xt7x3f4kmp9z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7x3f4kmp9z/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1940022 minutes English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, 1940-02-apr2. text Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, 1940-02-apr2. 1940 2011 true xt7x3f4kmp9z section xt7x3f4kmp9z 





     M.1inutes of the Res-ular M--eeting of the Board of Trustees, Uni-
versity of Kentucky, April 2, 1940.


     The reg--ular April meeting of the Board. of Trustees, ULiversity
of Kentucky, was held in the President's Office Tuesday, April 2,
1940.  The m-eimbers of the Board present weere ]overnor Keen Johnsonx
chairman; Judge Richard C. Stoll, vice-chairman; H. S. Cllveland,
Judge John Cooper, Marshall Barnes, Harper Gatton, Louis Hillen-
Meyer, Lee Kirkpatrick, M,.irs. Paul G. Blazer, Jam-es Park, R. P. Hob-
son, J. C. Newcomb, and J. W. Brooker, Superintendent of Public
Instruction, whose initial attendance was welcomcd by the Board
membership.   President McVey and Secretary D. H. Peak were present.


     1. A-pproval of Minutes.

     The minutes of the meetings of the Board of Trustees of Decemn-
ber 12 and 15, and the minutes of the m.-.ee-ting of the Executive Co.n-
mittee of February- a, here approved as published.


     2. President's Quarterly 5eaort.

     The President made his regular quarterly report which, on
motion and second, was accepted and ordered recorded in the miin-
utes.



               QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

                         A~ril 2, 1940


     At this meeting of the Board of Trustees .and the one following
in June, I expect to present a report upon some of the immediate
problems confronting the University.   The report for this meeting
will deal with the material side of the University, and this part
is callinp- attention to sore of the conditions and requirements
of buildings and grounds.   At the meetin.-, in June it is my pur-
pose to present to the Board of Trustees some consideration of
'he spirit of the University, what it is trying to do, and some of
its objectives, as I see them.

     The buildinc. progrc.m which was agreed to under arrangements
with the Public Works Adminlstration has been practically completed,
and the buildings, if not already turned over to the University,
will be transferred to the institution in the near future.    The
last two buildingss BiolojAcal Science Htall, and the Home Economics
Building, are large structures.   The money available for their
construction wa's not sufficient to fully complete them, and,conse-
quently, there are a number of things that should be done in
these buildings in the way of floor covering, painting-, partitions,
laboratory tables, shelving and the like.    Some of the require-
ments of the Biologicali Science Building can be taken care of from
the 20$,000 aptzropriated for sciltntific equipment by the last




 







Legislature; and the same can be said of the Home Economics Build-
ing, for which the sum of $15,000 v.as appropriated.  There remain,
however, many things to be done to make these buildings livable,
Fifteen thousand dollars is needed to do some of the more necessa-
ry things, such as painting, lighting facilities, shades and awn-
ings.  It will probaubly take another year.-to provide the things,
.-fhich these buildings require.

     In view, of the transfer of the Departments of Zoology, Art
and Home Economics to the new buildings, there will be left space
in the so-called Science Building and in the Art Center.   It is
expected that there will be some adjustment of room in the first
named building, giving some additional space to the Department of
Geology, as well as to the Department of Romance Languages.   In
the readjustment of this building it will be necessary to spend
some money, not a great deal -- probably about 12,000.   The Art
Center will be used by the Department of Music and by the work in
drama and the Guignol Theatre.   The result wHill be a considerable
readjustment of spa.ce for these departments, though hardly enough
to meet their recuirements.

     In a plant as large as that of the University of Kentucky
there are considerable repairs that inust be kept up if the build-
ings arc not to deteriorate.   Roofs have a vray of leaking, sash
of drying up, floors of becoming pitted, and walls of dropping
their paint.  And while thisi deterioration goes on, there must,
of cou-se, be adequate cleaning procedure to keep the buildings
presentable.   In the last fifteen years, the square feet of
floor space has trebled, and the amount of cubic space to be kept
at a fair temperature during the winter months, has grown apace,
so that the cost of maintaining buildings constantly grows from
year to year.

