xt7x959c8b80 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7x959c8b80/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640310  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1964 1964 2015 true xt7x959c8b80 section xt7x959c8b80 AAUP Members Discuss Academic Freedom
The problems of academic
freedom nationwide and in
llie multiversity were presented Friday and Saturday in a
weekend-lonjoint meeting of
the University and Kentucky
chapters of the American Association of University Pro-

as "the professional association of
college and university professors,"
has made its chief advances
since 1955 In the area of college
and university government, Dr.
Davis said.
Dr. Davis described violations
of academic freedom as more
"cry" than "actual." "We most
often And that the administration Is quite within Its rights in
taking what action it has," Dr.
Davis said.
"Violations of academic freedom are not as common as they
are thought to be. However, there

fessors.
The group heard from Dr.
Bertram H. Davis, national deputy secretary general and editor
of the AAUP Bulletin, In Us
Friday session, and President
"ohn W. Oswald addressed the
ite meeting at a Saturday
.icheon.
Dr. Davis termed 1955 a critical year In the development of
AAUP. The organization
had
reached a "low ebb" at that time.
1955 It
Dr. Davis said, but since
has experienced "excellent leadership" and has made "continued progress."
"Today, we have work three
or four times the volume we had
prior to 1955," Dr. Davis said.
AAUP, described by Dr. Davis

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Plans were discussed
Center for the Region
host next fall. From

5

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1964

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Saturday at the Student
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the left, Judy Reuse, SC

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program director, Rusty Carpenter,
Brandenburgh discuss the plans.

and Ken

Eaton To Lecture At Cambridge
Dr. Clement Eaton, professor of history at the University

has accepted an invitation to lecture for a year at Cambridge
diversity in England.
said the Cambridge invitation
lie invitation was extended by "is a fine honor not
only for
.ubridpe Vice Chancellor J. S. Dr. Eaton but for the University
oys Smith on behalf of the unias well."
versity's Council of the Senate.
The I'K professor said his lecIt is for the academic year 1968-6- 9. tures at Cambridge will deal
chiefly with American intellecThe post which Dr. Eaton will tual
history.
hold at Cambridge the Pitt chair
A native of North Carolina and
of American history is an enholder of the Ph.D. from Hardowed chair, the purpose of which
vard, Dr. Eaton headed the hisis to encourage the study in tory department
at Lafayette
Great Britain of American hisbefore
College in Pennsylvania
and
Institutions.
Other
tory
Joining the UK faculty in 1940.
American historians who previHe was chosen by his colleagues
ously have held the chair Inas Distinguished Professor of the
clude Prof. Ralph Gabriel of Yale
Year in the College of Arts and
and Prof. Lawrence Oipson of Sciences In 1956.
Lehigh.
of the
A former
president
UK President John W. Oswald
Southern Historical Association,
is recognized as one of the
he
foremost authorities on cultural
and social history of the AmerHorizons
ican South.
"The Conflict Between SciThe UK historian Is the author
ence and Humanism" will be
of several books that have won
diwussed by Dr, L. U Boyarsky
critical acclaim. They include
'64 lectin tomorrow's Horizons
"Freedom of Thought In the Old
ure at 4 p.m. in Room 206 of
South," which won the Duke Unithe Student Center.
versity Centennial Prize; "A HisDr. Boyarsky graduated and
tory of the Old South," "A Hisreceived his Ph.D. in neurotory of the Southern Confederphysiology from the I'niversity
acy," "Henry Clay and the Art
of Cincinnati! in 1948. In 1958
of American Politics," and "The
he received a Fullbright FelGrowth of Southern Civilization
lowship to study In Italy. He
has been at the I'niversity for
A new volume, "The Mind of
and is the head
fourteen years
the Old South," is to be published
of the Physiology Department
next month by the Louisiana
at the I K Medical Center.
State I'niversity Press.

J

'64

V.

