xt7wwp9t4p33 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7wwp9t4p33/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Press Association Kentucky Press Service University of Kentucky. School of Journalism 1962 Call Number: PN4700.K37 Issues not published 1935 Aug - 1937 Oct, 1937 Jul - 1937 Aug, 1939 Oct - Dec, 1940 Jan - Mar, 1951 Aug - 1956 Sep. Includes Supplementary Material:  2005/2006, Kentucky High School Journalism Association contest 2004-2005, Advertising excellence in Kentucky newspapers 2003-2005, Excellence in Kentucky newspapers newsletters  English Lexington, KY.: School of Journalism, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Press Press -- Kentucky -- Periodicals The Kentucky Press, February 1962 Vol.28 No.5 text The Kentucky Press, February 1962 Vol.28 No.5 1962 2019 true xt7wwp9t4p33 section xt7wwp9t4p33 4 ' ' . _. 4, 4 , . . 7 . 2:4;im':,13;..~,;_
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FEBRUAR
I I I | (Any such pie—listingr not based on him
,l The KentuCk Press + AS We See It + pricing is banned by the FTC. Mm1
l ) . ~ .
l' turers list prices on automobiles are H lff
i - ~ . . , . - a O
- vuled for undei a se )tll'lte law s
ll Volume 28, Number 5 Advertisers Must Take Blame . , . 1 ‘ . pew
'l For FlC‘l‘lClOUS Pricin deSigned to aVOid false claims.)
ll K I(IDttiIIcial PIaIblicaItioIn I g Now—can a Better Business Bureaii X i
f entuc y ress ssocration, nc. . . . . .- . I .- I .. . tl' . . . . . ‘ a
- ‘ ' —'." 'z . iat a .. Is .i .
ll Kentucky Press SemceI Inc. Fictitious piiIcing, baucally 1m clllIm to h we the immense ineich indismgk
it Victor R Portmann Editor the current selling price of a product is low- edge, or a fraction of the stall necesii
“ Perry J. Asl-iley, Associate Editor ei‘ than its former price—is “probably the protect the public from all false 1) Basic-Jim the
, Member primary evil in the field of false advertising, claims? Obviously not. It must rely h, for reproducing
i Newspaper Managers Association from a volume standpoint.” As such “it is on public spirited merchandisers antlioifset process 0
" KeMUCkY .Chambe' °f ComImerce todav’s most serious threat to public confi— tisers in specific lines—all lines—to i Volve the use (i
ll Better Busmess Bureau, Lexmgton - . . I I ,, . .
.i S t . . Member deuce in advertising, nationally and locally. such deceptions. We continue to plea image into a d(
u us aining ~ . . - . . .
i Notional Editorial Association These statements came recently from u this. Give us the facts, in time, and w number of va
l Associate Member man who should know—Daniel J. Murphy, exert every effort (preserving youriinethods.
i National Newspaper Promotion Association director of the federal l‘rade COIDIDISSIODS mity) to correct the Violations. This The first am
1 Printed by The Kernel Press Bureau of Deceptive Practices. Speaking operation in the best sense of coma methods is by l
l! —'——'——_——'—— before the American Marketing Assocration improvement. a screen is and
l. l " -‘ - ' A- "ati n recoanizes - ' ”' . . 3 . i i
I ll the] ’lfiiiildililghldl lijiheiihrtahichuofo the implied hIe tgflfighé ()slilSlfImI to. felt?“ $133,123: * * >.‘< =.': of optical glass \
l trust imposed on newspapers and dissemination he . ‘ consu elf“ an 1” I‘m 10" O l ‘ fine parallel lll‘tt
! of public information. It stands for truth, fair- relating to this eVil and how the courts have Know Your Neighbors gethef with the
1! ncss, accuracy, and decency in the presentation inheld the agencv in its prosecutions . . ,
i of news, as set forth in the Canons of Journal- l I ,1 ‘ ' 1 , I‘I 7h l . )“J; f ll The president of a neighboring 5[.nIlunbel 0i lines
Ii ism. It advocates strict ethical standards in its He 5‘1“ many “1113‘ “ K 1 ‘19“ u y . t' tt l “B . I tl bl'li Sth‘ 509611—120.
