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I ARTS AND SCIENCES / 71 1‘ E“E3il
71:, -‘ HIE).
(3)1 . - . 7 ‘ Eggs}?- :LEEE'
related to I 540 SySt?m Simulation. . . . . . . . . . , (3) ‘ .1 i ‘47 “ Eil‘i‘
uvknett, Computer Simulation techniques including building and utilizmg deterministic and 7 , I. tiiiII‘vaII ‘il‘i:
stochastic models for digital and analog computers. Prereq: CS 220 or equivalent. 7 III "E III
Iicaizlionijl E 560 Non-numerical Applications of Computers. (3) ‘ ‘ é} E‘I
’ I Introduction toIand training in non—numerical techniques by digital computers. Prereq: j .. "le 7“ E “E‘E
. CS 220 or equivalent. I I” E
eatIEIQIIOII 7I 570 Computers and Programming Systems. (3) 7, E2 E ‘:
's. 1:”:qu Advanced concepts in software design, development, and implementation including priority, I7 . I
I executive, and real time computer systems. Prereq: CS 420. E‘ 7; E’ ,‘ E
7; E
(263.) E
735533;; DIPLOMACY AND INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE _
The Patterson School is a graduate department, offering training in the 7‘ E
(0) I following interrelated fields: ‘ E
lad toward I 1. International Relations 7. E ‘.‘ . E
(0 2. Foreign Policy ‘E
) E 3. Comparative Politics 1 ‘ .7 E E
33.) I ll 5 4. International Economics and Economic Development ‘
11 gmd’m I S. Area Studies . j iE‘ ; I
> Admission to candidacy for advanced degrees in the Patterson School is ‘ . E E
E 1, 11,5 ‘ governed by the regulation of the Graduate School. . 7 I ‘ 7 7 I .
35E fVillbe The Patterson School offers both the master’s and doctor’s degrees. A11 . E, . ‘3 l, E .
Dfic'em‘“ E students seeking an advanced degree must indicate at the start of their first .‘ :7‘ 1~ . I
| semester whether they intend to take the main portion of their work in the 3 7 ‘
I: 11,3 fields of economics, history, or political science. They should then enroll in the ‘ .‘ . E
[:Irstgiyem: I designated introductory methodology course in the discipline in question. This ‘1 ‘ ‘ ‘
’ requirement may be waived if the student has taken comparable graduate level E
work previously. “ 7, . E E
i The student must take 30 semester hours for the master’s degree, 24 of 7 7E: ‘I 1 ‘ ‘I7
I which represent courses and six the thesis. At least 18 of these 24 hours must ‘ 1‘: ." =’
be taken from the lists below and, normally, should be equally distributed among . ‘ I} E
(3) I three of the five fields. Under exceptional circumstances up to six hours may be 3 . ’ 7 7 E
languages taken in a related field. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language, an ‘7 ‘;
pmg‘m“ aCCeptable thesis, and a final oral examination on the course work and the thesis ‘ i " ~ E
E are further requirements. A student may be allowed to take an additional six 7 _ j ‘; E
(3) E hours of course work in place of the thesis under exceptional circumstances. ‘ .‘ ‘ . ‘ E
relatian- Candidates for the doctor’s degree ordinarily take 60 hours of course work 7‘ . :7 7 i' ‘E
“”5th { (including the master’s thesis). Thirty to forty of these should ordinarily be in a ‘. “ “ .
single discipline. These requirements may be modified, however, depending on .‘ I: 1 E
(2) I the previous preparation of the student. The student's courses should otherwise ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ E
Icomputer E be equally distributed among the five fields listed below. In the case of the field 7 .
’ 440' 0‘ E of area studies, the student should select his courses from one of the areas listed. ‘ ‘
; Half of the courses taken for both master’s and doctor’s degrees must be open to
(3) E graduate students only.
:fferential- E Candidates for the doctor’s degree must also pass qualifying examinations ‘ .
E upon completion of the course work. A written examination is given in each of ‘ 7
( 7
‘ E
“3| I .