xt7wm32n8t8p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wm32n8t8p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700121  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 21, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 21, 1970 1970 2015 true xt7wm32n8t8p section xt7wm32n8t8p Tie Kmtocecy
Wednesday, Jan. 21, 1970

ECeknel

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LXI, No. 72

Trustees Confirm
Tuition Increase
By TOM BOWDEN

Futreil said after the board
meeting that "the great authority over student matters vested in
the council highlights the need
for student representation on the
Council." He added that legislation will soon be introduced in
the General Assembly to.place
both students and faculty on the
Council.
Also, the Board approved a
four-wee- k
summer term which
will run from May 18 to June
12, beginning the summer of 1970.
The new session, explained
Futreil after the meeting, will
serve to let students acquire as
many hours as possible.
A schedule for the session has
not been announced, but Futreil
believes that a wide variety of
courses will be offered. The new
session will in no way interfere
with the regular summer session,
he added.

Kernel Staff Writer
The UK Board of Trustees
confirmed an increase in tuition
fees for
students at
its meeting Tuesday
As a result of the action,
nonresident fees will be raised to
$515 a semester, an increase of
$25.

The trustees' vote marked an
approval of action already taken
by the Council on Public Higher
Education Nov. 21.
Student Government President Tim Futreil, UK's student
representative on the board, said:
"I hope students understand that
this action is merely a confirmation. The action was initiated
by the Council on Public Higher Education, and, as I understand it, that body has full and
final authority to raise the tuitions in question."
The fee raise will become effective at the beginning of the

In other action, the board
inducted two new members, Jessie Alverson and Tommy Bell,
and swore in Richard Cooper of

fall semester 1970.

Supplement Coming
A

literary

supplement,

Somerset.

de-

Cooper was recently
to the board by Gov.
Louie B. Nunn. Alverson is a Paris
publisher, and Bell is a Lexing- -'
ton attorney and sports official.
The eight-pag- e
supplement is
In academic action, the board
planned to include poetry, short authorized
persons graduated
prose, essays, critical writings, from
the College of Law prior to
feature stories, phoDecember 1965 to be allowed,
tography, graphics, ink or pencil
of a fee, to receive
drawings in short, any sort of upon payment
the J. D. degree to replace the
artistic work that can be reproLL. B. degree received at the time
duced in black and white.
who would of their graduation.
Undergraduates
Also, a program leading to
like to submit their work for the
should mail or de- the Ph. D. degree in chemical
supplement
engineering was given approval.
liver the material to Dan CosAuthorization was given to
set t, arts editor, co The Kendivide the Department of Gertucky Kernel, Room 114 Journal- manic
and Classical Languages
ism Building. If you wish to have
and Literatures into two deparyour work returned, enclose a
tmentsthe Department of Gerstamped envelope. manic
Languages and Literatures
The deadline for submissions
and the Department of Classical
is Feb. 9.
Languages and Literatures.
voted to the creative works of
UK undergraduates, will appear
with the regular edition of the
Kernel Wednesday, Feb. 25.

arts-relat-

.

The Drug Problem: Third In

A

V
f,

V

T

I

Two new members and one returning member of
the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees
were sworn in Tuesday at the group's January
meeting. Administering the oath is John Darsie,
UK legal counsel (far left). From left are Richard
to the
Cooper, Somerset, recently

i;

board by Gov. Louie B. Nunn; Jesse Alverson,
Paris publisher, and Tommy Bell, Lexington attorney and sports offidah At far right is Albert
of the board, and seated
Clay,
is Mrs. Rexford Blazer, board member.
n