     This wprinter has been, as you know, a severe one, makin- heavy
call upon the heating facilities of the University.   The low
temperatures extending from the middle of December to the middle
of March placed a heavy load upon the heating plant through nearly
four months.   In the main the plant has responded effectively
and well, and there have been no breakdowns, but there are six
buildings in the middle of the campus, consisting of the Adminis-
tration Building, White Hall, Neville Hall, the old Chemistry
Building, Science Hall and the Carnegie Library, which are con-
trolled by a thermostat placed in the Administration Building.
Consequently, the temperatures in these buildings go up and down,
not in accordance with their needs, but according to the condition
in the Administration Building.   This situation has been called
to my attention a number of times, but nothing has been done, due
to the cost involved.   However, something should be done this
summer, so that each building will have its own thermostatic con-
trol.   It is also desirable to make arrangements to heat the
greenhouse at the end of White Hall, so that the temperature can
be controlled in that house.   Some loss in specimens ensued
this winter.   These specimens were to be exchanged with one
of the western botanical gardens.   Thus the duplicates we had
were lost and the opportunity to secure additional ones had to be
givonup due to this loss.




 








    A great deal has been done through the aid of the Works Prog-
ress Administration.  Many of the buildings have been painted in-
side and out, the University furnishing the materials and the
Works Progress Administration furnishing the labor.  There are
now buildings that have grown dingy--and are not attractive to
students--there are probably not more than half a dozen.  McVey
Hall has never been decorated.  It should be painted inside at
an early date.   The roof on the building which houses the Depart-
ment of Buildings and Grounds has been patched and repatched, and
has now reached such a state that it will have to i replaced.
This is particularly true of the part of the building used as an
annex to the gymnasium _- water on the playing floors makes it
especially dangerous to students using this gymnasium.

     Much has been done in the care of trees and shrubs and in
the care of lawns,the development of walks and roads.   For sev-
eral years this work has been in the care of a committee composed
of Mr. M. J. Crutcher, Professor N. R. Elliott, and Professor
D. V. Terrell.  The work of the committee has been largely con-
cerned in developing a plan for the future, and to systematize
the work on the campus.  The committee has prepared a plan for
walks and roadways, and in my opinion, this plan should be followed
under the general direction of the committee.   Some attempts have
been urged to take care of the trees, many of which are now reach-
ing a dotage stage.   There is need for the removal of some of
them and the planting of new ones.   The University might well use
several thousand dollars in carrying out this plan, but has been
unable to do so, due to the need for funds elsewhere.   New build-
ings should have planting around about them, if they are to ave
a proper setting.   It should be said at this juncture that the
Works Progress Administration has been of the greatest assistance.
I doubt if what has been done in the last five years with its help
could have been done with the ordinary procedure in less than
twenty years.

     The University has a fairly good equipment, taking the campus
as a whole.   The College of Engineering has been rejuvenated, and
looks like a different place with the new equipment that has been
secured.  The Department of Physics now occupies the building it
formerly shared with the Department of Civil Engineering, and has
fairly satisfactory equipment.   In Kastle Hall, where the Chem-
istry Department is located, a number of things have been done,
yet that building should have additional money for the reorganiza-
tion of and painting.   The School of Education is asking for an
enlargement of its basement for recreation space for children in
the elementary and high schools during rainy and cold weather.

     The Experiment Station is now housed in a building that was
extended several years ago, through the agency of the Works Prog-
ress Administration.   The equipment there is on the whole, ade-
quate.   The farm has been well cared for, the buildings painted
and kept in good condition, yet the farm needs a large modern
dairy building.   Satisfactory work can no longer be carried on
in the old structure that has done service for a third of a cen-
tury.




 




4



     From time to time I have made comments upon the housing situa-
tion here in Lexington and the need for additional residence halls
fqr students.  The new women's dormitory was occupied in Septem-
ber.   It is modern and well equipped, and is proving highly sat-
isfactory to the young women who are living in it.   The accommo,
dations for young men were increased to talke care of 56 men in
the basement rooms.  These rooms are excellent with sufficient
windows and toilet facilities.   The University should spend some
money for furnishing them.