l (ltlvel'tib'itlg COMM“. 1’ OPPOSL’S the PUbh'CllliOn with what always has been contended about 50““ “m 5 ‘1 ec, emb ‘6 P“ 15 91-5 placed in tlu
l‘ "l pml’ugmd" “"der the guise of news. It “f' fictitious pricing probeblv the most funda— small “BWSP‘JPGIU I had hoped to filth] . l f 1 ) fil .
ll firms the obligation of a newspaper to frank, . ’ I l I. of the fellow-publishers in small townie“ 0 tit 11
ll honest and fearless editorial expressions. It rc- mental Of them being tiese: . t l t' . I t' 'thi'ough it.
. . - - - .- ~ - , , . .. mine 0 )6 ac we in assocuii 11
ll t‘l’et’l'? equality of .“V'mq” “Pd the ”gm (if every That the adccrtiscr has the rcsponszhilzty . . . (I) Second is the s
:1 individual to )iarticuiation in the Constitutional . . . l . f f . . .. through conventions, district meetings, . - -
i guarantee of Freedom of the Press. It believes ml the 11091“ “C." 1111C P100 0 any U)mPJN' . .. 1 1 I l'k 1 1 '(l itself. In this in
j . ., , _ .. l ,1. . . .- . . -. . .- . . .. uais,an( tic 1e. Ilusttieotiei a) .
,l I” the "Glbblmitc’l "5 (I bit" 13166111771 h” Clblliy tive prices in his ad; that estimates, guess- . t tl 1_ t f t t screen thh h
} .. -. I. -- . - 'i r _ . . . occasum o oover ie is o s -1e\\'r . ‘
l uonomic. social,I aiiId culiuia communitJ 6 work or opinions on his part are not enough, g . I: .Similar to the Il'i
I. l’t‘lolmic’nl (“Ml iiloalcss. . . . . and l was surprised and a little (ll: . h‘
,1 and that the real question is, ]USt snnply, . ’ of the sensitiyed
ll ' ' l does the ad have the capacity to deceivep ened, to find a good many whose pillt] 1 t 41
. .' . ‘ , . ' ie no 1 "
l . Kentucky Press ASSOCIGl‘IOn, nc. ,. . . I do not know and have never met, 1 0g] 1p “L
i . . ). ‘l Helpful as they are, no FlC advertising- , . . ,, The resulting p1.
; John B- Céllm‘fi- lie-W 0'” . . a . . .. . . f . association meetings. How true Hi
i Park City News, Bowling Green practice gmdes aie necessary to in (am Kentuckv halftone (lots MK
I [71111 J- BIII’H‘HNL l'IlCC'P’C-S‘ldc'” . . the advertiser whether he is telling the -' negative when m
i Casey County News, Liberty . 1 . . 1 \l 1 1 k . l . l‘ -.
i Vim”. it. Portmann Secretary—Manager tiuti in an ac. i ())0( y nows )ettei tian ::= ::= :fl: a me.
i . l’ci‘i‘y 1. Ashley, Assistant Sccrctary—.\Ianager he if he is lying, guessing, estimating or Third is the Au
« r, ... . . . . r . n u I! ,
, I, l‘londa li. (nirllhIUn, Assistant lied-Stile] . otherWise hedging. If he claims ‘savmgs Where Angels Fear . . . bv Eastman Km
5‘ (impel-sun of lwntuckll, Lexington , . “ . ,, . f
I-l ' through reductions from list (and varia- . . , film has the dots
It! 0‘ _ E t. C 'tt t' l'k “ f t , l’ t” u t 1 A prominent libel-law attorney n l’ l -
i v. ommi ee ions 1', manu ac urers is or sur es 8( . . . . USGC i , -
' l] i [Stnd xecu Ive . . e” » a n . Cg adVised editors not to rush into it ill if n “C “’IP."
it i (.‘hairman. George Joplin III,ICIommonwealtIli, 1'“ PlIce ) 01 from f01mel 01 gmng-con- irate leader demands a St()1‘Vl‘etl'flCllU]‘.L tone negative
l ' 50111013ct (Lighthlll 1:31:19: \fillll‘tm TI 113"”: cern prices elsewhere and these statements “You can be letting yourself in hot any sort betwe
Iii/on County Hcrat (vvi c- Cecom, arry . -. . 1 , . . . . . .