Kernel Photos by Kay Brookshire

SG Schedules Special Meetings

which was not acted upon at the
Jan. 19 meeting of the assembly
due to the irresponsible actions of
several members of the body."
The petition was submitted
most simultaneously called for
special meetings of the assembly. by Steve Bright, Lynn Montgomery, David Blair, Sallie Jo BenSG President Tim Futreil issued a statement to The Kernel ton, W. Bruce Carver, Mike
Green and Buck Pennington, and
Tuesday night announcing a special meeting to be held at 7:30 urged all 32 members of the
assembly to attend the meeting.
p.m. Monday, Jan. 26, in the Student Center.
The Futreil statement said
Seven other members of the that the meeting would be "for
assembly distributed a petition the purposes of discussing all
the same night calling for a spe- bills and resolutions currently
on the agenda."
cial meeting at 7 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 25, in Room 306 of the ComHe emphasized that the meetplex Central Facility.
ing was called "not in response
The latter statement said "this to the slanderously false statemeeting is necessary not only to ments made by certain parties
decide the fundamental issue of in today's (Tuesday's) Kernel,
full or limited participation in but in a genuine effort to reStudent Government elections, establish the assembly as a viabut to consider the business ble organ for student decision

On the heels of Monday
Stunight's
dent Government Assembly meeting, two factions of SG have alwalkout-curtaile-

d

making. The assembly can be
more than a circus if it wants

to be."
"Tonight," he continued, "I
reissue my call made last night
at the assembly meeting that we
students work together, and not
against each other, in the next
three months. I am perfectly willing to do my share in unifying

the student voice."
"If we pull together," the
statement concluded, "I am confident that major reforms can be
made in many University
structures."
When informed of the petition calling for a Sunday meeting, Futreil said that he had
not known of the petition when
he issued his statement, and that
the Monday meeting could be
held in reserve in case all busidecision-

-making

ness could not be concluded

Series

Alienation Enhances Drug Use For Local Secretary
EDITOR'S NOTE: Deborah has
used LSD, methamphetamines
(speed), mescaline, marijuana,
and has sniffed highly toxic fireon
gas. She is one of an apparently
growing number of turned --on
young people in today's society.
This article, the third in a series
of nine articles about the drug
problem, centers on Deborah's
story of how she became a drug
user.
By RAY

HILL

Kernel Staff Writer

the wrong "their." There were
tears trickling down my chubby
cheeks at such terrible failure.
And then my mother died.
Tears have been a common occurrence since the fourth grade,
and the ninth year of my earth
phase.
My speak-no-evi- l,
il
monkey existence
died along with my mother. Fantasy became reality. I had to
grow up and realize that living
also included death, loneliness,
il,

hear-no-ev-

bitterness, and hate.

I really can't believe 1 haven't

Deborah is a model secretary
always existed in some pfiase or
attractive, efficient, friendly.
another. But this one, my earth
from work she is even
phase, commenced when the sun Away
was in the water signof Cancer-Ju- ly more. Deborah is a drug user.
She is 20, the descendant of
8, M9.
family in a northern
I was a girl child birthedwith an
the moon in Sagittarius and the town of 40,000. Her father is a
fiery ascendant sign of Aries. It lawyer. Deborah's high school
was inevitable that J be a para- friends recall her as warm, exdox. This I have lived up to. troverted and very popular among
Once I was a rich kid, a love fellow students.
During four years of high
child, adored daughter of success. I played cowboys and In- school she was a cheerleader.
dians on real horses, drank water Her high school yearbook shows
from silver goblets and .never that she part ic pat ed in more exmisspelled a word in scfuxl until tracurricular activities than any
the fourth grade, when, misun- other student in her class. She
derstanding my teacher, I wrote graduated from high school with

an almost perfect academic record. In two years she has developed into a chronic drug user.
Why?
When Deborah was nine, her
mother died. "She was a very
beautiful, warm, and generous
person," Deborah said. "When
she died, my whole world fell

apart."

Her father was very broken
up about her mother's death.
"For a long time, every day
after she died, I ate dinner at a

'S

old-lin- e

different person's house," she
said.
Not long after her mother's
death, Deborah was home alone.
"I heard a noise down in the
kitchen," she remembers. "I went

downstairs thinking it was my
father. No one was there. It was

had a lump on his head the next
morning," she said. "He still
doesn't know who put it there."