    Perhaps I should point out that the growth in attendance will
require additional housing facilities.   I have no doubt that the
University will reach in the course of five or ten years what
might be called a standard attendance, but the attendance has
grown between four and five per cent in the last few years, adding
about 200 students annually.   The facilities for caring for stu-
dents out in town have not increased in the last few years; in
fact, the type of house that is coming into use for rooming pur-
poses is distinctly inferior to that used in past years.   There is
no evidence of increased construction in the city limits that would
assist the University in taking care of the student group.   So,
as I see it, the University will be faced with a real problem, if
it is to provide for the increase in ae student body.

     At this meeting of the Board of Trustees the budget for the
year 1940-41 will be brought up for consideration.   The Legisla-
ture appropriated $43,000 more annually for the next two years
than it has in the past.   There will be also some increase in
student fees  so that the University finds that the income will
be probably 475,000-$80,000 larger than it was last year.   This
is a small sum when the needs of the University are taken into
consideration.   There is no doubt that there should be some in-
crease in salaries, and that the cut made in 1933 should be re-
stored in full.   To a large degree this has been done,but there
still remains a cut in the amount of 1100-4200 on standard sal-
aries that have not been restored.   It is, of course, clear to
those acquainted with the budget and its operation that the amount
available for the payment of sal:.;ries will not be sufficient to
make this restoration in full.   Consequently, the University
can look forward in 1941-42 to about the same expenditure as has
been made this year.   It may be there should be a review of the
whole budget and expendtures, in the hope that some savings could
be made in the operation of the University.   Nevertheless, it
is quite apl-rent that the cost of operation in the maintenance
of buildings and grounds is not likely to be reduced.   The cost
of Instruction seems to be practically fixed.   The College of
Arts and Sciences spends about 30o of the General Fund budget;
the cost of administration, as it is arranged in the budget, io
in the neighborhood of 6ffi; the cost of maintenance of plant runs
to about 11%; so that in these three items practically one half
of the budget is accounted for,

     It is recognized by the Business Office, as well as my ow.n,
that some changes are needed in the conduct of the business affairs
of the University.   The system set up by the State in 1934 costs
the University a considerable sum of money, and certainly has




 





                                                                  5

increased the amount of work to be done in the Business Office.
That office has been able to secure the two rooms below its first
floor rooms,   These basement rooms have materially increased the
space for working purposes.   A review is being raade in the opera-
ti'ons of the office to find the points at which its work can be
speeded up, and I presume some procedure may be worked out that
would increase the efficiency of the office.   I must say, however,
the Business Agent, or. D. H. Peak, has carried a heavy load in
a conscientious and effective way, and has given the University
through his own efforts and those of his office an effective and
able service.

     It might be well to point out that the retirement plan which
the University has operated since 1929 has worked very well. How-
ever, I think it would be well to review the procedure and restate
the possible liabilities that may fall upon the plan.   When it
was set up, the American Mortality Tables were used to ascertain
the probable load.   During the eleven years the plan has been in
force, 17 men and women have been und r the plan; five have died.
Today there are 12 persons carried under the plan.   I have faith
that the plan will stand up, and thini: the University did well to
ado-t it, though it may be necessary to make changes later on.
Certainly the University would have beer unable to take care of
these persons by the Joint plan with the Carnegie Foundation for
the Advancement of Teaching Under that plan the University
would have had to pay over p35,000-$50,000 annually in addition to
what the persons on the list would have paid.   At the nresent
time, the retirement plan has not cost the University any consid-
erable sum.


     3. Financial Report.

     The Business Agent filed financial reports for months of
January and February, 1940, respectively.    The reports being curn-
ulative, the February report was ordered recorded in the minutes.

     A special statement of income and expenditures made by the
Business Agent showed estimate of a small eccess of income over ex-
penditures in general fund for remainder of fiscal year.



