xt7wh707xv1s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wh707xv1s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19330117  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 17, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 17, 1933 1933 2013 true xt7wh707xv1s section xt7wh707xv1s Best Copy Available
TUESDAY EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXIII

OF

LEST YE FORGET'
FOUR MORE DAYS
UNTIL EXAMS

KENTUCKY
NEW SERIES NO.

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, JANUARY 17. 1933

2!)

STUDENT COUNCIL 'REPRIMANDS' EDITOR
HEADMASTER OF Wildcat Team, Despite Sloppy Form,
ETON ADDRESSES

UK

Drubs Clemson Tigers by

DECISION

CONVOCATION

Dr. Cyril Argentine Alington,
Chaplain (o King Gcortce V,
(Jives Informal Talk

ATHLETIC GROUP
HOLDS MEETING

america"n-eglisi- i

Council Passes on Changes in
'.51 Schedule;
Date
Unsettled; High School
Gives Brief Synopsis of Eton
Meet March
Customs. Athletic Contests in England
MEETING DATE UNSET

relations stressed

Vol-C-

17-1- 8

Cyril Argentine. Alington.
Dr.
hrndmnRter of Klon college and
Chaplnin to Kins Gears'- V, stressed ths importance of friendly relations between United Sftitcs and
England in an informal address Riven before I lie University students at
10 k. m., yesterday
in Memorial
hall. Oov. Ruby LafToon introduced Doctor Alington and Bishop
P. Abbott gave the Invocation.
"I see no sort of political hope
for the world except on a basis of
understanding between the United
States and England," said the English educator. He also cited many
common heritages that the two
countries enjoy, namely, literature,
which is second only to Greece,
love of freedom and peace, and a
common ancestry.
Doctor Alington said that he felt
the right to be proud of Lincoln
and Lee and that the citizens of
United States enjoyed the reciprocal
right to revere the great men in
English history.
He believes that
all of these things combine to make
a more complete understanding
for
and sympathy between the United
States and Great Britain. He asserted that the United States should
not judge England too harshly
when she seemed to become entangled in her foreign relations
with more warlike European nations, for her geographical position
made it impossible for her to mainpolicy.
tain a
"Your best writers, here in United States, frequently express the
doubt that your country can remain apart in foreign relations,"
Doctor Alington said.
Doctor Alington gave a brief account of Eton college, telling of
the founding of the school by King
Henry VI in 1440, of the monarch's
personally designing the arms and
chapel, and of the difficulties that
the school had met and overcome
in its 493 years of existence. Ha
described the silk hats and collars
which the Eton boys wear and other
peculiarities of dress.
According to Doctor Alington all
sports are carried on an intramural
basis and the competition is very
Incidentally the silk hats
keen.
are often used for footballs.
Doctor Alington, who was educated at Trinity and Marlborough
colleges, holds the honor of being
a Fellow of All Souls college, Oxford. He was the guest of the
club in Louisville and was
brought here by the Kentucky
Branch of the English Speaking
Union, whose purpose is to promote
better understanding and comradeship between England and the United States.
Doctor and Mrs. Alington are
motoring through Kentucky with
Mrs. W. B. Belknap and Mr. William B. Davenport of Louisville.
They were the dinner guests of
President and Mrs. McVey yesterday at Maxwell place.
-

Al-m-

Pen-denn- is

Sigma Delta Chi
Inducts Six Men
Six men, Albion Parris, Earl Martin, Frank Adams, J. D. Palmer,
Fred H. Shells, and Moses Fried
were Inducted into Sigma Delta Chi,
fraternity
professional Journalism
Thursday night at McVey hall. The
men Initiated are all majors in the
Journalism department and were