like I was in a vacuum.
When she was 16, Deborah
"Then I heard a noise above
went to live with her grandmother
me. It was like I had earphones
on, like angels were singing. All 17 miles out in the country. She
of a sudden there was a break spent her junior and senior high
and I heard my mother's voice. school years there. During this
I looked up and started screamperiod of her life she had visions.
"There would be sounds at night
ing, 'Momma, Momma.'
"I ran and grabbed the phone calling me out," she said. "I
and I heard mother's voice say, would cry and sing and pray.
'don't worry. Everything will be I believed in Cod."
all right.' " Frightened, sensitive,
Walking through the woods
Deborah ran out of one day, she asked Cod to prove
his exist a nee to her. Immediatethe empty house hysterical.
A year after her mother's
ly after, she said, she saw the sun
death, her father remarried. "I dip below the trees and then up
wanted to get along with my again. "It sparkled," she said.
stepmother," she said. "But she "I spent half my life stoned
was neurotic. She wouldn't let before I was ever stoned with
me have friends in the house.
drugs."
She was poor and married my
at the moon once, she
father for his money. Her former sawLooking
a door. Mary and Jesus were
husband killed himself."
carved on the door. The door
By the time she was 15, her
"and it was like a church
father was "out drunk every opened, she said.
inside,"
night," she recalls. "A drunk
During all this, Deborah was
person freaks me out, even
Once, her father was going to school, doing well in
today."
drunk and nuking so much noise her school woik, was cheeilead-ing- ,
and to all external appearshe couldn't sleep. She went
downstairs and hit him on the ances was happy. But inside,
head with a baking roller. "He
fledse Turn To Vge 7
nine-year-o- ld

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday,

Jan. 21, 1970

Something Old Makes .Somethin g New

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They say that history repeats itself and winter's fashions are
proving the statement true.
Remember those jumpers that were so popular when you were
in the fifth and sixth grades? If you still have them around, now
is the time to pull them out of the closet, make a few minor
changes and have one of the "newest" items in your wardrobe.
The. only major change you'll have to make is raising the
hemline to about
The only other change you need
is a new blouse. Since most of the jumpers have scoop or deep-d
sliirt
necklines, either a feminine frilly blouse or a
adds just the right touch.
Most of the jumpers are a modified version of the old standby
shift. Because they're plain, use your imagination to dress
them up. A brightly colored blouse, a scarf, a chain necklace or.
belt, even bangle bracelets are all you need to change that plain
s,
outfit. For the jumpers with
jumper into a
a puffy sleeve, wide-cu- ff
blouse gives just the right accent.
This year especially, don't worry if your budget can't include a
new wardrobe. Just pull those old jumpers out of the .back of the
closet, get out a needle and thread and let your imagination go
free.
mid-thig-

h.

V

large-collare-

UK senior Dianne Moore shows just bow simple it is to take the
styles from 10 years ago and make them into this year's latest The
drop-wai- st
jumper is topped with a deep pointed collar
blouse.
and wide-cuff-

A-li-

ed

drop-waist-

Kernel Photos by Dick Ware
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Green heather dresses up with a
dark green paisley blouse in this
jumper worn by Sarah DeSpain.
The puffed sleeves are gathered
with an elastic band cuff. The
scoop neck is accented with the
pointed collar.

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station. University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
b, reported to The Editors.
'

SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files

$9.45
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KERNEL, TELEPHONES

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan. 21,

1970- -3

UK Salutes Late Dr. W. J. Tisdall

The flag on the administra
tion lawn was lowered to half
mast on Sunday and Monday of
this week in tribute to the late
Dr. William J. Tisdall, 40, who
died at 3:30 a.m. Friday at the
UK Medical Center following a
DR. W. J. TISDALL

heart attack.
Funeral services for the

chair- -

man of the Special Education
Department were held at 10 a.m.
Monday at the W. R. Milward
Funeral Home and burial was at

soon begin a residency.
The family requests that forms
of sympathy he shown by dona
tions to the Special Education
Department at UK, Room 224
in the Taylor Education Build- ing. Please make checks payable
to the University. Proceeds will
L'j used to set up a scholarship

in Somerset Cemetery,
Dr. Tisdall is survived by his
wife, Mrs. Ouida Farmer Tisdall.
She is a student at the UK
Medical Center, wher i she will

2 p.m.