             Statement of Income and Expenditures
                     Month of February 1940

                                                            Fiscal
                              Previously     Current       Year
                              Reported       Month          to Date

General Fund Income
  Fed. Appro.-IMorrill-Nelson 31,062.17     6,443.33     37,505.50
  Vocational Ed. Board       19,909.86      1,018.10     20,927.96
  Fed.Appro.-Bankhead-Jones  23,524.95      4,704.99     28,229.94
  State Appro.-Sum.School     8,000.00                    8,000.00
  Special Agr, Appro.        14,000.00      2,000.00     16,000.00
  State Appro.-General      437,751.99     65,095.20    502,047.19




 





-6



Bldg.Rev. Bond & Operation
    Fund                      34,640.01
Blg. Rev. Bond & Operation
    Fund - 1938                9,888.00
State Appro.-Repairs to Bldgs.  8,0oo.96
Int. on Peabody Endowment         500.00
Student Fees                  109,082.59
Student Fees - Summer Sch.     62,797.25
Student Fees - Un. H. S.        6,341.00
Student Fees - El.Tr.Sch.       4,205.00
Student Fees - Univ. Exten.     8,134.22
Misc. Recei-j)ts                8,346.53
Rentals                         1,040.00
Men's Dormitories              11,276.43
Engineering Equipment          27,768.50
Scientific and Lab. Equip.     60,000.00
Library Equipment               4,019.49
           Total              891,088.95



Expenditures
  Instruction
  Adm.,Expense & Maintenance
  Additions and Betterments
             Total
  Excess of Income over Ex-
        penditures

Patterson Hall Income
  Board
  Liscellaneous
  Room Rent - Summer School
             Total

Expenditures
  Expense
  Additions and Betterments
              Total
   Excess of Income over
       Expenditures
General Fund Income
General Fund Expenditures
   Excess of General Fund
      Income over Expend.

Experiment Station IncoLme
  Hatch - Federal Appro.
  lilk and Butter - Cash Rec.
  Beef Cattle Sales
  Dairy Cattle Sales
  Sheep Sales
  Swine Sales
  Poultry Sales
  Farm Produce Sales



578,367.18
308,463.58
28,001.71
914,832.47

(23.743.52)


43,864.50
       6.60
_- 1,147.08
  45z5018:18


  26,627.84
17,351.66
  43.979.50

  1.03S.68
  926,107.13
  (958217.841

  (2|2Y704.84)



11,250.00
7,459.54
   937.50
 1,039.73
 1,135.93
 1,204.80
 1,719.37
 1,501.33



30,184.00

7,734.00
    49.68

83, 339.12

1,575.00
   700.00
   834.96
 2,027.94
   190,00
 5,859.35
 12,395.11

 3 114.00



64,824.01

17,622.00
  8,350,64
    500.00
192,421.71
62,797.25
  7,916.00
  4,905,00
  8 , 9.9A8 i8
  10,374.47
  1,230.00
  17, 135.78
  40,163.61
  60,000.00
  7,133.49



227,264.7_ 1118.353,73


  89,627.05   667,994.23
  33,314.53   341,778.11
  12,767.54    40,769,25
  135,709.12 1.050,541,59

  91,555.66    67,812.14


  19,662.00    62,526.50
                     6.60
                 1.147,08
  19,662.00    64j6B0.18


  10,067.58    36,695.42
       90.00 __17,44166
  10.157.58    54,137,08

_  9,504.42    10,543.10
246,926.78  1,183,033.91
145,866.70  1,04   6786L



101,060.03



1,081.48

   93.70


   367.09
   933.70



73,355.24



11,250.00
8,s41.02
   937,50
 1,133.43
 1,135.98
 1, 204.80
 2,086.46
 2p435.03




 







Horticultural Sales          1,116.33
Seed Test                    1,078.42
Seed. Inspection            16,739.15
Rentals                      5,058.11
Miscellaneous                  306.12
Fertilizer - Fees           14,862.64
Public Service - St.kppro.  10,581.07
Public Service - Misc.          60.00
Feeding Stuffs - Fees       36,657.55
Adams - Federal Appro.      11,250.00
Serum - Sales                  930.10
Serum - Virus Sales             28.85
Serum - Live Stock Sales       104.35
Serum - Supplies                34.15
Serum - IMIiscellaneous         17.36
Horticultural Appro,         4,44-9.38
State Appropriation         29,251.20
Creamery - License Fees      8,502.50
Creamery - Testers Lic.      3,021.52
Creamery - Glassware Tested    326.16
Creamery - Miscellaneous         8.00
Robinson - State Appro.      7,063.92
Robinson - Misc. Receipts    2,439.18
West Ky.-State Appro.        8,317.17
West Ky.-Misc. Receipts      3,927.54
Purnell - Federal Appro.    45,000.00
Bankhead-Jones-Federal Appro59,203.53
Nursery Inspection-State Ap. 1,200.00



