xt7x696zwz96 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7x696zwz96/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170405  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  5, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  5, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7x696zwz96 section xt7x696zwz96 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
VOL IX
BALMY BREEZES

No. 26

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, APRIL 5, 1917.
PUT

COLLEGE

HENRY CLAY ENROLLS

OF LAW TO

PHILOSOPHIC

PLAY

TWO WOMEN MEMBERS
PEP IN TRACK MEN

F

Big Bunch Out Daily To Students Volunteer To Drill
Get Ready For
Three Hours Every
Vanderbilt
Week

FIRST MEET APRIL 21 FORTY
The breezes of balmy April striking
against bare strong arms and almost
nude lower extremities are egging on
the University track aspirants to supreme efforts in their preparation for
the meet to be held with the delegation from Vanderbilt April 21 on Stoll
Field. In order that no line may get
out on the trial achievements in the
different events by opposing aggregations, the coaches have declined to
give out the records made so far in

training.
The team has more men trying out
now than were out at this time last
spring, and In the meets will probably
appear representatives in the sprints,
mile, hurdles, running
the
high jump, running broad jump, pole
vault, (hammer throw, discus hurl and
shot put.
Captain Earle Grabfelder, around
whom the team is being built, is out
for the short dashes. Enuf said!
record and
Gratbby has a
altho no official timing is being given
out, it has been hinted that he is
spurting true to form. Other aspirants for the sprints are Kahn,
Kinne, Knight, Frank Shinnick,
Brunson and' Duncan.
For the half Planck, the erstwhile
Chote, J. W. Campbell
and Holiwell are out. Four candidates are also trying for the mile.
They are Shouse, Wihaley, Asbury and
Mapstone.
Mayhew, Browning. Parker, Camp
bell, Scrivener and Gay are endeavor
ing to get Into hurdling form.
Gus Gay and Bell are trying to bump
their cranlums against the grand old
canopy in the running high jump
They have hitched their spring wagon
to a star.
Boo Ireland, a newly retired soldier
from one field of fame, is getting over
a respectable expanse of terra flrma
in the broad jump. Forman is also a
candidate for this event. Assisted by
a pole, Moore, Brunson, Brittaln, Little and1 Ireland are clearing the bar
nicely.
array, the
Now,
in abbreviated
heavy men shall pass before our vision. Hicker8on is handy with the
weights, and he is entered in the hammer throw, the diBcus event and the
mot put. Whaley, in the hammer
throw, Farmer and Marshall, hurlers
of the discus; Davidson, Grabfelder,
Warth and Farmer, 4n the shot put,
half-mil-

ten-seco-

For-ma-

cheer-leade-

r,

are other heavies.
"Dad" Bowles, track coach, is authority for the following sharp stuff:
"A few misguided individuals have
been spreading a report that the Uni
veralty of Kentucky never had a win
ning track team and ought never ex
(Continued on Pag

I.)

HAVE

SIGNED

The latest military development at
the University is the formation of a
volunteer infantry company by the
students of the College of Law, who
under the present military system are
not required to drill. About forty
men have signed a petition for voluntary enlistment in the company and it
is thought others will join them, completing the organization within a few
days. The lawyers will drill three
times each week, from 2:15 to 3:15
o'clock in the afternoon.
Students of the Law College have
not been required to drill until this
r
r
year, when a
rule for
lawyers .was started. Many, how
ever, have had drill in other schools,
in the National Guard and in the Uni
versity battalion, while enrolled in
other departments, and a census has
been taken of the entire college to
determine the amount of drill each
student has had.
Officers for the company will be
chosen at once from students of the
college, subject to the approval of
Captain John C. Fairfax, commandant
at the University. Guns, when needed, will be furnished by the Univer
sity.
Those who have enrolled in the company are: N. H. Aaron, R. S. Bo wen,
B. B. Black, E. T. Bowls, J. V. Chamberlain, J. F. iCorn, J. P. Cherry, V.
Chapman, . T. DotBon, K. C. Elswick,
W. O. Fogg, R. M. Green, G. B. Fish-bacH. H. Green, J. F. Gregory, E.
Grabfelder, J. Howard, H. E. Hackney,
E. P. Hatter, J. P. Herndon, W. C.
Hosklns, B. E. Hickerson, W. J. Kali- breier, D. V. Kibbey, Sam Morton, C.
P. Mabry, W. B. Martin, B. W. Mc
Murtry, J. J. iMcBrayer, W. A. Mini
han, C. S. Ramsey, J. G. Reynolds,
Felix Renlck, William Rodes, A. A,
Skidmore, P H. Wltten and O. C
Walker.
one-yea-

