xt7wpz51gw1j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wpz51gw1j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19201001  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  1, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  1, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7wpz51gw1j section xt7wpz51gw1j Best copy Available

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The Kentucky Kernel
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..UNIVERSITY of KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY., OCTOBER I, 1920.

VOL. XI.

SEVENTY-THRE-

E

"LITTLE SISTER

MEN

FffiHTWG FOR PLACES
ON WILDCAT TEAM

NO. I.

SEVENTEEN REPRESENTED
KENTUCKY AT BLUE RIDGE

lOVEIEHT'

Prospective Students Sent Letters by
Girls of the Upper Classes

of tho University and Stato student secreof tho Y. M. C. A., represented the

Y. M. C. A. Sends Large Delegation to Annual Conference

The "Little Sister Movement" ! restituted by the
of the University last
year, how holds sway la the dormitories
aad a the campus, each new girl being
provided with
"big slater", who helps
her become adjusted to the new surround
lngs.
The work of this movement has been
going on during rammer. Bach prospec- tire student was assigned la July to an
upper classman, whose duty It was to
write to the new girl. Informing; her of
all University affairs, answering her questions as to conditions here, and giving
general ad v lee. Ia thls way each new
girl will have the personal attention of
somo upper classman, anddt Is hoped will
be the means of eliminating ranch of the
homesickness of the' first, few. weeks.
Adele Slade to general cbeIrmanof.th
movement and has the assistance of about
.
ninety girls, as "big sisters.'

tary

Three faculty members, itx men and
eight women represented the University
of Kentucky at the Y. M. C. A. conference
at Blue Ridge this summer. Many prom,
ineat mea spoke during the session which
is considered one of the most successful
ever held In the beautiful North Carolina
mountains.
President Frank L. Mcyey, Dr. P. P.
Boyd and Dr. Charles 1 Shull were the
faculty members present Students representing tho University were: Gilbert
Smith, George Baumgarten, Flexnor M.
Heath, F. L. McVey, Jr.,. C. V. Watson
and George H. Gregory.
Women who
represented the University at the Wom- en's Confercnco were: Margaret Ford,
Luclle Moore, Jessie Fry Moore, Esther'
Harris, Katherlne Herring, Adeline Mann,
Luclle Hendrlx, and Orena McMahan.
Br. Harry Anderson Fosdlck, New York,
noted minister and lecturer, spoke at the
Women's Conference.
Mr. R. W. Owens, retiring secretary of
University Y. M. C. A., was registrar at
the conference. Karl Zerfoss, an alumnus

State organization.
Dr. O. A. Brown, W. W. Alexander,
Dean Kesler, and Eddie Mlmms were
speakers at the Men's Conference.
Dr.
E. 8. Hall, of Australia, and Dr. Fletcher
Brockman, returned missionary from
China, were among the most noted lecturers who appeared before the conference.
Miss Nellie Stow, a graduate of Logan
College. Russellvlile, was the only Kentucky girl who remained to attend all the
summer conferences. Sho will enter the
University this year.
The morning hours or tne confeence
were glvea over to classes in Bible study
and kindred courses.' The most able
speakers available were procured to address these classes. The afternoonswere
devoted to athletics and hikes. The
University of Kentucky, represented by
seven men, took second place In the
athletic meet. Georgia Tech, with fifty-tw- o
men in the Held, was first.
The more socially inclined of the men
were given efficient Instruction In dishwashing by some of the fair
Montreat bathing beach seemed to bo the
favorite objective of the men hikers.
Other hikes to High Top, Beacon's
Pasture and other places of Interest were
enjoyed.