Sfflfiiffl

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U covered with a special batter and
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deep-frie- d
to a golden crispness, a n
If sPecial sauce you'll have to taste and
French Fries. We also serve Chicken
I
Peglegs miniature drumsticks and a J)
U shipful of other surprises. You can
U take your treasure home or eat it
here. And when it comes to prices,
we rG not Plates. So come to
be
Long John Silver's-w- e'll
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652
E. Main St

on&ohnSilverk
No, Broadway

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Set sail to
NX
Long John Silver's.
The specialty of the

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Dr. Tisdall came to UK in
from the Lincoln School
near Shelbyville to become the
UK regional director of special
education.
19G5

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fund for those who are interested in being a Special Education student.

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* The Futrell Fiasco:
Monday night's Student Government meeting illustrated an aspect of SG President Tim Futrell
which we find repugnant. Not only
did Futrell betray the best interests of the University's students,
but he did it in such an overt
manner as to cause one to severely scrutinize his ethics as well as
his motives.
The issue at question was SG
Bill 1969-5- 8
which would change
the present one day SG elections
to a two week period coinciding
schedule.
with the
This bill would hopefully involve
more students in the process of
choosing their representatives. In
past elections no more than one-fift- h
of the students have voted in
an election. This minority has been
caused mostly by political apathy,
but the conduct of the elections has
left much to be desired. The polls
were open only during the busy
portion of the school day and were
In the classoften
room buildings a long line would
develop after each class; since the
election officials were unable to
handle such numbers many of the
students were forced to scurry to
class, unable to exercise conveniently their part of the governing
process. With the polls remaining
open for a two week period most
of these problems would be solved.
The time has passed for a tiny
cohesive group to rule the campus
as it sees fit, disregarding the voices
of its fellow students. Yet the Greek
population has continued to install
their candidate in office, regardless
of his competence, simply because
their leaders are able to force the
individual members (through fines,
etc.) to vote. Not only are they
forced to vote, but they are carefully instructed for whom to vote.
With this situation it is un- under-manne-

A

Prostitution Of Ideals

derstandable why Futrell took the it impossible to consider the bill
entitled "That All Might Partici-pataction he did. According to students present at the SG meeting,
Futrell's asinine actions can onFurtrell marshalled the representabe matched by those paragons of
he controlled out of the meettives
ly
ing in order to prevent further independent, un selfish cd and entransaction of business. In addi- lightened thinkers who so majestition, Futrell went to much trou- cally departed the realm of Student
d
ble to advise one of his
Government, ascending to their
and
candidates on own heights of
presidential
the unthe techniques he should employ
leaving
in disrupting the meeting, making attended students they represent
e.

hand-picke-

self-adoratio- n

fellow-emulatio- n,

I define as most seriously overpopulated

that tt ition whose people by virtue of their
numbers and activities are most rapidly
decreasing the ability of the land to
support human life.
Compare the U. S. to India, for example. We have 203 million people and they
have 540 million on much less land. But
let's look at the impact of people on the
land.

The average Indian eats a few cups
of rice a day, draws a bucket of water
from the communal well and sleeps in a
mud hut. In his daily rounds to gather
dried cow dung to cook his rice he has
a rather small impact on his environment.
He does not clamor for highways,-Jet-portand steel mills.
An American on the other hand, will
destroy a piece of land on which he will
build a house, garage and driveway. His
employer will destroy a piece of land to
provide him a parking space as will the
developer of his shopping center. The
government will provide a road to his
house and a piece of ground on which to
dump his daily eight pounds of garbage.
With 38 times the per capita GNP of
the Indian our citizen's demand for the
latest fashion will cause cotton farmers
to kill the southern streams with endrin,
his demand for power will cause the
miners to kill Kentucky streams with silt
and acid, and his demand for steel to
replace last year's auto will cause U. S.
Steel Corp. to kill the Creat Lakes by
increasing the dally equivalent of 130,000
junked autos Life says it dumps into
Lake Michigan. And in hundreds of ways
he will contribute to the pollution of our
oceans causing the final death of our
s,

e,

p.

's

d.