Misses Rebecca Paretz and Lucille.
Cruikshank are the first women members of the Henry Clay Law Society
of the University. The young ladles
applied for membership at tho last
meeting of the society, held Wednesday night, March 28, and were then
officially enrolled. They are students
of the Collego of Law and are taking
an active part in all tho activities of
the department.
A largo crowd was present at the
meeting, and an interesting program
was rendered. Plans are being made
for a mock trial at the meeting Wed
nesday night, April 10, to which Dean
Hamilton's English class and all oth
ers desiring to come will be invited.
It has been the custom of the society
to give a mock trial each spring for
the benefit of Miss Hamilton's Eng
lish students.

first-yea-

GRAHAM TO CHICAGO
TO ATTEND MEETING
Herbert D. Graham, Instructor in
the Department of Journalism, left
Illinois,
Wednesday for Chicago,
where he will attend the convention
of American Association of Teachers
of Journalism, which will be held at
the Hotel LaSalle April 5, 6 and 7.
Mr. Graham was appointed a delegate
to represent the University of Ken
tucky by Professor Enoch Grehan.
Representatives from publicity or
ganizations of various colleges and
universities of the country will meet
in Joint session with the teachers of
Some of the editors of
journalism.
leading magazines and newspapers of
the United States will bo in attendance and all phases of the teaching
of journalism will be discussed.

JUNIOR

MECHS LEAVE

FOR TRIP INTO

Dayton
Cincinnati,
Hamilton To Be
Visited

OHIO

and

TO RETURN SATURDAY
Not to be outdone by the wayfaring
Seniors, the Juniors of the College of
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering left on the Southern Tuesday
morning on their annual Inspection
trip to visit and study the factories of
several Ohio cities. They will not go
quite so far north as the Seniors, who
leave 'Sunday for Chicago, and must
content themselves with visiting Cin
cinnati, Hamilton and Dayton, return
ing home Saturday night.
Those making the trip are: Harold
Parks, J .C. Owens, John Cooper, C.
W. Jordon, William McDougle, Lewis
Bauer, Alfred Brittain, Harry Mllward.
R. W. Waterfill, D. R. Ellis, J. D.
Maddox, M. L. Watson, R. M. Davis.
U. V. Garred, H. M. Henry, K. W.
Goosman, R. D. Nesbltt, Sidney
Wright, James Hedges and Buford
Professors Curtis, Frankel
Russell.
and Duncan, of tho Mechanical De
partment, will accompany the students.

PICKWICK CLUB HAS
HUMOROUS PROGRAM

ARE

HELD

IN CHAPEL

CLEVER

PRODUCTION

University Men From Bor- Scores Hit Despite Absence
of Male Characters in
der Honored Friday
the Cast
Morning
TALKS ARE FEATURES MISS McGOWAN STARS
A patriotic rally to show the appreciation of the student body for the
University students who went with
the Kentucky troops to the border was
held in chapel last Friday morning.
Talks were made by Lieutenant Bush,
Dr. Glanvllle Terrell, J. D. V. Chamberlain, R. S. Clayton, L. J. Heyman
President
and Dean C. R. iMelcher.
Barker presided.