BART PEAK IS NEW

ENROLLMENT IS

co-e- ds

Jtm,

Naw Coach, it Working
Hard to Wlsip Sqwd Iafto Shs .
ForTlrst Gmm, October 2 "

12 LETTER

MEN ARE BACK

la m iioaals ef wssae, mra er torn, the
entire studeat hsdy. mea aad
snOercLs sis
M be ea 8teU
Mifcm
tV, XlIiMT "rah-rattat the opening UM
v e whet prsmlBss to to the greatest
the history af the University. t
';Ja several years we wiM took back and
say. "OM Alsna Meter Mm tanett out
a great tenia
Thai U, our prospects lndteats acli at prssent
Te begin with, ear eeaefc, William J.
usees, of Wisconsin ana
who 1b
'one of the host coaohes la the country,
n.Tired ea the laeky thirteenth. Assist-- y'jst sane George C Baekhelt, alsa came
that day.
Jj Ceaea Myers;
of Centre, f sneaking of
twr eeach aad team says, "We ezpeet a
game oa Novas tr 13,' at Lexington as
hnrd as anything we hare. If Wildcats
lift harmony, they ought to de wonders.
Kven the Harvard game win not be as
interesting .la this State as will the con.
I eat with Kentucky. We struck the
University of Kentucky last year when
that, team was very unfortunate. Juneau
ila a mighty capable nana aad ho has
handled teams under all kinds of condl-- j
Lions. If we don't play football aad Ken- -'
tueky does; they'll beat us with the. same
men they had last year."
' In addlUoa to Juneau
aad Buchheit the
WiUdeat hare the advice of "Daddy"
, Boles whs has forgettea mere about football then meet coaches ever knew. The ,
(Wildcats have twelve 'letter mea vrhe are
oat scrapping for peatUoas ea the team,
namely;
Thompson,
guard;
Colplts,
fiHard; Server tackle;' Heber. ead; Ze?
loss, end; Faulconer. halfback; Muth;
fallback; PribMe, fullback, and Lavin.
Thornton, snorter; Grant,
quarterback.
truard; and Haydea, halfbaek. Letter men
Transylvania who were not eligible
from
last year heeanse of the "one year" rule
are alas sat. rest, eeater, from Marietta,
lias, served his required time, at the 'University.
In all Coach Juneau aad his staff have
seventy-thro- e
applicants from which to
plek- - a team.
A geodly aumbeir of men
ea the elass .teams aad many
high school graduates, whe made a name
for .these si tree last year la the
feet hall world are out on the
field working hard.
Maeh new eeuJemeat has beea
astd there are uniforms enough to
equip 1M men. The grandstand has beea
rebuilt aad already ssreral of the
sheer leaders have equipped themselves with gaily bedecked, yet unusually
soaereus megaphones. The schedule folag

aeev-tsa- lai

tau;

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I'

whe-playe-

te

pur-chas- ed

pros-peeU-

lows:

Oct
Oct
Oet

0te

Oet
.

Her.

i

Her.

Nov.

pec

I

Southwestern Presbyterian
here.
f. MaryvlUe, hers.
It Miami. Oxford.
stSs
0W4aVsMf lftffe
M. TaaaerbiM, Nashville.
OeaeUaaU. Here.
It. Centre, here.
SS. Teaa aaess, Xaecvllle.
2 PeetaaM haaeiuet.

1

Uet'-rsratt- y,

HSS CUR! IBTDiMS

gMie Adelads X. Crane, former house
iilstSstor of Patterson Hall, and for the
;pset year and half engaged In relief work

fta the Amarlean committee for relief

n the near East, has. returned to take com-

plete charge of ths girls' dormitories,
by Mrs. Vsowr la Maxwell Hall,
nd Miss Berkeley la Gordon Hall,

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L. BRONAUGH

DIES IN CHICAGO
Prominent AlumriusTDrops Dead in
Private Otfice
The following account of the death of
Logan Bronaugh appeared In the
Lexington Herald. July 27:
"Will Logan Bronaugh, former Lexlng-tonlapresident of the W. L. Bronaugh
Manufacturing Company, Chicago,, ftijd.
one of the most prominent University ikl
Kentucky graduates dropped dead Whlj-privatontlce la Chicago at noon Mpnday
according to a telegram received Rens;late
Will

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e

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EC. A. SECRETARY

Y.

MORE THAN 1000

ForVCarferback Returns to the Large Number of Women
:."