BY 5- -4
Many Substitutes Used by
Cats; Score at Half Is
Pres. Ewing Appoints Com;i a mittee of Three to RepriBy A. STANLEY TltH'KETT
mand Culprit
Kentucky's Wildcats romn- t'd all over the "Tiger clan" LYNCH MADE PRO-TEPRESIDENT FOR TRIAL
of Clemson college last night.
'I ho Orange
shirted South Unconstitutionality of ConstiCarolina collegians were no
tution .Mentioned by Coun
niai.cn lor naie, laies, Johncilor Cray
son, Davis, Darby, Demoisey
and company and they left
liv JAM S R. MINER
Kernel Student Council
the j'loor after taking as
Representative
sound a drubbing as any team
Without orthodox trial, the
that has faced the 'Cats in
years. Captain "Aggie" Sale Men's Student Council Mori-- 1
celebrated for the home town day afternoon found Law-- ,
people as he turned in one of rrnce A. Ilerron, Editor-in-chiof The Kernel, guilty by
the most sparking performances of his bright career. Ken- a vote of 5 to 4 of contempt of
tucky's
guards maintained the the Council resulting from an
high standard of play, with both article printed in
the school
Johnson and Davis scoring freely. paper Tuesday,
January 10.
The great
battle
raged on with both boys playing By the same vote of 5 to 4
great games of ball, Yates still Ilerron was to be "lightly"
seeming to be a little better on de- reprimanded by a committee
fensive play.
of three, Howard Smathers.
Woodward played much the better game for the Clemson team, Henry Glenn Burch. and
however, the Orange lads were nev- Smith Broadbent, appointed
er able to get started, so fast was by John Ewing, president of
the Wildcat onslaught.
the Council.
First Half All Kentucky

MARGARET WALKER CHOSEN
BY MEMBERS OF MEN'S BAND

AS SPONSOR FOR NEXT YEAR
GIRL
IS SOPHOMORE

LEXINGTON

FARM AND HOME SPEAKERS

IN A. S. COLLEGE

I

The Athletic council of the University met. Friday night In the
Colonial room of t lie Lafayette, hotel
for a Dutch supp?r and business
meeting. After the supper, svral
changes were made in the Wildcats' football schedule for next
sen son.
Of major importance was the request by Tennessee officials that
the annual Thanksgiving game between the Volunteers and the Wildcats be played either on the Saturday before or the Saturday after
Thanksgiving day. The reason given for this request was that it
would enable the Volunteers to
schedule an additional gams by
playing on these days. The council
delayed with the decision on this
question until further correspondence with the Tennessee council
can be made.
The Washington and Lee game,
which is usually played at Lexington, Virginia, has been scheduled
to bs played at Roanoke, at the
request of Washington and Lee authorities. The reason for this change
is that V. M. I. also has a game
scheduled at Lexington, Virginia on
the same date. The council passed
this request.
Alabama's athletic council filed
the notice that the Wildcat-Crimso- n
Tide game will be played at
Birmingham next year instead of
at Tuscaloosa, as has been the custom fn the past. This was quickly
agreed to by the local council.
The annual high school basketball tournament will be held in
Lexington this year, as usual, but
will be held the last two days, according to a statement issued by
S. A. Boles, athletic director. There
will be 16 boys teams entered in
the tournament and there will be
(Continued on Page Four)

Scabbard and Blade
Holds Initiation for
Eight Advanced Corps

8

Stu-

dents Inducted in Armory

Friday Night

Scabbard
and Blade, national
honorary military fraternity, held
its annual fall initiation Friday
night, January 15, in ths "Y" room
of the Armory building. The new
members of the organization are
Robert McVay, Morristown, N. J.,
a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity; James Boyd, Paducah, Triangle; Joe Fyrdom Mills, Lexington, Delta Tau Delta; Edwood Barber, Ashland, Lambda Chi Alpha;
Rodger Davis, Newport, Phi Kappa
Tau; Robert Wheeler, Alpha Tau
Omega; and Walter Steitler, Owens-borCaptain Gerald Griffin, U.
8. Army, was made an honorary
member.
The initiation was conducted by
Harry Emmerich, captain of the
company, and the initiation team
was composed of Cameron Coff-maGeorge Skinner, OUie Price,
Howard Baker, Ray Alford, and
Tom Qulsenberry.
n,