Eight Pages

the control of any university

"It would be extremely difficult. I think," Dr. Davis said,
to allow
"for an administrator
students full freedom of the press
If the administrator
has the responsibility for the paper."
Dr. Davis also said that editors of student publications
should never be removed by the
administrators of institutions. Removal of editors, he said, should
come only after due process and
for an "adequate cause."
At Friday's session, Dr. Max
Milam, chairman of the state
government committee of AAUP,
presented a citation to former
Gov. Bert T. Combs for his worlc
for education in Kentucky.
Gov. Combs, a visiting professor of practical politics at tha
University of Massachusetts, said
the award would "give me much-needprestige as a professor."
In Saturday's session, President
Oswald termed AAl'P an "ever
that ha
vigorous organization
been in the forefront in behalf of
Continued on Page 2

John Ciardi

Lecturer Signed
For SC Series

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cover the areas of student academic freedoms, the student
press, student demonstrations,
and the like. Its purpose would
be to see that students were not
dismissed without "due process."
With regard to the student
press. Dr. Davis said that
breaches of student freedoms
were "most common" in this area
and expressed the view that student papers should be completely free.
He approved of the student
board where the
publications
newspaper would not be under

ISIE IRMlB IL
University
Kentucky

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are truly documentable violations
of academic freedom and tenure," he told the group.
Dr. Davis said the AAl'P was
becoming Increasingly interested
in the area of student academic
freedom.
In a coffee session with the
"Faculty at Four," Dr. Davis had
outlined the appointment of an
AAUP committee on the Faculty
Responsibility for the Academic
Freedom of Students. Dr. Davis
said a statement from that committee would be Issued soon.
He said the statement would

John Ciardi, former professor of English at Rutgers University and presently host of C'l'.S television's "Ac tent," will
lecture at the University March 31. 1 lie letturc will be part
of Student Congress' annual Lecture Series program.
Tentative plans can lor noi.
deDartmellt
at MIT. Aldoul

Ciardi to deliver two lectures and
meet students for an informal
discussion following the second
lecture.
Prof. Ciardi, poetry editor of
"Saturday Review," has contributed poems and articles to "Atlantic M o n t h y," "Harpers,"
Review," the "New
"Saturday
Yorker," and others. As a former
assistant professor at Harvard he
authored "Other Skies" and "Live
Another Day." He has also transand
"Inferno,"
lated Dante's
"How Does a Poem Mean?"
received many
Prof. Ciardi has
awards including the Prix de
Rome, 195G; the Harriet Monroe
Memorial Award, 1955, and the
Eunice Tirtjens Award, 1945.
of Boston, Prof.
A native
Ciardi graduated from Tufts College and recently was awarded
nn honorary degree of Doctor of
Literature by his Alma Mater.
He did graduate work at the
University of Michigan.
The Student Congress Lecture
Series was initiated last year.
The first speaker was Dr. Huston
Smith, head of the philosophy

LZ

DR. CLEMENT EATON

Dr. Eaton has lectured previously in England at the University of Manchester, where he was
a visiting professor under the
Fulbrlght program. He also has
lectured, while on leave from UK,
at Princeton University, the University of Wisconsin and Columbia University.

Si7 Meeting

Student Congress will hold a
meeting at 7 o'clock tonight in
the Student Center Theatre.
Plans for spring elections will
be made and the Student Congress Lecture Series discussrd.
All members are urged to attend. The recently adopted attendance rule will be enforced.

JOHN CIARDI

Clinic
Annual
Scheduled For Friday
J-Sch-

u

Huxley was scheduled to appear
this fall, but his lecture was
canceled due to an illness which
led to his death.
The lectin e series chairman is
Carl Modeckl. Other members of
the committee include Gil Adams, Wayne Jones. Eddie Whitfield, and Doug Smith.