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Students

This Year

pnivesJtyGajtripus

last night

"Mr. Bronaugh was graduated from the
Grange, graduate of
P.Vk.ifJf
College of Engineering,
University of
Kentucky, In 1899. He was 42 years old" Hhe University of Kentucky and Y. M. C.
A. secretary during the war. has assumed
at his death. He founded the
turlng company which bears his name. the office of Secretary of the University
It .is one of the leading heating and venY. M. C. A., succeeding Mr. Ralph E.
tilating manufacturing companies of the Owens, who resigned to become 'Associate
West
"He-- was born and reared In .Nicholas" .Pastor. at tthe. Second Presbyterian 'Church
.
of Lexington'.
vllle. Besides his widow, who was form- -'
erly Miss Maljpl Taulbeepf Chicago, and
Mr. Peak attended'. the University from
one daughter, Mary, 7 years old, lie la '
to 1117. He is a K man. having
survived by his mother, Mrs. Kate Logan
team.
quarterback on

lill

Bronaugh, of Lexington, and a sister. Miss
Anne Bronaugh, of New York, a well
known actress.
"Mr. Bronaugh was three times presiy
Alumni
dent of the
Club aad one of the most active members
of the Alumni Association of tho University of which ha was president one
term. He was a member of Sigma Chi
fraternity and of Lamp aad Cross.
"The following committee was named
to draw up resolutions ea behalf of the
Professor T. T.
Alumal Association:
Jones, chairman; Misses Marguerite McLaughlin and. Lulls Logan, J. D. Turner,
Headley Shouae and Herbert Graham. A
committee from Lambda Lambda chapter
of the Sigma Chi fraternity also was appointed to draft resolutions on his death."
Chicago-Kentuck-

REPAIRS AND CHANGES
Department of Journalism Has Nov

,

Rooms

played
the football
He Is a member of the local chapter of
A. T. O. Following his graduation, Mr.
Peak enlisted' In the army as a private.
He served at .Camps Taylor, Jackson,
Kaox and Lewis. He was commissioned
la June, 1918. When the war was over
he became a student at ths Southern College of the Y. M. C. A. and later at Vender bllt University.
Mrs. Peak was Miss Lavlnia McDowell,
of Warsaw, a former student at the

Student enrollment had broken all records when the books In the Registrar's
offlco were closed Thursday evening. Because of the heavy registration an extra
day was required for enrollment and
matriculation. The enrollment was 1120
at noon Thursday and a' number, ofstu-denhad not registered at that time.
A feature of the present enrollment was
the large number of out of stato students.
It Is estimated that approximately'
of those enrolled are from New
Jersey, Texas, Delaware, Oklahoma. California and other states.
The large number of women students.
Is also of Interest.
There are approximately
more
than wero
enrolled last year.
Dean Sim rail says that some women
have returned home, being unable to find
accommodations and that a number of
others have not been placed as yet but
that every effort Is being mado to get
them satisfactory rooms.
ts

one-four- th

one-thi-

Organization

co-e-

Orving to difficulties in the
the Kernel
to make its initial aptas forced
pearance in altered form.

Dramatic

office of the printer,

v

Keeping step with the general progress
the Strollers, the
dramatic organisation of the University,
has occupied a large room in the remodeled basement of the Science Building.
Ths new room provides the Strollers
with an attractive studio suitable for all
occasions. Many pld Strollers ara hack
a the' campus, and members of former
casts can get their pins by seeing Herndon
Svans.
Many entertainments are planned for
the year, and the prospects for an
cast in this year's production aro
unusually bright.
t
A large number of new students havo
already signified their Intention of "going
oa" amateur night, which will be held In
the chapel as usual, on Hallowe'en.

of' the University,

Maay repairs and changes have been
made oa the eampus during the, vacation,
l)ut.now asw buildings have been erected.
Uleachers are being erected on atoll field,
and a gas engine laboratory Is to be built
this year. The University cafeteria has
beea enlarged, aad the thrse rooms formerly occupied by the 'Department of
Journalism, In the basement of the administration building, will' be Used. as dining rooms. The old dining room will be
used as a serving room.
The Department ef Journalism has been
to the basement of tho Science
v transferred
tbulldlag, where the room of the Strollers,
the University dramatic organization, will
also be located.

.1

Under Difficulties

IN SCIENCE BUILDING
For

.