Kampus
Kernels
F. Paul Anderson. Dean of the
College of Engineering, came to the
University in 1M91 und established
engineering training as a definite
part of the University of Kentucky.
Before that time a lew subjects
huvmg direct relation to engineering were taught in the old Agricultural and Mechanical College,
but there was no definitely organThere will be a meeting of Pershi ized engineering course. Dean Anderson has built up the College of
ing Rifles at 7:15 p. m. In Lieutenant Le Stourgeon's room in the Engineering until today it is recogArmory. This meeting is lor active nized as on" of the great technicul
schools in America.
members only.
Dean Anderson was trained prl- JOSEPH H. MII U. Capt.

CLECTED SUCCESSOR
OF ELIZABETH JONES

V

v

As the first half got under way
both teams tried numerous shots,
but Darby and Davis scored the
only points on gratis throws. Kentucky then began to run wide open
with Sale and DeMoisey peppering
tjie net from all angles. After seven minutes of play Kentucky was
leading
Woodward scored the
first Clemson points.
Davis and
Johnson continued to run up the
Big Blue's score. With the score
20-- 2
Clemson began sending in a
raft of substitutes in a vain attempt
to stem the Wildcat hoard of sharpshooters. Clemson scored its third
point, after twelve minutes of the
first half were over, when Johnson
fouled Woodward, who slink the
free throw. Yates and Kreuter entered the game and "Big Georgo"
celebrated by scoring in the first
thirty seconds. Kentucky continued
to run wild and the half ended, 39-12-- 0.

8.

Second Half Still Fast
The Blue machine continued In
high gear throughout the second
period and was little hampered by
the presence of substitutes in the
lineup. Simons played a greatly
improved game for the Tigers, during the second period, scoring several times on twist shots.
With
the 'Cats out In front to the tune
Lawrence replaced
of
Dave
the pacemaking Sale. With "Aggie"
gone, Johnson started out to make
it a field day and scored several
times before half ended.. DeMoisey
and Davis entered the game five
minutes before the final gun replacing Yates and Johnson, who
went to the showers with a tremendous ovation from the crowd
ringing in their ears. The game
ended as Kentucky failed to run the
score quite to 70 points.
53-1- 8,

FACULTY CLUB TO GIVE TEA
The Faculty club will give a tea,
Sunday, after Memorial services for
members of this semester's graduating class and graduate students
in the Faculty clubroom. Invitations have been sent to the seniors

Ilerron was called before a.
meeting of the Men's Student
Council Monday afternoon after
having- received
summons from
Eira L. Gillis, registrar. The
summons did not state that Her-ro- n
was to be tried or even the
nature of his appearance at the
session.
When he arrived at the convocation of student representatives,
however, the Editor of The Kernel
was asked if he was ready to answer
certain questions which the president pro-teThomas Lynch, who
took the seat when John Ewing
withdrew from the Chair, would
ask, and which other members of
the Council might choose to put to
him. Herron acquiesed.
With him Herron brought a student. Gilbert Kingsbury, to act as
his lawyer, after obtaining permission from the dean of men. The
Kernel Editor asked Lynch if he
were on trial. The latter answered
in the negative, and said that he
merely wished to ask questions in
order that future action might be
taken or dropped. With this in
mind, that he was not on trial,
Herron freely answered all questions put to him by Lynch and other members of the Council, save
those he thought irrelevant to the
issue.
Council's Charge Not Specified
Kingsbury, acting as Herron's adviser, asked Lynch what his client
would be charged with when the
trial should be held, or just what
kind of charge the Council was
making against Herron.
Lynch
stated that the question was out of
(Continued on Page Three)

1890-189- 1,

if

'

;

GUIGNOL PRIZE

PLAY

SELECTED

Alas. Poor Yorick!' Is Title
of Prize Winning Skit By
and graduate students through the
Virginia Boyd. C. P. Kraatz,
University Station post office facilU. of K. Graduates
ities.