.~ ’ ' ’ . . ar false then the customei is misled. And ,, . .tOUIa l"ll‘ .
i Stone. Mcsscngcr-Argus, Central City; Third, e ’ . legal headache, Said Paul Ashleyo e P C Pllnt.
‘ i Basil Caummisar, Com-ter-Jom'aal and Times, who can be more respons1ble for a statement 1 “l .- . I . .. I. it Liigth/I 15 the
1 I ,. s» _ I ,. bl D _ .. te, )y plinting a coiiection \\ . I. .
I l LUUIWIHC; l‘lfll‘v hank C- BL“, T’l’" . C 9'7"“ than the man who makes it? . . . . {making the halftt
l l crat, Bcdtord; Sixth, George Trotter, Enterprise, I thorough investigation of the “‘131- to th “ '
' .I %(‘l)Iill]I()Il1305/0111},\Vilié'qenNR. lITishIcr, .IlleIrcurtl, Mr. Murphy re-emphaSized the two i'e- \iolved.” His advice was given to ‘11“ 6M eIoiiginIa
. .2 .. 1""! i. aines . orris, _r., at EOGH- '. ~ '. . .. ’ . ' ‘ .. _ . . . , ‘ Y ‘6) lot i
. i “ ‘5‘: I’ l- r,,- I Mr .I K H: _ D] ‘l quiiements on which any claim 01 implica socuited Press Managing Editors con I1 1 t1
, (lcnt, Ashlant . Iciiti. aurice . tray, 01 y “.0 )f red iced i‘ic . mi st 1 based (1) . ls held In direct
‘ l News, I\liddlesho1‘o; State—at—Lal‘ge, S. C. Van n ( 1 I P 6‘s 1‘ )e “ ' in Dallas. ’lli" I h
l (luron. State Journal. Frankfort: State—at—Large, the advertisers own usual and customarv AP" ..1 . , . F" kt ”"8; t e expos
ll Fl 1 \l T l' Herald Leader Lex’ing f 1 l 1 1 5 genera inanagei, I‘m ‘ liithct I
‘ “\"ims i - vmpin, ’ " ‘ H “ ' rice or tie med 0 articc in tie reccnt, . . . . ‘ we V6 V
il ton; State—at—Larac, jaincs Lee Crawford, 1) l . I Iflfi' .. . 9 1 1 ‘5de the attomey about hint." lenThe CI”1pliic b '
' iii 'I'iinc.s~—'l‘ril)unc, Corbin; Immediate Past Presi— iegu 111 ““1159 0 “15‘11655~()1 (-4) he 1151111 demanded bv “wronged” readei‘s- a\i’perim t l .V l
i » "-v i; "1 x2. . .. .- ‘ - -' r '. ,, ene9: III I II Despite! tl f
.. . a . n . . =r =- , 1e .1
. . de'iler advertises a S'lVln from lrit l'l‘ ‘
it Board Of Directors ‘ ‘ g t ‘ p fer . IIldvocates of the
ii I . . he cannot escape blame, the FTC holds. A new quarterly digest, Peal, hh‘lint d
. =3 Chairman, Martin Dyche, Sentinel—Echo, Lon— VI” VI . h t 't tl -. _ I “A 1 .1s. l "l l' . . Tl bl' lition'l e a rather .
ll don; Maurice K. HenrY, Daily News, Middles- i 1' 1 mp y pu l “,5 wayI. (ea c1 W10 geneia clicu ation. )6 p11 10‘ .IIJ'emains that it is
‘ boro; Niles O. Dillingham. Progress, Dawson elects to use comparative prices IS presumed nounced aims to carry legal materl'hethod of . t'
‘ ' ., . i -'1- ' — . . x . . ~ .~ . . . . i 1.11)]
. l I fivrlntfl R0 Gdrdmr, Cf’m’u’ _H‘Cl‘m‘mv ROM“ to know the ordinary business facts of life pertain to the fields of publishingre‘ p, I
, I lay, Shelby News. Shelbyville; Officers cx- . . .. . 1 .