the honor
Dr. Terrell discussed
which it meant to a young Athenian
to foe allowed to carry arms. To be
given arms meant that a boy was a
patriotic citizen, because he could use
the arms just as well against his country as in its defense. So the men from
the University are patriotic citizens.
The speaker said that the Greeks
believed the bearing of arms a part of
their education. This should be the
case today. Human nature has not
changed a great deal thru the ages
and after the end of the great war we
cannot assume that universal peace is
at hand. It is the duty of every good
citizen to be able, willing and ready to
serve his country in time of need.
J. D. V. Chamberlain spoke of the
sacrifice of the men from the University who answered the call to defend
their country. "When the President
Issued the call for men," Mr. Chamberlain said, "they answered from all
These men anover the country.
swered in the fair name of Kentucky,
without any thot of their personal
safety. Their only thot was to save
the nation. The same spirit prompt
ed the Americans at Bunker Hill and
They
Pickett's men at Gettysburg.
are made of the same stuff."

(By Eliza Piggott.)
The Philosophlan Literary Society
gave Saturday night in the gymnasium, its annoal play, "A Southern
Cinderella," considered by many the
best the organization has presented.

The play Itself was well chosen and
admirably adapted1 to amateur production. The story is that of a young
girl robbed of her rightful inheritance,
first by a haughty unforgiving grand
mother, who was estranged ifrom her
daughter by a forbidden marriage;
then by two English adventuresses,
who try to destroy the will and take
everything for themselves.
The fairy godmother comes in the
form of a settlement worker with an
old black mammy for assistant. Between them they restore the little
Cinderella's fortune, and all ends
happily.
Miss Bertha Miller was splendid in
the part of Mammy Judy Johnson, a
black Blue Grass widow. Her lines
were clever and she kept the audience
in a gale of laughter at every appearance.
Miss Louise Will played well the
part of Madame Charteris, the old
aristocrat. Her voice was good, and
she Interpreted the character skillfully. It was a matter of general regret that her lines were so few.
' Enid Bellamy, the Southern Cinder-

ella, was played by Miss Elizabeth
McGowan, who was sweet and appealing and won the sympathy of the audience from the first.
Miss Zula Ferguson and Miss Edith
Sachs took the parts of the English
They were most
adventuresses.
Mr. Clayton thanked the students
"vlllianesses", and their Engfor this display of appreciation, say lish accent was, in the words of Maming that it was the first real welcome my Judy, "mighty salubrious."
he had received since his arrival from
iMiss Eyrl Richmond and Miss Viv
the border.
ian DeLaine took the parts of a set
Dean Melcher told of his personal tlement worker and a coquette, re
at the spectively. Both wore splendid, their
experiences in Washington
time when the United States battle- scenes with Mammy Judy being par
ship Maine was sunk. He told of how ticularly good.
much Old Glory meant to him at that
One unusual thing about this play
time and to thousands of other patriot- was
the absence of male characters.
ic Americans.
The prince never appeared, nor did
The speaker said that he had lived any of those charming gallants de
in Germany for several years and scribed by the coquette.
The action
stated that the thoro military training proceeded very well wtthouf Them,
which everyone receives is largely re- however, and for once the hero was
sponsible for the Teutons' success in not missed.
the European war. He urged univer
sal military training for tho United more, C. A. Hughes, A. H. Townsend,
States, saying that It was almost es
George Drakeford, George Bradley, J.
sontlal In this day of preparedness.
D. Turner, C. W. Clark, H. K. Combs.
Patriotic music was furnished at the
G. L. Chilton, C. B.
exercises by tho cadet band. Tho C. R. Roberts,
Marshall, W. P. Rlngo,
University men who answered the call Elston, T. F.
H. J. Dean, R. S. Ben Wooton, T. F. 'MeElroy, J. W.
to arms were:

The Pickwick Club held an enthus
iastlc and rather prolonged session
Tuesday evening. The discussion was
philosophical but was
richly spiced with humor. G. B. Fish
Philosophy" would
back's "Hash-hous- e
have shamed a composite production
of Emerson and Nye, while J. D. V
Chamberlain defended "The Smoke
Ordinance In Hades" with a becoming
Professor Farquhar ciraltruism.
cumnavigated the globe and thon returned to tell a joke and smoke a Clayton, R. G. Polndoxter, Guy Ledg Wilson, L. M. Hammond, K. G.
L. J. Heyman and Ben Mahoney.
wick, M. A. McDaniels, D. W. Lattl
cigar.
Pul-Ha-

* THE KEN TUC.KX- - KXRKEL.- -

fagt2

THE ORPHEUM THEAT0E

Triangle, Metro, World and V. L. 9.
Feature Pictures,
First Class in Every Appointment

II

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WORK

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& COMPANY

YOUNG MEN

I want the new "style

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with new

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Stetson and Knox Hats,
New Regal, Hanan and

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New Shirts and Neckwear:

I Give

them a "once over"
today.

