculum.
a father confessor for the help and his you see those two horses coming down Boone cited the genetics, feeding,
clients," he said. the track and one doesn’t want to let and anatomy and physiology courses as
"You also should be half-veterinarian the other go by. He wants to win." having been particularly helpful to his
to boot," he added. Several of the managers said they career; ,
Most all managers agreed that got hunches on winning horses, but, as Prior to managing North Ridge l
despite the long hours and hard work, Boone said, "the main ingredient in the Farm, Wolfram worked ar the UK
» the rewards make it all worth it. horse business is luck." He added, Horse Research Center on Maine .
"It’s a thrill to raise a horse and see however, that he always bets on the Chance Farm_
him become successful on the track," horses he has raised. "The practical experience combined
McLean said. "'Ihe best way in the world to go with the education rounds out your
Wolfram said he found the sale of a broke is to take a tip from a capabilities," he said.
yearling colt at Keeneland last summer horseman," according to \White. "We He was responsible for the care of
_ particularly rewarding. The North all think our horses are going to win." the horses and the farm, and
Ridge Farm sold a Northern Dancer- Having graduated from the concentrated on nutritional research.
Bernie Bird colt for over $2 million. University of Kentucky, the horsemen Eaton noted that courses in pasture
Lee Eaton, who owns Eaton Farms cited favorable contributions from UK management, agricultural economics,
Inc. on Newtown Pike, said his biggest to their careers. and basic agronomy have been helpful
reward was breeding Bold Forbes, who "My degree from UK prepared me to his career.
won the Kentucky Derby in 1976. His to do anything I wanted to do. It not Boone said that while a farm
biggest disappointment came just a few only prepared me, but it gave me the managers work is confining, it is never  f
days later when Bold Forbes' mother, confidence needed for success," Bates boring. "Any kind of livestock work is
who was in foal with Secretariat, was said. confining, but it’s always exciting. You
found injured with a broken shoulder. "Since UK is situated in the horse don't ever get bored," he said.
She did live, however, and produced a capital of the world, Central
live foal. e
Eaton, who attended UK In the   : _  N ia. - _W, .`   ,· A e &;:_.·;·. _'  .,,,3;,  N  $, %,3 y
1950 s, described that experience as an - ;·., ll,     ,  · c K , -¢; ff    ·*   'L K,  ’ ,
"emotional rollercoaster when you’re as  }i?$L_j§··- $ ¥»°'n i` ;:&° *  .’ {_ ~2 F _. —'  i i" ~tfY`V ·
high as you can get one minute and as  {Ti jeg _  nf  {23* .%i_»   ‘ A,   ‘q¤'”iQ_,§ ‘f·,;_;, W W.,  K   if   A .,
low as You <¤¤ ast the ¤•¤¤<¢·"         M Y   e~       .·.. ° f       
Bates noted asimple "love of the horse fi.       " if     .  , 9   Q,        _..    iiii i   `
and desire to work with living     I .    Jag    ,·    
animals" as one of the biggest rewards I, . r   _ li`¤_,___"  i   » '     l  
vi his Career- ‘i I       · .   ` ·-          i  ¤·»  i'”’`    
"Personal satisfactions are to see ,      9    ,4      2},, ~  `,_‘V  l, ~,yt_ lk   r  
foals raised that go on and excel at the _     ii     a     ` ‘i = ,_    ,       I  
race track, or those who sell well and · » i     ii/Z"  ‘°'f·i if F  TiQ»:»; i   ii?  
then excel at the track," he said. t' il V     B     itt     ‘ ~   . . I
The horsemen cited characteristics g I   ,      t`  i ii i f      . 3;  
such as confirmation, pedigree, spirit, ’  r.    _,/_/ A y , '     ‘ .    _       ( # ..,` 
breedingrtemperament and intelligence             V           __ rn   ~· `=`.··    
when defining a good horse.               ,_      
Confirmation refers to a horse’s   ..i           A   ·’‘,.`         g
Overall   and  CC ['€f€[’$ {0           _ V           E;
site and family-   `. ‘     .
