xt7x959c8b7d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7x959c8b7d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680312  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7x959c8b7d section xt7x959c8b7d A

Quest For Identity At UK

Blacks: 'The African Thing That's Our Bag'
By GUY MENDES

a football game until you get in the huddle," said
another.
A third added, "Anytime you see black people gathering together, this is Black Identity . . . it's black in the
raw, not hidden."
Examples of Black Identity range from substituting
the word "black" for "Negro" all the way to hair
role of black athletes.
Black Identity is an essential component of Black styles to the new
Today's young blacks call each other "black brothers
Power, but it has received less attention in the media
and sisters" because "our problems are similar."
perhaps because it is less sensational.
"It's like a fraternity," said one. "We wear our
It is a slippery term that has different meanings for
all over us."
different blacks. But what it boils down to is taking pins
"Like when a guy wears his hair in the natural
pride in being black.
he's trying to revitalize the African
style, the Afro-cu- t,
"Before you go out and tell society about yourself, thing. . . this is our bag," said one.
Many of America's black athletes have announced
you've got to be able to identify with yourself," said
one student.
intentions to boycott the 1968 Olympic games because
"It's a collective consciousness . . . you can't win of "poor conditions" blacks face in this country.

and DARRELL RICE
A Black Power pennant on the wall, Coltrane on
the stereo and Stokely CarmichatTs book "Black Power"
(the Bible, as someone called it) layingon the floor that
was the setting for a discussion on Black Identity by
11 black University students Monday night.

THIS KENTUCKY

"They say they're black first and athletes second,"
said one student. "Like Rap (H. Rap Brown) says,
'Running, jumping and shuffling amount to the same
thing when you do it for The Man.' "
How does Black Identity work? How does it take
effect?
The blacks say by buildingup pride amongthemselves,
they will cause the white man to take notice. "They'll
have to respect us because they'll see the pride we have
in ourselves. Then they'll start to perceive blacks as
social equals," one student said.
ents
The 11
present at Monday's night's
discussion were Jim Godfrey, Ron Hale, John Edwards,
Brenda Mapp, Theodore Berry, J amesEmbry, Bill Turner,
Art Gamer, Dannetta Craves, P. C. Peeples and Km
Kennedy.
Continued on Tage 8, Col. 4
UK-stud-

I

KE

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The South's Outstanding College Daily

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

University of Kentucky, Lexington

Vol. LIX, No. 117

Students Visit Capitol
To Urge Tuition Defeat
By DANA EWELL
FRANKFORT
Eight University students found at least
one friend here Monday in their
quest to convince legislators not
to pass a bill raising
tuition at UK to $2,000 a year.
The team of eight students
roamed Capitol halls buttonholing senators and presenting them
with figures on three petitions

-

out-of-sta- te

circulated at UKover the

week-

end.
Sen. Robert Flynn
was one of the legislators
who proved receptive to the students' plea. He agreed to speak
against the bill when it is brought
before the Senate.
Sen. Flynn thinks the tuition
bill is unreasonable. "You have
to absorb (tuition) jumps gradually," the senator said. "You've
got to crawl before you walk."
Believing that the level of tuition rates is not a matter for the
legislature anyway. Sen. Flynn

concluded "it is a job for the
Council on Higher Education.
They know more about it than
we do."
Ron Owen, freshman from
Winter Haven, Fla., and Robin
Lowry, sophomore from Chicago,
111:, helped distribute copies of
the petition results.
Of 2,673 students who signed

dent Government; Barbara

Rine-har-

t,

Louisville sophomore; Bonnie Burdzy, junior from Clifton,
N.J.; and Ann Price, Louisville

junior.

The- - students moved to the
Senate gallery when Monday's
session convened, anticipating
debate on thefloor between Sen.
Worth ville) who introduced SB

petitions opposing the tuition 394.
But the students' wait was
raise, 1,641, or 65 percent, were
Kentuckians.
Of
in vain because the bill. was
signees, 68 percent said they
Continued on Page 5, Col. 1
would not return to UKif the
out-of-sta-

Mm.