Nursery Inspection - Fees
       Total



  1.795.00
299,577.55



   27.25       1,143.58
   241.11       1,319.53
3,611.01      20,350.16
   94.67       5,152.78
   178.37         484.49
7,862.50      22,725.14
1,738.98      12,320.05
                  60.00
6,783.34      43,440.89
              11,250.00
   52.13         982.23
     .60          29.45
                 104.35
      .25         3 Z1.40
    1.51          18.87
  714.24       5,163.62
3,722.24      32,973.44
   73.00       8,575.50
   52.00       3,073.52
   15.37         341.53
     5.68          13.  
1,266.11       8,330.03
  249.23       2,688.41
1,143.33       9,460.50
   959.22       4,886.76
               45, 000.00
               59,203.53
   200.00       1,400.00
                1,795.00
_1,468.J1     331,045.66



Expenditures
Expense
Additions and Betterments
         Total
  Excess of Income over Ex-
          penditures


Extension Division Income
  Federal Bankhead"Jones
  Federal Smith-Lever
  Federal Capper-Ketcham
  State Smith-Lever
  County and Other
                 Total



241,504.15

245,407.68

54,169.87



221,805.44
74,154.38
18,400.48
70,233.50
. 12.050,94
396,644.74



34,320.92
_193.22
35,514.14

(4,046.03)



221,805.43
74,154.38
18,400.49
  9,988.50
  4.689.96
329,038,76



275,825.07
  5.096,75
280.921.82

50,123.84



443,610.87
148,308.76
36,800.97
80,222.00
16,740.90
725,683.50



Expenditures
  Expense

  ExPess of Income over Ex-
       penclitures



427,426,38



66,565.89



493,992.27



231,691.23



- 260,473 87 



(Z) O, 781, 64)




 






8



Excess of Income over Expendi-
tures for the fiscal year to
date - Extension Division
Cash in Bank July 1, 1939 -
Extension Division
Cash in Bank February 29, 1940 -
Extension Division



Trust Fund Income
Student Loan Fund
Student Notes Paid
         Total Receipts



1,174.17

3 00. 56



61.33
276.89
338.22



231,691.23

  7 . 603. 41



239.294.64-



1,235.50
2,106.28
3L,511.78



Expenditures
Expense
  Student Notes
         Total Expenditures

  Excess of Receipts over Ex-
    pendi ture s



751.09
345.00



110.00
200.00



1.096.09       310.00


1,907.47       28.22



861.09.
  545. 00
19406.09


1,935.69



Sunmary
General Fund Income          936, 107.13
Experiment Station Income    299,577.55
Extension Division Income    396,644.74
Trust Fund Income              1,174. 17
          Total             1.633,503.59

 General Fund Expenditures    958,811.,97
 Experiment Station Expend.   245,4107.68
 Extension Division Expend.   427,426.38
 Trust Fund Income                751.09
           Total             1,632,397.12



Excess of Incorie over Ex-
  penditure~s

Excess of Receipts over Ex-
   penditures for General
   Ledger accounts

Petty Cash accounts

Accounts Payable



246,926.78
31,468.11
329,038.76
     61. 3



1,183,033.91
  331,045.66
  725,683.50
    1,235,50



607.9498 2,240. ,98 57

145,866.70 1,104,678.67
35,51z4'.14  280,921.82
66,565.89  493,992.27
    110.00       861.09
2-48,056.73 1,880.-453,85



1,106,47    359,438.25   360,544.72



76,515.33

(2,200.00)

22,057.79



(19,010.453)



57,504.90

(2,200.00)

(22,057.79)



Student Loan Fund Notes        1

Excess of Receipts over Expendi-
  tures for the fiscal year to
  date - Combined Fund        54



,48-i.539



     76.89 1a561k28



340. 501,71   395. 353.11_



.