Kernel Is Published

NEW STROLLER ROOM

Attractive Studio

i

'S

The trouble Ttas in no way due
to the negligence of the Kernel
staff. In fact, much credit is due
the staff for getting out this issue
as the work Was done under unfavorable conditions.
AH subsequent issues hvi appear in the regular form which
the Kernel has used for so man)
years.

all-st- ar

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published every Friday throughout tho College year by tho student body of the
versity of Kentucky, for tho benefit of tho .students, alumni and
faculty of tho Institution.

Alumni Notes

Uni-

Announcement has been mado of the
engagement Of Leo Jeeefch Sandman, of
Louisville, '14, an Mies Julia De Boor,
of Lexington. They will be married early.
In October.
..

Tho Kentucky Kernel Is tho official' newspaper of tho University. It Is issued
Kentucky, logether
with a vlow of furnishing- to Its subscribers all tho college news
of Hems of Interest concerning tho Universities of otheiv,8tatcs and
with a
Canada.

tt

dig-oa- t

SUBSCRIPTION, ONK DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflco as second-clas- s

vj

Best Copy

EDITORIAL

W. H. McAdams,

"

STAFF

J. RAIBLH
Martha Buchman .,
Donald Dinning ....
BOBT.

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

F

Managing Editor
.Assistant Managing Editor

Adolo Slado

,. Feature Editor

Squirrel Food
. . . . Sport Editor
Dramatic Editor
"Y" Editor
..

REPORTERS
Tom Woodson

Adaline Mann

assistant

pro-

M. J. "Romcy" Clarke, '16, Is principal
of tho Frankfort (Ky.) High School. Ho

who arc "State"
has four assistants
alumni, Misses Lois Ammcrman, '18, Carolyn Lutkomoler '16, Elizabeth Sergeant,
12, and Nell Crawford, '17.

Emmett Swlsshclm

BUSINESS STAFF

'Business Manager
.Assistant Business Manager

H. B. Lloyd
J. Burton Prowitt

Is

an engineer with'
Than G. Rice, '17,-Ithe Wynn Coal Company, at Providence,
Kentucky.

.Associate Editor

Mary Elizabeth James
Arthur Cameron ......
Gerald Griffin
Fred AugsburgGeorge Gregory

'II,

fessor of Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts InsMtuto of Technology and Is
one of a firm of consulting
chemical,
engineers in Boston. He was in Lexington recently on a visit to his parents.

A daughter christened Dorothy Anne
was born to Mrs. E. T. Proctor at
Juno 29. "E. T." was a member
of the class of '14. Mrs. Proctor, formerly
Miss Mario Louise Mlchot, was graduated

TE SALUTAMUS!

Solsnons in the drive of July 18, 1918. Ha
was awarded the Legion of Honor and'if&c
Croix de Guerre.

f

Murrill,
Dr. Paul
Plainfleld, N. J.

'f

tslivlng " at

J. Q. Stewart, '18, is ft farmer
stockman at Crittenden, Ky.

nndll

Rufus L. Weaver, '95, who is a- lcadlng.
t.
lawyer In New York, is taking active
terest In alumni affairs and in the Mo
mortal Building Champaign.
-

ln-.-

Honry N. Marsh, '15, who is with Her- cules Powder Company at Wilmington,
Del., writes that ho saw, Mr, and Mnf.
,t
Maury Crutcher, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Hall
on a
and Mr. and Mrs. "Jlmmlo" Hedges
recent trip to Detroit.

'.

Jack Wadsworth '12, is at Norwood,
"prosperous, married and happy."