marily to be the superintendent of
Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing company at South Bend, Indiana, where his father had been
superintendent for more than 25
years.
In addition to the training of the
public schools Dean Anderson served four years machinist's apprenticeship. He received the Bachelor's
degree in Engineering from Purdue
university in 1H90 and was a fellow
at Purdue university in
working under the direction of Dr.
W. F. M. Cioss. at one time Dean
of the Engineering Schools at Purdue, afterwards Dean of the Engineering. Schools of the University
of Illinois, President of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and one of the great authorities on motive power of railway's in America.
Dean Anderson
while a fellow at Purdue developed
the details of a locomotive testing
plant, which was the first device of
its kind, for the studv of the locomotive muter all conditions of speed
and power in a laboratory.
Dean AnjTson enmo to Kentucky in liiUl, not with the idea of
taking up teaching a shis life's
work, but with the purpose of returning lo the Studebaker Brothers
Manufacturing company ut the end
of the year to take up prearranged
Pcan Anderson
work with them
with the
become to fascinated
training of engineers that he put
on the final decision about returning to Studebaker Brothers for five
years, when he decided to muke Ms
(Continued on Page Four)

rr

Gulgnol, little theater of the University, will present "The Circle,"
by W. Somerset Maughan, the week
of February 6, according to Frank
Fowler, director of dramatic activities. The plan is a delightful English social comedy of manners and
furnishes an excellent study of
comedy character. Tha cast, comprised of eight characters, has not
b?en released as yet, but will be
published as soon as it is completed.
Announcement of the prize winning play has just been released by
the dramatic department, and has
the tentative title of "Alas. Poor
Yorick."
The play was select
from 10 entries in the contest and
was written jointly by Virginia
Boyd and C. Parry Kraatz. Its
theme is a spiry burlesque on Guig-nmovement, requiring 15 charThe cast
acters for presentation.
will not be announced until the
end of this mouth.
Virginia Boyd
The
and C. Parry Kraatz, represent a
play writing, as
triumph In amateur
they are both former students of
Miss Boyd is a
the University.
graduate of the 1927 class and is,
at present, connected with the Uniwith the
versity in conjunction
music department of which the is
secretary.
She also was a student
In the 'graduate school until 19il
aivi has been uctiv-;- in work with
the little theater for some time.
Mr. Kraatz connected his m ister's
decree h tc in lU'U in conjunction
with the graduate school, and is
at present, attending the medical
fehool of the University of Cinol

'

cinnati.

Members of 1he committee of
judges who selected the prize winning play are Prof. E. F. Furquhiir
of the Fni.'lish department Miss
:Ann W. Callihan of the Art d
and Mr. Frank Fowler of the
Fnelish department and director ol
dramatics.
:

'tvnt-nient-

tl&
i

T.

P.

Coopeh

t

Sally Marparet Walker, 18,
Delta Delta Delta, was selected band sponsor for the next
two semesters by members of
the men's band this afternoon.
Margaret Walker is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.
L. Walker, 507 N. Broadway.
She is a sophomore in the
College of Arts and Sciences,
majoring in physical education. She is a member of W.
S. G. A., Y. W. C. A., and W.
A. A.
She succeeds Elizabeth Jones, Kappa Delta.

Ji

'.3

yr'iEv)

New Sponsor To Be Introduced at Eirst Net Game
of New .Semester

H Arv

V4.

--f

Yates-DeMols-

Dean of College of Engineering
Established Co urse in 189 1

COOPER TO SPEAK
Thomas P. Cooper, dean of the
College of Agriculture, will address
members of Sigma XI, national
honorary scientific fraternity at a
meeting, at 7 p. m., Friday. January 20 at the Experiment Station.
His subjecs will be "The Economic
Situation ana Its Effect on Agriculture."

Walker Is Men her of I) Ita
Delta Delta, W. S. G. A.,
Y.W.C.A. and W.A.A.

ef

o.

pledged November 21.
After the opening of the second
semester, the group will meet and
make plans for the second term's
activities.