 



9



                 Abstract of item shown on State..ment
                 of Income and Expenditures as "Excess
                 of Receipts over Expenditures for gen-
                 eral Ledger accounts $57,504.90.'n


                                   Debit         Credit

      .Accounts Receivable     $26,563.89

      Sundry accounts                            $69,557*14

      Notes and Bills Pay-
         able                                     14,511,65

                               $26,563.89       $84,068.79
                                                  2.6, 563. 89
                                                  857,504.90



     4. Budget for Year, July 1, 1940, to June 30, 1941.

     President McVey presented the proposed budget for the Universi-
ty of Kentucky for fiscal year July 1, 1940 to June 30, 1941. The
budget shows the income appropriated and estikated and the estimate
of expenditures in the aggregate to be for the Division of Colleges
(General Fund) income $1,454,590.50, expenditures $1,-32,965.39,
reserve not allocated, $21 625 11; Experiment Station, income
$428,437.00, expenditures S428,437.00; Extension Division, income,
$758,720.60, expenditures $758,720.60; service funds (dormitories
and cafeteria), income $135,362.51   expenditures  123,407.32, bal-
ance $11,955.19.

     The budget was carefully examined by the members of the Board,
the items therein being explained and commented on by President Mc-
Vey.   On motion and second, which motion carried by unanimous
vote, the proposed budget was adopted, subject to future modifica-
tions by the Board or Executive Committee, and the following en-
dorsement was made thereon:


                      Action on the Budget

     Budget accepted as the basis of imaximum expenditures for
     the year 19-10-19411, and provision for income and expendi-
     tures approved.   The inclusion of the nare of any person
     in the budget shall not be considered as a contract of
     employment and the Board of Trustees or Executive Commit-
     tee shall be authorized to make such changes in the budget
     as may from time to tire be deemed necessary.

                      (Si-ned) Richad C. Stoll
April 2, 19410             Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees
    April 2, 1940    (Signed)       De H. Peak
                            Secretary of the Board of Trustees




 










    The budget is made a part of these minutes.
Budget Records.



See Volume



    5. Allotments by State Finance Department.

    The Business Agent presented fourth quarter report of allotments
of State Appropriations by State Finance Department.   The report
shows complete allotment to date of all appropriations except as
follows:



Service Laboratory -
Total Allotment - - - - - - -
               Short


Quicksand -
Total Allotment - - - - - - -
               Short


Hort. Prom. - - -- - - - - -
Total Allotment - - - - - -



Short



$21,000.00
19.068,00
$ 1,932.00


$14,000.00
13,135.00
    865.00


$10,000.00
1 8,850.00
   1 , 10.00.



     6, Basketball Building Note.

     The Business Agent reported that the Basketball Building note
carried by the First National Bank and Trust Company was renewed
March 14, 1940, after payment of interest due and $500.00 on prin-
cipal from Grants in Aid fund as heretofore ordered by the Board
of Trustees.   The note was renewed for $5,925.00.

     The action of the Business Agent was approved on motion second-
ed, carried.


     7. Haggin Fund - Employment of Attorngy Approved

     a. Correspondence.



1. Letter of Laughlin, Gerard, Halpin & Graham.



10




 






11



         LAUGHLIN, GERARD, HALPIN & G.RAHXAVI
                Counsellors at Law
                   40 Wall Street
                      New York


                                      March 5, 1940


         1E: TRUST UNDER DEED OF TRUST OF i(ARG..RJ-T V.
                  HAIRPIN DATED JULY 14, 1938.


University of Kentucky
Lexington
Kentucky

Dear Sirs:

    We wrote you on November 21st, 1939.   In that letter
we asked you whether or not it was your intention to be
represented in the action which we are about to bring for
an accounting by the trustees under the above Deed of Trust
in the New York Supreme Court in New York County.

     In your reply dated November 24th you advised us that
you did not contemplate being represented in that action
by a New York attorney.

     For certain technical reasons we feel that the de-
fendants in the accounting action should be represented
by an attorney solely for the purpose of appearing in the
action and consenting to the entry of judgment judicially
settling the accounts of the trustees,   Unless the de-
fendants are so represented additional expenses will be
imposed upon -he trust fund which we are sure that you,
like ourselves, wish to avoid.