ool

By BOB RYANS
Kernel Assistant Daily Editor

Effective writing, copyreading, and page makeup will be
among the many aspects of journalism which will be
Friday at the annual Kentucky High School Press Association Publications Clinic at the University.
di nign scnooi siuaents irom
on
nallsm
will present talks
48 schools have registered in ad
many phases in the production

vance for the all day sessions.
51 high school newspapers have
been submitted for evaluation by
advanced Journalism majors at
the University.
Special awards to top newspapers and their staffs will be
presented by Sigma Delta Chi,
men's
Journalism
professional
honorary. Newspapers In two divisions, letterpress and duplicated, will be considered in the
presentation of awards.
Students will have the opportunity to take part In each of
the five hourly sessions beginning
with an lnitation to sit in on a
journalism class in progress.
the day faculty
Throughout
members of the school of Jour- -

of a newspaper from the writing
of news copy, advertising principles, and newspaper makeup to
tricks of news photography.
In the fifth and final session
of the clinic UK Journalism majors will meet with the individual
high school staffs and offer criticism, evaluation and commenC
on their individual newspapers.
Student newspaper sessions will
be held in the Journalism Building where the students may tour
the UK Division of Printing and
the photography division. In addition the students may tour th8
Department of Radio, Television
and Films and observe the operation of Radio S'.atwu WBKY ill
McVey Hull.

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

10, 19fit

Library Gets 2 Prints

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1 lie University Margaret I. King Library has received
two color prints from tlie Sot icty of the Cincinnati under
a grant of the Lilly Endowmcn t, Inc., Indianapolis.
The reproductions are of two
Declaration, handing the doou
"The Declarhistoric
paintings:
and
of Independence"
ation
"Signing the United States Constitution."
The picture of the Declaration
of Independence was painted by
Col. John Trumbull, a member
of the Cincinnati Society. He was
employed by Congress to do the
painting, which was placed in
the Capitol In 1822. It shows
Thomas Jefferson, author of the

Frosh Camp
To Be

ment to John Hancock, president
of the Continental Congress.
"Signing the I'nitrd States
was painted
Constitution"
by
Howard Chandler Christy, who
also was commissioned by Congress. It was hung in the Capitol in 1939.
The Society of the Cincinnati
was founded in 1783 by officers of
the Continental Army and Is the
oldest hereditary patriotic military organization in the United
States. Its first president general
was George Washington.

For

Men Only
By CARL MODECKI
Kernel Campus Editor

Freshman Camp next fall
Dr. R. B. Simons, Lexington, representing the
of the Cincinnati, presents a color print to
Dr. Jacqueline Bull, director of special collections

In the Vniversity Library. The print Is one of
two presented to the library by the Society.

AAUP Discusses 'Freedom'
Continued From Page 1
intellectual freedom in higher
education."
He praised the work of AAUP
in protecting the Idea that a
"university is a community of
scholars, free to inquire, to teach,
to experiment, to dissent."
Dr. Oswald said he shared with
AAUP "a deep commitment to
the . . . two key principles set
forth nearly 25 years ago: the
common good depends upon the
free search for truth and its free
expression, and freedom and economic security, hence tenure, are
indispensable to the success on
an institution In fulfilling its obligations to its students and to
society."
Dr. Oswald pointed to the initiation of a standardized
appointment and promotion procedure at the University as an
example of the implementation of
AAUP principles. "Through the
years I have been pleased to note
that the association has recognized that tenure, unfortunately,
can be used to prepetuate medi

ocrity as well as scholarship and
creative teaching," Dr. Oswald
said.
This underlying awareness wait
what caused the promotion and
appointment system the president
said.
The University is also meeting
its "obligation to notify a faculty member early in his association with the University If he
cannot meet our standards," Dr.
Oswald said.
Oswald told the
President
group that he endorsed the statements of AAUP emphasizing the
rights of faculty members in their
roles as citizens. "This must also
include students," he said.
"You and I defend this right
to function as citizens, independent of our institutions, regardless of the public and private
opinions we express or the cause
we espouse. At the same time,"
Dr. Oswald said, "we ask our students to accept the same kind
of restraint which we impose
upon ourselves as faculty members and administrators."

SPECIAL LUNCH
For Students and Staff

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0pmU"

Ct.r

each day
a"
Always unaer. $1.00
L'm

DR. MAY SANDERS

Dr. Sanders
To

Speak

Tomorrow

Legal implications in nursing will be discussed by Dr.
May Sanders, assistant dean
of the University College of
Nursing, at 7:S0 p.m. tomorrow in the Hospital Auditorium of the Medical Center.
The lecture Is the ninth In a.
series of talks sponsored by the

College of Nursing to explore
"Nursing's Challenge In a Changing Society." The series provides
an opportunity for nurses In all
fields to keep up to date with recent developments In nursing and
allied fields.
The series also aims to be a
means through which the general public might become better
informed about nursing and Us
goals.