Seniors who are to be graduuted
January 27 have been notified to
pay their senior fees to the business
office before January 23, according
to ail announcement Issued by that
department. These fees are usually collected at the beginning of the
veiir but this vear the collection
waa postponed until this later date.

67-1- 8

HERRON GIVEN
ON WRIST'
Score 'SLAP

s3

VI
tAeeiAHO

tat P.louJot.

FkHniS

fA

L.MVs1

The newly elected sponsor will

not assume her dut'es until next
semester, and according to Prof.

3,000 EXPECTED Mrs. W. Hansen,
AT FARM MEET H. Overton Kemp
Convention Set for January
Special Sessions
Will Be Held in Various
24-2-

7;

,

11

Departments

TALKS ON PROGRAM

Approximately
3.000 men and
women from all parts of the state
are expected to attend the 21st annual Farm and Home Convention
to be held January 24 to 27, at the
experiment station farm. This aggregation of farm representatives
will feature prominent speakers
from various parts of the country,
in connection with a careful study
if present situations on the farm
and in the home.
Special sessions in several of the
various departments will be held
Tuesday morning with the initial
opening of the convention.
This
Includes the agronomy, markets and
economics; animal husbanfarm
dry; vetinary; dairy; poultry; beekeepers; and homemakers' departments. Each session will present
lectures by instructors of the College of Agriculture and prominent
farmers.
A general session for homemakers
will be the principal item on the
program Wednesday. O. E. Baker,
United States Department of Agri-- (
Continued on Page Four)

Rings For Seniors
May Be Ordered
From Salesman
Seniors may secure class rings
from H. W. Peters company, according to an announcement issued by
Howard Baker, chairman of 1933
ring committee.
The company is
represented on the campus by Red
Chandler and the jewelry may be
ordered directly from him or
through the chairman of tha committee.
According to Chandler, the ring
is similar to the one selected last
vpnr hv the senior cUlss A nersnimt
call will be made on the seniors of
graduating class in
the mid-terorder to show the ring to those
members. ApixMntments may be
made if the prospective graduates
so desire. Chandler muy be reached, according to the ring committee members, by calling at 118 Basset t court or phoning Ashland 6243.
The degree received bv the giad-uat- o
will be engraved on the ring.
In addition a fraternity or sorority
crest may be substituted for the
University seal that is ordinarily
placed on the ring. Although the
crest will be set on an onyx base,
the birthstone of the purchaser may
be substituted for the original stone.
The senior invitation committee
composed of C'liarlei Knstne r.
chairman. Elise Bureau, and Jack
St nil her, will meet with Prof. H. H.
Downing, chairman of the University auditing committee, in the near
future, in order to select the invitations that are to be used for the
The committee
June graduation.
was appointed during December by
Gray, president of the senRussell
ior class.

Present Musicale

Elmer G. Sulzer, director of the
band, probably will be forma1' v
introduced to the uni: sit at
the first basketball gam. ,i the
coming semester.
The position of spetsi of "the
best band in Dine"
th highest
honor that may Le ai crded to a
j, s
University
d
duty to
appear with the band at all games
and concerts, and to go with the
band at all gam?s and concerts, and
to go with the band on all trips
with the athletic teams.
In ordt'r to keep the election free
from politics strict rules were given
and followed by the committees
choosing the candidates. Two committees of four men each were appointed to select the candidates;
each committee picking four girls
as eligible for the position of band
sponsor. The names of the girls
were kept secret until yesterday Just
before the election.
At the election, which was held
in the Art center, the girls were
brought before the band members
and introduced as candidates. Each
band membpr was then given a
numbered ballot with spaces for his
first, second, and third choice. The
voting was then conducted and the
votes counted.
Professor Sulzer, in a statement
to a reporter, emphasized the importance of this election being free
from politics. He Intimated that It
would be a tragedy to the University if a band sponsor were elected
by political factions rather than for
her merits, because she must be
chosen for her appearance, style,
and personality.

hr

co-e-

Piano
Mrs.

E.