L
Pierre Salinger former Press secretary to two presidents, has. been
called "a boy musician, a Navy hero, ace reporter, political strategist and one of the great cooks of our time." Mr. Salinger, enr
cigar during a banquet in his honor sponjoying an
sored by Sigma Delta Chi, is shown talking with Dr. Lewis Dono-heUK communications professor, and Bob Webb, political
writer Cor the Qncinnati Enquirer.
after-dinne-

bill is passed.

Freshman Charles Fall, Roanoke, Va., spoke to the Senate
Education Committee and senior
Brint Mil ward, Lexington, spoke
to the Senate Appropriations
Committee, pointing out these
figures and asking for the committee's cooperation.
Other members of the UK
delegation were Pat Fogarty, Ft.
Knox senior and member of Stu

4

l

X

'x

Salinger At UK

The former presidential press secretary,
'At home' with food, offers political views

By MARTIN E. WEBB
and SUE ANN SALMON

Pierre Salinger, one-tim- e
press
to two Presidents,
secretary
spoke before a UK audience
last night and said "if Nelson
Rockefeller gets the Republican
nomination he will win running
away."
Mr. Salinger's comments came
during a banquet sponsored by
Sigma Delta Chi Journalism
Society. It was an appropriate
setting for the speaker, who
has been termed "one of the
great cooks of our time."
Although he would not comment on his choice for a 1968
presidential candidate, Mr. Salinger said should the Republicans "commit political suicide
by nominating Mr. Nixon, then
I'm afraid they'll drive some of
us (dissident Democrats) back
into the fold." Richard Nixon
opposed Mr. Salinger's boss, the
late John F. Kennedy, for the
presidency in the I960 election.

Iater, in a talk before a

Stu-

dent Center Theater audience,
he commented on the opposition

Freshman Charles Fall discusses Senate and House bills on
who has
tuition with Sen, Robert Flynn
agreed to talk on the students' behalf when the issue comes up
on the Senate floor. Fall was one of eight University students
out-of-sta- te

lobbying in Frankfort Monday.

conservative Republicans would
give Gov. Rockefeller because
of his stand against Barry Cold
water in 1964.
In the final analysis, Mr.
Salinger said, the Republicans
want a winner and "if Mr.
Nixon tan prove he is a winner,

then hell get the nomination."
"When they (the Republicans) get to the back room in
Miami, the drive will be to win
they want a winner." He went
on to predict that if Mr. Nixon
fails to convince the GOP he
can win, "the conservatives will
swallow their pride" as far as
Cov. Rockefeller is concerned.
Noting that Gov. Rockefeller
is expected to receive a few
write-i- n
votes in today's New
Hampshire primary, Mr. Salinger said "it will be spontan-eous-nexactly like LBJ's
campaign. It will be interest

ot

ing to watch. They (the Rockefeller supporters) haven't done
much in the way of campaigning."
During a candid question
period following Mr. Salinger's
banquet talk, he said "our whole
draft policy is a disaster. I think
we should have talked about

drafting

before they

are even starting to college."
"At this time just to cut off

graduate deferments is bad policy and is bad for our country,"
he added. The lottery system, in
Continued on Pace 3, Col.

1

Getting In At Los Angeles
(Provided We Win At Home)
If the Wildcats win the Mideast Regional and you want to
follow them to Los Angeles for the NCAA finals, here's what
you need to know.
Eiditv-nin- e
tickets have student) will be numerically
been allocated to Student Govdesignated and deposited in the
ernment for students participate Dean of Students Office. The
ing in its charter flight to the consecutively numbered cards
will determine the order of ticket
West Coast.
If you want to make the trip distribution.
Students must pick up tickon your own, present a validated
ets Monday. Two hundred tickID card in room 206 of the Administration Building between 8 ets will be allocated to students
a.m. and 5 p.m. Wednesday or if UK wins the regional here
this week. If the Wildcats lose,
Thursday.
ID's will be punched, and a there will not be any tickets
separate card (filled in by the available at all.