WHO THE

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LAWERENCE

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Selection change

He warned, "in our role as
citizens we must take care
to assure that we don't leave the
impression we are serving as representatives or spokesmen for our
educational Institutions."
Dr. Oswald pointed out that it
Is "society that ultimately benefits from academic freedom not
the Individual teacher nor the
institution."
"This accents our dual role,"
the president said. "We must
serve the society which we study,
analyze, and at times, criticize.
The modern American institution
must play both roles
leader
and servant," he said.
Dr. Oswald pointed to the bemoveginning of the land-grament as the beginning of the
must be
idea that a university
both leader and servant.
role
It Is the
of the university that has caused
the term "multiversity" to come
into use, the president said. "Even
a minor prophet can see that the
University's role as a servant will
increase," he stated.

will he for men only for the
first time since 1957.
The change to an
camp is necessary because sorority rush will be held prior to
the opening of school next fall.
To continue the camp as a coed
one, it would be necessary to
have the camp two weeks after
school starts.
It was believed that professors
would object, and Justly so, that
students were being taken from
classes to attend such an event,
for the
Hal Brady, chairman
camp said.
Freshman camp was Initiated
M that top high school seniors
could get acquainted
before
classes started and also discuss
problems of leadership on the
college level.
The YMCA had originally
planned to hold the camp two
weeks after school began, but the
YMCA Advisory Board, composed
of students and faculty, advised
against it, Brady said.
The number of students invited to the camp will remain
stable at 100, Brady reported.
Brady also said that applicaare
tions for camp counselors
now being accepted at the YMCA
office in the Student Center. Ap10
counselors are
proximately
needed.
Working with Brady on arrangements for Freshman Camp,
which will be held at Camp Daniel Boone, are Steve Beshear, and
Ralph Churchill.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

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Woman's Page
Ed! led by
Nancy Louglu idge

Lil

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Little Strange I

Fun and Island atmosphere were the order of the evening; at Farmllouse
Party Saturday night.

CaWar

Campus

Home Ec
The Home Ec Club will hold
its monthly mn tiiiR nt 6:30 p.m.
today in Room 309 of the Student
Center. The program will consist
of a religious N.mel disscussion
with representatives of the Protand Jewish
Catholic
estant,
faiths. All members are urged to
come and bring their questions.
All officers are asked to be present at 6 p.m. for a council meeting.
Psl Chi
Psi Chi, national honor society
for psychology majors, will meet
nt 7:30 p.m. in Room MN2R3 of
the med center. The program
will be "Graduate School's Inside Story." All interested persons are welcome, refreshments
will be served.
d
Society
Pryor
Dr. Frank Spencer will speak
d
to the Pryor
Society at
7:30 p.m. today in Room 313 of
Funkhouser
Building. He will
speak on "Open Heart Surgery"
and will show colored slides. The
public is invited to attend.