Accompaniment by
A. Cheek Enhances
Renditions

Two local artists, Mrs. W. H.
Hansen, soprano, and Mr. H. Overton Kemp, tenor, presented as guest
artists, another of the weekly musi-calin Memorial hall at 4 p. m.
Sunday. A larg and critical audience enthusiastically applauded
the presentation, y
Assisted at the piano by Mrs. E.
A. Cheek, Mrs. Hansen's
numbers
were given the proper support not
often heard by a Lexington audience. Mrs. Cheek's work as an accompanist was of the best h;ard at
the music ales this year. In Mrs.
Hansen's singing of Edwin Schnie-der- 's
"Unmindful of the Roses," the
audience probably witnessed her
ability at its best during her perHer sopfono voice is
formance.
seemingly capable of interpretating
the most minute effects desired by
her as well as by the composer. In
revealing the range of her voice,
Mrs. Hansen's singing of "Depuis
le jour" from the operetta by Carpenter brought much favorable
comment from her listeners. Roger's
"Autumn," and the delightful waltz
of LeForge, "Love-tid- e
of Spring,"
completed Mrs. Hansen's renditions.
As an encore to her appreciative
audience she sang the attractive
Baby."
lullaby, "My
H. Overton Kemp's fine dramatic
tenor voice was enthusiastically received, and his singing of "Vesta
Le Giubba." the dramatic aria from
Pagliaccl was exceptionally
es

Curly-Head-

wpll-don-

e.

The only part of Mr. Kemp's program which possibly have been
to his audience was his
absolute refusal to encore.

Sarah Whittinffhill
Is Boyd President
Mid-Ye-

BANQUET CLOSES
Y. M. C. A. GROUPS
Pres. McVey Is Principal
Speaker on Dinner Programs; Groups Founded in
1920
The twelfth

annual discussion
the campus Y.

group, sponsored by
M. C. A. organization,

will be closed

officially by a banquet at 6:15 p.m.
tonight In University commons.
President Frank L. McVey is principal speaker on the program
Graduation of Billie has been arranged for the occa that
u i.
Maddox Necessitates
'The Value of the Discussion
to the Average Student," will be hus
Election
G'-.u-

m

Sarah Whittinghill. Hazard, junior in the College of Agriculture,

was elected president of Boyd hall
for next semester to fill a vacancy
graduation
caused by the mid-yeof active president Billie Maddox.
The election was held at a general
house meeting of Boyd hall resident. Thursday. January 12, under
auspices of W. S. O. A.
is a member
The president-elec- t
of the orchestra, of the Girls' Glee
club, the Home Economics club,
chai'man of the program committee of the Y. W. C. A., and a member of Pitkin dub. She alt. 'tided
t!v Western Kentucky State Teachers colleee before coming to the
'tiivei-sitthis fall.
Other eir's who were named by
the nominating committee are Marie Poll not t. Virginia Lee Moore.
Nominations from the floor were
made for Mary Phillips nail Martha lewis.
Official duties for the new president will begin the first of next
semester.
ar

topic.
These discussion groups, which
are conducted so that ethical assistance can be given to the student
relative to problems of his every
day life, were founded in 1920 and
have climbed steadily into a place
of importance In student activities
An award is made to the fraternity or other organization
that
maintains highest average attendance and seems to respond mott
readilv to teachings of group leaders. Phi Kappa Tau Is conceeded
this year's award.
Class enrollment
totalled 512:
attendance of all groups
averaged 2,717, and the va'ious organizations
an average attendance of 3:!2 at each weekly
meeting.
sea-so- u

i!):s:i

mnio oitiink

oit

The University has issued ifs new

booklet out UniiibT nil its radio programs for the first six months of
1933.
Aovone desiring a copv may
gi t it from Elmer O. Sulzer, director
of U. K. radiocasts.