'

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

little man on campus

Chilean Believes UK Women Are
More Mature Than 'Senoritas'
By DOB OWEN

"My visit has been impressive, hut not without confusion."
So

says a Chilean

medical

student, Henee Valle, who has
spent a month at UK and Transylvania College as a participant
in the Experiment in International Living.
Renee says living in dormi

tories and fraternity riouses has
brought him close contact with
"students and their roles on campus" at the two schools.
But he declines to compare
except
Transy and
to say "I did notice the fraternity
men at UKare more liberal than
dormitory men at Transylvania."
And he surmised that "the ad- UK-stude-

$44,000 Grant Supports
Job Development Study

UK's Center for Developmental Change has received a $44,000
grant from The U.S. Department of Labor to study the problems
of employment in a regional context, according to Dr. Niles Hansen,
Department of Economics faculty member and principal investi
gator for the project.
The year-lon- g
project, which problems of American Indians,
began last month, studies the Mexican-Americanlarge urban
s,

Biology Seminar
Set To Explore

Cultural 'Abyss9

ghettos, Appalachia and other
lagging areas in the United
States.
The problems covered include
the nature and causes of income
differences,

employment opportu"Three
Perspectives One nities and the development and
Culture?" is the theme of the use of
manpower in these regions.
Theoretical Biology Seminar
"The study attempts to formscheduled for 7 to 10 p.m. Wedulate
comprehensive
policy
nesday in room 139 of the Chemistry- strategies for dealing with the
-Physics
Building.
problems of these areas," Dr.
Purpose of the seminar Is to Hansen said. He added that there
explore the alleged "abyss" be- has been little coordination between the community of scientists tween
and strategy for
and technologists and that of the regional theory
and urban development.
arts and humanities.
This study for the Department
On the program are Dr. Louis of Labor "will include all the
L. Boyarsky (of the Physiology
information in one package," he
and Biophysics Department), Dr. said.
Guy M. Davenport (of the English Department), and Dr. ThoCiting Appalachia, Dr. Hanmas Olshewsky (of the Philososen noted that many of its probphy Department).
lems are related to those of the
Dr. Boyarsky's topic will be big cities when the Appalachian
"Of Men and Methods! in the people move out of the depressed
Sciences. and. Humanities." Dr. area
urban areas.
Davenport will speak on "The
Poet as Scientist," and Dr. Olshewsky will concern himself
with "Scientism, Humanism and
a Pragmatic Perspective."
Dr. William Hugh Jansen of
the English Department will act
as chairman of the symposium.

vantages and activities are wider
at UK, and offer more room for
expression."
One interesting sidelight: in

Renee s view, American young
men are less mature than Chile's,
"just as the girls here are more
mature than they are in my coun-

try."

A reason for this male dilemma, he thinks, is the assurance
of advanced education for almost
any American boy. Such security
does not exist in Chile, he said,
so boys often become men in a
hurry.
The same principle, in reverse,
allows for the American girl's
maturity, Renee guesses.
"Most girls in Chili," he says,
"go from the arms of their mothers
to the arms of their husbands.
This is their security, and not
so many attend college."
Another difference between
American and Chilean students
is the way they spend leisure
time, Renee notes.
The "closeness" experienced
between students here is uncommon in Chili. "We leave school
and go our separate ways," Renee
says.
"We have no dormitories at
our universities, nor all the extra
activities. So we spend most of
our time working or with our

families."

Due to obvious cultural differences, Renee claims he has
difficulty "absorbing American
student life." He admits "I soon
felt accepted by Lexington students, and I was treated as one
of them. But since I am Chilean,
i could not act like them."
Those students living with
him, however, say Renee rapidly "absorbed," was accepted,

'
TAKE" THE REST OF TH' PERIOD rPP
-- TOMOPPO
APOUNP TH' 6TUPENT UNION
NEXT PAY TAKE IN A N6VlE
GlNNlNG- TO GET TH' PICTURE, WORTH A L??''

ii

-

Alternates Are Summoned

Nearly 100 NCAA Tickets
Have Yet To Be Picked Up

Dozens of lottery winners still have failed to purchase their
tickets for NCAA Mideast Regional basketball games.
Students whose names were
drawn have until 1 p.m. WedThere are 43 unclaimed tickets
nesday to pick up tickets.
for Friday night's game, 47 for
Alternates, whose names are
posted in the Student Center, Saturday night's.
should inquire from 1 to 4 p.m.
Both games are scheduled for
and; furthered understanding of Wednesday whether .tickets are
Memorial Coliseum.
his own country; '
available for them.