Cs

NEW PLAN MARKS

DEPARTURE

This issue of the Kernel marks a deNew students, wo salute' you. You aro entering upon a year fraught with many
parture from the old policy of, the papery
trials In national and civic life. New policies, economical and sociological, are being In lfl.
and of the Alumni ' Association. The
everywhere.
formulated. Progress is the
Alumnus, hereafter, will bo published Mrs. Edward pppenhelmor, formerly
'Tho year is to bo one of progress hero in our, scholastic community, also. New Miss Goldye Lazarus '07, is living . at annually and will Include a dfrectory. "A"
section of Thq Kernel will be devoted to
,
s
students and now instructors are more numerous than ever. You are entering one Mission, Tex.
Alumni news weekly.
r
of tho best universities In the South. It is .a university which can offer you all the
Prosloy.
jAtjrisexrO
Tho Alumni Association, decided upon
advantages that a modern American university can offer. You have a choice of Various
er of tho Pinevlllo (Ky.) Sun. He took this step In the belief that it would re- colleges.
You havo access to a varied campus life of intense activity to which you
charge of the paper last week.
suit in reviving-- more intense and more
should, add your talents and your
active interest in affairs of the University.
Dr. William C. Hobdy, '96, who was In
Cast session we experienced the most successful year in our history in student
This is your section. It will carry news' f .
activities. The football team made an enviable reputation. The baseball team never government service in the Philippine
of your friends and classmates. Suggest
private
engaged in
had a better year. The Y. M. C. A. carried out a pretentious program. The Glee' Islands and later was
tlons as to things to bo accomplished by
practlco there, will be living In Sdn FranClub, under Professor Lampert's direction, made im'portant trips and advertised tho
the alumni and methods to be employed
cisco about November 1, where he will
will be welcome always.
university well in the western part of tho State.
Academic work was generally
bo a surgeon. Ho is hunting now in
Alumni of the University are reaching';
satisfactory.
'
i
"Alaska.
the point now in their march to success?
Tho Kernel, too, became a more integral part of tho University last year when the
Professor W. E. Freeman is on leave where they can do something for the
Registrar sent several hundred copies weekly to various high schools of the State.
University. Joined in a strong and vig- of absence from tho Universltyfor a year
This year with the
of the student body, the Kernel hopes to put a copy,
orous organization wo can accomplish'
and Is with tho educational department
of each issue into tho hands' of every senior in every high school' in the State. On
Infinitely more than by individual action,
Westinghouso Electric and Manufacof
the campus, also, the Kernel feels that it has its mission to perform and that it will turing Company at East Pittsburgh.
Great strides forward have been taken
by our Alma Mater in tho last few years.
perform it well if it has the
of the student body. Without
Captain John I. Bryan, '96, wh& has
do more. You can aid in
But
of tho students it cannot succeed. Tho new Kernel home is with the Department
beeii in tho revenue service for twenty-ts- li
many ways to reach this end. Let us,
of Journalism in tho Science Building. Students are invited, to Visit it
tlmt .Sr.
'
'years, is in charge of the Barge' count on you to carry on.
to submit matter for publication by contributions to the'StjUddnt Forum and'Ie'ave
Office, ,Nw York City.- - Captain Bryan
i I t J" .
them in the Kernel box in tho postofflce.
r
,
.'fiervdd tn.a destroyer in the Medlterran
Tho Kernel admonishes its friends to learn to lovo youf coltegb" ah'd its 'tradiALUMNI NOTICE
ean for.stVeral months during the World
tions which are as old as the verdant ivy which entwines Mechan4car.aJi".anjJ
o; War.
Dues to the Alumni Association inmake this tho greatest, the happiest, tho most useful school year 'of your ethdent"
clude subscription to The Kernel. See
Major John Scott, is at tho General
lives. Finally, let's all pull together
glory of "Old TCentucky."
honor and
e
that ono of your classmates also is in
Service School, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.
good standing.
Mall your check to
He spent twenty months in France durHerbert Graham, Secretary-Treasure- r,
Life In Three Acts
University of Kentucky, Lexington.
ing tho World War, on the staff of com- s Maid One
ACT I - w
bat divisions. Ho was with tho First,near
w
w ' Maid Won
ACT If
w
ACT III
Made Ono
key-wo-

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a

41

5

at-oh-

.

for-th-

...