* Best Copy
The Kentucky Kernel
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Kill IORS
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Yir)iiiiia

we don't know the lucky
school. .Alfagnm Marlon rinnry
wants to know... whether Fyetnw
Art Muth is... half ttp.ht all the
time... or Just bashful . Tyrknp
lamps Wylli? Curtis will give his
opinion, .on any subject .. on the
sl(n.ht"st provoratien ..the Delta
Chi hnu'iP Is still on Maxwell street
rnmpared with other schools U.
K. Greeks. .are most harmonious. .
Personal nomination for the most
.Kymi Ra Martha
blase
Johnny Kane will not
tolerate laziness. .on thp Kentuck-la- n
staff... fired a political appointee who wouldn't work... there
are too many honorarles on the
d
sociecampus. . .the Pryor
publicity. . .AlfawedMta
ty. . .likes
Elnlse Carrel will get by... the KD
house Is always dark... find your
friends by the light of cigarettes...
Sigalf Horace Helm rings the bell.,
at the Triple Triangle lodge...
Mary Andrews Person has
been dubbed ... Miss Collegiate .. .
beer ads are taboo in The Kernel . .
Will
and "Sportln' "
Dickson... is so mean that... his
courtees cry.

mrster..

students nrr F.ms
of the nobility and eonsldrrrd this
privil'r.r a concession grnnlrd to
them by thrir birth. The rrninp")
FiiKlilnnan lias brn llir headmas
ter f tlif rollope for the lint 17
the

most part., (hp

.

CID the CYNIC

.

Mq courlee's clock's a

years.
Continuing his remarks. Doctor
AliiiRtnn asked for a better under
standing between his country nnd
America, He Raid that the conflicts
engaged In by England and tli"
United States In the past shouM
be forgotten and a better spirit of
of
fellowship, to the advantage
both nations, should be established.
He was applauded generously as he
drlivered this statement.
At the conclusion of the visitor's
speech President McVey asked that
the students forget the Revolutionary War and seek, through open
mindedness, to weld the two countries together so that the mother
country, England, and the younger
nation, the United States, miqht
profit by the spiritual union.
The Kernel wishes to congratulate
the Kentucky branch of the English
Speaking Union on bringing such a
world figure to the state, and the
University on its successful efforts
in getting Doctor Alington to deliver an address before the students.
An opportunity to hear such a
gentleman and scholar Is rare, and
The Kernel feels sure that the student body appreciates the efforts of
the University authorities In bringing before them such a distinguished man. The students themselves
are to be commended for their attendance at the convocation. The
hall was fiiled to Its capacity, and
the large assemblage reflects credit
on the students' recognition of the

.

noisome bore
At

half-pa-

tuide

"Uou'U
haue to qo."

And uaums,

kiug-Omr-

Ky-me-

.

(self-nam-

ROAMIN'
THE
RIALTO

JEST AMONG US

I

Hc-nr-

ic

.

i

nigu-msn-

I

I

cut-thro- at

i

?

rto

-

DOTES AND

ip

too-lon-

t

dila-forde- d.

Mac-Mohn- n.

...

i

i

LITERARY

,

I

j

Edwards-Haldema-

d

REVIEWS
liiri'i
in

.