Dow

tfhese

one off

dressed-u- p
DimsC'eQid off o

Salinger

Continued from Pare One
Mr. Salinger's opinion, "had a
lot of merit to it."
Also during his Student Center talk Mr. Salinger, emphasized the "struggle between the
government and the press that
is rooted in the U.S. constitution and has involved all U.S.
presidents.
"The credibility gap between
the government and the press is
caused by the existence of two
kinds of information."
"Security information must be
held back by the government
and not given to adversaries.
But the government has an obligation to tell U.S. citizens what
is going on.
"News is a weapon in a time
of crisis," he added, quoting a
famous remark by former assistant Defense Secretary Arthur Sylvester. Mr. Salinger
noted the Cuban missile buildup in 1962 was discovered several days before the people were
informed of it in order to give
the U.S. government "time" to
take initiative in the crisis.
"But efforts to make the situation look different (from reality) is a mistake. John Kennedy made some mistakes but
Lyndon Johnson has compounded them.
'The Kennedy administration
played down involvement in
Vietnam. The Johnson administration has done worse." The
present administration has tried
since 1963 to put a better face
on the conditions in Vietnam by
continually promising peace in
the near future, Mr. Salinger
said.

12, 1968- -3

GM

CfoewoOelte

Mud 0 tHUUNCI

sffrirpipedl-dowir- D

Usee

somniefiihiDirDg)

mmt :.

is

-

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i

Foreground: Chevrolet Impale Sport Sedan; fight background: Chevette Mallbu Sport Coupe; left background: Chevy It Note Coupe

'68

CHEVROLET

prices start lower than any other
models. Look at it. Chevrolet's
sedan is roomier than
any other American car except one

full-siz-

e

or

luxury sedan. Drive it. You tell by its
smooth and silent ride that Chevrolet
quality runs deep. Buy it! Get a Chevname
rolet instead of a medium-priceand you can have, say, power steering,
power brakes and a radio besides!
d

NOW IMPALA V8

SALEI

68 CHEVELLE
prices start lower than any other
mid-siz- e
models. Obviously nothing's
e
newer in
cars than Chevelle.
mid-siz-

There's fresh styling, the
short-declook. There are two nimble-foote- d
wheelbases now both on a
wider, steadier tread. You get big-cr
ride in a quick-siz- e
power,
package. No wonder Chevelle outsells
everything in its field.
long-hoo-

d,

k

ar

big-ca-

Save on specially equipped Sport Coupe,

or

'68

CHEVY

II NOVA

prices start lower than

any other
economy car so generously sizod.
Nova is big enough for a 'dm!! cr. vacation, yet it slips into parking spaces
others pass by. With its new wide

stance and computer-tune- d
chassis,
Nova rides as silent and steady as cars
costing a lot more, and it comes with
the biggest standard V8 in its field.
car.
Nova's the

Sedan or Station Wagonsl

rrrTT7

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March
All-Weath- er

'

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1

17

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.,. n

1

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Coats Lead The Way To Spring
n

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I
Julie Hurst, junior history major, is ready for those
coat of
soft rains this spring in her canvas-lik- e
green and yellow stripes. The coat features a
jumbo zipper.
slanting
side-slashi-

Bright lights will flash on psychedelic flares of
coco
and white cotton when Barb Bowers
coat is approsteps into spring. This
priate for an afternoon of shopping or a night
on the town. She is a sophomore business major.

UK sophomore Lynne Dickey will wear patriotic
red, white and blue as she travels in Switzerland
this summer. The coat features slanting hideaway
collar. All the coats
pockets and a small stand-u- p
are compliments of Four Seasons.

er

Kernel Photos by Dick Ware

Women A Minority Leadership

SPRING BLOWOUT ... featuring
THE CHIFFONS with
THE XPLOSIVE DYNAMIKS
and THE MUSTANGS

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March 30, 1968
8:30 Sponsored

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Central Government

By MARVA GAY
Minority strategy and petty
loafer morality were discussed
before a largely female audience
last night at the Student Center.
It was part of the Wonderful
World of Women Week, sponsored by AWS.
Members of the panel were
Vice President Robert L. Johnson, Dr. Nicholas Pisacano, Les

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UAKKGAISI.E

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4888.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

presents a

High St.

E.