Squirrel Food

Oh Boy, aren't wo all happy, now

that

aro back again.
Freshmen, don't worry, you'll feel at
home In a few weeks, all you have to do
is to Just keep your eyes and cars open,
your mouth closed and your brain, working. Just remember that every one passes
through tho Freshman stage, that every
ono has had that sklddlsh feeling. With
a few years of study, some work, and a
llttlo courtship, you will bo equipped for
llfd, with a wife or husband, as the casa
may bo. You aro on tho top of tho world,
with tho knowledge of centuries at your
finger tips, all you havo to do is to reach
out andk grasp it.
NOTE For several weeks tho editor
will expound, through this column, Helpful Hints to Freshmen.
Wo

,Thoro will bo a meeting of all the
Froshraon girls who havo never allowed
themselves to bo kissed, by one of the
opposite sex, noxt Saturday afternoon In
;tho telephone booth InWnlon Station,
I'll Say He Did
Bill also had a
Bill had a
board bill. Tho board bill borod Bill,
to
Co Bill decided to sell the
pay his board bill. BUI sold his
'and paid his board bill, Thusly after
BUI paid his board bill the board bill no
longer bored BUI.
r

d.

bill-boa-

blll-boa-

'

Why ccntalnty we all understand Engili'- -i ii.Lt-- -: J
lish.
,4 . .

Tho Knight of Lexington Drug says:'
''Somo persons would think you wero
talking about tho wife of Jupiter If you
said anything about Juneau."

MEMORIAL BUILDING

Mary Elizaheth James

CAMPAIGN PROGRESS

Llfo Is like a street car line, if you
miss the first car don't go down in the
dumps there'll bo another along pretty;
soon! Elbert Hubbard.
How about girls or "Squirrels," Mr.
Hubbard?

Senior Stuff
class of 21,
Best and wisest 'neath the sunl

FEATURE

Loyal Fayette County Citizens have
Underwritten the Bond Issue
'

Oh', tho

Tho post office should advertise, "With
every bar of Horshey's bought for seven
cents wo will give five one cent, stamps
for a nickel."

FIVE DOLLARS FOR BEST
KERNEL HEAD SUBMITTED
Tho Kernel announces a contest with a
prize of 6.00 for a drawing of a name
plate, or title, to be used at tho top of the
first page of the papor.
Tho purpose of the contest Is to provide
a drawing from which a plato can be
mado.

While the contest is primarily for Btu- dents in the Department of Art and Designs, drawings will be welcomed from
anyone.
The drawings should be the width of a
regular issue of the Kernel, the height
arbitrary.
All drawings should be left In the
Kernel postofflce box by October-20- .
The winner will be announced as sooa
as Dossible.

The Memorial Building- campaign is
progressing
steadily.
Approximately,
$170,000 has been raised
including tho
175,000 bond lssuo by tho City of Lexington and "tho appropriation of $25,000 by
the fiscal court of Fayette County. Validity of tho bond issue has been questioned.
It is now before the Court of Appeals.
One hundrod citizens of Fayette county,
havo underwritten the bond issue, however, each pledging himself to pay $1,000
to the fund )t the question Is decided unfavorably,
"We must coiint moro on the support
of tho alumni and former students of the
University in rauilng tho remaining $130,
000," says Herbert Graham, the Campaign
Manager. "In every county in which we
seek to effect an organization for carry- lng on the work tho value of tho University is questioned. Many persons say
If your alumni aro for it and will work
I will do my share.' Before these local
drives are resumed an effort will be made
to have every former student in these
respective sections of the State talk la
favor of the campaign and explain the
value of the University. We need active
lovaltv euch as this not the nasslva kind."

SAMSON

AND

DELILAH

MODERN

VERSION
"Some persons aro born bald, some
achieve baldness, and some have baldness
thrust upon 'cm."
Apologies to" BUI Shakespeare,
As unsuspecting as Samson, tho mighty;
huntor of old, come the freshmen, strong
in the pride of youth, bursting with
and glorying In the luxurlence
of their unshed locks.
Pompadours ol
patent leathor sleekness vie with cluster-- '
lng curls thxi shade an intellectual browfl
the military haircut that bespeaks a man
is next in lino to tho latest "partcd-l- n
mode. Alas all in vain I
As cunning as. Delilah, tho fair on
chaatressr, tho sophomores He in wait for
tholr victims. Under a mask of feigned
friendship each soph unearths the "Scan- -:
dal of the Blue" Card," gives tho Freahle
the once over and liastens homeward to
sharpen his clippers. From that time
forth the freshman is a marked man
and great is tho fall thereof.
A reign of terror is on. Tho hair flies
with the falling leaves and' like them He
in brown and withered drifts about the
campus. 'Tls thon that freshmen math
and chom classes assume a bjeak and
unprotected look as to surface. However
this is soon lost In a haze of down re
mlnlscent of a baby chick; the next stage
Is a bristle that quite properly reminds
ene of a chestnut burr.
Watch the hair growl
You tell 'em, chlmpansee, Darwla wa
rhcht'

I

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
CADETS MAY DISCARD

Military News

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S.,

toi

comm lesion.