newly formed Southeastern ConferSociety Editor
ence, of which Kentucky is a memhlialirtli II. mini
;inc A. Mat hew . Asst. Socicix Editor
ber, also will be asked to conduct
an investigation of Its own or one
NOOIr I V WRI I K.RS
I my loan Anilervin
In conjunction with that of the
Marl ha Alfonl
irginia Hiwworlh Willie II. Smith
Southern Association of Colleges
Vienna k. Young
and Secondary Schools, If the latter accepts.
)nhntiie Craclilork
Irt Editor
Dramatic Editor
Joan Caliban
A move of this kind to "clean up"
Southern athletics is one of comSI'I CI AI. WRI I K.RS
Roheil llinford Howard I.. Cleveland
mendable principle. However, it Is
doubtful if the investigation really
(nlbert
Xrws Editor
will be fruitful. There seems to be
ASSISTANT NKWS f'.DITORS
a great deal of conjecture whether
Mary Carol) n Terrell
I). Palmer
I.
those who submit to a probe will be
The treasured romance of the
Roliert H. McC.anghcy
charged with anything serious.
American theater, "Madame Butterfly," modernized and done Into
REPORTERS
Ann Hornsby
J. C. Hiilcttc
a motion picture by director MarK.loise Carrel
Urn Tavlor
ion Oerlng, opened Monday at the
Marjorie Wiel
W. Miller
Kentucky theater. It will continue
H. W. Baker
Frank Adami
its run through Wednesday. The
Sara IrI.onR
Grace Lovett
Idyllic little tale Is based on the
Agnes Savage
W. Shom ell
life of the real Madame Butterfly,
Mary A. Brend
Florence Kellcy
a beautiful Japanese Geisha Girl.
Mary Malersoii
Frank Borrics
Some women don't make their; Sylvia Sidney has the title role,
Sylvester Ford
mpcrt attached to hearing suih a
Jack Mav
Paying opposite
""7
men verv eood wives but they sure wltn
Arthur Muth
ine Hamilton
man as Doctor Alington.
her.
.
i
i. . ,
Kettv Dimrxk
(1U mu&e Llltrill guuu t,.nunnjBi
Judith Chadwiik
uuauniiuoi
F.. Shannon
M. Ho.ikI.iihI
Wednesday brings the Tower proNinety-nin- e
out of every 100 per"Shop Angel."
K. Johnson
Ralph
Sports Editor
HARMONY AMONG THE sons go to Califllma instead of Cali duction, theater. The story, toas the
Its
Strand
llelmar Adams . . . Asst. Sports Editor
GREEKS
name suggests, deals with the trials
fornia. D'yo' gettit freshman?
SPORTS WRITERS
and tribulations of a beautiful girl
In an effort to brine fraternities
C. McCown
Joe Qiiinn
who rolls her own an American
ormeriy n was, wnere mere
closer together, a conference is ba- . Manicv
i iiikctt
c.cne l.utes
working girl. Outstanding among
.
i
ak
w..
f v,!a will there's a way," or "Where
'Edward Walls
the names of the players are Marcouncil. The nature there's a will there's a law suit; ion Shilling. Dorothy Christie, An- Coleman R. Smith . . limitless Manager
now It seems to the Jester that; thony Bushell, Holmes Herbert,
but
of the conference will be a two-da- y
ADVERTISING STAFF
program
Amnnc the scheduled 11 reaas, wuere nicies a mu, ureignijon nme, nu wniier oyiun,
E. Mason Hopper directed.
Ned Tiirnliiill . . Advertising Manager
features are addresses by alumni there s a utile wmie
Dave Ditroril
Rolierl Nail
to be given pledges and members of
William Powell, who has so often
Bliss Warren
Dan Ewing
Editorial
head: "Early Bird." played
roles In which
the assembeld Greek orders on sub- They
the
didn't say anything about the ladies faintmasterful arms at hs
C. V. Coiliiian . . Circulation Manager jects relevant
into his
to social organizaworm; our guess is that graduates veriest whisper, comes a cropper In
tions.
to leave his role In Warner Brothers' "Lawhave learned enough
DISCUSSION GROUP
Whether such a conference will worms alone by now.
yer Man." It opens Thursday at
BANQUET
be effective in establishing more
the Ben All. Not that Powell has
friendly relations is a matter of
Famous last lines "Oh! but that's ceased to be masterful, but his magTonight in the University Comnetism is diverted to swaying Juries
The plan has worked our private business."
mons one of the most beneficial conjecture.
to his will in this current feature.
at other educational institutions.
activities of the Y. M. C. A. will be
Every time he mixes with the ladies
Add simile: Closed as tight as a
satisfactory functioning on other
officially culminated with the an-- 1 Its
he gea the worst of It. Some of
governing those ladies are Joan Blondell. Hel
nual banquet. After six weeks of campuses Is not indication that it meeting of the student
body.
en Vinson. Claire Dodd, and Sheila
intsnsive discoursing, the leaders of wlU be heralded with approval at
Terrv. Others