I GRAVES, COX

jj

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& COMPANY
INCORPORATED.

fHWrWHH-f-

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DAY AND NIGHT SBSSIONS
BOOKKEEPING
TYPEWRITING aatf

TELEGRAPHY

roup1

lu Praudeot.hu yei of experience in Met untile tad
Banking buunew. tito 43 ycin educating 20.000 young
mtn and women (01 uiccate. CV Enter now.
LolUif 1 5 J h.. Main It., ntatfatl
Add. WILBUB B. SMITH.

Ul4tm7T.

T BY

REQUIRE $1.00 DEPOSIT MAY EMPLOY EXPERT

Same Management Same Classy Shows
"If a Laughwas worth $1, You'd Leave Here Rich"

25, 30,

Ml

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Students Have Until Friday Asked to State Views on
Consolidation of
Night To Sign Up
Colleges
For Annual

ALL NEW BUT THE NAME
20,

Oil KENTUCKIAN:

AdmiMton 5c and 10c
OflN

10:00 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M.

HU6HES School of Dancint
Mrs. Hughes, Member of AmcriHn
National Association Mnsters
oLDancing.

UNIVERSITY
CVCNiNGS

CeHti

"Superior Vaudeville"
10, 25,

PURCHASED."

IS ALMOST COMPLETED

Chiflgeof TiCXm Each Day

clDA MEADE
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Perionally Picked

Boxes

3550

R. A. HUNT TO EDIT
RURAL KENTUCKIAN
f
Russell Hunt was elected
of The Rural Kentuckian; C. R.
Morgan, associate editor; J. O. Stewart, business manager, and J. G. Mel-vicirculation manager, at the regular weekly meeting of the Agricultural Society Monday night. They will
serve the rest of this collegiate year
and half of next.
The offices of assistant business
manager and assistant circulation
manager were not filled, but Sophomores will be elected to those places
at the meeting next Monday night.
A big rally is to be staged at the
coming meeting to arouse interest in
The Rural Kentuckian and the regular society meetings. Every agricultural student in the University is
urged to be there at 7:30 o'clock Monday night, April 9, in the animal husbandry lecture room of the Agriculture Building.
Refreshments will be served after
the business meeting and a good
crowd is expected.
editor-in-chie-

Work on setting up the 1917 Kentuckian has been practically completed and tho book is ready to go to
press as soon as the printers are advised as to how many copies will be
needed.
A number of students have signified
their intention of subscribing for an
annual, buttiave not as yet made the
required deposit of $1. The staff has
decided to extend the time for subscribing for the Kentucnlan until Friday night. Copies for all who make
the first deposits before that date will
he reserved when the book comes off
press and up until the end of the year,
If they are not called for.
Arrangements have been made with
the printers whereby all Seniors who
pay the full subscription price of $2.50
at this time can have their names
stamped in gold on the cover of the
book for an additional charge of 25
cents. This proposition is open for a
limited time and all Svho desire to
take advantage of the offer are requested to see the business manager
at once.
During the subscription contest a
number of students gave their promises for Kentuckians to men who have
dropped out of the contest. The only
ones who are now taking subscriptions for the book are Miss Nancy
limes and members of the business
and editorial staff of the Kentuckian.