     We have therefore contacted a responsible New York
attorney, explained the situation to him, and requested
him to quote a nominal fee for the above services which
he would render to you in this respect.   He has quoted us
a fee which we feel is very low and with which we feel
sure you will be satisfied.  We have apportioned this
fee among the various defendants according to the amounts
of income which they received from the trust,   According
to this computation your contribution to the fee would
amount to $88,89.




 





12



    We woulCL appreciate it if you would advise us by
return mail whether or not you would be willing to em-
ploy this attorney to appear for you in the action and
to consent to the entry of a judgment settling the
account.  If you are satisfied that this be done, we
shall have the necessary papers prepared so that you may
authorize the attorney to appear for you, and will for-
ward those papers to you to be executed.

                             Very truly yours,

                       (Signed) Laughlin, Gerard, Halpin
                                     & Graham



2. Letter from Judge Richard C. Stoll.




                             March 8, 1940

Laughlin, Gerard, Halpin & Graham
Counsellors at Law
40 Wall Street
New York, N.Y.

              RE: TRUST UNDER DEED OF TRUST OF
                  M'GARET V. HAGGIN DATED JULY
                  14, 1938.

Gentlemen:

     Your letter of March 5th to the University of
Kentucky has been referred to me.

     I can readily understand why for technical rea-
sons you feel that the defendants in an accounting
action should be represented by an attorney as suggest-
ed in your letter.   I notice that you have selected
a responsible New York attorney and he will represent
the University for a fee which will amount to ,88.89.

     While I do not know the attorney of whom you
speak, yet I am sure that you would have no one other
than a comoetent attorney to represent the University
or the defendants in the accounting action and so the
University will be willing to employ tils attorney to
appear for it in the action.




 




13



         II' You will forward to mie the papers, I will be
    glad to execute them for and on behalf of the Univer-
    sity and send them to you.

         You know I am Chairrnan of the Executive Committee
    of the University of Kentucky.

                                   Yours truly,


                                      (Sinrned)  Richard. C. Stoll



    3. Letter from Laughlin, Gerard, Halpin & Graham.



                                       M.arch 18, 1940


    Stoll, Muir, Townsend & Parks, Esqs.,    Re: Trust under Deed
    Suite 602                                     of Trust of Mar-
    Bank of Commerce Building                     Faret V. Hapgin
    Lexington, Kentucky                           dated July 14.
                                                   1938

    Gentlemen:

                    We acknowledge receipt of your letter of
    IMarch 8th.

                    We enclose herew.ith a form of Authorization
     to be executed by your cliant, University of Kentucky, Af-
     ter this Authorization has been executed, will you see
     to it that a County Clerk's Certificate is affixed to the
     acknowledgment, and the Authorization with the check for
     your contribution to MrN. Knisley's fee is forwarded to Mr.
     Knisloy at his office address set forth in the Authoriza-
     tion.   May we suggest that your client trite a letter to
     M1r. Knisley at the time the Authorization is returned
     authorizing M-. Knisley to appear for it in the action
     and to consent to the entry of Judgment therein.

                                 Very truly yours,

                                     Laughlin, Gerard, Halpin, &
                                              Graham
     Enclo sure.


     b. Resolution of the Board of Trustees

     On motion duly seconded and carried, the action of the Chair-
man of the Executive Committee as shown above under head of cor-
respondence was ratified and approved, and he was authorized to
execute the following authorization of employment:




 






14



    SUPREME COURT,

    NEW YORK COUNTY.
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - -   x

    WILLIAM I.M. HAUPT, JAMES W. GERARD
    and BANK OF NEW YORK, as Trustees    :
    under a certain Indenture made the
    14th day of July, 1938, by and be-
    tween MARGARET VOORHIES HAGGIN, as
    party of the first part, and WILLIAM
    M. HAUPT, JAIES W. GERARD and BANK
    OF NEW YORK, as parties of the
    second part,
                    Plaintiffs                AUTHORIZATION

              -against-

    UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, THE WOODFORD
    COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, FRONTIER   :
    NURSING SERVICE, HINDMAN SETTLEMENT
    SCHOOL, THE HAPRODSBURG HISTORICAL :
    SOCIETY, THE CLEVELAN