Obligation
To pursue the course to completion

as a prerequisite to graduation.
2. - - To devote 5 hours a week to tho
"
workprescrlbed.
8.
attend one summer camp, nor0J
mally between junior and senior year, at
which tho student will not only receive
pay, but all expenses while at camp and
en routo to and from camp.
A systom of demerits will be substituted
lor mo nquaa una lormenyin vogue.
Instruction during first week will be
held at the 5th hour, on September 23rd,
24th, and 25th.
Thereafter, Drill hours
will bo; as follows:
Freshmen Monday, Friday, Saturday.
Monday, Wednesday and
Sophomores
Thursday.
Chapel on Tueiay at 5th hour.
Schedules for the Advanced courso will
bo announced later.
Any information-desire- d
regarding tho
MiHtary Department will be gladly answered at th9 cxico of the Commandant.
Benefits
1. Commutation of subsistences amounting to approximately flG.lio per memth.

Blue or Grey Attire With White

Annual Roll Call Will" Be Held'
November 11 25

Trousers Proposed

,

.

or a total of eight credits toward
graduation for the advanced
course.
Work: This Is addition to the 4 credits
given fors'ie Basic courso.
3. A comploto uniform.
4. A commission in the Reserve upon
suoceasful completion of the courso and
graduation, if recommended for same.
5. A training that will prove of benefit
In later years not only to tho individual,
but to the Country.

NEW COMMANDANT

When America went Into tho war there
was an Immedlato rush of college men to
tako their places on tho firing line. By
fall 150 Institutions reported that 18,520
students wero in the army or navy, and
1,850 had gono into
activities. Tho undergraduates for tho most
,part went Into active service, the alumni,
or those of them who for ono reason or
another wero unfitted for army or navy,
went into tho service of tho relief organizations.
Hundreds of college mon and women
went into the Red Cross. This organization was mado up largely of college men
and women. They went into it because it
was constructive, because it gave them a
chanco to apply practically those ideals
which are the Ideals of America, and
which tho training they have received in
colleges and universities has taught them
to honor and cherish. .
When the war ended, many ' persons
thought he Red Cross would end too.
But disease and suffering did not end with
tho war. Health, good citizenship are as
Important today as they were two years
ago. So the Red Cross work goes on. It
NEW RULES CONCERNING
still stands for tho Ideals of America.
It is the dity and, the privilege, thereABSENCE FROM DRILL
fore, of every college student to stand
back of the Red Cross, to aid It In every
Demerit System Has Been Installed way possible in Its after-wa- r
campaign
for a healthier and happier America. The
In Military Department
Annual Red Cross Roll Call will be held
November
Ten million Americans
The following ruling concerning abjoined or renewed their membership last
sences from drill has. been issued by the year. The Red Cross counts on Its college
friends to Join again", this year, says a
military department:
recent bulletin.
1. All instructions previously issued and
not in conformity with the provisions contained herein aro rescinded.
SUCCESS IN PROMISE
2. Hereafter delinquent
students will
bo awarded demerits on a basis as deFOR ARTIST SERIES
scribed below. Award of demerits in
special' cases will bo determined according to circumstances and necessities of Miss Goff Arranges a Pretentious
the case.
Program for Season
3. As a guide in the awarding: of demerits tho following will obtain:
Miss Goff and her assistant, Mrs. Frank
.. 10
Unexcused. absence
Gentry are meeting with success in their
A cadet not In proper uniform will not bo undertaking to procure for Lexington the
allowed to fall in at military formations,
Artist Concert Serlos, which will consist
and will bo marked absent.
of four notable events In the history of
this part of tho country:
3 to 9
Late at formations
At Woodland Auditorium, Cincinnati
Minor breaches of discipline;
Symphony, Orchestra, EUgene Ysaye, di(Inattention; trifling, laughing or
talking In ranks or class room) ... 5 rector. Soloist, Miss Jessie Christian.
Matinee and evening of October 6.
10
Neglect of rifle or equipment
Geraldlno Farrar (ono concert only)
Failure to render properly the military
Assisting artists: Ada Sassoli, harpist,
5
courtesies
Edgar Scoheld, baritone; Claud
Serious breaches of discipline will bo accompanist. Date to be announced.
Now
York
Philharmonic Orchestra,
considered according to tho circumstances.
Joseph Stranski, director. Soloist: Freaso
Demerits In tho abovo Hsl may be'
Green) soprano. April i, 1921, ono concert
creased In the case of repeated violations.
only..
4. Any student receiving 30 demerits In
during week
Madame Schuman-Heln- k
a semester will be called before the Comof April 25, 1924.
mandant. A student receiving 40 demerit
Ono thousand season tickets must be
in any semester will bo reported tp his
Dean. Any student receiving 50 demerits sold before the series may be procured and
lf
of theso havo been purchased
in any semoster will be sent before tho
by tho music lovers who aro delighted
Discipline Committee, and the semester's
with tho opportunity promised.
work will be regarded as unsatisfactory,
. A special price has been mado Uniand a grade of "E" entered eti his record.
versity students .for tho series .
ALBERT S. J. TUCKER,
Major Infantry, P. M. S. & T.
tight-fittin-