March 10 Psl Chi, 7:30 p.m., Room MN263 Med Center.
Recreation Majors Club, 7:30 p.m., Patterson House.
Pryor Premed society, 7:30 p.m.. Room 313 Funkhouser.
0
Christian Student Fellowship,
p.m.
Home Economics Club, 6:30 p.m., Room 309 Student Center
March 10 Council on Aging and Mental Health Association of Central Kentucky, Medical Center Auditorium, 8 p.m.
1
March
Kentucky Highway Conference.
March 10 "Emotional Problems of the Aging," 8 p.m., Med Center
Auditorium.
Mar. 11 Stars In the Night
March 11 Stars in the Night, 7 p.m., Memorial Hall.
March 13 Student Bar Wives, 7:30 p.m., Room 309 Student Center.
College of Agriculture and Home Economics Banquet 6 p.m.
Student Center Ballroom.
March 13 FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH.
13 Spindletop Hall Dance, 9 to 1.
March
4
Graduate Record Exams
March
March 14 Spindletop Hall Spring Style Show, 12 to 2.
3
March
Spring Break.
March 18 Cancer Teaching Series Lecture, Otto D. Sahler, M.D.,
Medical Center, MN463, 8 p.m.
March 23 Concert, Byron Janls, Memorial Coliseum, 8:15 p.m.
Fine Arts Quartet, Chamber Music Society, Memorial Hall,
8:15 p.m.
Senior Forum, Council on Aging, Student Center, 10:30 a.m.
March 24 Audubon Film, "Land That I Love," Memorial Hall,
7:30 p.m
March 25 VK Musicale. Rex Connor, Tuba, Roy Schaberg, French
Horn, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
March 27 Good Friday.
March 28 Spindletop Hall Dance, 9 to 1.
March 28 Kappa Formal.
March 29 Easier.
March 29 Spindletop Hall Easter Egg Hunt, 3 p.m.
March 30 Spindletop Hall Annual Meeting, Spindletop Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Lecture, John Kenneth Galbraith, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.

when the pledges gave a Paradise

Pin-Mate-

George
Downed
The
Tree,

s

Miller Ward, a Junior elemen-

tary education major from Paris

Elections
Phi Sigma Kappa
Phi Sigma Kappa recently
elected Don Miller, president;
Robert Jones, vice president: J.
W. Bennett, secretary and IFC
David
Smith,
representative;
treasurer; James McDonald, InRonald Hunt, sentinal;
ductor;
Ronald
Ca.se, rush
chairman;
Duncan Bushart, house manager.
Phi Tau Sigma
Phi Tau Sigma, national honorary mechanical engineering fraternity, recently elected oicers to
serve during the spring semester.
Those elected were Arthur Knight
Bill Schmidt,
vice
president;
president; Robert Baglan, recording secretary; Mike Higgins, corRichard
secretary;
responding
Callender, treasurer; and Edward
McCracken, public relations.

and a member of Chi Omega, to
Robert Grundcnskl, a senior political science major from Lawrence, Mass. and a member of
Phi Sigma Kappa.
Kit Lapham, a sophomore elementary education major from
Louisville and a member of Alpha Gamma Delta, to Ron Cole,
a senior math major from Danville and a member of Phi Kappa
Tau.
Pam Andrews, a sophomore
business major from Geary, W.
Va., and a member of Alpha XI
Delta, to Maris Caibe, a sophomore architecture
major from
Hopkinsville, and a member of
Sigma Phi Epsilon.

Seranade

The Sig Ep's entertained
Kappa's with a seranade
Tuesday.

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* When?

The Rose Street traffic problem

lias been tliscussetl, surveyed ami analyzed by city and University officials
for some time,- yet students continue
to risk life and limb as they make
broken-fielruns across ibis street at
points between existing traffic lights.
We realize that installation of trafwhich requires
extensive study of traffic density, both
Vehicular and pedestrian, if maximum, desirable results are to be obtained. We do not propose drastic,
immediate action to correct the Rose
Street problem, but we do believe
that some steps can be taken to increase the margin of safety for those
persons who must cross Rose Street
in order to gain access to the eastern
portion of the campus.
fic lights is a matter

The existing traffic lights on this
street create safe crossing points, but
these crossings are
for
many people who live or park east of
Rose Street. Rules of the road and
good driving demand that a motorist
stop when pedestrians are in a cross-ValWhy can't crosswalks be painted
at Clifton Avenue and in front of
the Fine Arts Building? These cross-Walcould be made even more effeo

The Kentucky Kernel

live, if they were manned by uniformed, city or campus, police during peak periods of pedestrian traffic. A traffic jxiliceman stationed at
the Clifton Avenue crossing would
also assist motorists attempting to
enter Rose Street from Clifton or the
eastern vehicle entrance to the campus.
Short interruptions of traffic flow
at these control points may cause
minor traffic jams and annoying delays for motorists using Rose Street,
but we feel that the added safety
for pedestrians would more than offset the annoyances suffered by the
motorist. Must we wait until someone is "clobbered" in order to prove
our point?
The preceeding portion of this
editorial ran in the Kernel on Nov.
15, 1 962. How ironic this last paragraph must seem to the two UK
coeds who have been hit crossing
Rose Street.
nobody has been
Fortunately
killed. We asked if someone had to
be "clobbered" to prove our point.
Must we now wait for someone to
be more seriously hurt, or even killed,
before attention is given to the