For the convenience of those who
desire to get their orders in Friday
some member of the staff will bo in
SPEAKER DISCUSSES
the Kentuckian office during chapel
ELECTRICAL POWER hour, another at the north entrance of
Main Building and others will be
M. C. Turpin, representative
of the the
stationed at various places around the
Westinghouse Electrical Manufacturcampus.
ing Company, of East Pittsburg, deThe alumni of the University are
livered an illustrated lecture in the
in the sale of the annual
chemistry lecture room of the University, Thursday afternoon on the ap- and a number of the books have been
plication of electricity to transporta- disposed of. The annual will contain
a section devoted to the Golden Jubition.
"Electric locomotives have become lee, which is only one of the many
a necessity in the big tunnels because attractive features of the year book.
of the poisonous gases produced by Taken with the sales that have al
the steam locomotive," said Mr. Tur- ready been made to the student body,
pin, and he iproved his point by show- the indications are that this week's
ing motion pictures scenes of great sales will about exhaust the number
trains thruout the East, where electri- of books contracted for. Only a few
cal power has been substituted for books in excess of the number actual
ly reserved by the first payment will
steam power.
be printed.
Speed is one of the big gains of
(Members of the Kentuckian staff
electricity over steam and the much
have spent much time and: labor on
electrically-drivegreater capacity of an
motor over the steam locomo- this year's book, which it Is thot will
tive. The lecture was one of a series outclass all publications of previous
of similar lectures given under the years.
n

auspices of the College of Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering.

NOTICE, SOPHS!
The Sophomore dance will be held
In Buell Armory the afternoon of May
5, from 2:30 to 5:30. If you want bids
for the dance your dues must be paid
by April 21.
CLYDE BLAND, Treasurer.

SPECIAL RATES TO
University Students
Patronize Our Advertiser!.

FRATERNITIES SHOW
PATRIOTIC SPIRIT
A commendable spirit is being displayed by the fraternities of fhe Uni
versity, several of which are displaying large American flags in front of
their chapter houses. In addition to
the displaying of the large flags, it Is
fast becoming the mark of patriotism
to wear a tiny metal American flag
or Bhield in the lapel of the coat.

Inquiries to alumni of tho Univer
slty and others prominent in business
and educational affairs thruout the
State regarding general conditions
here and suggestions for improvements have been sent out by the
Probe Committee.
Among other questions asked are:
"Do you think that efficiency or economy would be promoted by the consolidation and operation of the College of Mechanical Engineering and
the College of Civil Engineering under
one dean? If so, why? If hot, why?"
"State your opinion regarding the
discipline of the institution, the moral influence of the faculty, and of the
various faculties upon the student
body, and the results obtained within
the last four years."

.

TUESDAY, THURSDAY,
and SATURDAY
HOURS:' 8

MR. JOHN CLARK

k

toll

ifl

o'cleck

MR, HENRY KELLER

FURNISHING MUSIC.

Eat Your Sandwiches
and Hot Chocolate at the
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE
207 W. Short St.

McGURK'S
Where All is Well and Good
HoChocolate,Home-mad-

Candy

e

and Ices.

SAM GULLO
Prog restive Shoe Repairing Shop
Lexington, Ky.
140 S. Limestone
Rubber Heels and Soles a Specialty

Restaurant

"What reputation does the Univer- Metropolitan
sity bear and in what estimation is it
held in your section of the State?
The Place for Good Things lo Eat
Do you know any means whereby adverse criticism, if it exists, can b,e
eliminated?"
DENTIST
The Probe Committee will reconservice call on
vene in Lexington April 9 at the call For any kind of dental
of Chairman R. G. Gordon. Hearings
begun at the initial meeting here sevPhone
eral weeks ago will be resumed and Office hours 8 a. m. 6 p. m.
investigations of a general nature concerning the University and the Experiment Station will be continued. W.
B.
From the fact that the Executive
SHOP
Committee of the Board of Trustees
The Closesl Shop lo University
appropriated ?3,000 a few days ago
15c
HAIR CUT
for the purpose of carrying on the in10c
Shave
vestigation, the opinion exists that
15c
Shampoo
an expert in scholastic requirements
Glover's Shampoo 35c
and general university training will
Lexington, Ky.
be employed by the committee to ex- 153 S. Limestone St.
amine conditions in the various departments.