. officio. concerning what happens to his products. ment, advertismg, and allied fieltSOr
' i
iiw

 "‘1‘ 11‘
FEBRUARY, l962 THE KENTUCKY PRESS PAGE ONE 1 1 1
donbon 1‘11
(13' MRI . Your screened picture is pasted directly 1 1 1 1‘
biles 11111 Ha If‘l'one Photog ra ph ProceSSlng onto the page paste-up along with the type .111 1 1 1‘1
“V Speci matter and the whole thing photographed 1‘ 111111
) 1 . . . on the big copy camera as a line shot. This 111111".1
9 hureau EX lalned By Gra phlc PUbIISher sounds simple because it does not involve 111.1 ‘1
l‘hsmgk p the separate screening of halftones and 1.11.111 1
lnecessa ‘ . stripping them into holes on the finished 11111 1 '1111
false 1) Basically, there are four different methods (Note: This article represents the con- page, but this isn’t the whole storv. The 11111 1
1st rely hi for reproducing halftoiie photographs by the tribution made by Archie S. Frye, publisher darkroom technician must take special pains 1 11I 1 1 1
:ers andzoffset process of printing. All of them in— of The Graphic, Georgetown, on the panel, with the combination line and halftone 11.1 1 1 1
ineS—toivolve the use of a screen to break up the ‘Offset Printing Processes,” at the mid—win— negative in order to get good results. He 1111 1 1 1
ie to plea image into a dot structure, but there are a ter meeting and is “full of meat” for the must use a slightly different exposure than 111 ‘1 1 1
1e, and 11 number of variations of each of the prospective offset printer. The Graphic was usual and also a special developer formula. 11 1 11 '
g yourflnethmls, the first Kentucky offset newspaper.) The negative must be developed entirelv 1111 11 1 1
as. This The first and oldest of the screening E without agitation after the first 30 seconds 11 1 1
of coma methods is by use of a glass screen. Such photographic part of the process probably to avoid streaks, and the developer has an 1 1‘ 1
a screen is made of two rather thin pieces offers the most complications, and the mak- extremely short tray life—it must be re- ‘1 1!
of optical glass which have been ruled with ing of the halftone negative is by far the placed after every few negatives and can’t .11 3 1‘1 11 1 '
fine Parallel lines and then cemented to— most difficult part of the entire darkroom be kept 1“ the tray very 101155 1111111 1
$911151 With the lines at right angles. The operation. For years the photo engraver has With the Autoscreen P1100355 0f negative 1111111111 1 1 1
)oring 51(number of lines to the inch gives you the demanded the highest rate of pay in the making you, of course, need no screen of 111.1 1‘1 111
publishe size screen—120, 1.33. 100, etc. lhe screen graphic arts industry and this is due in no any kind and no specral screen holder or 11111 ‘1'11'11
ed to gel is placed in the camera a short distance small part to the fact that he must first be vacuum back on your camera, The film is 1111 1 1‘ 1
mall tomahead ot-the film and the exposure is made able to make a halftone negative before he adhered to the Sthky lka 01 your 0211119111 11111 11 11
ociation through it. 1 Ch” etch the finished zinc plate. He uses and you make two exposures depending up- 1111 11 11 i
meetings 1 Second is the screening of the photograph either the glass or the contact screen, but he ‘1’“. the density range 01 the D‘Cthl'e to be .11 1.1 1
other dmitsclf. In this method a plastic or contact seeks a somewhat different dot structure in 5.01 eened and thedegree hf enlargement ‘h' 1‘11 11 .
fstate\\iS.C11e.en1 which has been ruled with lines his negative than that which is needed for ledhChOh‘ N0 intermediate exposure .15 111111 1111
1 little (1151111111111 to the glass screen, is placed on top ()Hset. We once found to our sorrow that 1166(11‘9dfmd there 15 no need for aspecial 1‘ 11 .‘ 11 .