Study Shows

Student Rights
Should Be Considered
American colleges and universities,
traditional champions and defenders
cif rights and causes, are not practicing what they preach when it
conies to protecting the individual
lights of students.
More olten than not, students are
being deprived of basic Constitutional
piivileges as offenders on campus.
These are findings in a study,
"Disciplining Students in College,"
made by Dr. Isabclle Terrill as her
doctoral project in the Department
of Guidance and Student Personnel
Administration at Teachers College,
Columbia University. Dr. Terrill's major doctoral adviser and sponsor was
Prof. Esther M. Lloyd-Jones- ,
department head.

The study, conducted by personal
interviews at 31 colleges and univer-titie- s,
examined procedures in the
handling of 167 collegiate offenders.
Dr. Terrill is now director of housing
at Illinois State Normal University.
The investigation found that student rights are frequently ignored by
personnel officers in disciplinary cases.
,'J he welfare of the institution
and of
other students is the main concern.
'J he of fender's rights were rarely considered.
Can rent disc iplinary practic es on
campus, Dr. Ten ill reports, contradic t
adthe purpose of a student-personne- l
ministrator, who should be a "model
leader genuinely concerned with delude i atic l ights."
Eveiy college student, Dr. Terrill
dec hues, must have the light to know
the explicit chaiges against him; must
line the light to counsel, the light
to call witnesses, the light to question accusei s, and the light to appeal.
So far. Dr. Ten ill points out,
cleans have not shown that college

undents, like any other individuals in

our society, deserve these privileges.
"The student offender should be
able to expect that the college
-personnel
officer will honor his
civil liberties. This is the challenge
to the dean."
A primary concern of

student-personne-

l

officers should be the intellectual development of students, Dr. Terrill maintains. In disciplining students, he should remember that part
of this development is "the ability to
profit from error."
In emphasizing the intellectual development of the student, Dr. Terrill
explains that it is in challenging the
student in this area that adolescent
behavior is "modified, if not abandoned," and that "the mature,
adult" emerges.
Dr. Terrill's investigations show,
however, that the disciplinary techniques repeatedly used by student-personnadministrators "only served
to extend and underscore the adolescent role of the offender."
Dr. Terrill places much of the
for student development
on the college dean. "He has the
jxiwer to coerce, the opportunity to
stimulate," she suggests, "lie can
stifle student surges of independence
or place the responsibility for conduct
on the student himself."
"Coercion, repression of independence, authoritarianism certain'y are
not acceptable in the university," Dr.
Ten ill concludes.
In her study, Dr. Ten ill identified
25 categoiies of student misbehavior.
Ollensive acts were most frequently

committed in the areas of sex behavior, use of alcohol, and thelt. lew
cases, she notes, were pending beyond
one week. More than half were decided within 48 hours.

The Soulh's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

cli mtrr

ondrr the A of March 8, 1870.
second
pout office at Leitngtnn, Kentucky
week during the regular
year except during holidays and man.
Publjfthed lour timet
school year; 10 cents a copy from liles
Subscription rates: $7
Sue Endicott, Editor In Chief

Interrrl at the

Caul Modecm, Camptu Editor
David Hawpb, Managing Editor
Associate and Daily Editors-- .
Richard Stevenson, Sandra Brock, William Grant, and Elizabeth Ward
Departmental Editors'.
Sro Webb, Cartoonist
Nancy Louchridce, Social
Wallt Pacan, Sports
Tom Finnib, Circulation Manager
Joi Curry, Advertising Manager
Phones: News, extension 2285 and 2302; Advertising and Circulation, 2306

Letters To The Editor

Readers Discuss
Kernel Editorials
'The Right To Criticize'
To The Editor:
The Kernel's March

3 editorial on
criticism retreats from what it calls
itself a principle "characteristic of the
American way" into the anonymity
of
defeatism and in doing so
points up just how valuable some
honest
might be.