By WAYNE II. DAVIS
The United States is the most seriously
overpop dated nation in the world today.

below in bewilderment. Representatives Mark Bryan, Linda Hille-polJennifer Young, Debbie Fergus and Jan Teuton represent the
epitome of the mindless, spineless
students installed by the greek machine.
In a later presentation of reasons for opposing the controversial
bill, President Futrell contended
that extending the voting period
two weeks would allow those to
vote who were not aware of the
impact their vote would have, and
who were not closely acquainted
with the ins and outs of the poIn other words, the
litical set-ufor every student to
easier it is
vote the harder it will be
type of candidate to be
elected by the machinery of the
minority. It is obvious Futrell and
company don't want a 10,000 voter
turnout, there are only some 2,000
Greeks.
Futrell is not a bad president.
He is an extraordinarily egocentric
man who is concerned with the
perpetuation of his pretty people
and not the establishment and perpetuation of a system of student
government that will be of benefit
to someone other than the hacks,
the
the unoriginal and
unauthentic people to whom Futrell has prostituted himself. He is
a good administrator and a competent executive, but perhaps he
aspired to the wrong office. Perhaps as president of the InterFra-ternit- y
Council Futrell could have
achieved his goals at less expense
to the progressive student body.
This is not meant to be a malicious or pessimistic opinion. When
theSG Assemblymen consider what
they have done they will surely
remove their blinders aud enact a
measure that will benefit the entire
student body.
yes-me-

Kernel Soapbox

fisheries which the Commercial Fisheries
Review for October 1969 described as a
"national problem" and a trend which
has "become precipitous in the past seven

years."

To supply him with his 26,000,000
gallons of water to pollute in his lifetime we will build a reservoir and flood
the farmland. He will contribute his share
to the annual 142 million tons of smoke
and fumes which killed the spinach industry in southern California, are killing
forest trees and decreasing the amount of
sunlight reaching our land. He will contribute his share to the annual load of
seven million junked cars, 20 million tons
of paper, 48 billion cans, 26 billion bottles, and a rapidly increasing number of
plastic Chlorox and antifreeze containers
our environment is expected to absorb
each year. He will poison the land with
the lead, nickel and boron from the
21,000 gallons of gasoline he will use
in his lifetime.
He will eat 10,000 pounds of meat.
To supply this demand, cattle will eat
plants on western range land and the
nutrient minerals are passed to our friend
who flushes them down the toilet and
into the ocean. This life pattern, unknown
In the Orient, has joined overgrazing,
erosion and lowering of the water table
by pumping out ground water for irriga

ESTABLISHED

Because the American is far more
destructive of his land than citizens of
other overpopulated lands are to theirs,
I want to introduce a new term which
I suggest be used in all future discussions of problems of human populations
and ecology. We should speak of our
numbers in "Indian equivalents" or IE.
An IE I define as the average number of
Indian citizens required to have the same
detrimental effect on the land's ability
to support human life as would the average American. This value is hard to
determine. I take a conservative working estimate of 25. My Indian friends
say this is much too low. One person
suggested to me 500 as more realistic.
Certainly the addition of 1000 people
to Lexington would do moe to destroy
the land than 25,000 new people in an
Indian village. But let's use 25 as our
IE.

In terms of IE, then, the population
of the U. S. is over four billion. And the
rate of growth is even more alarming.
We have by far the most serious population growth problem in the world. We
are growing at one percent per year, a
rate which would double our numbers

University of Kentucky
1894

ernel

WEDNESDAY.

JANUARY

Editorials represent )6 opinions of the Editors, not of the University,
Jame

W. Miller,

so

tion and city and industrial use, to hasten
the destruction of our land's capacity to
support people.