-

5.

Lieut Colonel George D. Freeman, now
commandant at the University, has arrived, and is in his office dally to answer
nil questions concerning military traiSpecial Inducements aro offered to men
in the advanced course this year, includ- lng $ ltf a month commutation and f 1 a
day at the summer camp, which Is usually attended during the Junior and
Senior years.'

STUDENT FORUM
EDITOR'S NOTE The Kernel will
be glad to print under this caption
any communications received from
students that are of general campus
Interest.
EDITOR KERNEL:
How do you llko the company your
nation Is associated wlth'now?
Theso havo signed tho covenant of th''
Lcaguo of Nations:
Great Britain
Franco
n
Italy
Japan
Belgium
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Brazil
Netherlands
Denmark,
Grceco

Canada
Australia
South Africa
Now Zealand
India

:

t
.
.

';

,
.

Czecho-Slovak-

Bolivia
Guatemala
Uruguay
Argentine
Paraguay
Chill

r

;

.'
Columbia
Poland
'Peru
Norway
Venezuela
Slam
'
Liberia
Panama
Persia
Salvador
These havo NOT signed, ther covenants,
of the League of Nations:
United States
Germany
'

Mexico

Thrkey.
Sincerely,
A SENIOR LAWYER.
SOCIAL SERVICE COURSES

fO BE OFFERED THIS YEAR

'

one-ha-

Engineering

The Berean Bi
Class

WIRELESS STATION WILL
BE IN MECHANICAL

OF

'

Calvary Baptist Sunday

This class

is

organize

Aij?

for young women, and you will
find here a lively, congenial com-

pany of girls who will be happy
to meet you

and make your visit

a pleasant one.

t

Miss Pauline Wherry of American
Red Cross Will Instruct Com- - '
munity Welfare Subjects
The Social Service Courses to be offered
by tho University this year aro listed as
Applied. Sociology in the Department of
They wlll
Economics and Sociology.
bo taught by Miss Paulino Wherry of the
Lako "Division, American Red Cross,
Tho work of the year has been arranged in two parts; the first semester
will bo devoted to the study of Family,
Welfare, and tho types of social service
that may bo rendered for the family.
This .course catalogued as Applied Sociology 159 and 1C0 Includes three hours
lectures and six hours laboratory work
a week, giving credit for five hours.
Tho second part of the sourso has been
named Community Welfaro or Community Organization and deals with the principal problems of health, recreation, education and organization in small towns
and rural communities. This courso Is
catalogued Applied Sociology 161