T. Slaton
Dr. J.ciieapsiik
ist

864--

Martin's Barber

i

CONDITT WINNER OF
IMPROMPTU CONTEST

J.

D. PURCELL GO.
326--33)

West Main

Street

LEXINGTON, KY.

APRONS

50c
The annual impromptu oratorical RUBBER
Socontest of the Patterson Literary
JUST THE THIN6 FOR USE
ciety, Iheld in the society rooms last
Saturday night, was won by Marion
IN THE LABARATORIES
Conditt, 'with H. L. Stewart coming in
second. The prize given the winner
set of historical
was a handsome
works donated by President Barker.
Professor Weaver and Mr. Grove acted as judges.
The contestants were not notified
J 1 1 South Limestone
of the subject until a few hours before
the time of delivery, and their
speeches were to a large extent exMmI State Men Know Us
temporaneous. The subject of all the
talks waB "The fallacy of allowing a Let us meet you
Meal Ticket
regard to going to
in
referendum
war."

Martin & StockwclPs
Restaurant

AT THE ADA MEADE
Popular demand has caused the
management to hold over Eearle's Six
Diving Nymphs, and another contest
will be held Saturday night, so enter
now. Four more special feature acts
complete our wonderful bill.
will
Phone 612 and reserve your seats.
Advertisement.

Franz Josef Spengler
The Photographer

in your TewH

Has pleased the exacting
student and the best people generally for fifteen
years. Can he show youT
811 W. Main St.

Pkel092.y

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

The

Boot Shop

Walk-Ov- er

(PHOENIX BLOCK)

Shoes that

FEEL RIGHT
LOOK RIGHT

WEAR RIGHT

Tans for the Cadets a specialty
COME IN AND SEE US.

CHAS. COHEN, Manager

Thrifty Students
Wanted
vacation as demonstrators of the great usefulness of the HOME AND SCHOOL REFERENCE WORK in the various counties of
Kentucky. Good salaries or a very high
rate of commission will be paid to such as
are suitable. All who enlist with us before
April 15 will have the benefit of our free
training class which will meet one hour
each day, outside of school hours, and will
be conducted by men and women who are
experts in the lines you are expected to

James iM. Ross, managing editor of
The Lexington Leader, will address
the members of the local chapter of
Alpha Delta Sigma, national Journalistic fraternity, at their
luncheon at the Leonard Hotel today.
The fraternity has adopted a policy
of having men of prominence in the
field of journalism speak to the mem
bers of the active chapter, discussing
the news, editorial, advertising and
other iphases of the newspaper work.
The active chapter of Alpha Delta
Sigma is composed of Messrs. Enoch
Grehan, William Shinnick, John R.
Marsh, MoClarty Harbison, Thomas R.
Underwood, Herndon J. Evans, Wayne
Cottingham, Thornton Connell, Herbert Graham, Frederick M. Jackson,
and J. Franklin Corn, pledge.

For information call at 407 West Sixth
Street or call up 2228-Y.

Midland Publishing Co.

COLLEGE MEN

ANNAPOLIS

Clothes

J. D. GEDDES
Agent for Kahn Tailoring Company, of Indianapolis
210-21- 1
City National Bank Building
J. W. Milam State Representative

REPUBLICAN CLUB
TO ELECT TONIGHT

V.li,,,;,,,.lt.,..l....it,.Mi.,iil,l,l,M,,lit..t.

WANTED.
Typewriting to do.
THESES a specialty"
J.O. S. Box 585, U. ofK. 1

MRS. BARNETT

University Lunch Stand
GO TO

HUMPHREY'S STUDIO
FOR YOUR

CALAGIS & CO.
107 WE ST, MAIN STREET
BEST IODA FOUNTAIN IN THE
CITY. FINE HOME-MADCANDIES

PHOTOGRAPHS
341

Weit

Main.