Under the guise of what it calls

"The Right to Criticize," your

edi-

torial makes it clear that, all the
same, "we" (that ponderous editorial
dodge) are not to be considered guilty
of anything so heinous as taking a
moral stand. Who, "us"? Criticize anything? () goodness no! That way, as
your editorial carefully demonstrates,
no one can criticize us.
But are "we" so very perfect? Or
are "we" simply so afraid of criticism that "we" find it necessary to

make
bargains? And while the
questions are piling up, it might be
interesting to consider whether the
above attitude has anything to do
with the lack of Letters to the Editor
printed in the Kernel.
What, if anything, is more deserving of criticism than the failure
to take a stand precisely what the
Kernel has been so consistently guil- -

Canipus Parable

Centennial
Comments
The Wholeness Of Persons
The Centennial Year might be a
time to give concern for what is happening to individuals within the university, to the kinds of pressures that
destroy or build a sense of wholeness
in persons. While the university works
on its problem of compartmentaliza-tio- n
which tends to divide person's
values and standards as well as their
time, let the church help persons so
to know God's grace and acceptance
that they can accept themselves and
be the same self in various situations.
At the same time fraternities and religious groups alike can question the
shallow "groupiness" and "togetherness" based upon conformity which
olten passes for true community.
Let's use the Cenieiini.il Year to
speak a word of judgment upon any
part of campus life (classroom, fraternity, or campus religious oiganiza-Won- )
which encourages supei lie iality
and lalse role playing, and to cultivate all occasions where persons can
find coherence and meaning in their
college expei ienc e.
John R. King
l'resbyterian Chauplain

ty of? To evade one's own moral
queasiness by accusing those brave
enough to commit themselves of acting only "for lack of something better to do" is both slanderous and cowardly.

Alvin Creenberg
Instructor
Department

Newspaper

of English

Objectives

To The Editor:
It is high time someone recognized the tripe that is put into college

newspapers. The article that appeared
in The Cardinal was certainly degrading to that university. We cannot
deny that it was a clever article which
certainly must have amused the readers, but such subject matter is unheard of! Who would have the audacity to approach young, clean-cut- ,
upstanding American students with
the idea of free beer, even if it were a
hoax. Subject matter such as this
should be kept in the drawing-room- !
Perhaps if some of the other college papers could read our newspaper,
they would get an idea of what the
right and most important material
going into a college newspaper consists of.
The first objective of our paper is
to be sure to include the most important articles from the local newspapers. This way our paper has much
more original articles because they
are written by such
journalists.
The second objective which is really a must is to include a "Campus
Parable" devoted to those students
who can't woik it in their schedule to
get to church every day. This is even
better than having mommy and daddy"
around to remind us of what we
should and shouldn't do.
The third and most important of
the three objectives is to try to keep
as many student letters out of the
Kernel as jxissible. After all, the stuthe
dents aren't writing the paper
Kernel stall is. If some of these letters got in the paper there would
surely be trouble because sometimes
students disagree with the editor. Perhaps the Kernel staff would be intery
ested in knowing that the frontal
is perfected now. This would
surely take care of any of the people
who get angry, which is in truth not
the good Cluistian attitude.
In dosing I would like to say
congratulations, Kernel! You've done
it again. Keep those healthy, upstanding articles coming, and maybe papeis
such as the Caidinal will abandon any
ideas of tiying to produce clever,
ai tides and take our
Kernel as an example.
Patla Jansen

Junior
Aits and Sciences

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

r

Spindletop 9s Research
To Aid State Economy
"Spindletop's primary purpose
to advance the economic development of Kentucky and its
surrounding areas," according to
Thomas M. Macey, vice president
Spindletop Research, Inc.
was
Center
Research
The
formed In July, lftTO, with the
Idea of providing leadership In
using science and technology for
of the
the economic
entire region. Macey feels this
aim is being fulfilled today
through the various phases of the
Center's programs.
Discussing the origin and development of Spindletop, the vice
president of the Research Center
raid,