The Kentucky
Editor-in-Chi-

n,

21. 1970

in 70 years. India is growing at 2.5 percent. Using the IE of 25, our growth
rate would be 10 times as serious as
India's if our people had their life expectancy of 35 years. With our expectancy of 70 years, our growth problem becomes 20 times as serious.
But this cannot be true you say. I am
playing with statistics. You are right. I
am assuming 70 years life for today's baby
at today's level of affluence, and such as
assumption is absurd. If we continue population growth or rape of the resources,
or both, IE will drop so drastically that
by the year 2000 we rnav think the average
Indian is fortunate.
So we should not worry about the
hungry nations. The tragedy facing the
U. S. is greater and more imminent than
theirs. India will be there after the U. S.
is gone. She will have colossal famines,
but the land will survive and she will)
come back as she always has before.
Our citizens vary tremendously in IE.
If we plot IE vs. its reciprocal (the percentage of land surviving a generation),-wobtain a linear regression. Now if we'
place occupation types on this graph we!
would find the starving blacks of Mis- -'
sissippi on one end. They would approach unity in IE and would be least
destructive to the land. At the other end
of the graph would be the politicians
slicing pork for the barrel, h'ghway contractors, real estate developers and public
U. S. Army Corps
enemy number one-t- he
of Engineers.
So blessed be the starving blacks of
Mississippi wUh their outdoor privies,
for they are ecologically sound, and they
shall inherit the nation. You young people who are working with these folks in
hopes of saving the nation are working
on thft wrong end otthc grajii.
..

* 1970- -5

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan. 21,

rr

'

Fl

Hi

Gift Packs Now Available

I

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i

You wlio are running low on
squeeze, squirt and spray, heed
this notice.
It seems that 13,000 Rift packs
containing samples of deodorant,
toothpaste and other personal
items have gone unclaimed.

!

i

Assistant Dean Bob Elder
notes that the gift packs are free
,

..

Presents Classes
In Socialistic Education
YSA

,

in

A class in socialist education,
"The Working Class and Social
presented by the Young Socialist Change," and "The Fight for
Alliance (YSA), began last night Black
at the Student Center. Edjure-na- s,
The next meeting will be SunYSA member, led the disday afternoon, Jan. 25, at the
Student Center.
cussion of "The Emancipation
of Women in Capitalist Society."
The class is presented so that
Introductory Offer
members of the YSA and other
interested parties may gain a
perspective of socialistic and conNEW CIRCLE ROAD
temporary issues.
Future discussions at regular
weekly meetings will include "A
Marxist Analysis of Fascism,"

JD

IL

JIMMY'S

This painting of Dr. A.D. Kirwan, seventh pres- other UK presidents. Mrs. Kirwan, wife of the formident of the University of Kentucky, was un- er president, was given the honor of pulling the
veiled in ceremonies at UK Tuesday. The paintcord that unveiled the portrait A reception for
ing, by Lexington artist Alfred Domene, will hang friends of Dr. and Mrs. Kirwan was held immediin the old Board of Trustees meeting room in the ately after the board meeting.
,
Administration Building alongside the portraits of

Car Wash

Monthly Lottery Numbers Limited
-

WASHINGTON (AP)
The
Selective Service system, doing
said Tuesday the
an about-facdraft will try to reach no higher
than lottery No. CO in meeting-itFebruary call.
A ceiling of lottery No. 30
had been suggested for the January call, but spokesmen said it
Is too early to tell how well it
worked.
An official spokesman for Selective Service national headquarters had said Monday it was
decided not to propose a similar
guideline for February; without
one, draft boards could reach as
high up the lottery list as necessary to meet their quotas.
e,

But a White House source said
Tuesday a limit of No. GO, under discussion for the past week,
would be applied.
Shortly thereafter, the Select
tive Service spokesman confirmed
that No. 60 would be the February guideline, although state
draft directors have not yet been
so advised.
Col. Bernard T. Franck, an
aide to Director Lewis B. Her-shesaid the decision was made
Tuesday morning.
Last Dec. 1 Selective Service
held a lottery drawing ordered
by President Nixon, assigning a
number from 1 to 366 to the
man.
birthday of each draft-ag- e
y,

Local boards were directed to
call eligible men for service by
working their way up this list
starting with the lowest numbers.
Representatives of the White
House, Pentagon and Selective
Service feared that local conditions could create wide disparity
among the numbers called by
various local boards, and that
men might be
some
drafted unnecessarily before
men, now deferred, reenter the draft pool later in the
year.
The January guideline and the
one for February were set to encourage uniformity among local
high-numb-

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erlfla aa a ejaallncaMea fer reaUag
reenaa er fer emote? meat.