whose “1 of the sens1tlzed paper in the enlarger and halftone negatives made by a skilled photo cveve Olhhg SOhlhOh- The regular 11118 de- 111 1‘1 1 1
p the photographic print is made through it. engraver didn’t do the job on the offset "6101361 works fine; however, 1t 15 “99635311." 111 “51 1
3Veh 11191111116 resulting print is broken down into press. to do the developing without agitation. and. 1111 111.11 11
7 tiue t11halftone dots and may be copied as a line Let’s discuss the advantages and disad— if you pull it Oht 0f the SOhlhOh for exami- 111 111 11 1
negative when making the final page nega— vantages of the four methods. nation under the magnifying glass during 111.111 1 11 1.‘
: tive. The glass screen method, as used by most development, you Ihh the “151" Of getting 1'11 11‘ 1 1 11 11
Third is the Aiitoscreeii Process developed photo engravers, does not require a special streaks. Autoscreen film costs nearly twig-91111111 1
, ," by Eastman Kodak Company. Autoscreen vacuum back for the copy camera, but you as hthh as the regular kihd' 1111 1 1
ttornev Itfilm has the dots built into it and it may be do need a holder and the screen itself is AS I said earlier, we have found the C0h'111 1 1 1 1
into {111,1used in the copy camera for the making of rather expensive and subject to breakage. tact 8”th method to be thh IhOSt IhRChC‘11111‘11 .j ‘
v retracti11halftone negatives without placing a screen As I recall it, ours cost about $150 ten years for “5‘ The screen \ye‘use 15 magenta C01‘ 1111 1 1 1
self in f0101' any sort between it and the original pho— ago. This is a 10x14, 120-line screen and is ored WhICh “‘1 why. It ‘5 calledn Magenta 1.11 1 1
AslileVU‘tOngth print. not the highest priced on the market. The Gontact Screen. It ’5 IOXM 1“ Size, has 120 1‘1 1 1 -1
ction '“111 Lastly, IS the contact screen method of cost and breakage factors are not the great— hhhs to the thh and CO“ "h’OUt $40 It 113 11. 1 ‘1
. the faintikmg the halftone negative. This is simi— est disadvantages, however. It is more dif— delicate, Of course, hht “nth care. can 119111.11 1 1
Iriven 101lar to the original glass screen method with ficult to make a negative with its use than usedl for several .years. A vacuum back 151111 1 1 1
hlitors 0011‘th exception that the ruled plastic screen by some of the other processes. Three ex— neet ed to keep It in coma“ Wlth the hhh1‘r1 ‘1 1 1
‘ is held in direct contact with the negative posureS, at different lens apertures, are nec— dunhg the exposure, two “1303111185 are 11111 11 3
Frank 1.lupng the exposure. essary for each picture—one for the high— hail/Ed hh h)“; pic-lturels hhh development 1111 1. 1
hastV 11611111 :1 Cthe twelve years we have been printing lights, one for the intermediate tones and a Its t‘1 youi iegu a1 ( eve opei ‘Vlth 1”“ 11g" 111 1 1 1 1‘ 1
eaders. a it 1. lapliic by. the offset process we have flash exposure for the shadow detail. ‘1 8h" .. x. 1 1 _ 111 1 1 “
r. AS1116111sxpe11mented With all four of these screen- Some excellent results can be obtained 1 1 hl‘c‘hhé’llalls h 17‘1hCh Robertson “'hICh 1‘1 1 1 .1
ances “111mg methods. For our purpose we have from screening the photograph itself. How- (“Mt “5 hiw (”01111113115130 ten years 3130- It 111 .