The Kentucky Kernel

Dr. Pisacano said he was impressed by the maturity and concern with social phenomena
which the women students have.
"When women get jobs they
are in a male world," saidRosen-baum- .
"Then they should compete in male terms on a basis
of ability."
He condemned w hat he called
petty loafer morality. "Women
prefer to be treated as an object
and to hide behind their feminine
aspects. I prefer an intelligent,
warm and tender person to a
Villager, Lady Bug and Weejuns
tripping around campus," he

LONDON GRAFICA ARTS

RENT-A-CA- R

116

Rosen baum, chairman of the Student Center Forum Committee,
and William Murrell, member
of SDS.
Vice President Johnson commented that 40 percent of the
students at UK are women. "As
a minority in leadership, women
need to adopt minority strategy
to make themselves felt."
"Women are completing a full
cycle in roles. They're beginning
to turn back to the home," said
Dr. Nicholas Pisacano.

12--

13

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

12, 1968

-- 5

Publications Board Approves Yearbook Plans

In its last meeting before
spring break, the Board of Stu-

Kentuckian
adviser Linda
Cassaway presented to the Board
dent Publications discussed let- the specifications for the 1X9
ting of bids for the 1969
yearbook and asked permission
the role of the adviser to let the specifications to ten
in student publications, the role yearbook publishing houses.
of student publications, and deRequirements for the 1969
velopments resulting from a Ker- 'book include 2,700 copies of a
nel Forum letter about Morehead book 448 pages long with 24
State University President Adron pages of color. The specifications
Doran.
were adopted unamiously.
Ken-tuckia- n,

Students Roam Capitol Halls
Urging Tuition Bill's Defeat
Continued from Tagre One
skipped over when the Senate
wentjo work.
Speculation was that SB 394
was being tabled so House Bill
110 could be referred from the

percent limit on nonresident students.
Senate aide Jim Fallen explained the tabling by remarking
that HB 110 is further along in
the legislative process and has
Education Q)inmittee onto the a better chance of being passed
Senate floor. This may happen before the Ceneral Assembly adTuesday.
journs Friday.
House Bill 110, introduced
With the fate of both tuition
bills still undetermined, several
by Rep. Quentin Wesley
is a compromise bill of the students plan to return
to Frankfort Tuesday to concalling for a $1,500
tuition level at UK and a 20 tinue their lobbying effort.
out-of-sta- te

SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO
PATRONIZE THE KERNEL

Announcements for UniTcrtltj (rowps
will be published twice once the day
before the event end once the afternoon ef the event. The deadline Is 11
a.m. the day prior to the first publication.

Today

Dr. Daniel Reedy will speak and
show slides on the
Ruins of Peru." at a meeting of the
Latin American Club at 7:30 p.m. in

Student Center.
The Italian Club will present five
Italian Arias on records at 7:30 p.m.
in the Laboratory Theater, Fine Arts

245

Freeman Lee, art critic
and author, will speak on "Before
and After," at 7:30 p.m. in Com
merce Auditorium for AWS Wonderful World of Women Week.
Eta Sigma Phi, r.aitonal classical
languages honorary, will meet at 7
p.m. in 109 Student Center. Mrs.
Kerns, latin teacher at Lafayette,
will speak.
Marlboro Trio will perform as part
of the chamber music society at 8:15
p.m. in the Agricultural Science Auditorium. Admission free with ID.
Theta Sigma Phi will meet at 7 p.m.
in the Journalism Bldg.
Amy

Tomorrow
"Last Year at Marienbad," will be
shown as part of an art film series at
7:30 p.m. in Student Center Theater.
Admission is 50 cents.
Prof. M. J. Llghthill. of Imperial
College of Science and Technology,
London and Fellow of the Royal Society, will lecture10 on
a.m. and 2 p.m.
fluid dynamics at
in Room 257, Anderson Hall.
Peter Voulkos, professor of sculpture at Berkeley, will give a ceramic
demonstration from 10:30 a.m. to noon
al

i

1C2 Fine Arts Bldg. and an aluminum sculpture demonstration from
to 4:30 p.m. at Coal Research
Bldg., Upper Street.
"The Artist Speaks: Ceramic and
Sculpture," will be the topic of Peter
Voulkos talk at 8 p.m. In Guignol
Theater, Fine Arts Bldg.
"Three Perspectives One Culture?"
Is the topic of theoretical biology
seminar featuring Louis L. Boyarsky,
of the Department of Physiology and
Biophysics;
Guy Davenport, of the
Department of English, and Thomas
PhilOlshewsky, of 7the Department ofIn 139
osophy, from p.m. to 10 p.m.

at

2 p.m.