Phont

1135-X-

GRADUATE

Lieutenant Thomas Field Harris, a
former student of the University, and
one of the four Kentucky boys who
were graduated from Annapolis last
Thursday, has returned on a short furlough and is spending his vacation
with his parents in Versailles.
The young midshipman is under
strict orders and cannot tell "where
his assignment will take him after he
has completed his stay in Kentucky.
The class of which he was a member
was to have graduated in June, but
due to the present international crisis
the time was moved up.

$1 5.00 to $35.00

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Now try the "BEST"

"Lexingtons Bigger and Better Men's Store'
OFFERS TO THE COLLEGE YOUNG MEN

The Worlds Best

Clothing-H- art,

Schaffner & Marx
You pay no more for these good
clothes than you would just

ordinary clothes.
Won't You Come in and Look?

Kaufman Clothing Co.
Spring Style
All the new nifty Spring

styles are here ready to

j

show you.

Both High and Low Shoes.

HAVE A LOOK.

The Special Shoe Co.
206 W. Main St.

Cy. Hanks Prop.

Lexington, Ky.

The College Boys" Store
GRADDY-RYA- N

CO.

INCORPORATED.

Clothing,

Tailoring, Shoes & Furnishings

"Wear for Young Hen & Men Who Stay Young"

J. Franklin Corn, State Representative

ATTENDED THE UNIV.

Enjoy the Summer in Cool, Comfortable

For EATS

"In tho ovent of war, fifty thousand
men may bo needed as army officers,"
salt! Captain John C. Fairfax, commandant, when ho addressed tho regular meeting of tho University Club
of tho city Saturday night. "Every
man feels It his duty to render somo
service to the government and ho who
Is possessed of a college education
may begin now to proparo for a com
mission In tho United Statos rosorvo
forces.
"There Is no reason why young men
of education should enlist in tho ranks
ftvhon they can give their country
much better servlco by making tho
added preparation and assuming ad
dltlonal responsibility.
Tho pay Is
also much greater."
At tho conclusion of Captain Pair- fax's clear and vivid explanation of
the bills calling for universal military
service, which will provldo tho United
States with seven million thoroly
men, tho University Club unanimously passed resolutions in favor of
compulsory
military
training and
pledged its support to tho President.
These resolutions wero drawn up and
presented by Judge Samuel M. Wilson.

J. M. ROSS TO SPEAK
AT A. D. S. MEETING

follow.

Measure

FAIRFAX SPEAKS ON
MILITARY TRAINING

d

We will give employment to a good number of thrifty students during the summer

Kahn

PiftS

.

E

Patronize Our Advertisers

We're Beginning Our
Eleventh Season
With the majority of our old customers coming
hack. Pretty strong proof that Justright
Clothes stand the test
New Spring Patterns at

$18 to $25
Justright Tailoring Company

Tho Republican Olub will meet at
145
7:30 o'clock this evening in the law
department for tho 'purpose of electing officers for tho ensuing year. A
full attendance is requested.
This is tho ilrst meeting of the club KY. ALUMNI CLUB
slnco tho election. At the last mootOFFERS SCHOLARSHIP
ing Uio principal discussion consisted
In a criticism of Wilson. At tho mootApplicants aro wanted for the an
ing tonight resolutions commending
nual scholarship offered by tho Cen
tho policy of tho President and pledgtral Kentucky Alumni Club of the
ing loyalty to him will bo adopted.
Uuiversity. Awards will bo mado In
a fow weeks. Qualifications for ap
plicants aro that they must bo at least
lti years old, of studious habits and
All Owonsboro iClub (Davioss
goodi .moral churacter, according to
duos must ibe In by April 14.
A. B. Jonos, socretary'treasurer of
FLOYD POTTS, President.

West Main Street

NOTICE!

tho club, who recently

made an

an-

nouncement of the award.
Tho club has twenty members and
tho followiug officers: Doan Robert
K. Massio, president;
Aluu P. Gil
mour, vico president : A. E. Johns
secretary and treasurer, Other mom
bers of tho Executivo Board are C. S
Brent, W. B. Nichols and Dr. T. B
McCartney.