he originounc the last named method—the contact ever, this, too, has its advantages and dis- “th “”1 a Shh ac , hht we hhllt (1)1“. 111 1 11
' 1 “edlegative—the most practical. All of the advantages. If you take all of the photo- own vacuum back. We Chose the 120 hhe ‘111'11 1
1.;gzhmnethocls have merit and all are being used graphs used in your paper and have the screen1blecauselzlit‘the time we “13.116 having 111 1 1 11
per—01109;: iehinldustry. Your choice must be the original negatives for all of them, you have Szmetl 1“ 1h°h )6: “111d hhohght flt-lmSt to 11 ‘ 1
alll‘louhchyhic‘}: 1c iI most nearly .fits your needs and no particular problem in screening them un— :1c1heenle Ocihfpal at”? ‘y “’31:? (-0111 10155611) 111 1 1 ‘
ss Bullet“ ‘11 1unc e1 your particular circumstances del‘ your enlarger other than to get used to ‘ _' nex sueen WI pio )‘1 ) y )e 11 1' j
“‘71 glve you the best results. giving each a much longer—than-usual ex— 1'33 hhe‘ ’ 1‘ 1‘
* Despite the fact that some over-zealous posure. However, if you use pictures from \Ve dont have the time here to go into 11 1
’ Peal, 1111;153:3913 0f iihe offset process have at times other sources you probably do not have the gamer: exposures,- llmt suffice 1th] Shy they 1‘ 1 11
1hbhcatian1€mains :hfitaer‘rosy picture of it, the fact original negatives. onu must, therefore, re— (Sp?) hpoh youi 6:15" 110111. 1g “lhg’l thc11 . 1 1
111 matefiflhethod fd it 1.5 a muchmore complicated copy these pictures in order to get a nega- g ee 0 en aigemen 01 1“ hChOh’ an( up- 11: 11 1
)lishing19‘1 0 p'lll‘ltllig than is letterpress. The tive for projection through your screen. (Please Tum To Page Two) 11 1 ‘1
ed fields 0: 1 1 1 1
1 1 1;
1 1 111: ~
1 11 11 1‘1

 “ (I " ' , 1., , ~ v »‘~ .,....,._.,,. . , . .-..
il
l
l PAGE TWO THE KENTUCKY PRESS FEBRUARY, l962 FEBRUAF
l III I
[i - . Newspapers Should Check
l Retai Memo Proves Pro Ita e 0n Privileged Publications PO 1
} Perhaps one of the most erroneous it
)1 By MAURICE K. HENRY does one in the newspaper, radio, and out- held by many newspaper reporters as- No one has y
l Back in 1958 the Daily News advertising door billboard business find time to put as by some editors is ‘that freedom of but many Loui
}[ lineage hit some soft spots and rather than this memo téigether and where do you get press confers the priVilege to publish bothered and t
‘l hope some little Pixie would help the mat- the material. . . inattei that has the semblance of aull regulations that
1; ter it was decided to do several things. Each month the advertismg trade papers, tic1ty. Time and again, news stones {q Not a few have
l First, rather than cut expenses by re du c- brOchures that come in the mail, Bureau of court room happenings which have 110[ AS Of this W1
I ing personnel it was decided to add an extra Advertismg, KPA bulletins, SNPA bulletins, nection with the actual proceedings ur- 591116?th 61188
space salesman. This then gave us three and ANPA bulletins all have information coiiSideration and it is taken for go tions on two (i
El full—time salesmen plus a combination pho- that can be adapted to local retail sales s1t- that this is a priVilege. . . . 111183011, althougl
; tographer-advertisiiig salesman. nations. As this material comes in those AS a general riile,.priVilege is abso “15 made “0 SI
To further implement our sales personnel Items that are adaptable are filed, and then only when an article is confined to the .~ A local posta
l efforts it was decided to publish each month during the last week in the month a two or tual proceedings thatare a matter of at tions—when 115k
l‘ a five-page Middlesboro Retail Memo. The three hours work seSSion and the material is Othei'Wise priVilege is qualified and Hi leek—0“ F 913mm
ll riin'irv purpose of the Retail Memo is to adapted and redrafted for the local five- the tour facets of the rule on privilege businessmen hi!