Chemistry-Physic-

8

s

Bldg.

Dean Doris Seward will speak at
p.m. In Patterson Halt

Coming Up

"John Tuska: Recent Ceramics," is
1
showing from 17 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily
in the Art Gallery
until March
of the Fine Arts Bldg.
Registration is taking place for
sorority open rush in Room 301 Administration Bldg". until AprU 19.
London graphics will be on display
in the Student Center Art Gallery
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. until Saturday.

Gary Karr will be guest artist at
the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra, directed by Leo Scheer, at 8:15
p.m. Friday in Memorial Hall. Ticket
may be obtained with ID cards In
Room 18. Fine Arts Bldg.
Students interested in being Freshman Camp counselors should sign up
in 204 Student Center. A meeting will
be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in 204
Student Center.
Below are the Job interviews scheduled for Thursday. Contact the Placement Office, second floor of the Old
Agriculture Bldg. for further information.
Kinder- Carlisle. Ohio, Schools

V

V

i

j

WDKY-F5:00

5:15
5:30
6:00
7:00
7:30

TUESDAY
Do You Want To Know?
Burt Mahone
Sports
It Happened Today Bob Cooke,
Rick Kincaid. Mark Withers
Evening Concert MacDoweU,51
"Woodland Sketches" Opus
Business Round table

Fine Arts Forum

7:55 News
8:00 Viewpoint Editor of Look discusses his current article in the

magazine
Bob Cooke
Brahms, "Variations and Fugue
on a Theme by Handel"
News Sign off

9:00 Masterworks

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Flower Power for Fort Lauderdale

John Meyer teams a matching shirt and
slacks for casual living at a resort or
during a Kentucky summer. Orange or
blue sizes
Slacks $14.
Shirt $8.
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an approach that graduating seniors and employers can ill
afford. Because we are responsible for performing all contract
audits for the Department of Defense as well as audits for such
agencies as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration,
the Peace Corps, and the Atomic Energy Commission, we must
use the latest approach to problems and techniques which include audit through computers, statistical sampling, and graphic
and computational analyses. We're looking for those who see
themselves in upper level supervisory and executive positions in
the near future. Look this way if you can see that far.
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WE'LL BE ON CAMPUS MARCH 26, 1968
SEE YOUR PLACEMENT

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2:00 Afternoon Concert Bob Cooke
Elgar, "The Wand of Youth,"
Suite No. 2

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WEDNESDAY

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12:00 Music 200 Sign on
1:00 Hodgepodge
Lynn

take Piedmont. See your travel agent
or call Piedmont Airlines.

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111

garten; Elementary; Secondary Chemistry, PhysicsEarth Science, Commercial.
Franklin, Ohio, Schools Elementary
Supervisor, Asst. Secondary Principal,
Speech Therapist, Elementary, Special
Education, Ind. Arts.
Los Ange'es, Calif., Schools Teachers in all fields.
Mutual Life Ins. Co. of New
(BS).
North American Rockwell Corp.
Acct.. Personnel (BS).
EleOldham Co., Ky., Schools
P.E..
mentary, Elem. Guidance, Elem. H. S.
Music, Ind. Arts, Jr. High Core,
English. H. S. Social Studies, Asst.
Football Coach. Asst. Supt., Asst.
H. S. Principal. Special Education,
Art.
Troy, Ohio, Schools Teachers in
all fields.
United States Gypsum Co. Acct.,
Bus. Adm., Mkt. Personnel Mgt.,
Sales (BS); MBA; Chem., Civil, Elec.,
Mech., Mining E. (BS, MS). Summer
work also.
Botany. Zoology.
Upjohn Co.
Chemistry. Microbiology (BS); Pharmacy. Citizenship.
Washington Court House, Ohio,
Schools Elementary, Elem. Art in
H.S. English. Ind. Arts, Music, Math.
Educ, Home
Spanish. Latin, Bus.General Science.
Economics, Biology,