Bl.

fill

JOB OrrOETUNTTIEf
SECRETARY

Interesting work with
responsibility. Shoftftand desired but
not neceasar. Excellent fringe bene-

fit.

R. W. afcrfoker

St Associates,

5.
E. High St.
A MALE STUDENtf,
;

DELIVERY

s
Your

BOYS

own car. Flexblevvenl
Earn $1.90 to 2hhr. Call

have
hours.
2.

21J27

2
or
semester, call
after 6 p.m. for more Information.
1478-852-

277-62-

20J26
Compensation $30.
MALE roommate wantad, preferably
over 21, to share spaioua efficiency
very near campudiOO month. Call
1.
20 J 26

"

ROOMMATE wanted. 2 bedroonrfur-nlahe- d
Grad
apt utilitiee paid.
student preferred. Call 206 X761 after
5 p.m.
20J5t
FOB KENT
BACHELOR efficiencieup to 4 person uniU from 190. Adults. Parking.

Between

15J28
jT
rent corner

i(
Cftaners,

FURNISHED houses
of Euclid at Woodlalkd. Apply TayOne-lio-

lor's

4.

19J23

4.

same

372. 374
15J23

FURNISHED apartment first floor;
spacious living room, bedroom, kitchen, private bath.larking, utilities
paid. 260 South Lunestone St 20J26

1985 S. BROADWAY

D
Phone

on men's and James'
clothing. Twenty earsefperlence
with Crolley Cleanrsj24 Longview
,r
16J22
Dr. Phone

ALTERATIONS

I

277-601-

Open 9 to 5:30

3

nannnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnL

278-77-

collectors; 840 E.
nerpent off on all

W

20J26

ENGINEERING SENIORS!

FOR SALE '64 Corvalr Spyder; yellow convertible, 4 speed; 150 h.p.
turbo-charge- d.
Call 252-3- 1 75 after 6
20J26
p.m. Ask for John.
ST. BERNARD puppies, 6 weeks old.
AKC registered males, 1 lefnale, $150.
Phone 252-7121J27

afirlm.

LOST
$48 in cash. In the student section during the Tennessee game. If
found please call lAtText 88482 or '

LOST

20 J 22

3488.

in working

in
programs in research,
and limited manufacture of missiles, satellites, airborne
development, design,
computers, radar, telemetry, data links, and related systems?
Would

yss !;ks to be part of

unlimited opportunities

PIANO SERVICE Reasonable prices.
All work guaranteed
Trained by
&
Stelnway252-19- Soils hr'New York. Mr.
21J-F- 3
Davies,

IF you are a male Junior or aenief majoring In English, engineering, psychology, physics, soclaork, chemistry, sociology, Journalism, or educational psychology and wish to participate in a psychological experior
after
ment, call
6 p.m. Interesting and financially re15J21
warding.
378-85-

Are you interested

2

a

professional team with virtually

fast-movin-

field?

in your chosen

I.

interests lie in the
end microcircuit applications; or
wave,
and aerospace systems) or In

If your professional

irees of circuit development, microtest and evaluation of avionics

devices and electronic
senior in Electrical, Mechanical orfndustrial
then the place for you is electro-mechanic-

packaging and you are
Engineering, or Physics;

NAVAL AVIONICS FACILITY,

INDIANAPOLIS.

RENT
Late Model

Typewriters
and Adders.

NAFI

representatives

will be interviewing

on your campus

Friday, Jan. 30, 1970

SALES cTsEltVICE

SMITH COflONA

Why

let

sign up now for

in Interview?

Set yoir Placement Office.

--

The Classified Column of:
The Kentucky Kernel
brings

results-gi- ve

it a try.

Standard
Typewriter Co.
393 Waller Ave.

GENEROUS

FRINGE BENEFITS

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

EMPLOYER

255-632- 6

Imperial Plata Shopping Center

Theater

a UntilJunel-$15.-Ne- w
a
NEW AND USED ON SALE
a
REPAIR ALL MAKES
a
a
a Dodds Sc