ll Etimiil'ite business and add to our 'idver- page Retail Memo. observed there is danger of litigationllmlor LOIIiSVillG
H ‘1“ng lineage. The inimeo graph publication Is the whole thing worth the time used? four elements are that the 1:6p01't linllsf‘im; of it? “1:“
li contains those retail facts to help local busi- Frankly, we are afraid to stop it now. Con- full and complete, fair and llnpfll‘tltllflie‘lf' 8‘ “00 11.
ll ness firms in the following areas: monthlv stantly, we ask our advertising personnel for contain no comment and must be fie éi‘u‘lwdv‘ ”110$“
ll per cent of various types of merchandise vol- their customers’ reactions, and they feel it malice. . . . i111“ mailed to 1
ll ume; calendar of sales events—both local is Serving a very useful P11113053- Absolute priVilege P61131115 t0 matter-‘k ow many 0th
li and national dates; business trends; mer- A recent November and December adver- are 0f record, “Ch as evidence in the “$11“ .
l. chandising techniques; various types of tismg 5916 experience brings the matter into Of a case. Chance remarks Of a llldlliigiiofistlflililjjti:
{E business promotions such as for grocery :li.ii.1]).'ft)ctis. .M.ost newspapei ad people aie I.)].()S€.ult(;‘l.({;,dlttmnclf-b :{ie not Tulnlelsecond-class 111']
ll stores, furniture outlets, automobiles—just ‘Iml 1‘“ m iecent yeais Wlth thé Famous “dune 0 a so Ute piiv1 ege 1m 685“?" .1 ers) . lthf'
[i , all types of business in any given commu- Brand merchandise Ieftorts at Christmas. A a matter of record and are 'made willie” XIB .. r111
it nitv; and reasons for advertising. brief note was put in the November Retail course of. performing an official duty. tions st‘ t 51011191
l ‘ Subscribing to the simple theory that a Memo—the sales people got favorable re- was the issue in the‘case of Hendersox'(MR/re}:lefl hilt
i . newspaper and radio station has two funda- action. In preVious years we had 501d only Evansvdle Press, 12/ INCL App. 09221.1(] coin it: lln‘lt
H mental functions—first, to give the news and one or two pages of Famous Brand ads and \t’thh the appeals COP” held that all. , . 1H6 e y ‘1
l' ‘ , . . in 1.961 striking while the iron was hot—we libelous statements of a Judge \Vel'EY‘Ul) (lllmlel 0V6!
5 second, to sell meichandise, the Retail ‘ . ‘ ' ‘ .f . l 1‘ 1 .A1_ ,‘1 1 . ”‘1. ‘, addresses. But
Memo concentrates on helping local busi- 501d two and a half pages, and It was 1e- ‘1 t6] le 1‘“ 1L inquis 1“ ]11115(1(.t10flsmted.
l} , ness firms sell services and merchandise. peated four times with minor ad changes, a C1136- ‘ 1 A 1
: l After four years has the Retail Memo total of ten full pages. Every sales call sold When a court accepts jurisdictioninc];lde _u)mp£'
2E helped? ' founads each—aiid our personnel credited 02155 15 21 debatable question .1”. IlllOHicl'als (Egg 1
, l 3' Yes, it has certainly helped the Daily the httle memo booster, Also, these Famous Some authorities hold that 1urisdictwlmmm thl'it l):t(l
ll { News and Radio Station VVMIK. Both Brand Christmas Ads did not affect the oth- gins-when 11 complaint “filed and thalbuildings (for ex;
l staffs want their sales results and commentS 6],. “(ls normally placed by the various parti- li'cation 0f the contents ls at least quathree letter C‘ll‘l‘li
1 published as it gives them sales entrees in cipatiiig merchants. . . if not absolute under the priVilege 9 A . ,,
l 1 the weeks ahead with various business firms. There are very few original sales and ad- However, the ina]o,-1ty rule holds that“); 01cficoii {:ct
l g The Dailv News’ local sales have not sagged vertismg ideas left, but it is certainly not fllCUO” begins OITlY when 1111 entry orstreet 1de ‘OX
l ‘ during this period even in the face of a “flu-h trouble to adapt other people’s adver- IS made by the court. . imle ()Efi crissfin
three—county population loss of 41,000. tismg ideas and incentives to your own local Privilege 15 an 1111P01'tanl a(111mCt ‘box’h ”C 1“} 5‘ 1“
. l , -. , , _ . . situation. reporting of court proceedings. Biit!_ "(91 Spec
ll maiiv retailers have expressed appreciation time, five stencils, ream and a 'halfvof mimeo- "0W“ and Observed. O F -
’ ll for ideas aids and trends as published in graph paper, envelopes, typist for two to . ‘e) ll .delHUMYH
l the Retail Memo. three hours typing and running off copy, Seeing is believing—if you see it intrimtc [that 0
\ BM“ 1961 Middlesbom furniture and the first-class posatge for Middles— _—___Jmm:j°,, longer .