Patronize Our Advertisers.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

fact 4

The Kentucky Kernel

CADETS TO DRILL EVERY

Published every Thursday throughout tho College year by tho student body of
the University of Kentucky, (or tho benefit of tho students,
alumni and faculty of the Institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL Is the official nowBpapor of the University.
It la issued with the view of furnishing to its subscribers all the college news
9t Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the universities of other States and Canada.
UMCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
Entered at Lexington Postoffice as second-claBEDITORIAL STAFF.
William Shinnick
Dillard Turner
Wayne Cottlngham
J, Franklin Corn
Miss Eliza Piggott
Thomas Underwood
J. R. Marsh
Miss Mildred Graham
Kugene Elder
Herbert Schaber
Harry Cottrell
John S. Sherwood.

Promotions Made In Battalion Other News
Notes

L.

4

The Kentucky Colonel Says:
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
Without further delay, suh, tho
mall matter.
Government should send our cadet
hattallon to the front with orders to
sing "The Star Spangled Banner" to
Assistant Editor .the enemy and thus bring tho war to
Managing Editor an early conclusion, null.
"Squirrel Food"
EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

REPORTERS.
Thornton Connell.
W. C. Draddy.
BUSINESS STAFF.

Eugene Wilson

F

"Coed"ltor
Lykelle Pomes No. 26.
Sporting Editor La Follotto tried to gum tho works
Exchange Editor
With all his might and main.
Y. W. C. A.
He didn't want to light tho "Dutch"
Mining
But Lawyers Can Charge When They
And wanted pcaco to gain.
Literary
Want To.
But when war was declared
Agriculture
Straightway to fight he fared.
If tho law department military company becomes a reality we may exFrederick M. Jackson
pect something like tho following:
Superb.
Captain: Charge!
Hick: I see that Jones realized his
High Private: May it please the
ambition to become a super-maBusiness Manager
captain, wo plead surprise, non comQuick: How's that?
pos mentis, statute of limitations, sic
Hick: He got a Job with the
motion picture company and semper tyrannis, o plurlbus unum and
acted as one of the 'howling mob in ask for postponement.
"The Girth of a Nation."
Light-agrap-

The Hour Has Come.

Upon recommendation of tho commandant, tho Commlttco of Deans has
ordered that drill tako placo at tho
usual time dally, except Saturdays and
Sundays,
Squad
until Inspection.
drills will bo held on Saturdays. The
date of inspection ihas not yet been anGet This Deep One.
nounced by tho War Department, but
First Roommate (In 2x1 dormitory it will probably tako placo tlto latter
room): Geo, I wish we had n llttlo part of April or in tho first part of
May. Daily drill was begun last Monroom.
day.
Second Roommate: Wo have.

Every week wo have something to
bo thankful for. This week it is tho
fact that "Gum Shoo Bill" Stone is
not an alumnus of tho University of
Kentucky.

A wave of patriotism such as the United: States has
not seen since the days preceding the Spanish-America- n
War is sweeping the entire country. The demand that
the army and navy be called out to defend the rights of
American citizens and to express in an emphatic manner our disapproval of the German method of waging
war has grown, until, at the time this short editorial
was written, the Congress is on the verge of declaring
that a state of war exists. The President, in a message
that is a masterpiece both from the standpoints of rhetoric and of lucidity, has asked that this be done arid
that an army of half a million or more be mustered in
and trained for an emergency. He recommends further
that universal military service laws be enacted.
America has been long suffering; she has endured
insults and damages time and again that were apparently sufficient cause for declarations of war, and she
has forborne. But the time for patience has ceased;
President Wilson and his advisers feel that we can wait
no longer; the Spirit of '76 is
and the
martial fever is abroad in the land. The Imperial German government is to learn that America can protect
herself.
The Kernel feels that it is not inappropriate at this
time to refer to the part that college men have played in
recent military activities and the part they will undoubtedly continue to play in the near future. A large
proportion of the militiamen who went to the border
last summer were college men, and according to the officers they made very efficient soldiers. The University
of Kentucky is proud to point to the fact that she furnished a number of these. We believe in the case of
actual hostilities the majority of our students will be
found in service.