12:00

Vacation time. Weekend time. Any time you're
planning on leaving the campus, you'll find
the going is easier and faster when you

mm

ton told of telephone conversaImplications of the convertions between Dr. Doran and sations were that the letter's conhimself, between University Prestent was possibly to bt judged
ident John W. Oswald and Dr. for libel, but that the matter
Doran, between Dr. Cinger and rested with Dr. Doran and his
Dr. Doran, and between Dr. A.D. attorney.
A final report from the ProAlbright and Dr. Doran.
The conversations stemmed cedures Committee, headed by
from the publication of a letter Oliver Kash Curry, was delayed
in the Kernel forum March 4. until the next
meeting April 1.

TODAY and TOMORROW

JT

Bldg.
Dr.

Using a committee report from
Dr. Lyman Cinger, chairman of
the Advisory Committee, the
board discussed the wording and
implications of that report. No
action was taken on the item
and board members were asked
by Dr. Cinger to take the document home and think of additions
or corrections to it.
Turning to next year's student publications, Dr. Cinger
brought for discussion a series
of qualifications for the newly
created Director of Student Publications, a job created by the
board this semester from the
merging of the advisership of the
Kentuckian and the Kernel.
According to the document,
the adviser should be:
A person with a reasonable
amount of experience.
A person with an understanding of the special needs of the
academic community.
A person with an understanding of the role of the press in
its community.
t A person with an understanding of the responsibility of the
press to its readers.
No action was taken on the
item.
A final discussion was held
in which Chairman Cifford Bly- -

DIRECTOR OK WRITE

THE DEFENSE CONTRACT AUDIT AGENCY
527 South LaSalle Street
Chicago, Illinois 60605
An Equal Opportunity Employ tr

MF

* Unicop's Pistol Must Go
Disrespect for authority is ouc
of the causes of America's problems today, the politicians will
tell you. "The kids don't look up
to the cop on the comer any more,"
they will say. "One cop makes
a mistake and every man on the
force suffers."
Last Thursday morning provided one of those mistakes, packaged and tied together more neatly
than the stories the cleverest defense attorney ever could cook up.
The Thursday incident,, almost
everyone agrees, involved a fleeing
student shot in the leg by a campus policeman. With today's diet
of murder and mayhem on the
6:30 news every night, the story
might seem routine.
It isn't.
Part of the difference is that
Pvt. Lenwood Holdren wasn't chasing Bonnie and Clyde, the Viet
Cong or the Boston Strangler. All
the facts indicate he was, in fact,
pursuing two male students who
sought to pull down a bedsheet
banner from Elkton hall, one of
the University's shiny
dormitories.
Such a prank borders, of course,
on the childish. But shooting the
alleged perpetrator of such a
heinous deed is something like using tactical nuclear weapons to
chase away those bothersome
roaches in area apartments.
In one of the few deviations
among those who discuss such
things, there is a report that Hold-ren- 's
quarry first was suspected
of attempting to break into Elkton.
However, even in such a case the
use of firearms could only be condemned; the mere fact that Holdren had observed and chased away
the housebreaker would have removed any imminent danger.
That hypothetical case raises the
question of just when shots ought
to be fired. The enviable campus

police record apparently clear of
any such shooting incidents until
Thursday seemed to prove the use
of firepower wasn't even considered
except in the most drastic situations. Even then, a gun appeared
to be more of a threat than an
actual weapon.
In fact, the good judgment of
campus police seemed to support
the common law enforcement dictum that guns may be used only
chases inin cases of
volving a fleeing known felon or
other serious situations and then
only when all else fails. (The rule
varies in every jurisdiction, but the
rationale always is the same: use
guns only in the most extreme
cases.)
But all that went out the window early Thursday morning, along
with the respect of many students.
Regaining that respect will not
be easy. But, as a first sign of
good faith, the case should go to
"Vm
the grand jury if the investigation
by State's Attorney Arthur A. Marcompromise
shall Jr. turns up no new evidence.
At the same time, Chief Daniel
B. Wiseman should ascertain exactly when Holdren filed a report
saying he fired a shot. If the report
Out-Of-Sta- te
wasn't completed immediately, it
should have been. And if it was