g‘ ‘ u g .‘ . ~ ‘ .- .. ‘ . boro busmess firms. (Continued From Page 0718) f . “V 303‘ hOlC
stoic won two Ramblei lcars f01 its sales ac- An idea born of necessity that is paying .atlldiessed to
tivity. Some of the baSic promotional ideas dividends f0]. our retail advertising sales ef— on the density range of the pliotogl'dlffhcial explained
, l, used by the stm-e'were from previous Retail fort that has put an end to just picking up would be well to read up on the subjflWEll known” if
l‘ » ‘ Memos. A" appliance dealer won a trip for ads, and stimulating ad ideas for creating to get i“ ‘15 much actual darkroom pilave zllbox. Otl
2 ll two to the recent Sugar Bowl—the basic effective retail sales on the town’s cash reg- as possible before the deadline for will? mall goes 01
i‘ sales gimmick was an idea from the Retail isters. _ halftone. 1111.1‘88 a transfer
3; Memo. This retailer told us the day prior Ilike offset and sincerely believe thlellvered.
j to his departure—“The Daily News and ——.___ of these days all of the smaller new": When asked
l \VMIK were the only sales media used for Benjamin Franklin once said, “Doing an will be printed by it, but don’t be del’lll‘ase, “no obvi
1 my sales promotion, and you fellow’s gave injury puts you below your enemy; i‘eveng- Offset is no picnic and there is nS‘ald‘ advertising
v I me the ideas on how to do the trick. mg one makes you but even with him; for- really simple method of reproducing-1111 liito that cat
: ‘ l l Of course, naturally the question—how giving one sets you above him.” tone photograph.
. ‘i

 3 3E:
1962 FEBRUARY, 1962 THE KENTUCKY PRESS PAGE THREE EEEE E
3 E
'1 l
" R l E C B ' ‘3‘: 3
53' 3 3 3' 3
.5 PO egu attons ause usmess Concern E 333
oneousit EE 333:3 »
rters as No one has yet admitted being bewitched, (Note: The problems concerning recent mark envelopes “Return Requested” or use E'EJE EEE
edom of but many Louisville businessmen have been postal rulings, and requests for information old envelopes marked “Return Postage EEE EEE
publish bothered and bewildered by the new postal from KPA members concerning same, have Guaranteed.” EE3 E E EEEE
e of ant] regulations that went into effect january 10. been of growing concern to the KPA Central Third-class returns will cost a minimum of E E E E E E
stories Eel Not a few have been just plain angered. Office, especially the greatest problem of 8 cents a piece 011 matter weighing five Eh E E
have 1103 A5 Of this writing, the situation has been getting the factual information. We are ounces 01' less. Above that weight limit, EEE E E
edings a somewhat eased by unannounced “relaxa- reprinting the excellent informative lead ar- mailers will be charged the transient return E E E E E E
f0]. grar tions” on two of the new protests in Wash- ticle in “Louisville”, trade magazine, Rich- rate. This goes to 9 cents for six ounces, EE E E E
ington, although the Post Oflice Department ard Cherry, editor, which answers many of and then an extra cent and a half for each Ell E 1E E E
e is absn has made no such admission. the questions anent said problems in a lucid additional ounce. Under the old regulations, EEE E .E3 E E
ed to tllt A local postal official reported the relaxa- manner which must suffice now until official third-class returns could cost as little as 3 EEE E E E
tter ofrer tions—