Clmles M B¤<>¤s '56» ¤¤¤¤¤gi¤g   ..    ? Z
owner of Boonesborough Farm on     E I
Newtown Pike said imeui { ¥·—*@  Z ii.·  ‘?f%’$%#%’iF ’"`t   ~   Z
. . . ’ . gcnm 5 *~~··¢¢· —;.     -        . , ·` ·    . »~  3 ·
indicated if a horse is calm and doesn’t l ` ·i—~       E `
resent the manager handling and   _ i_       Y l
caring for him. · ` _” ‘*      i`    E `
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.   y     by Julie Schmitt
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t is 6:45 a.m. on a cold, fresh April working his way through the minor seriously injured in my work." Stevens
morning. Crimson fingers of the leagues," said Bowman. "Once you get has been kicked a few times, but
new day creep slowly over the to the big leagues, you appreciate considers it a part of the hazards of
horizon, awakening the Bluegrass. having gone through what you did." being a horse trainer.
City streets are peaceful for the moment, As far as the actual training of a horse
the hustle and bustle of Lexington is concerned, both men stress the fact
daily life has not yet begun. that, like a human being, each horse ,,..;ae» ;., _  
At the same hour, at Keeneland Race has a different personality, and is   e.,  
Track, tranquility is a memory. Hurried trained in an individual manner. "You   _.,,Y$t-‘: F; 
activity replaces the calm of the dawn. start training in the fall when the · ·` Z   i   f` 
This metropolis and its inhabitants horse is a yearling," said Stevens. "1 ,7.   c r     .. e  
have been awake and on the job for a train young horses in groups, because .  Qi  ‘'’ '   ·-_—    ,; ·~s—’ A ? 
good l"lOl11'. just ask horse trainers and they gain more experience being with           __ l__     
former UK students Herb Stevens and other horses, and they also learn how   {rj  ,___ __ gf    
Carl Bowman `69. to compete against one another. From ji  · . `°* a · 
"The life of a trainer is like that of a then on, you know which horses are      fi    » — _,
t gypsy," said seasoned trainer Herb OK and which ones need extra work. Q ‘.`~ fr a   · : _, U i
= Stevens. "I get up around 4:55 every It's all a matter of judgment and    ·‘ Qi   ' '""   .
morning and leave home at 5:20. We experience on the trainer`s part." `     4, _ ,  
get the horses out around 6:00 and Bowman emphasizes the individual- _  _·  Q '
Staff morning workouts. We get done ity of each animal, and how important T,¤,nE,H€,b $,€V€,,S¤,,Bh
abut 10:50, and then come back in the it is to watch out for its quirks and
afternoon to watch the horses race. It's infirmities when training. "lf the horse ln addition to actually training the
a long day." backs off his feed, you train less. lf the individual horses, the trainer deter-
— Novice trainer Carl Bowman's day is animal "does" better, or eats more, you mines at which track the horse will
similar, although he rises around 4:15. train him harder. You`ve got to pay run, what level of training the horse
"l work from about 4:45 to 11:00, take attention to whether the horse has a must have before he enters a race, and
a lunch break, and then come back in robust, or refined build. Also, trainers which jockey will ride the horse.
— the afternoon. This is definitely not a tend to work colts harder." According to Stevens, "most good
job for a person who likes to sleep in," The most strenuous part of training, jockeys can ride any horse you put
said Bowman. "It demands seven days according to Stevens, occurs right them on, but some horses require
a week, 365 days of the year." before the horse`s first race. "The special ones. The trainer tells the
But Stevens and Bowman are used to maiden race is different because to jockey the characteristics of the horse,
working long hours. Both men started compete, the horse must have more and how he would like to see the race
out in the horse business when they education. Once they race though," he run. lt`s the jockey`s responsibility to
were young. Stevens is a fourth said, "they're usually not